Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 66 · 1 year ago

66: The Book Doctor Is In with Stacey Aaronson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Stacey Aaronson is an established writer, ghostwriter, editor, book designer, and publishing partner who has been involved in the full or partial production of over 200 books. She works with authors across genres through her business, The Book Doctor Is In, and as a layout artist for She Writes Press. In other words, she knows how to get things DONE.

Now, Stacey is tackling her own book. Raising, and Losing, My Remarkable Teenage Mother is her first solo publication, but my goodness, is it enjoyable. Stacey’s enthusiasm leaps off the page, and it’s seeping into this episode, too. There are so many goodies in here—let’s hop to it!

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people cool things. Today's guest is Stacy Aaronson, a writer, ghostwriter, editor, book designer, publishing partner, grammar nerd and all around wonderful person, and we are talking about so much this might be the most jampacked episode of good people cool things that we've ever had. We're talking all about Stacy's background in helping people get their books out into the world. She's done more than two hundred and twenty releases as of the recording of this podcast, and we're also talking about her first book that she wrote that comes out on June, fourteen raising and losing my remarkable teenage mother, which is our first solo publication. Stacy is just full of inspiring words lots of great advice. If you've ever wanted to write anything, there's plenty of great tips in here. We're also geeking out over grammar, since we're both big old grammar nerds. We're talking a little bit about baseball and softball and neither one of us have ever dove over a wall to make a catch, but hey, there's still time to pull that off. There's so much good stuff in this episode and I can't wait for you to hear it. But what other little detour before we get into this conversation? If you'd like to port good people cool things, you can do so via the merch shop. Go to good people cool thingscom shop and check out all of the fun hoodies, hats, t shirts, mugs shenanigans going on over there. Can also get in contact with the show Joey at good people cool thingscom or on facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast, on all three of those platforms. For now, here's the conversation. What, Stacy, if I throw any curveballs your way, I have upmost confidence that you can handle that. Did you play? I play catcher during growing up, playing I whatever level of baseball, softball, tea ball you got to I never played catcher. I was a left fielder actually. Always loved say I feel like there was like one of two left fielder or really anywhere in the outfield in little legget laced of like very into it. You will catch anything your way. Like you're spritting down, making over shoulder grabs all that, or you could not care less about being on a bits fall field and are just like daydreaming and staring at the sky. I was actually the motivated one who went for it. Okay, I got the sense of that. I got the sense of that, so that's that's good. What was your were you like Robin home runs over over the fence, like dive in into stands and stuff like that? Oh, no, I mean this is bobby socks softball. Not to say that there wasn't good competition going on, but no, I don't think I ever left over a wall and any kind of heroics. I'm sorry to disappoint you on that one. I mean I didn't come through. Yeah, I was trying to, okay, sariously through you. I think I would always dream about it, I think when I was in the Outfield, like Oh, this ball is going to hit off the bat perfectly and I can. I mean we only probably played it like one or two places that even had a wall. It was usually just like the woods or other grass was, yeah, the outfield. So it was right, always an adventure. Well, I'm glad we have a level playing field. Haha, so to speak. Now already with the word play. I love it. I love it. So you okay a good deal. Well, I will say I mean, I guess we've already kind of started with baseball, but another type of pitch. This is how I've been starting these episodes and I think it's a fun little creative exercise. If people don't know who you are, can you tell us your elevator pitch, but...

