Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 28 · 2 years ago

28: Supporting Women Founders with Lizanne Falsetto

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Women should support other women, especially in business—so why do so few of them do that?

Lizanne Falsetto, founder of thinkThin wellness brand and Pink Talented Angels, joins the podcast to chat about her network of women founders, challenges of running a business, and why walks can be a super productive part of your day.

Welcome the good people, cool things podcast, featuring conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. I'm your host, Joey held, and today's guest is Lausanne Falsetto, who created think the nutritional bars and last year established the pink talented angels, an organization designed to bring female leaders and early and mid stage entrepreneurs together to help one another thrive. If you have any inkling of starting a business, you definitely need to be listening into this episode. Liz An is just dropping knowledge left and right. She's talking about why women need to support each other, how she thrived in a male dominated industry and a whole lot more. So looking forward to that conversation. If you'd like to get in touch with good people cool things, you can send an email joey at good people cool thingscom or follow the show on twitter or facebook, or both. Why not limit up at GPCT podcast for both of them? You can also shop at the merge store, good people cool thingscom shop and because it is my birthday this month, we're doing a little birthday sale going on there and are the code birthday, all one word, as it normally is, when you check out you'll get twenty percent off anything you order. Your whole order will be twenty percent off. So it's magical. It's wonderful. We're celebrating a birthday. I'll take some cookie cake or Brownie if you want to send it my way. Other was let's hop into the conversation with Laz Anne. This is a very cliched question, but I'd love just the elevator pitch an overview on you PTA. I imagine where we've got five floors, so you got about twenty to thirty seconds to wow us. What are you got? I started PTA interesting enough, like I started think then, which was very organically. I had a group of women that I like to drink wine and have dinner with once a month and I do a lot of advising for female founders and the dinners that I have are with CEOS and I thought, why am I not bringing the female founders that are starting out and the CEOS that have been there and done that together to support the female founders, and so I came up with the name PTA off of just exactly in the old days, the PTA right, and I decided to call it pink talented angels, and you know, it's really funny because I had no idea that it was going to turn into something that has become quite a voice in supporting our our female founders around the world. So it's very exciting. That's awesome and a much better I'd say dinner and wine as a much better PTA treat, I guess. That and the stale pretzels and ship ups that I think my parents are just really good at the at their pret our mission is to support the female founders and entrepreneurs through this process that I put together called the holistic success method, and it intertwined the business opportunities and the personal goals together to create a better whole life, because, if you think about it, when you're an entrepreneur it's also you're living it twenty four hours a day in your personal life also, and so we are approaching the pink talented angel philosophy around creating personal goals for a better life all together for our female founders. Awesome and I think that's a really good sort of lesson, I think for anyone really, but especially for women founders, women entrepreneurs and supporting other women, and I think that's something that you certainly preach and is an important...

...important thing for people to really do, but it is not always the case. So why should women support other women? That's a good question. Well, I could take I can tell you. You know, we we are the caretakers. That's kind of what women have been kind of, you know, described over the last many, many years, and what I have learned is that when women support each other, they just become better people and it's a win for everyone. And I really believe that there is this united front in today's world where, you know, women are starting to realize that that supporting each other is a great example for their children, especially their daughters. It brings in that tribal support. So it gives you more of a balance. And also, the men have always had the good old boys club, right the women never really have had the good old girls club. And so when you think about bringing women together, it is about supporting, uniting each other together and really building this tribe of voices that say hey, I got your back, you're good, you know keep going, I support you, you're successful. Let's do this together. And I've watched it through pink talented angels and it is just the most incredible spirit that you feel when you leave, when you're with a group of women that are laughing and enjoying each other, opening up about what's going on with their life and really really helping each other. It's great, absolutely, and I think this is perhaps just me being on instagram too much, but I think we saw by a really kind of micro level of that with the the black and white photo challenge. I don't know if you've been been seeing this popping up as well, but just a real quick overview for anyone not familiar with it, it's women tagging other women that have inspired them, that they find motivational, they support they think are doing awesome things, and posting a black and white photo of kind of them, you know, being vulnerable and not, you know, not primped up like a lot of instagram photos. I know I've certainly in my instagram hey day I've probably spent way too long trying to get a perfect photo and sometimes it's just the one where you just you're like, you know what, just take a photo, that's fine, like I don't need to to spend all this time doing this, because you should be spending more time supporting people like that. And I think it's just been so cool to see all these great women supporting each other and the just like the comments on all of these are just amazing and like so supportive and I totally agree. It's just such a cool thing to see. Well, you know, I think it's I think it's the way forward right and it is. Some think that is, you know, the sisterhood, the support and sisterhood right is a really important part of women standing in their own two feet and also being able to move into the workforce and, you know, have an equal right now. You know, I'm not doing this because I'm not much of a Sheryl Sandberg Voice. She has a great voice and she's on a mission to equal right in pay and equal rights when you're pregnant at work. I think mine is really simple. I just believe that if we show as an example, will change the energy with our daughters watching, and you know, our children watch us, they watch how we act, they watch how we are collaborative with other...

