Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 112 · 5 months ago

112: Incarcerated Life and Second Chances with Aaron Smith

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Many of us want to make more money. We’ll find side hustles, or work hard in our main gig so we can negotiate for more. Would you take up to $15,000 a day? 

Aaron Smith, founder of Escaping The Odds, was doing just that on the south side of Chicago. The problem: His business with a heroin drug operation. He was later indicted and sentenced to 12 years in federal prison, serving nearly a decade of that time. 

While in jail, Aaron’s mindset changed. He decided it was time to switch hustles, or as he puts it, to go from selling dope to chasing dreams. But that entrepreneurial spirit never left him, and today Aaron is a business owner, podcast producer, and mentor. He’s out to change the narrative that people who have been incarcerated are beyond hope. They deserve a second chance. 

And through Escaping the Odds, Aaron is helping them get those opportunities.

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is Aaron Smith, founder of escaping the odds and you turn transportation. Aaron grew up in public housing on the south side of Chicago. Got Involved in a heroin drug operation the produced up to fifteen thousand dollars a day. He was later indicted and spent nearly a decade in prison, but he still had that entrepreneurial spirit within him, although he went from selling dope to chasing dreams, and when he got out he started the escaping the odds podcast, started network and building up those relationships. His podcast and his business gives opportunities to formerly incarcerated people, letting them show off all of the cool things they are doing within the entrepreneurial and business world's lots of great people that he's highlighting and, as we'll talk about, podcasting a fantastic way to network and to meet New People that you maybe wouldn't have talked to otherwise. So there's lots of good stuff right within this episode. If you'd like to get in touch with good people cool things, reach out on facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast. You can always send an email joey at good people, cool thingscom and if you want to support the show, pick up a copy of time but kind of weird short stories online's relationships, or grab some merch at the merch shop. Errands also got some great merch at escaping the odds, so why not get a combination good people, cool things, escaping the odds merch. Get a nice little hat to mix with a sweater. I mean, life is too good, just like this conversation with Aaron. To kick it off. For people who don't know who you are, you get your name and your elevator pitch, but also the type of...

...elevator that we're riding on. Yeah, yeah, you say that. They said it kind of elevator were riding on. Yeah, well, you know what, my whole life, Malvin, taking the elevator man is short cut, right, so I'll learned to take the stairs now, you know, it's just try to walk it out. But I'm interest with the course of the found of escaping Os media, where we interview to pull me incost ready are like now super dope success entrepreneurs. And then it for like my third season. Over sixty stories told and idea came from own a constration did almost a decade and federal prison up until two thousand and nineteen for a druid crime. And so always been entrepreneur and I want to blend a passion of, you know, entrepreneur media, and so escaping OS media was birth. And here we go. Love it. Love it now, like you said, you spent nearly a decade in jail. I know there are podcasts like your hustle is the one. Yeah, I think it's probably Mosch, wellknown, that kind of give a, you know, a peek and be in between the two people that are incarcerated and try and shining to light on some of the things that you probably wouldn't expect. So, based on your experience, what's something that people wouldn't expect about being incarcerated? The in some situation, at least for myself, the sense of peace that approach can get like again, depending on the place where you're located. Of course they can. It can run as factually, could be super dangerous, could be super laidback in the place I was located was kind of like in the middle, kind of do your time and not really high like the distractions, of course, of the world. So you can get a lot more done. I've done a lot more reading than I do now. I read the newspaper every day. So I would say that's probably one of the things that people probably would not expect that you can. You can get a lot done. You know you have a lot, a lot of idle time. Kind of make it work for you and that's where I be. While you were incarcerated, you kind of had a mindset shift of yeah, I'm going to I'm going to change. I like the way you phrase are from selling dope to chasing dreams.