...also what kind of elevator are we riding on? Oh okay, well, that is such a fun question because I am a huge classic movie Van and so I would have to be in the elevator of one of my favorite films, how to marry a millionaire, from one thousand nine hundred and fifty three, going up to the posh apartment that was shared by Marilyn Monroe, Lauren the call and Betty Graybell. And so if the elevator operator asked me what I did, I would tell him I take writers and aspiring writers by the hand as a writer, ghostwriter, editor, cover designer, layout, artist, graphic a website designer and publishing partner and help them bring books of excellence from cover to cover into the marketplace. And I do this using the arena of self publishing but with all the high standards of traditional publishing. And I've also recently authored my first memoir, which is coming out in June. Well, so you've got one or two things going on, it sounds like. Yes, just a couple of that that long list. Will definitely get into your memoir because I think it's just really interesting and want to get into that. But of all the things that you do for other writers, do you have a favorite out of the bunch? You know, what is such a blessing for me is I love everything I do, and I know not everybody gets to say that, and it took me a lot of years to get to a place where I actually had a reinvention career and I discovered all these different pieces that I loved and that I was good at so that I could actually be a onestop shop for for authors. But you know, I love writing and I love helping people shape their manuscripts as an editor, and then then I love all the design aspects. So I unfortunately can't pinpoint only one. But actually that's fortunate as well, because there's there's really nothing about what I do that I dread, which is always nice in your career. That's always good. Yeah, you don't want to be waken up and my God, this is a guest. Exactly exactly the writers that you work with? Do you like to kind of focus on a specific genre or specific style or format of book, or are you like Hey, if you've got a good story to tell, I can help you make it a possibility and make it out into the real world? A little bit of both. I do have specific specialties, I would say, where I feel I'm the most equipped to help people, and memoir is definitely one of those and I've worked on all kinds of different memoirs. But I've also done some great books in the areas of SELFHELP or self development, a little bit of like careers and business, some academic books. I've done some books on travel, of a travel nature. So nothing dry. I mean everything has been something I've really enjoyed and most of the time learned some really cool stuff from doing them, and that's always fun too. So I kind of kind of joke sometimes that I have all these sort of honorary masters degree and in oddball things because I've work done so many different kinds of books with different people. Full that I get to share in the knowledge that they're bringing into the market place with their books. So yeah, I've worked on lots of different kinds and memoirs kind of got this special place in my heart. Helping people bring their own personal stories into the world. I've really enjoyed that. But but to be honest, I've had very few projects. I think too, that for whatever reason the the chemistry wasn't so great, and I mean the book ended up being great, but other than that I really enjoyed working in all the different genres that that that I shared with you and a few other little like specialty genres to like poetry and inspiration and pets and stuff like that. You had me at oddball...

...back when you were saying you you have masters and all these different oddball so what's what's like the most obscure project that you've worked on? Maybe I worked at this gentleman who had done a lot of extensive travel in Southeast Asia and he did this series of books on five different areas. So there was a Thailand and a Indonesia and mean Mar Burma and you know, and they were these really eclectic little odd chapters of different encounters with with the native people's and different kinds of cultural things and odd traditions, and I mentioned say odd because they're special to them. I don't mean that in a disrespectful way, but but sort of like outside the box things that I hadn't really ventured into before. So I had this this knowledge of something, of a place I'd probably never go and people I would never meet, and so that that's an interesting one, for sure. That's probably I mean, maybe that's not so oddball. It's maybe just a little bit more outside the box for me than what I would normally be drawn to or walk into working on a book project. Very cool. Yeah, I think that's always so fast, I mean, and a huge reason why I love traveling in the first places, just because you do get exposure to things that really you probably wouldn't see if you were just kind of inside your bubble. And similarly, it's always interesting to to hear what people oversee, is what their opinions are of Americans or what they think life is like over here, and sometimes it's very accurate and other times I'm just like, Oh, no, like this is you know, you're watching like breaking bad or something and you think we all cook math out here. But right always. Actually, this, this could be a guy I just I just thought of when I was studying abroad. This could be a question. See if you have a good answer for it, because I didn't. They were asking for a movie that summarized the Ericin kind of like high school or college experience, and I feel like all of the movies they were naming were like American pie or like Van Wilder or animal house, even for like an older one, which I'm like. These are all kind of very embellished, but I didn't know if I had a good answer. Do you think? Do you have any any suggestions I could retroactively tell my college self to share with them? Who that? That is a tricky one. I am not coming to you for you here and I am so sorry nothing is coming to me readily this question. Now, after we after we end the PODCAST, I'll probably think of something and maybe I'll email you, but the listener won't have the benefit of me being really snappy and bright during the interview. So I do apologize for that. We can drop it in the show notes when you I mean I'm sure you'll think of it like as soon as you lay your head on your pillow, for bed and you're like, wait a minute, here's five great examples. Exactly, exactly. First of all, I need to I think, probably also after this podcast, chat with you about a potential memoir idea I have about when I was hosting Karaoke in Los Angeles, because I was thinking about it the other day and I'm like a lot of weird stuff happens when you're a karaokehost and you see, you see some things and I think that would be fun to kind of recount those outside of just at parties or conver stations with friends and kind of get them into writing. So we may have to talk about some some memoir products, but first we got to talk about yours. You've helped so many other people with your books or create their books, and now you've got your first solo book coming out on June. Fourteen raising and losing my remarkable teenage mother.