...people and it it's time for us to teach them to empower other women by showing it and doing it so that down the line we can really, you know, stand in our own two seat and be equal to everybody. I just think it's an important it's an important mission. I also think women being kind to other women. You know, I did a I did a pole with a hundred CEO men before I launched pink talented angels and I asked them one question. What would you do if a woman took your chair? Is CEO, and there was a response that was really interesting. The response was well, to be honest, I don't have to worry about a woman taking my chair because another woman will take her down before that happens. Wow, and that was a really powerful statement, really powerful statement. So I think that we need to understand and not underestimate that the you know, the power of women supporting each other at work and in life is an incredible step forward in in really lifting up who we are. Absolutely that's crazy feedback to think about but again just drives home the importance of PTA and having this support system in place, and that's, yeah, that's just, yeah, crazy to think about, for sure, it is, it is, it is, but we're getting there and you know, it's fun. I had a great pink talented Angels Event Today, a virtual event of course, and it went really well. We have we had Jesse draper on. She talked about how to seek funding. She is a big investor in a lot of women, like I am, in their businesses, and it's just when you get off the phone, it just, you know, it just feels so good. It just is a great feeling all the way around, for sure, and that's actually something I think that's worth touching on. Is Obviously, being in the midst of a pandemic, I imagine you've had to make some shifts and events like this I like, you know, having virtual events, maybe phone calls instead of in person meetings. How has your strategy shifted, if at all, and have you still seen a strong sort of following and support from everyone, even though we're all isolated and we can't see each other in person it? That's a good question. You know, at first it was zoom, zoom, zoom, and we have to do it every week. And you know, we did. We we buckled down and we said what do our women need in a crisis? They need to learn about the PPP Zane. How do we bring on people, you know, forty eight hours before eight o'clock when the application process opens up, and how do we help them understand how to fill out the paperwork? So we brought on someone for that. How do we think about, you know, the the employee, you know, disbursement of working from home, and how do we give them tools to make sure that they are able to connect each other, even though it's by Zoom, and keep their business running? How do we help their retail strategy? So we did a lot of zooms and then we realize there was fatigue and of course you can see that in the numbers and you can also see it through the comments. Right, is another zoom. I don't want to sit in my chair anymore right. And and so what we did is...

...we said, okay, so when there is a point where we have something really good to bring to the table for them, or if there is another loan that comes through or you know, there's a lot of grants for females right now, we will arrange a call, will send out a notice and we'll do a zoom to help them get through it. We've also, you know, the whole idea about pink talented angels as we pick out of our community for women a year. And what we do is we give them over a hundred and fifty hours from top executives, myself, one on one mentoring, mentoring with marketing with Tona Kanishi. We have UBS as one of our biggest sponsors, who comes in and help set them up for financial personal success, and then we have attorneys that help them with their legal work or anything that they need with contracts and and we work with them. So we had one woman that we were going to use before Covid, you know, facetoface, and be able to meet with her and work with her and her business, and when covid hit, we said, listen, we'll do it all online, and what I realized is that we were more efficient doing it that way then being facetoface with them. So it has been very positive all the way around through covid and and again, you know, we're going to be what a year into this, maybe more of managing covid with work, and so we're continuing to push forward. That is a very interesting point about it being more efficient, and I've found similar, similar things. I feel like, I don't know, you kind of ditch the small talk a little bit at the start, which I think helps, but it's just kind of like your are just you are just more focused, like by being the only one in quote unquote, the room, even though you are interacting with other people, but by being like alone. It really seems to kind of hone the focus in. And this is perhaps a foolish move on my part, but I've been very fond of walking meetings. I say foolish because Texas is a hundred degrees all the time. But yeah, just yeah, it's just so rejuvenating to stretch your legs, get outside, get some sun and hopefully not sweat too much. I know it's a little cooler, or at least a little more temperate outward here, but yeah, I mean it's fantastic, for sure it is. You're so right. Walking. Why? That's why those walking deaths are so interesting, right. But I totally agree. I put my headphones on and I take, you know, five mile walks and I talk and you know, I've noticed that I actually am more clear minded going through that. When you're walking and talking right, you become almost more invigorated, like you're like you're saying fresh air. You're able to communicate. I actually wrote a whole book when I sold my business hiking and talking, dictating the book and then transcribing it. So I'm a big advocate of that. I agree with you. Anyone who says they can't write a book. You just gave the blueprint right there. Yes, you can. Hell you got to do is talk. Yes, you can put your headphones on, on tape it. Yeah, where were there any egregious mistranslations from I assume you were using like a voice to text, like what could I say? That doesn't make sense, but you know, you got to go back, obviously and edited. But it's a great way of putting content down, you know, while you're exercising and clearing your head and and taking deep breath. I really enjoyed it and I agree with you. I think this, you know, and people are walking all over you see it everywhere, talking on their phones walking. I think it's going to change the way we work moving forward.