Yeah, what's there like a specific moment where you're like, okay, I got to change this, or did it just kind of build up over time? I'll believe it build up over time, the culminating different things that happened. Really it was prior to my conserration. Luckily, I was on bond for a couple of years. So I really had mindset shift while I was on bond basing potentially a life sentence, and so once I went to prisons. Like my mind was already made up, but, you see, you have to walk it out. Okay, now I'm in this place that I have to make my, quote unquote, home for almost a decade, and so I was like, okay, since I've been a been a college before, I always like I know how to when never in the collegiate environer. So I had to make that my new college, you know, and so that's what I did and I just, I'm just made the best of the situation and just knew that I wanted to be better opposed to being bitter upon my release. Was the first thing you did when you got out? The first thing I did was a kind of tripped out out. I was giving it what they call a furlough. I was in Minneapolis, and a federal city, they sent you anywhere, so I was in Minnieapolis for the length of time I was a decade. And so when I got out, I went to had like a six hour layover just to kind of before I went to the halfway house, which is like another form of incarceration, as I stayed there for six months, but it's a lot more freedom. So I'm like like, while walking around downtown of the Athletas and I'm like, you know, I want to give you something to eat. So I went to like a rooftop bar. I wanted, I wanted to drink some beer, but I know I couldn't, you know, make it. Probably go back to prison. But I had this. I think I ordered me like some some hot wings and yeah, I think I tipped the lady like twenty bucks. I just feeling really good. I want to make somebody Dady. So I gave a twenty one was like, Oh wow, you know, thank Oh my yeah, appreciate it, you know. So, yeah, so that was one of the first thing I did. I think I went shopping for like a new press shoe something on that furlough and just really just taking it all in and it was all new to me. This the smallest of...

...things, like hearing dogs barking or like women chattering, just the smallest thing that a person may overlook. This in a free world. And so it was all new to me. And hopefully it wasn't in the middle of winter. I was more. No, I okay, it was. It was in the summer time. Okay, perfect, it was perfectly. I was a like August. Okay, not sens. so it was really, really warm us. So I had had a good time for what it was worth. Nice, Nice, yeah, because I know, I mean you know, we are both Chicago Boys. So, yeah, you you actually had the city, man skoky. I can I tell people Chicago if they're not from Chicago, and then I'm like, I'm Chicago Jason. So we know, we know those winners, man, right, they are as nothing like the meniap is winned. Oh, like you think Chicago is tough LIKE MINNESOTA? That's a whole nother level. Even word. Oh, man, I guess. Yeah, because you got all those lakes right throughout. Yeah, thats right. Some day, some day, will visit them all. Now you touched on escaping the odds. You're in your third season with it. Now it's people who were incarcerated but now kicking Butt with entrepreneur business, you know, living it up really. Yeah, was this something that you had, like did this kind of start while you were incarcerated? Was the something that you always want to do? Had you had an int Stin podcastor how did that Guy Started? No, actually, as I look back on my life, I've always been like at this affinity for like entertainment, media. I went to school at Columbia College when I shooting familiar with that school, so column in Chicago. So I went to school for business management, but a concentration like music business and media arts, and so it's crazy to have life out a way to kind of full circle. So now back in this whole media space. But while I was away, mind you, I never knew what a podcast what I read about it because I would read the Entrepreneur...

Inc magazine, wired stuff like that. So I kept myself a breast what was going on, and I just say that it was a medium that didn't really calls for a lot of money to get started up. And so I wild. You know what, I think I'm gonna start a podcast, and I didn't call it escaping our. I can't think of the name that came up with, but the idea was like I wanted to change the narrative or what people thought of someone who was forming in coostrated, because I mess so many dope guys that were locked up and were like brilliant businessman, whether they were like formerly Wall Street kind of Powsy schemers type things, or this kind of ran a file, a law or they were like someone like me who were inspiring to be entrepreneurs, but we were selling a wrong product, so we had to switch hustles, but we still had that mindset, that business mindset, that was in it. We just maybe didn't have the access to kind of legitimize, you know, productal service. So I wanted to make sure that so scaddy knew about these men and women and that we want to just locked up away, just kind of doing daytime, so to speak, and so this is my way to do that, to change and narrative, but it also to like to build them my own social capital, because I had no professor of network when I left prison and Dow this would be a good way also like to meet New People and also kind of carved on my own niche. Why? Also staying true to light my love entrepreneurship, but they also wanting to wanting to give back to like prison reform. Yeah, and I think you touched on an important point for anyone that wants to get into podcasting, is that it doesn't cost a lot to get started right, and I I mean I have I wouldn't even say it's that fancy of a microphone, but I'll see people being like, Oh, yeah, I'm going to get this three hundred ninety nine dollar. Mike, no idea of what I'm doing, and I'm like no, like you can, you could get started for a lot less. Also like make sure you enjoy it too. It's podcast. It's not for everyone. I like to think it's accessible to...