Why did you decide now is the time for this book? Well, what happened was my my mom actually became ill, and I won't go into all of that, but I lost her in September of two thousand and twenty and it was really tough because we spent our whole lives being very close, very great friends, having just a singular dynamic between us, and there's everything gilmore girls. We were very much rory and Laura I go moore and many assoonishing ways. We always joke that Amy Sherman Palladino wrote that show about us, even though she didn't know us. It was really remarkable. So I lost my mom on September fifteen and there was a lot of stuff that happened after that, of course, things to take care of and just to deal with, and I came home on October fifteen and I just absolutely knew I was supposed to write our story and it was so strong and it felt like all the star ours aligned, my schedule allowed for it. I felt like my mom was really present with me and that we had all these silly stories from growing up and all of these like mystical and magical events that happened and we were together and we were a part and we were funny and we had sentiments and we had all these things and people were always so intrigued by our relationship and you know, over the years we were here. Oh you girls should write a book one day about this whacky and wonderful relationship you have is it's so rare. And so after I lost her, the title just boom, it hit me and the feeling that I was supposed to write the book was so strong that there was there was no question for me about doing it. It was honestly, I'm going to write every day and I'm going to figure this out. And, like I said, the timing worked and it just felt like the right thing. And so that was the catalyst, was losing my mom. But Luckily I had lots and lots of wonderful stories about US growing up together that, you know, weren't at all Modelin so the experience itself was mostly wonderful. And then the writing to end, the losing part was the hardest part because it was the most raw and it was actually a little bit of it was a lot to figure out in terms of what happened in order, because we only had nine last day is together and they kind of blended and so I had to go back and piece it all together and that was very emotional, but it was also therapeutic and very special and again I felt the really strong presence of my mom. So that was the catalyst for writing the book. What a wonderful end result of having this book that has all these memories and now you can share it with the world as well, which is just a super, super cool way. Also very impressed at you putting together and releasing a book in nine months. Well, thank you. And and what's kind of Ironic, and I know ironic is a weird word to use because no one ever really knows exactly what it us for. Little more set. Certainly doesn't, but I know. But truthfully, you know, I always tell people, you know, you need a good six months from raw manuscript to market, and that's typically what I have with with my clients. And this is just a very uncommon experience. I actually partnered with a very good friend of mine in the month of November and she wanted to write a novel and I wanted to write this and we just said, okay, let's be accountability partners with, you know, word counts every day and cheerleading each other and and I wrote every single day and I stayed on...