Absolutely, I agree, and it's I'm so interested to see how, again, like you were saying, well, probably be at least a year into this, if not longer, by the time things get, quote unquote, back to normal, which it's not going to be totally normal, but till at least you know they're they're more in person opportunities, but I am very interested to see what other developments and and strategies people are finding for working from home. Like walking meetings. I think I just got a new lap lap desk to put on top so I can, Oh yeah, get out of my my you know, normal workspace and and maybe go sit outside for a few minutes and then when my computer overheats and says please get me inside, I can go back sit at the Sofa but still have a nice desk and just I think that change of scenery just helps so much. It does, it does, and you know they say that like Google, right, they're closing down their offices, that fifteen percent of businesses are going to open up the door to work from home, and I think a lot entrepreneurs were nervous about that. What's the culture like? Will can you keep the culture? How do you think about that? You know, having lunch together, stopping at the coffee or the water conversation, you know that whole thing about getting water in the kitchen and talking to your colleagues. I think that people are realizing that when you work from home you're more comfortable, you're more efficient and your overhead is less. So it makes sense. All right, we're going to go back in time a little bit too. When you started think then, and okay, this was primarily an industry, maybe not a good old boys club, but pretty much, yes, like a product primarily designed by men for men. So how did you break through all that and create this awesome product? You know, it's so funny because back then I didn't even think about it. You know, I guess when you're in it and you're so passionate about it, you don't you just don't even analyze it. You just go right and I would present to you know, make appointments with buyers and present the product. And it was, you know, a man specially ralphs. That was the funniest money. He loves cigars, he loved Whiskey. Right. I'm talking to him about protein and fiber and share her free he's like yeah, yeah, yeah, I'm sure that's great. You know, hey, you want to Scotch that? I'm like like one of the afternoons. You know, it's just a different it's almost like, you know, on the golf course. Right. It was a it was a very interesting intellect and and you know, back then it was only to whole food stores and you know, people thought that natural food was Hokey or broken stock or, you know, not hip, not realizing that the value of what they're bringing gives you a longer life. Right and and through the process of twenty five years of building this brand, I saw a lot of changes and what I really saw was that the two women that I met out of all the buyers that I presented to, gave me my first break. Where women, Annett Davidson from trader Joe's and Eo Ruth at whole foods Mit Atlantic division, and they both said to me, you know what, we like what you're doing, we're going to give you a shot, and both of those accounts, trader Joe's pretty much financed me for a good couple years. It was the cleanest, Best Company to work for, and whole foods expanded into national out of one region. So I have a lot of you know, I'm grateful to both of them for that. But you know, you...

