Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 113 · 1 month ago

113: Working at a Grocery Store in the Middle of a Pandemic with Adam Kaat

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In January 2020, Adam Kaat quit his corporate job to focus on creative pursuits. To help support his new path, he took a job at a grocery store. Things were going swell until, as you may have heard, the Covid-19 pandemic shut down life just a few weeks later. 

Suddenly, Adam was working at virtually the only place on earth that was still open. While everyone else was rocking masks and practicing social distancing, Adam was in the thick of things, watching and interacting with people who were mere moments away from a breaking point. 

He started blogging about his experiences, and people quickly responded to his stories, which showcased our humanity in the middle of one of the worst times in history. Adam used that great feedback to write Life on the Grocery Line: A Frontline Experience in a Global Pandemic. And we’re chatting all about what that life was like.

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is Adam caught, author of the book life on the Grocery Line, a frontline experience in a global pandemic. Back in two thousand and nineteen, Adam quit his corporate job to work on a novel and he got a job as a cashier to help pay the bills. In January two thousand and twenty, as you may now, just two months later, global pandemic hit the entire world. That's my it's a global bandemic and not just like a regional one, and, as you may remember, grocery stores were pretty much the only thing that was open for a while and, as a result, people were a little chaotic at the stores. Adam chronicled everything that he saw working as a cashier at this high end grocery store. Started off as a blog, turned into a book. He's got a second book on the way. We're covering all of that. There's lots of good stuff going on throughout and what does happen. A lot of fun and a good reminder by the end of this and really for right now, is just to be kind to one another, especially grocery store workers, retail workers, servers at restaurants like you. Don't need to be a jerk to people. I know you're not you listening because you one of my listeners and I would not broadcast to jerks, but maybe tell your friend, let's you know a little little bit of a rude person. Let me tell them, hey, lighten up, things will be okay. I'm going to have a great time. If you'd like to get in touch with the show, you can reach out via facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast. You can also always send me a message Joey at good people, cool thingscom. And if you want to support the show, you can head over two good people, cool thingscom pick up a copy of my book, pick up some merch from the merch shop or just head on over to apple podcast or pun chase or leave a five star review. I'll read some of my favorites on an upcoming episode, because I love it here in from you, just like you'll love hearing from Adam. For people who maybe aren't familiar with your work and you give us your name and your elevator pitch, but also the type of elevator that we're writing on. My name is Adam cotton and I'm author of life on the grocery line, in frontline experience in a global pandemic. It's a kind of a ficialized memoir that follows Daniel the first week on the job at a high and grocery stores the pandemic. It's and yeah, that's my pitch. I guess that way that I maybe the elevators more of like a conveyor belt. I'm a kind of like a moving walkway type of type of thing. There, and this is, you said, like kind of a fictional Li's memoir,...

...but obviously pulling from real life experience. You started as a cashier in January two thousand and twenty. So I'm curious, before we get into the nuts and bolts, what was from January twenty twenty to march two thousand and twenty, like when it was, you know, but before times. What was that like? You know? Like so in two thousand and nineteen I quit my job in an incorporate world because I was just I was in a bad situation. I wanted to move on and I didn't know what to do. I was one of those people. I'm in my S. I just went to college to go to college, to never direction or a plan and kind of I quit and I decaide I was going to work on a novel I've been thinking about doing forever. So I guess I've worked on my novel. Is More like I just hung out with friends a lot and messed around, but I did get a draft by the end of two twousand and nineteen. And then two thousand and twenty hit. I needed a job. My F one came. Money wasn't good anymore or was gone, and sign a grocery store was a good way to like be maybe physically exhausted, but not mentally strained, because you know computers and like sit in front of it doesn't seem like it's a lot of work, but it's a lot of mental strain on you. And so I also love talking, like you have a gift to gather. I really love stories. I love listening to people and getting the no strangers and it seemed like the perfect kind of job for me. Honestly, I could afford to live on the very low amount of money that they pay those people. It's like fifteen bucks an hour in Denver and that's not much in the city. For sure I could afford to live on it for a while at least. So I started and it was, you know, it's really enjoyable, like I is fast paced as learning. You end up learning a ton of stuff and like it was such a busy store that the lines were always packed. You know, is a fluent, like a very high end area in Denver. So the client tells very specific, very snooty, I guess you could say. Or it was definitely very like I enjoyed it the most part, even even rude people and stuff, like, even all the baggage I got or like flak I got, was it was fine because, like you know, wasn't a permanent job. To me, it was definitely like I viewed it as kind of a throwaway job in a way, or a temporary gig, and maybe I was. It sounds kind of rude or like really flippant, and I don't like I feel bad about it in a way. I just my opinion changed. You know, by March everything change, like the when the schools shut down, the everyone's working from home. They can. Everyone that's is in the restaurant industry had to go home and take government income or whatever they could do. And the tension just ratchet it up. Everything became so intense since Sir Real, like the...