...my word counts and then I uped my goal and then I up to my goal again and then by the end of November I wasn't finished, and so I spent the whole month of December, and even saying that now that I wrote, you know, a substantial but more outand and said the words in two months is daggering into my own mind. That's why I say it really felt like all the stars aligned for this to happen. But luckily, because I work in this industry and I know how everything works and I know how to do all of these different elements professionally. You know, I was very fortunate I was able to do all those things and know exactly how to put one foot in front of the other. And the reason why it's coming out on June fourteen is because that would have been my mom's sixty nine birthday, and so it's very special for me to launch the book on her birthday. That's very special. Let's it. What a what a Nice Momenteau, I don't know from a mentors right word, and I tribute to to your mother there. And I do want to get a little more into the writing process and kind of all that goes into launching a book, since you obviously have ample experience with that. But it's a little a little different on the outside. But first I've got a note. This is more so for the folks listening at home because I can't claim I'm a huge Gilmore Girls Fan. My sister watched it growing up, so I definitely familiar. I could name you at least Luke outside of Rory and Laura, lie and I. I want to say there's a chase in there, but I might be making that up. You can, you can just mock me hey silently at home, but now I will not mock you. Well, thank you. is not a chase, put. That's okay. You Got Luke, Laura, lie and rory. Mean there's the trifector. So you're good, excellent, excellent, got the important so do you have a favorite episode or scene from Gilmore Girls? Oh, okay, well, one of the really sweet gilmore girls episodes for me is when Laura, Li and rory go on a road trip and they decide to go to Harvard to check it out, because rory has wanted to go to Harvard all of her life. And they go there and they just walk onto campus and they rory sneaks into a lecture and, you know, and and they walk around and they have this really sweet time together and and Laura, I completely sees her daughter there. I mean she can see it. My mom and I had an almost identical trip. Now, it wasn't a long road trip, but it was a good news thirty seven miles from home. I wanted to go to scripts college in Claremont, California. I grew up in southern California and it was my dream, not not as long as it was for rory, but it was my dream and we made the trip there one day and we did I didn't speak into a class, but we did walk all over campus and we had that magical moment of my mom saying I see you here, like this is where you belong and and I know that you're going to go here and and I ended up getting in and I end up going there now. Rory ended up choosing to go to Yale. We won't get into that, but nonetheless, that that really sweet episode I loved so much, and part of it too, that was so fun is that they stayed at this bed and breakfast that they both despised because neither one of them wanted to have to socialize with anybody and eat with other people. And you know, my mom and I were kind of like that too. We just we just liked being together and we just kind of wanted to do our own thing, and so when I saw that episode I couldn't believe how it mirrored our lives. I mean there were many things about that show that mirrored my mom and me. It was quite incredible. But that one was pretty sweet. And and also rory's first day at Yale when Laura La takes her to school and rory doesn't want her to leave and she ends up staying, saying the night and just making a huge hit out of out of Rory's sweet and, you know, having all the food there and,...

...you know, just being the cool mom. And had that happened for me, my mom would have definitely been that person too. Those are both fantastic and I've maybe I'm due to watch gilmore girls now. I I keep seeing it on, I want to say Netflix. Is it on Netflix now? It is on Netflix and, Joey, I do highly recommend it. It's not just for girls. Okay, okay, I'm gonna I'm going to add it to the list. We did is finished watching sister sister a little while ago, which was a nice throwback to shows I watched growing up sporadically. So maybe maybe we're do yes, maybe you are. That's great. So going back to the book, as as much as I I can fake my way through a Gilmar girls conversation going okay, you've done great. Gold Stars are a little around for for absolutely for everything else that goes into a book. I like, I think a lot of people are, like, whoa writing one is very impressive. And you did, you said, a hundred tenzero words. So Double Nano Rymo look can be used in the slang their national novel writing month. YEA double in two months, which is just phenomenal. And that's just part, though, of publishing a book. There's so much that goes into it, like you're talking about with the design, there's the marketing elements, all kinds of other things that people don't think about. So this kind of a two parter one. What all goes into that? And to what was the most surprising part, as you were doing it for yourself as opposed to someone else? Great questions. Well, all the all the elements. Will start with your first part of your question. You've got after you have a raw manuscript and I I edit as I go because that's who I am. There are other people who just you kind of a mind dump manuscript and it might be just horrible even hold together. But I don't write that way. That's just not my nature. So I'm you know, I would edit every day too, and so by the time I was done with the manuscript I knew there were things of course. I of course that we're going to need to be refined and tweaked and Oh, I forgot about this, and okay, I could probably take that out. But what was wonderful was having the accountability partner for both of the months. And then I had a wonderful group of for women who are all writers. They actually were all my clients at one time or another and we've become friends and they were my Beta readers and they were a huge help to me because they were coming to it from a whole different perspective. They didn't know me all that well personally. They knew, make maybe a little bit about me, but so they were really coming with a fresh perspective and they each had very different opinions or saw different things. Where somebody might say, Oh, I really wish I would have known more about how you were feeling in this scene, as opposed to just what was happening or this part. I felt like a like maybe it was too much detail. I think you could leave this out or yes, they're all these different types of feedback I was getting and it was so helpful. I was so grateful and so I, you know, went back to the manuscripts and did all these tweaks with all of their advice and and then I've been very fortunate to be in this industry to have a really wonderful colleague who is a top notch book publicist and I always said, okay, when I finally write my first book, I hope I'll be in a position to hire her, because that would really mean a lot. And so I was able to hire her and she read it and she was able to give me some feedback from a publicist standpoint and mostly she was very happy with it, which made me very happy, but she had a couple of interesting...