...everyone, but some people, you know, they try and they're like, nope, that's not for me. Yeah, and you don't want to. You want to throw away like hundreds of dollars like a quitness. It's just going to collect dust. So for you set up a good part of this is building up your network. They're so have people been reaching out to you to become guests? Are you you know, finding them is a kind of a mix of both. Yes, a mix of both. Initially, of course, you know, I was reaching out to people and most people that they would it receptive coming on, but now it's like it's probably a little bit of boat. It's kind of easy like to find people. You know, for me, I just kind of go on instagram and maybe I have a knack for it, but I just kind of cold call or just reach out just like blindly and say hey, this is what I'm doing, and most people really like the concept because it's a really niche and that's not too in people. I'm probably like one of the only people that's actually in this space, thankfully, that's doing this on kind of trailblazing it, at least the entrepreneur apart forming and conserrated, and so a lot of people are all why it's pretty cool and they go to the website, they see you legit and I got, you know, a few episodes under my belt and so okay, cools, give it a shot. And so there's also opening up other opportunities for me as well. So that was a I knew that that would come as well, you know, just being able to allow for the podcast to parley into other business opportunities, and that's what's happening. That's what are some of those other opportunities? Well, one thing is a trucking, trucking company. I was already working for free broker here in Chicago area and so I decided just to kind of open all my own trucking company and I'm one of the people that's working with me as formally in conserrated. So the name of the company is you turn transport and pretty much it's being able to kind of give guys like myself with a background the opportunity to kind of eventually have their own equipment, truck or cargo van, to kind of do their own thing, because a lot of men and women it's the cost with the...

...actually want to, they want to pursue a career in truck it because it's it could be pretty Lucative, you know, does really require a lot to start up. You can kind of make money right away, and so yeah, that's one of the things that I'm doing and I've been able to partner with company called stretch finance, which provides online banking for forming and cost rated and people to like jest as involved, and so I'm creating content for them. Is Well, that came directly because my podcast. So opportunities like that as a couple other things, and I'm working on it. I gotta kind of keep under wraps, but it's going to be super, super dope. And Yeah, so it pretty much they all derived from escaping yachts one way or another, speaking, engagements, you name, and it so pretty cool, good stuff all around and from a from a guest perspective, I mean I agree. I think it's always fascinating to meet New People. That's why I like doing a podcast. There's been I've said this before on the spot, gast, but there's been times we're going into a recording I'm kind of like, you know, I don't know, like I'm feeling a little groggy or whatever, just kind of like I don't know, but then I always come out feeling so much more energized. Yeah, I'm just hot, man, my head's like all over the place now. I love it. I so who's someone that you've interviewed? Were they started a business that you were kind of like, Ho, I didn't know that could be a business, but they're they're thriving in it. Oh Wow, this yeah, me think. Yeah, that's a gentleman in Texas. He has a company. It's like call like a Crypto, like pretty much like a crypto machines and basing. I think Dall is, sex or maybe even Austin Texas, where it's like people can kind of go inside of this like a chamber, if you will, and it's like like scopting or kind of think of the name of it. Man, it's Crypto. It's pretty much it takes your temperature down...