...the lines were to the back of the store, you know, empty shelves. I never had anyone personally cry in front of me, but that happened the LY. Everyone I knew had people just spilling their their hearts out to me too, like the so worried about everything that was going on. There were weren't remember when everyone thought that your pets could like carry it to you know, like some people wouldn't like pet their or let you pet their cat, the dogs that came in, stuff like that. The or like wiping down your groceries, things like that. We had to wipe down all the conveyor belts like so, the conveyor belt, the register, everything between each customer and my store. I went through hundreds of people went through my line easily, if it could probably really busy. Saturday felt like a thousand. So and yeah, it just a man of warries, so thin so quick. Everything changed. It become claustrophobic and like miserable over now. was there? I'm thinking back to like the very start of things and I'm in I think we probably collectively all underestimated, I how long, you know, how impactful this would be, and I remember, you know, I had heard some some buzz around this coronavirus, covid nineteen thing, like back at the beginning, and for me it wasn't really serious until backtoback days the NBA shut down and and Tom Hanks and Ria Wilson got count and I was just like, okay, so this is this is real now. Did you have a moment like that, whether it was through work or outside of work, that really kind of like hit home of how serious things were? Um, see, there was. There was like a few moments there. I remember this one woman that went through line, my line. She's the first person I really noticed that had a mask. There were a few other people that masks on, but this woman had like shit like goggles on, she had like a face shield, she had a mask, she had like rafts like her, like not trash bags, but like like gloves, latex gloves on hit things on her feet. She was telling me that she lived through the AIDS epidemic in the s and she's just like I was like, well, that's this isn't same thing, but like should be. Just got in my head like so worried so quickly, like was she onto something, like what what is going on here? And I mean it was. It was a parent almost immediately. It almost kind of bubbled up. That's what it felt like. It felt like it Alston. It just got started getting busier and busier and busier and shells got emptier and emptier and the each cart is like five hundred dollars worth of groceries because it's a high end store. Not a specific moment, but I do remember her and I just remember like looking at like this list ladies crazy, but like as we got farther along, it's like, well, she was the lead, least ahead of like how people would...