...just charged through it. You don't even really think about it. I see, I guess like you were talking about being in there seven you you really can spend that much time thinking about it. If you really want to be successful, you've got to just keep focusing on your own product and making it the best that it can be. And having twenty five years running that as you were saying. I'm sure you learned a lot along the way, but what was something that was really surprising about running your own business? But, you know, I there's so many surprises, right. I think it's a running the business is it's selfdiscipline. You know, I definitely am someone that when I put my head down and charge through something, I give it a hundred percent. So when I'm in, I'm in. I think what I realized early on is that I didn't have an outside life from business. I didn't focus on, you know, a Saturday night dinner with friends. I just didn't, because all I thought about was I only have time to build this business and if I was, you know, going to do it differently, like I am with pink talented angels now. But back then I would say to the entrepreneurs out there, make sure that you take some time to to regroup and take a breath and, you know, really understand what your next steps are. I worked seven days a week, you know, practically fifteen, sixteen hours a day for a long time and when I had my kids I realized, okay, it's now time to spend some time with them. So, you know, it broke that but I just, you know, running the business. I didn't realize that I would not have, you know, outside vision for for activities. Yeah, I think that's even today. I think that's a wonderful reminder and maybe even more so now in a time where we are at home all the time and it can be easy to kind of have that line blur between work and home life. I Know I've certainly done that sometimes where it's eight o'clock and I'm still working and I'm like what am I doing? Like well, let's relax for the night, and they yeah, it's tough to find the balance but definitely worth doing. But you know, everybody says, what's that work life balance? What's that worklife balance? And you know, I say, I don't have any work like like you don't have balance when you're that's why I always say the holistic approach method that we're doing, and then I work with my entrepreneurs one on one with is, you know, you're bringing your personal life into your work, so make sure that you bring your work into your personal life so they're so that at least you you know, if you're out with your girlfriends and you want to talk work, that's great, but at least you're out with your girlfriend's right, and you're enjoying yourself and if you want to talk about work, great, right, but there is a balance between personal and work. But you know, being the whole person that you are, when you're a true entrepreneur, that's all you think about is building the business, the ideas that you have, how you're going to get there, what's your strategy? So it never goes away. It's always in your mind. Absolutely and you get more of those dictating things into your phone, jotting down notes all the time. I love this. Is like a odd people watching thing, I've noticed, but seeing someone like dictating notes themselves is so like I love it. I think it's so fascinating and I'm just like, what are they working on? Like I've I want to know like their story and what they're what...

...they're up to, and then I try to do that from, you know, a non non alerting them distance, just like let me see if I can get any context clues, but I don't want to like get up next to them in the grocery store be like what are you working on? Right? Yeah, are you a people watcher? Oh, absolutely, I this is one of my my favorite summer memories. This is going to sound probably real creepy and context, but a friend of mine visited. I grew up in Chicago and the summer, I believe this is a summer after I graduated college, I had gone back home for a couple of months and one of my college friends was in town visiting Chicago and he brought his girlfriend with them, who did not know me and they had not been dating super long either, so she did not have as strong a bond as we did and I think she did not appreciate our break that we took at a coffee shop where they had a wide open window and we just people watched for like an hour and waved at people walking by, and the difference in reactions was just amazing to see. Like some people would wave back, like you could tell we made their day, like they were they're all happy, they had pep in their step. Afterwards, one guy turned and flipped us off and we're like, he probably hasn't had a great day and thanks for being sarcastic, but it was just like a really interesting kind of social experiment that really just stemmed from us being bored and wanting a little bit of a caffeine boost, I guessed, but it's just such a fun, you know, fun way to spend an hour and then we went back out walking in Summer Chicago, which is hard to beat. Yeah, Nice, Nice, I imagine. Are you also a people watcher? I imagine the answers. Yes, I love to watch people. I also love to look at homes and kind of think about what's inside and what's so design like. And you know, I love I love looking at yards and you know, it says a lot right, it's really interesting. People watching can teach you a lot about yourself and about them, that's for sure. Yeah, I do like it. Do you also go to a lot of open houses? I don't know, I don't have time for that. I'm so crazy busy. That's fair. But I like to walk and look at houses, you know through covid up at my ranch and Oh hi, we'd go out, my kids and I would go for a walk and I'm like, oh my Gosh, look at that beautiful house. I never even saw the house and I went up and down that street driving them to their school. I don't know how many people. So it was just a great way of being able to really see the surroundings of where you're at, and I like that. You know, I like I feel like I'm more connected to where I live because of that in my awareness and paying attention instead of going, going, going, dropping the kids off, going to work. You know it. Actually, I think there was a lot of a lot of change for me through covid that helped me grow. I think that's segues nicely into another question, which this this lets me do very little work, but I like to ask you a question of what you wish you were asked more frequently and I think in in light of covid and what's currently going on, I think this was really important, is to ask one another more often how are you, and can you kind of tell us like why, why this is important and how it can benefit people? Well, you know, it's so interesting because you go in well these, you know, when covid what'sn't around me? Good, all these cock jail parties and you're with, you know, CEOS or business people from all around the world and it's like, oh, so, what do you do? Oh, so, what do you do? Right, oh, are you a CEO? Oh, and I'm thinking, who cares what I do? How about? How about how are you? How's your day going? You know, it opens it up to say I care about how you're doing and...