...like to like negative something and a lot of people used to burn fact. Now maybe I'll send a name. Wrong. It's been a while she's been on the podcast. But it was pretty unique. He has like a bus set up, but you kind of going there and it's like you're in this like almost like a tanning bed, but like less than two minutes or so, and it was pretty Lucative, like people paid a couple hundred dollars and land has been for a couple minutes. I'm like, Oh wow, you don't mean like you started doing a numbers. I'm like, wow, this is could be pretty pretty looking to a lot of people are doing it. I'm like, okay, cool, you got something here. And so I would have never, ever, ever in a million years thought about something like that, and so that was a someone the unique ideas that it's kind of came across the podcast. He thought of that idea. Why he was incarcerated. I believe the story was like he's seeing the guys like, you know, sports athletes or athletes, a kind of sending this bucket of ice, you know, to like he'll or whatever. I've never done before. I can't see what self doing, but I believe that's what he said it came from he was in the TV room in prisoners kind of watching it, like Oh, wiles, unique concept. He looked it up and it was something that was if people were doing, and so he started his business and it's been pretty pretty successful. Nice. Yeah, I think I wish to think of a name. What, I'm sorry, it's good. So susy, cryotherapy, I think. Right. Here you go. Yeah, that's what I'm thinking. CRYPTO curse. You're right, Chara, maybe that's the that's the new business is you're getting like educated about crypto while you're doing crying. Right. Yeah, reading, Abile Brown. It's gonna be quick reading, though, because that, yeah, definitely be a quick more than two minutes. I'm just like no, yeah, yeah, I've never tried it either, but I think I learned about it the kind of the same way I've just seen it. Think it was like one of the you know things Lebron spends a million dollars, yeah, on his body as here, and like part of it is right. Yeah, absolutely, yeah, because he mentioned that. Yes, so that's why. Yeah, cryotherapy, that's the name of but I mean, yeah, just an awesome job of recognizing something. It's like, Hey, people are doing this, but people aren't doing it here where I listen. Let's let's start it up. I love that. Yeah, and I believe, like his companies like Onet of the only feel...

...like this immobile kind of Nas and the Dallas, Dallas all scenario, or at least and sex as I believe. Yeah, so pretty cool. Shot us out to him. They think of his name right now, but we can. We can find the episode in a link to it. Absolutely good stuff. So you have you turned transportation. Yep. Is there something that's surprised you about running a business? Um, I wouldn't say surprised. Yeah, maybe slightly, just like managing people. You know, I did it in my former life and on the streets or whatever, but that's kind of different. But yeah, just like people are you have to really be explicit, you know, breaking things down with people. It's like you and they ten a half selective M Lesian. You know well certain things, so you find yourself repeating. So just kind of manage people and just kind of like expectation that you may have for some one may not pan out the way you think it maybe just because they have their own agenda, whatever that may be. So that was that was somewhat surprised. I would say, have you found any? Obviously, I know the past couple of years has made remote work even more common it was before and I love it. Obviously, like we were talking beforehand, you're based in Chicago. You're yeah, had a driver that was just going through the radio. Texas. Yeah, I and, as we're talking about texts, a very big state. So even just driving between the I thought my parents have made that drive actually while they've come to visit. Man, it took them a few days. They were you know, they're not tried to knock on a twenty five hour drive in one day. Who is? You can't runs longer than it does that. So have you found I whether it's like a you know, not my tool or software or whatever that has made that easier, or is it kind of just...

...like a trial and error, like you're saying, like sometimes people might not work out either way you thought or you know, there's there's bumps in the road along the way. Have you feel like you know a tool that's helped to make that easier? Is it just kind of come down to people connections there? Yeah, it's people connections are but I would say, like initially when I first started my first season on my podcast, well at least half of it. It was pre pandemic. I started in nineteen, some of nineteen, and so I had a full season where all of like my podcasts were in person and I will get I'll at people actually that a know. Can I come on your podcast on my own? Well, you know, mainly just kind of doing people in Chicago. If you get Chicago, I can you know Cuar. Everything was in person. Then a pandemic it and so now I oh, I have to switch up out of pivot a little bit, and so I was allowed to kind of open up my my audience to and also my guests, because now I was able to use stream yard, which is similar to podcast. was like kind of like the Zonne. It was really user friendly and I did my whole season to virtually and so the remote work that really really kind of worked out for me, and just even not even just with the with the podcast, was just like my everyday life, like meetings and this opportunity just read people in connecting most of the people that I like do some kind of business with or even just mainly business. I've never met before a person like facetoface is all solve zoom. So I think that that's one of the positives that it can kind of come out of the whole pandemic. Just the opportunity you don't have to be face to face with anyone anymore. So, yeah, and I think too. I mean I've I've noticed I'm like more lenient with people now to like and we've had some podcast episodes where someone's like, you know, babysitting their kids or yeah, you know, there's they're just like right off screen yelling or in...