...comments that nobody else did, and so that was very helpful as well. So I think making sure that you understand that at the writing process is really about rewriting. I mean getting it all out on paper is is it's step one and there are many steps in the writing process after that. So I think, you know, people have to understand that writing really is rewriting and there's a lot of editorial work to be done and you don't want to rush that and it sounds like I really really rushed it, but in all honesty and all honestly, I did have such good people around me to help me. And then my partner read it and she gave a whole bunch of really, really great feedback as well, because she was part of it, not not my early years, but but the part toward the end where I was losing my mom and she was part of that. So there was that aspect to and then the design part actually came very organically for me, because I do. I've I've designed over two hundred books and book the conterriers now, so that part comes very naturally to me and I just kind of knew what I wanted to do. And the cover, to the cover is a huge part and you know, getting the cover right is a big responsibility because it's the first thing people see. And for me it was really about showing a picture of my mom and me when she was a teenager. She had me at sixteen, and I have this picture of us on my first birthday, my first birthday party, and so she's seventeen and I'm there next to her and it just really shows sort of the sweetness of us together, where she's a child raising a child, and I loved that picture so much that that was the one I worked really hard to make work for the cover, and so that was, you know, that was a whole other process. And then, yes, the marketing part is definitely something you're thinking about all the time. I mean, and you actually need to be thinking about it before you write a book. Who's my audience going to be? What is my driving why for writing this book? What do I want people to take away from it? You know, how do I want people to steal or how do I want them to see things maybe a little differently? How how can I be inspiring or entertaining or whatever your goals are? So those things have to be there while you're writing, otherwise you can get really off track. So all of those things were present and they're all part of it. And then the the publishing aspect of it. You know I've done many, many times. So using the self publishing platforms and knowing how to navigate those is certainly a part of it, but those are really kind of the biggie's is the editorial process and the the cover design and then, of course, making the interior look very pleasant and and, you know, just flowing with the cover and story and everything, making it all cohesive. Yeah, I think I agree with you. I think the cover is just so it's so eye catching and it just is such a it's such a lovely picture and so excellentially thank you. That's so nice of you and and great tips all around to I think the marketing element. I know I always see what's the old thing, like writing is ten percent writing and ninety percent marketing or whatever the percentages are. I feel like a change every time I see the quote. It's like that. It's like that stat how like fifty eight percent of stats are made up on the spot. So you can just you can tweak it to whatever whatever fits your needs there. But yeah, I think there's your got it. You got it. Thank you. Thank you so totally. which it's that, but I think that is a big element of having that marketing going into it as well and it's something I think a lot of writers kind...