...treat it farther down the line. So it was telling. Yeah, she's like the I the periscope, I guess, for a shout at to a long forgotten social media platform. Yeah, out of its Noo, but just to is to sit to say a lot of periscope. It's so long, man. I was like I think that was the day, but it took me a sad like I had to go through the the Graveyard of old social media platform. So I a great time, great time and date. Now your book started off as a blog. I was was that like kind of the initials, first sort of step for it, or were you like, I know, I want to write a book, or did it just kind of because the blog blew up you were like wait, I could chronicle this into a book too. Well, like I said, so I kind of like a shelve the the old novel, and I mean honestly every I tried to reread it like a few months ago and I'm like those we're shelving. It's not really like a little bit too in your head, Nora neuros, he's another some interesting stuff in there, for sure, like I'll probably revisit it eventually, but I started writing on a necessity. Really like the blog. The first posted really well, like if people connected immediately, but I just did it because I hadn't know it no other way to like kind of work through what was going on, like what I was experiencing. I was in a very peculiar, peculiar moment in history. Like you're like, all sudden, I'm kind of accidentally they're like I'm only planned to be there for maybe a few months until I could find something else, and I got a full on manuscript instead, like I'm thrust in the situation where I have no choice but to be there. There's no other jobs out there and I'm on, I mean the only place that's open, the it's a center of community, it's extremely busy, it's it feels stressful beyond measure, like tension just hangs in the air all the time, and that was the best way for me to deal with it. And it turned out that a lot of people connected and they were worried about their coworker. They're loved ones, people working in stores, because no one knew what was going on. We didn't know what the severity of it was, or was it airborne? was in on ever like like where thanks touching it a out of necessity. And then, as that grew and I like kept telling stories, people kept sharing and I felt a sense of like community with it, that was like, Oh that you know, I see themes here, I see things that I want to build into a novel, a fictional memoir, whatever you won't really want to call it, and the people, like this group of folks that work in grocery stores, because I don't do I don't work in a grocery store anymore, but they deserve a voice. They like this story needs to be told. Like this is going to go down in history as a very strange, interesting moment. The people will write about it until we're dead. But like...

...it'd be good to tell the grocery store workers side of things, even through fiction. was there something that surprised you about either working in a grocery store or the way that people treat grocery store workers? Um, I've worked in customer service, even in like a like a corporate level. It's kind of what I was doing. That's what I'm doing now, like to pay the bills, because it we're in grocery store, doesn't pay anything. And I worked in retail lot, so I was pretty familiar with how people were treated. But, you know, there was this a good example of what happened. He saw a lot of the source of stuff was there's this woman in my line. We started to run out of bags because we were so busy and they couldn't in this probably supply chain was broken on it too. I didn't know anything about that at the time, but so we couldn't double bag the groceries. Well, the woman my line asked me to double bag the groceries. I didn't look up. I said sorry, I can't double bag and if I had read her a little bit better I probably would just done it. But she proceeded to grab everything off the conveyor belt. The she had paid for everything already, but in slam it into the cart and grabbed my bag that I was putting groceries in and threw it into a car to the point where it fell off. And the whole time she's telling me it's not you, it's not you, like looking mean the eye, it's not you. And then I'm just sitting there stunned. And as she's going out like she she looks back at me, says something, licks her hand and smacks it on the final register and then walks out the building. Perfectly rational way to react. You know? Why not? Course, yeah, yeah, I mean, who everyone do it regularly? Yeah, well, I did it today now, but it likes it's cemented the like. People were just at a breaking point because it was like a month or two end, maybe as April, almost may, probably, and everyone was at such a breaking point. Now. She had no like reason or right to really treat someone like that, because it wasn't my fault at all and like it was just a circumstances. Everything sucks right now. And but it was like that sort of thing just happened all the time. You became either like the like whipping boy of the customer, or you might become a therapist. I listened to a lot of people really desperately, deeply worried about their lives and their families. I remember one couple came in and they they were clearly in a fight. They were not having a great night and like I was trying to joke with them. It was towards the end of the night, and she what did she say? She said, well, I guess this is date night, and it took me back. We all kind of laughed at it. That kind of broke the engine, sort of. I mean they still...