...one case they were walking around in high heels and I was like, you know what that's life like, can't I can't fault someone for taking care of their kids like that's but yeah, it's your point. It's been amazing, like the types of people that I've been able to interact with because of tools like streamers, like spodcast zone. We all, yes, zoom, the Og have them all. I know some people have the zoom fatigue, but I'm like hey, that's allowed me to meet a lot of people that I wouldn't ever other yeah, I give credit and like the business opportunities, as will working on something where it is strictly like zoom and is deally would like presentations, and that business model like would not have existed maybe three years ago. What people are paying, you know, exorbitant amount of money for our presentation, you know. So that came out of, you know, the pandemic. Yes, so, it has, is it's negatives and positives, you know. So I think we I think we here to stay with that. I think society is is. You know, some people are zoomed out. What I think most people are looking at like you could still be productive, and you can. You can trust your employees or people working with the kind of get things done and still have a productive work experience. Yeah, exactly exactly. We're not. I mean some people crave the in person, but I think, I think most of us have a realized like, wait a minute, yeah, no, I meet people now as I hey, you want to meet? Going to you know, if you want to lose own, we can dose own, you know. So I'm like, if you're down the street, maybe, but yeah, right, if I gotta drive thirty minutes, right, yeah, exactly. Now, what a hop back to something you said earlier how you were reaching out to people on Instagram, and I think instagram has been I would say for just about every business, like a pretty important part of people's marketing efforts and just kind of like...

...connecting with New People. You mentioned you've got a nice little MAC for a cold reaching out. Are there other instagram tips that you have that would be helpful for for anyone listening? Yeah, I would say this takes a lot of work. It is pretty tedious. However, I'll found it to work and I which to be honest, I wish I can do a lot more with it. Again, it's so teas and takes time, but we do argue of it. It's priceless. Right, let's say take the state escape in the odds, right, say I'm following someone who has like a huge following in my space related to business, maybe even like prison reform, something that nature. You find someone that's like similar and you will not only like what the owner that page is posting whatever, but like he may have, well she may have, like five hundred comments below, right, and so just take the time to comment on a comment and stuff, right, and not just like Ay, that's a cool right, but like really think it out, think, think about it, and people like that. People like to lie all wow, this person you know it really took the time out to respond, you know, to what I was saying, because most people, they probably won't. You know out of all those comments, that most people aren't comment on each other's comments, and I think that's a pretty good way to to kind of gain new people, to kind of follow you. They are all wow, who is this person that left this really thoughtful comment? More than just a like or love button? Right, you may get it with that as well, but when you leave a thoughtful comment, people say, all the check you out. Now they stop following you. All. Kay, well, I want to see what this person is up to, and you already know that they're they're in the same that they're in.

It into the same thing that you're produced anyway, and so it is easy for doing a follow you. Just takes a whole lot of time to do it. They too kind of go through that. You did that every day. That's a full time job alone. But you could probably really grow your brow you user based. That would yeah, I know. I A friend of mine has at least I take at least three or four. I like virtual assistance. That will help out with that and I feel like I can almost now like which one of them is respond. I don't know them individually, I just know my friend, but I'm like, oh, that's the one that like uses a lot of emojis. I'm like that one always uses way to an exclamation points, but it's I totally agree like you. Someone even comments on my post that's just like a hundred, like hundred emoje. I'm just like, okay, well, I'm not fond to that, but you, when you take the time to actually craft something thoughtful like that's yeah, you'll get you'll get it back tenfold, for sure. You definitely would just going to take a long to go through all that, but I think it's worth and I wish I had more time, or at least can kind of come up with a strategy to kind of to be more to kind of do that more often than I do. But it works. Maybe it maybe in like two thousand and twenty five the technology I'll advance enough you can think of. Comment is that it's so kind of a yeah, yeah, maybe, maybe not crease like that. Yeah, I mean I'll be on board. You got me as right. Right, yeah, definitely it. Yeah, for someone that's just getting started, we've feel like you're dropping lots of good knowledge throughout this, but someone that's just getting started, let's say they have an idea but they don't really know what to do next, will be your top ten. They don't know what to do with they got something, they just having got started. I would say it sounds Cliche, but it's like you just have to do it. It's got to jump out there, just kind of get your feet well with it. But I guess a little bit more concrete advice would that is I would maybe fine people there's doing some...