...of dread. But I don't know. I mean maybe it's because I have a marketing background, but I think it's fun. Well, you know, I think it all depends on perspective. I mean actually all of life is really about perspective. If you think that trying to sell your book to people feels awful, well, that's just one perspective. You can think of it as sharing a story that people might really find inspiring or fun or Oh wow, I did know moms and daughters like this existed. or Oh wow, now I have a really interesting perspective on what it's like to to lose someone, to go through their transition. there. There are lots of different elements going on in my book in particular, but you do want to be thinking about like, what are people going to take away and why are they going to enjoy it? And that's why you're writing it. You're writing it for an audience. And so if you're thinking, oh, I have to try to sell my book to people, yeah, that does sound really heavy and quite unenjoyable. But if you if you think about sharing parts of your story or, you know, peeking people's interest with with different things that make up your story, and it can be any book. I mean it could be a book on, you know, business or self development or anything, just the things that someone might go oh wow, I'm really interested in that, or this is really helpful to me, or this really touched me. You know, there are lots of different ways people can feel and I think if you look at it more that way, like, well, I wrote this book for a reason and this is what I hope people take away from it, and you kind of focus on those elements and sharing those elements, whether you're a guest blog or sharing or, you know, you're on an awesome podcast like your which I'm still so privileged to be on right now. I mean, there are lots of different ways to get the word out, social media, writing articles, you know. So it just really depends, I think, on the perspective. Thank you for organically plugging this podcast with that answer. That was wonderful. The bag of money will be delivered to your house shortly. Excellent. I did not expect it, but what a lovely bonus. Exactly exactly. It's just it's the little things, the little surprises in life that really really make it. Yeah, you're worth well. I did some poking around on your site, which is always wonderful to do, and a very a very nicely designed site. Well done, well done. But the thing that my eye, because I am in this same boat as you. I mean there's multiple things, but there was one where I was like, Oh man, spot on with that. You say you're a lifelong grammar nerd I am right there with you. Going back to spelling bees is like a five year old and and just, you know, constantly being like there, there and there, and you're in your and all that good stuff. So what is your biggest grammar? Pet peeve, oh joey, well, you just named one of them. They're there and they're I really get frustrated with it. And in Ip Apostropheus, you know there's a difference. You know, I apostropheus is is a is it possessive? It's a contraction. I mean I'm starting how to consessive. It's a contraction. And so, yeah, I get I get frustrated when I see IPS, you know, use wrong. I feel like there are there are so many. There are so many. One of one of the biggest ones maybe for me, is people starting all their sentences lately with so. Yeah, even even people...

...on jeopard you do this it. You know, someone will ask Aska a nice question, like your graduate of Scripts College and how do you how do you end up going there? So my mom and I. You know, sometimes it's sometimes it works. Are Sort of a context, but that one's been driving me really crazy lately. But in terms of you know, grammar, I probably one of my other biggest ones is when people use myself instead of I. Myself and my friend are going to the movies tonight. No, I'm sorry, I'm sorry, that's that's not correct. I feel like I need to do a like offshoot of this podcast. Now that's just stacy tears apart grammar I because I am just nodding my head over here. Oh good, good, because I'm feeling like a big giant language snobs saying these things, like I'm like I'm judging every person speech patterns. But they're just things that jumped out because, as you know, now that I know, we're twins in this arena and this is so exciting to me to have a grammar nerd friend. You know these things just once you are aware of them. You can't be unaware of them. You just see it everywhere. You see it in writing, you see in the way people speak and it's just so obvious and you want to help people too better, but you end up coming across sometimes is just a SNOB. So not you, but anybody. Yes, yes, I wasn't offended. Okay, good, think you were specifically calling me out. And the so one is really funny. I remember reading, I don't remember where, but someone had written an article about it and I think in the article they said it's more a millennial type of thing of the younger folk, which I mean I guess there's already two generations after millennials now, so not not so young anymore, but that they were the the biggest instigators of it, and I was kind of like h I never really noticed that. And then, yeah, ever since then, most specifically in an episode of Shark Tank I was watching and every question they had, like every inventor that came out was like so, we made eight million dollars last year, and I was just like, ah, it's it is a thing. It is a thing, it is, but you know, I mean just like anything, there are so many generational things. For example, we say like a lot. Some people over like and, but you know, we say things like so. I was like yeah, yeah, let's do that. He was like no, no, I don't really want to. I mean where did that come from? My grandparents never said that ever, they always said and she said and he said, I said there was no and I like and he liked. But funny, you know, this this sort of came into fashion and we picked up on it and we say it and I've I've been really trying to break that habit because I grew up with it. I don't like like like, you know, all the time, but I do have that pattern and I know it's a little bit odd. I don't know where it came from, but it is just a generational thing. So, you know, I try to be kind and cut people from flack, but things do stand out to me. I can't help it, and apparently you feel the same way. Yes, and I also say like. So I'm sure people are are shaking their heads and disgusted. Well, you have to say it sometimes. I mean there is a context for it. But at the same time, just like we might be picking on the millennials or something, you know, our grandparents are parents are picking on us for things too, and we're going, yeah, but that's just what everybody says, you know. So I don't know, it's my myself. Yeah, one knows what I'm talking about. It's exactly to do it exactly,...