I just want to look at you in the eye and say, Hey, how you doing there? Are you having a good day? And I don't get that a lot. You know, I get you know, tell us about what your next thing is, or, you know, what business are you in? Or you know, are you a CEO or you know, just it's it's a it's a very simple opening of hey, how you doing, how's Your Day gone? It's nice. Now I feel like I'm remiss if I don't ask how how's your day going? You know what, today has been a pretty tough day actually, but good I'm I'm working on a reorganization of a business with three hundred employees and it's you know, it's a big responsibility to try to turn a business around through COVID and try to keep people's jobs. Becomes a bit emotional because they have families and kids. So Day by day, minute by minute, how's your day? It hasn't been that. Hasn't had anything of that magnitude, which I'm grateful for. I have been, I feel like I've been dragging a little bit throughout the day, which I am fully crediting on not getting enough sleep last night. This morning, I guess I woke up earlier than usual, which isn't that always the worst when you wake up like just early enough before your alarm that you can't get back to sleep. Or the worst is when you wake up in the middle of the night, like at that for clock and they're like being you like wait, what, I'm supposed to be sleep right now? What's what's happening? Or if you fully get up because you think it's just time to get up, which I I haven't done in quite some time, but I remember I used to live in an apartment where the clock was like on the other side of the room, and so I usually would just like wake up. I think I use my phone as an alarm, and so when I'd get up, I'm just like, Oh, it's time to get up. And there was one time I fully got up, started making breakfast and then glanced at the microwave clock and it was like three a and it's just probably my doing. What what am I making? You like, I'm gonna so high, and that wasn't even in a in the midst of a pandemic. That was just like a normal Saturday. Moving from think thin, where you're living breathing it, into Elephan advisory and PTA now, where it's you are kind of been more of an advisory role and working with with multiple different businesses. and has that been a change in mindset? Has has your overall kind of like strategy of tackling the day? I'm sure has changed as as new business challenges come on, but as far as like your mindset goes, have you had a lot of the sort of the same, I can't think of another word for mindset. So the same mindset where? Yeah, yeah, it is, it is. It is like a mindset. You know, it's a passion, right, because you know it's like when you are teaching. I do a lot of at UCLA or USC or and I do at Harvard before covid where I would go teach a class, right, and the way I teach a class is talking about the errors that I made and analyzing those. And when I'm advising entrepreneurs, it's almost like you're teaching because you want to bring them along and let them make their own decisions, but you want to have them think outside the box, like we're the opportunity in that and do you think that's going to, you know, be a good decision in the long term? What's the balance of short term long term decisionmaking? And so the way that I deliver the message is really about, you know, helping elevate their idea, is giving them questions that help them think...

...outside the box and then coming to the solution and saying, if that's where you want to go, what are the pros and cons around that? So it's not about telling them what to do, it's about helping them learn how to make the right choice for whatever the issue is, to push their business forward and to feel good about it, because a lot of times I think entrepreneurs have their head down, and I believe there's two kinds of entrepreneurs. There's the one with their head down, marching through it, and then there's the entrepreneur with their head up, looking ahead and being strategic. And that's what I want to teach the people that I advise and mentor is lift your head up, don't get caught up in the Daytoday, even though you still have to do the task that you're doing, and be strategic, and that is so rewarding when you're able to get that message across and you see the decisions, you see the businesses moving forward. It's really great. Yeah, and you obviously have a very solid track record and I think coming from someone with that impressive history is just like to me, that seems like a no brainer to follow that. But yeah, I can't be tough when you when you ever head down like that. I like that analogy a lot, I guess. I don't know my yeah, it's kind of a metaphor. You know, it's it's a it was actually a Harvard study where there's entrepreneurs that, you know, our task masters, that put their head down and do the every day and eventually they learn to pull their head up and be more strategic. But it's very important to be aware of what's happening in the trends and the numbers, in the personnel and understanding where you want to go, because it's a map, right. It's like keep going north, keep going north right, and you really want to make sure that you're aware and not caught up in the isolation of what's happening today. And so I try to encourage people to lift their head up and think strategically and I think a lot of people are like, wow, this is fun, like now I get to think outside the box, even though I'm doing, you know, payables or receivables or inventory checking or whatever. Right we as entrepreneurs where many hats and there's many balls in the air all the time. So how do you manage that? And I think, I think, I think that so far it's been it's been fun and successful and I've watched some of these pink, talented Angel Women Really, really grow as human beings, and that is probably the biggest success that we could put in our pocket. That's so wonderful. I it almost perhaps even answers my next question, which I always like to hear this. What's the best compliment you've gotten? I don't know. Best compliment is probably been probably then I'm that that that people have said that I I'm consider it to other people and that I listen. I listen well, and I think that is important in a conversation to listen and I think sometimes we get caught up in our head and we take over and we talk too much or we don't listen because there's so much on our plate. But when you listen, it makes that person feel like you're being kind, you're, you know, respecting them. So I think that's what it would be. What about you? What would yours be? Goodness, I had back in my pr days, I had an editor tell me that I was let's see...