...left very mad at each other, but got mean to think, you know, like I mean, this is this is the only thing open, this is the center of community, this is everything right now, and that couple that probably never like maybe they meet up, like even if they live together, they only hang out every once in a while, but they also like meet up or they meet up for dinner. They don't really have to spend all their time together. They're not. We're both working from home, trapped, or one works at a restaurant another one. So it like you saw those sort of things all the time where we're definitely on the edge and people were just going like cuckoo being inside all the time. Yeah, I've I am thinking back to those early days, to we're getting to be able to go to the crasher store's kind of like a red almost I'm from, just you know, all the craziness that's going on and the world, and when I'd see people like I never I never saw like a full on fight, but I definitely saw some like Rastlin and hustling going on between people over like toilet paper or, you know, sanitary wipes or things things like that, where I was just like, I don't, I don't know if I'd ever get that desperate to like almost come to blows with someone, but also like I'm not in these situations like they might have. There was one woman who had like a small girl with her and I was like maybe, you know, this is like they're they're completely out of toilet paper and they need this or like maybe they've got a huge family at home that it's just all these things that you you know, you want to give people the benefit of the doubt, and then sometimes it's just like all of the things going on together causes people to snap and then maybe like two minutes later they're back to totally normal. Like maybe that woman walked outside. I was just like what the hell did I do, like what was that? And just, yeah, walk to her car and was like I've Oh my goodness, like that was horrific. That's a good point. You know, like the I thought about this too, because I, like I'm single guy. I don't really have like a lot of worries when it comes to like if I get food, I can get enough, I can live off of a fairly small amount. I think back to like how empty those shells were and if you are a family, a person with the family, you have to go in and give food for your family, like you're providing everything for him, and you see these empty shells like that has to like ratch it up. The anxiety and the feeling that of like how worried you are that you're going to be able to feed your family. Granted, the store that I was at, like, if I was shopping, I wouldn't shop there because it's it's expensive. It's whole food, so it's like very expensive and it's kind of the last like place that I'd go because it's so pricey. But the like it would definitely bring a lot more anxiety. If you had a family and you know the people, you'd see them like scowed around you. You know at the beginning when they'd avoid you and they saw a fair amount of arguing over social distancing. Never so many fights. He tussles, but the probably people got...

...close and I didn't. You know, I can't see the whole store all the same time and you're so busy that you've just focus on a register. But yeah, it's time people finding the best like dark alleys of the store's like put into me like right scoad that someone's going to get shanked. Yeah, it's gonna add very Qart. So you have the blog. It's getting shared. People are people are really responding to it. So then you start putting the book together. Hmm, what was like? Did everything just come out really easily, or was it also kind of a bit of a process, like the the first novel was well, you know. So since I've been writing the writing blog post, I was able to like kind of collect those and weave them together. Now, the writing process in general, writing a book, a novel, is quite the so it took me four months roughly to get a manuscript and then four months to like put, like, edit and publish it. So, like it is brutal, like it's like spends up all my time, but I had nothing else to do. There was nothing else going on, and I think that was the first New Year's that didn't do anything and my entire adult lifey just stayed home. The I always think the years is very overrated. So I'm with you, Amateur Hour. I'm too old for it now for the most part, but you know, I'd be nice to go to a friend's house at least or something. But every yeah, yeah, the Um. Yeah. I wove all those things together and it was kind of a non traditional way of putting it together and that's why it ended up being what it is. It's like a present tense first person count and it's less about like a the story of Daniel a lot of ways, like the pandemics, almost the kind of main character. In a way it's about a lot about feel and tension, how you like really immersing yourself in the moment. So I've heard people now we're getting farther out, but like at the beginning, when I publish the book, they were like this is too much, as reminds me of like the worst time of my life and I don't want that. I want people to laugh. I think it's I've heard it's hilarious. I think it's supposed to be darkly funny. It's definitely a dark comedy that explores the darkness of the pandemic, but also like the caricatures, like I am these characters. For sure, I've been rude to customer service people for no reason and you should be able to laugh at that and like grow from it. So that's definitely my goal there. Yeah, I think that's been something I that I think it's been a very interesting conversation during the pandemic. Is like what you're finding funny, because there are things where I you know it if you've had a heavy day, like you'll laugh at something where it's like I don't know if I'd normally laugh at that, but just like the combination of events that have happened to like a lead up to this. Like, yes, I find this.