...but then myself instead of I really does have to go that one. That one I can't really abide. I will, I will keep an eagle, I guess, an eagle ear out for it now. Oh Yeah, will harshly criticize anything, uses it and cause of real scene for it. Okay, good in your honor. I'm so happy I have you on my team. So that question I like to ask is always is a question you wish you were asked more frequently, and I like asking it because it's minimal work on my end and I'm like you do all the work of coming up with the questions for this episode. Now, just the one question. But I and you you would mention how your mom was sixteen when you were born, and so did you ever resent having a role reversal relationship with your mom? Well, interestingly enough, I did not. I never resented it, and people do tend to sink right away. Oh, poor you. You had to be kind of the mom in your situation. And I will just sort of back that up a little bit by by sharing something which is my mom always said, well, you are the the wiser, more mature one of two of us, and she would joke and say I didn't raise basic stacy raised me and and indeed, when I was growing up we did have this really funny role reversal where I would, you know, be looking out for her and be concerned about something she was doing because she was the more free spirited, unstructured one and I was the more bookish, well, how do you say just more conservative or traditional one. And so I just popped out that way and we always just sort of marveled at how different we were but also how close to were. Me, we really adort each other and loved being together. But it is an assumption people make. They automatically stinks that whatever role reversal we had was dysfunctional or somehow detrimental to me. And so I love this question because of course there are role reversal situations where children are dragging their parents up out of a, you know, hangover or you know, a drunken stupord it's can you take me to school, or you know, there's a lot of irresponsibility happening and sometimes kids are trying to keep the family afloat or get a job when they're twelve or you know. I mean there are certainly those kinds of scenarios, and I'm not undermining that at all, but in our particular case we were just meant to be the twesome we were and it worked so naturally and and was so nurturing to both of us for us to switch in and out of our roles. And she was definitely my mom too, but really more of an equal and a playmate. That's just how we grew up and that was how she saw me and and it was really really wonderful for us. For somebody else, for two other people, maybe it would have been awkward and in somewhat detrimental, but for us it wasn't at all. It was just so natural for me to look out for her and it was never in a way that felt like a burden. She was never somebody who is so irresponsible that I felt burdened by having to look out for her. She always took good care of me and and we really did grow up together in a really sweet and beautiful and Wacky and playful way, and we were like that until the very end. That's so nice and sweet and, like you're saying, not everyone has that relationship. There's definitely that kind of role reversal where it's not the best and to have that and just be there for each other all the time. It's so it's so cool to hear and I'm glad that it's out in the world for everyone to to shortly see. It's not a hundred percent released yet, but but coming out very soon. Well, thank you for saying that, and it...