...of the work and kind of seeing how there, how they doing it and maybe immolate some of it right they did doing and gang inspiration from those people'll be a great, kind of great way now only to get inspiration, but get like the knowledge that you may need, you know, because you could ever see the experience. I like it. I like it all right, Aaron, you're almost off the hook. Care we always like to wrap up with the top throw, so I'll go and joining myself. That's what I like say for our top three. Hair we kind of touched on that's a little bit with I think the the something about person that you wouldn't expect, but since you've built these great businesses in giving people that were formal in car serrated another chance to thrive. Yeah, what are three stereotypes that we should stop thinking about incarcerated people? Oh, probably going and all with this one. I will say number one is that like we're we're going back all right, that we don't have what it takes to be successful. For sure, because people will. When I first came home from prison, I guess I don't have a certain look of someone that did time whatever. Right, if you're looking for a whole bunch of Tattoos, whatever, I don't know. Whatever. Oh Wow, you know what, I never thought. I would never think that you were in costry. I would. I was like, I know a hundred more guys just like me with the same mindset. You know, it's mine. So I would say just not like judge in the book by its cover. I know that sound again like kind of normal cliches, but definitely those, those few things, like to the cat, just kind of really get to know a person, looking to like like the context of what they went to prison for or incostraty for, because you be surprised, like I was. I was in a job and I be I never forget, as for some reason. I was talking about like maybe I gave up too much information, that I was pretty transparent, and I think they...

...got told late, like how much time I had a goat in my employments. You don't, Hey, what are you doing all, like well, you know, and comes rate. Right, maybe honest say it that way. I'm said a little bit more professional, but you like, oh, wow, like what do you do? Like, like you had like it must have been something serious. I'm like, no, you know, it was drugs. You know, meant federal drug crime. You know, they give you a life sentence with a lot, a lot of stuff, and so I think that's something that people can, I wanted to miss conceptions, if you will, or stereotypes. If you spent a lot of time in const rated, you know, must have been for something like paynous or whatever, right, or too another thing. Right, this is kind of like not business related, but I would get this often. It's kind of crazy. But because you spend a lot of time and costs rate, like, maybe they may think like like homosexuality or something like that, like that runs rampant in a print system, and it actually doesn't. You know what I mean. It's you know, and no, no, say it against sexual orientation whatever, right, but I think inside is still like taboo, you know what I mean, like how it was like maybe in the s and s stuff like that. But yeah, so I think that's one of the misconceptions as well, that person that's incostrated they probably been involved in some kind of a you know. Yeah, so that's not that's not true. Yeah, I think that's I do feel like that's still a common stereotype. You know, though, it's like don't drop the soap, I yeah, stuff like that. It's like yes, all the time, like that's all right, yeah, all right, yeah, yeah, exactly. So, yeah, yes, I would say those those couple things, a few things. It's like kind of really kind of stereotyped. People can kind of get away from and you'd be surprised. I was someone like the hardest working people, because we have like this great and resilience and like we really want to get back to life it kind of get things and kind of catch up with time...

...as well. So we've been like on the shelf for so long and so we really anticipating our release. For a lot of us, we're not not all. You know, some people going to go in and out, and some people want to be wanted done, like myself, and some people you need a couple chances to get it right. But but nevertheless, like you got some really, really cool, great people on some of my best friends are men and I met while would accost rated and we'd be lifelong friends. I hope nice notice doing great stuff out there. If people want to learn more about you, want to check out escaping the odds work and they find you escaping the Oddscom you can drop me a message there. I'm on Instagram, escaping OS media, facebook, Linkedin Aaron Smith. Yes, just reach out to me, speaking engagement podcast producing. Yeah, it's just reach out to us, make something happen. PODCAST, guess whatever. So this check out. Check out the podcast on spotify, Apple. Yeah, so, thank you all. We should. Yeah, absolutely. Thank you for taking a time to chat. This is great. Absolutely my I love it, but I like what you doing greater what you do. Man also have to help to be on that. Thank you. Likewise, likewise, I'm of course, we got to end with a Corner Jack, as we always do. What to construction workers do when they're out partying? Get hammered? Oh well, I like that. I like that. I was going to say they raised the roof, but I like it hammered said a little a little bit of buff. Okay, all right, good after today. People. Good people cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you're a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. You can send me a message Joey at good people cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people cool things and check out all the old episodes via good people, cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

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