...if I remember this. I saved this email and I opened it up every once in a while and I'm in need of a good pick me up, but it was something along the lines of undoubtedly the friendliest, most helpful editor I've ever worked with, and he sent a longer message. How, you know, it was so rare for someone to reach out just to like give him an update, aside from like pitching something and how, like, I would just check in to see how he was doing and what he was up to, because I think that, like, it's nice to hear from people every you know, every once in a while, even if you're not super close with them, like and I think that's been another side effect of the pandemic, is that I've certainly reached out to people I haven't talked to in a long time just to see what they've been up to, how they're doing through all of this. In some cases they've moved and I didn't even realize it and they're in a new state now, so learning about those new surroundings. I think it's been really great to reconnect with people like that and in some cases they're like the you know, they'll remind me of something like a project we did together in high school that I had totally forgotten about, but then I'm like, Oh, yeah, that was so great, and just having that that shared experience again, it's been really nice. Yeah, that's great. That's great. Well, there's an you're almost off the hook here, but as it's customary, yeah, actually, yeah, usually people are clawing to get out by this point. They're just looking at the clock. But always like to end with the top three and for you, I'd love to hear your top three ways to find opportunities in crisis situations. Well, I'll kind of take that with covid because, as you know, we're in a crisis situation and and it's gotten a bit normalized, I guess, to a certain extent. I think the shock for all of us was, oh my God, what's happening? The plague is here, right. But what I find in a crisis, even in just a business outside the covid is, you know, how do you look for opportunities and through the covid conversation. I think the first thing is, is your company culture good enough? And and can it survive, you know, chaos? Can it survive chaos? I also believe that, you know, getting closer to your community is really important, and I think that's happened. I think a lot of communities that come together, neighbors have come together and supported each other. You know, people are supporting the elder now. So I think that's really great. And I also think that it's time to up the content game, like where's your content and how are you communicating your brand, and are you focusing on what's really important through a crisis, and does it makes sense moving forward or do you need to change it? And so those would be probably the three things I would say. Of finding opportunities in a crisis. Fantastic, and I like how you phrase that, that it's we are in a crisis situation, even though it has normalized a little bit, but just solid, solid advice all around. Yeah, well, was an you are officially off the hook. If people want to learn more about you, more about PTA the pink talented angels, not the Parent Teachers Association, Still Still Mixed up by that, but I don't I don't think that will be where can they go? Yes, for all those female founders out there, please go to Lausanne...

...falsettocom and we have all the information about pink talented angels. We are actually opening up submissions right now for the next entrepreneur that we pick to work with three months. It's, you know, an incredible opportunity to work with experts in their field and work with UBS on their personal financial gain. We have a link at there. You can go to Lausanne falsetto on Instagram, linkedin any of the above and we really hope that you fill out those, you know, those forms and get yourself in because we are just making such a great impact on some of these leaders that are coming into the world to be the next big leaders for us here in the next, you know, ten, fifteen years. So it's very exciting. Love it. Yes, everyone, fill out those forms and get some great support. That's I mean you're doing. You're doing awesome things. I don't know why people wouldn't want to take advantage of it here. Well, I appreciate your support and getting the getting the you know, the voice out there. It's it's really important that that we support our younger generation of business leaders, because they're going to be the ones that are going to be driving the economy moving forward, and that's a big deal. That's a big deal. Well then, thank you so much. This was fantastic. I feel like I just took one of your your courses. My sister did go to USC so I can, I can drop a fight on there. You Got I think you can handle yourself pretty well. Well, thank you, and of course we'll end with a corny joke, as is as another tradition here. Did you hear about this new book that's about Anti Gravity? No, it's impossible to put down. That's actually cute.

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