...really was a blessing for us to have each other in the way we did and I feel like being able to write our story was really honoring that. And not only her but also I had a wonderful father, to a wonderful young father. My parents were only married for about ten minutes, but but they you know, they made it work and my dad was great and my grandparents were great and I truthfully grew up in what I call sort of this trispect of beautiful or delicious flavors, because I really had three distinct worlds, my world with my mom and the one with my dad and the one with my grandparents, and they just sort of had this marble fudge ribbon twirling through all of them. That was unconditional love, and so I was very fortunate. I mean, my mom and I did have periods apart and periods together, and it wasn't always perfect. I don't mean to make it sound like that, but in terms of having that kind of very different relationship with a mother, I never wanted to have any other mom than when I had, which you know, and I know a lot of people can't say that. So I count myself very fortunate to be able to say that. What a great way to describe it. Of A marble fudge ribbon. Once again, I'm regretting recording a podcast so close to dinner time. Now I just want some marble fudge. Hey know I ruined your dinner. I mean if marble fudge is included, I would say you've enhanced the dinner. So it's a win win. Okay, all right, say so. You're almost off the hook, but we always like to wrap up with the top three, and this is allay, the the foundation. It's a top three reasons. You're more amazing than you may realize. But we're not talking about you, we're not talking about me, or should I say myself, we are talking about everyone who's listening. Why are they more amazing than they realize? Yes, well, I think especially right now, a lot of people are going through tough times and reinventions and lots of rockiness and kind of the rug being pulled out from under them, and I think it's important for us to remember some things that do make us as humans really amazing. So number one is I just like to always remember how we live in ammer miraculous body that performs like like Oh, I like. Oh No, I keep you, I'm in trouble for more, miraculous body that performs like billions of processes every second of every day that we don't even have to think about, and that in itself is pretty darn amazing and, I think, pretty empowering. So that's number one for me. Number two I would say, you know, we all came here with a multitude of gifts. So, whether those gifts are obvious or not to you right now, there is at least one way, if not many more, that you can shine your light in the world. So don't let anyone ever tell you that you can't or you shouldn't, because we are all meant to shine. And last at not least, I would say to remember that we are truly limitless beings and we're only bound by the limitations in our minds. So if you've been telling yourself the limited story of what you're capable of. Know that you can change that right now to a limit less story. All you have to do is rewrite it. I like that. Yeah, on a motivational poster. My Barren, barren wall here at this recret'm just very, very white wall. Need something like that to be a reminder of of pushing forward and having that limitless mind. Yes, I think that's I think it's so important because really we really are only bound by...

...what we limit ourselves within our minds, and so I just would love to see people take those those those limiting belief and just chuck them to the curb and say, you know what, I don't need you, I never needed you. I'm going to step into my truth self and be a limitless being and and bring my gifts into the world. And you know we are all capable of that. So those are my top three. Yes, consider them chucked, those limited thoughts. Yay To limitless all right. Well, stacy, if people want to learn more about you, learn more about your mom, learn more about the book, learn more about Gilmore girls. Where can they find you? Well, my author website is Stacy aaronsoncom and that stacy with an e. Why and Aaronson with a double a, and if they have any interest in what I what I do with authors. My business is the book doctor is incom. The book doctor is Incom but in terms of the book and me and my mom and Gilmore Girls Than Stacy aaronsoncom is a place to be. Fantastic. Will Stacy. Thank you so much for hopping on the PODCAST. This was wonderful. I feel like I am just going to go out and conquer everything that's in my way now. It'll be wonderful. I love that and thank you so much, Joey, for having me. This was so much fun and I really appreciate having the time with you. Your book raising and losing my remarkable teenage mother comes out on June fourteen, so go pick it up. If you're listening, I guess you don't have to pick it up. You already have probably I do copy so so you don't need to pick it up, but everyone else listening. Thank you so much, Joey. And of course we got to end with our Corny joke. I thought this one was appropriate. It's mom themed, although I could probably plug in any group of people, but I'd like I like this one based around mom's what drink helps mom's relax? What calm? A meal? Tea? Oh, good one, good after it to day people? I love it. I think that was a good one. Good people, cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you were a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here with the show. As always, you can send me a message Joey at good people cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people cool things to check out all the old episodes, be a good people cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

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