I'll use the Big Bang theory because I always say that's like my Goto, not funny show, and I think the laugh track just over and over does it. I apologize to all my big Bang theory listeners, although I have heard young sheldon is very good, although I've never watched that. So I really like the first season the Big Bang because it was like smart, funny, okay, but lit. You know, after that it just got hot, it got high on its own barts or something, and that's okay. Maybe I'll revisit Susan one, because I think. But a lot of the ones I've seen are like later. Once yes, it's very high on Farts, which is probably a joke that they've used within there too and played it off as big brand, big brain energy, like two not of men. Same Way, like the first like season or two, really like Edgy Sitcom. After that, you know, it's just the same repetitive jokes over again and like you know, he's a sexist dude. That's just I don't know, the drunk. That's all interesting and we all laugh at it. Left it is cript like a diction alcohol. I love it, love it. So from that I was like to ask authors this, because writing the books will say ten to twenty percent. Marketing huge element of it as well. Obviously appearing on great podcasts like this one, I would say, is the number one way to market a book. But what else have you found that is worked well and hasn't been anything we're like, oh, that's going to be great, and then it didn't really have very good results, honestly. So all like the the marketing, like through Facebook, with facebook's my biggest platform, and Amazon marketing, really haven't done anything for me. It's almost like I hired a PR firm because, like, I don't when I just don't have time to do stuff, and it was worth it, if not for like if I didn't make the money back, if I don't make the money back, but at least for the experience and like the building the press resume, like and it's just been the best experience of my life. It's so cool. I've gotten on some really cool stuff, like this amazing podcast there. Oh, and you know, like I've some pretty big market things and it's been pretty fun. I did it and I've done some articles it's like it's so worth it to invest in yourself. Man. It's like even like I think this is a good book and I think it'll make money and it I think, if it finds its way into the culture, that's what I really would love. You know, when I when I stopped worker, like I quit my corporate job, it was the first time in my life I'd taken a leap where I really like let go of doing the same oldgit that I've always done, like just a job to do a job. I went to college. To College, I've always been a creative person, but never really put in the time and effort and gave gave it my all and even if it was a different novel that I never maybe I never use any...

...of that ever again. That led me to working in a grocery store and being in the weirdest circumstance most like I would have never imagined in a lifetime that I would have been there. But let alone start a blog, write a book, do a media tour. Just in every way it's been rewarding. In like when I was going through those really tough months working in the grocery store, I leaned into it because I knew I was experiencing something very unique, you know, something very special if nothing else. So, even if it's it was horrible, like I was like miserable all the time and I couldn't go hang out with my friends and like happy hours via the Internet do not work, like people just get drunk on their own thing and then they're talking against like others and doesn't make any sense. The been every way, it was so worth it. Yeah, I think that's been. I mean, I feel the same way with this podcast to it's like there spend t times where I'm less than you know, I'm maybe having like a crummy day or something, and I'm kind of like and I've got like a recording to go to, but I always come out of it afterwards just feeling so refreshed and invigorated, and I think that largely again goes back to the investing in yourself and like taking those chances, taking those laps, because look at what you've got from it, with a lot more on the way. It sounds like, yeah, it's like, yeah, I'm working on a second book and I'm working on the audiobook for this, and it's it's like you don't want to wake up one day you're sixty years old and you're like, I didn't I want it, you know, I wanted to write a book. I wanted to I want to express myself in some way that had a true meaning and connect with people, make them happy or sad or something, or make them feel anything. That's the most amazing thing about being a human. His feet, like you can feel things. And Yeah, it was like, I feel like it's so rewarding and now I know how to write a book at that process down. So the second one is a continuation. He's a cake. Oh so easy the but it's it's a continuation of Daniel Story, but it's going to be straight up novel, like it fiction all the way, because I think a grocery store is an interesting place. I think it's a center of community, like I never thought of it before. It's got the one I worked at had over two hundred people working in it and you had some characters. Oh, and you got some like a organic grocery store like that, you have some odd ducks and people didn't work in their thirty years. Like I couldn't imagine work in a grocery store thirty years. That means hot, thirty years of working the Thanksgiving Day rush and Christmas and weekends and all these like things, and you get to see the nuts and bolts and you really are mixed in with people in a like customers, in an interesting way. So yeah, it'll be interesting writing it. It's going to be a lot longer. It's also completely different dynamic because I'm not...

...writing it or not living it, I'm writing a post afterwards. So it's going to probably be harder, honestly. Yeah, but you're pro now, so it'll be. Yeah, because a simple simplace now and and this ties and nicely, I think, with a question I always like to ask, which is one that you wish she were asked more frequently, and you can even answer it for both of them, since you've got the second one I on the horizon as well. Is Who do you think this book is for? You know, I I like to it's two different segments of two different types of experiences. I think you get out of it retail workers and service industry folks. So yeah, like servers, cooks, anyone like that. I had a really an awesome review from the girl that was a search. She's kind of a professional serve I guess that's been her life, like is their career, and she absolutely loved it. She's like I could just feel the the conversations, like the it's like you were speaking my language, and I don't think I've ever read something where someone was speaking for me or speaking in my like my language, of what service industry people go through. Also like Grocery Store Industry folks. So like that's one way to connect to it. Then I also think there's this large segment of the population that doesn't think about or notice grocery store workers, are retail workers in general, or service industry folks. They're just they're just passing through, you know, like that's why I feel like they can be dismissed so much. Will be the rude I call Linda's and Dave's look, it's a very boomer sort of thing, but like the just being dismissive of actual humans that are in front of you. Like you, they're nothing. I got ghosted of not a quite a few times, under ten, but like someone would not even talk to me like straight up, like a how's it going? Nothing, and they I scam their stuff. They do you. Are you a member? Blah, nothing, like nothing and take the bag and leave just walk out the door and you're like what just happened? Did I just like, am I person that I lose my humanity here? That's so fucking crazy. Like that, you wouldn't say him. And I think there's a large cross section of people that don't know what grow like, retail employees go through, what the struggle is. So I think that opens up their eyes. My aunt was like, are people really do they really treat you like that? I'm like you, I carol, it's probably way worse, be honest with you, like I probably got it easy, to be honest, just those there for a shorter period of time to like a year and a half roughly, as a cashier. Then I moved to a different department. But yeah, I think those are the two main people and it's for everyone really, but like there's so many people that don't know what goes on there and then the ones that really do with the ones that really connect to it. Yeah, I think that's I know this is not a unique thought, but I think everyone should have at least some experience in a service or retail I end street. I...

...remember my very first job was working at a cold stone and I agree. I think I also got off easy, like I don't think I had. As you know, a lot of people that want ice cream are reasonable enough. Sometimes you'll get some odd requests, but it's never just did you have to sing? Yes, this was before they they took that away as a requirement. And what often? For most of the time I was working there, I was mainly working Sundays because I had basketball practice. I worked there for probably about like ten months in total and then for like six or seven of them I played. Was In high school. I played basketball, so we had practices or games like Monday through Saturday and then so Sunday was the only day I could reliably work and so casually ad work like during the week, but usually was Sunday. So a lot of people. But during the winter months. This was in Chicago, so very cold in the winter. Our boss thought people don't want ice cream when it's cold, but she's here's the secret about ice cream. People always want it. It's doesn't matter what the temperature is. They they crave it. And it was across the street from a movie theater, so people would come out of a movie, get ice cream and go home and I was like it seems like a logical order of operation. So makes sense to me. But as a result of our bosses thinking, I was usually the only employee there. So if someone tipped, I'm like, would you like me to sing? Sometimes they'd be like no, you don't have to. Other Times they're like, you know, I would kind of like to hear it. So then the line is shut down because I have to sing this song and a little like song and dance for them. But at everyone else is waiting in line kind of like can I just put my order in and I was like, I would love to take your order, but I have to sing this ice cream themed version of the Adams family for exact dance, monkey dance, exactly, exactly. But if someone left a really big tip, like there are a couple of people would leave, you know, kind of like ten dollar tips and for high school student making less than that, an hour like that was as phenomenal. Yeah, I was like, I will sing you this song and actually enjoy it. Yeah, it's true. When I was I worked at Wendy's, was my really first job job. Besides, we're going to grocery store actually, but is lady one time she was so upset about her sandwich that she threw it at the wall behind me. Oh well, like, yeah, like I think it had onions on it. She didn't want onions or something, and she just like slammed it like throw it against the wall, and I'm like, you know, sixteen year old witness here, I know, it's like you're not trained for that like we were. We're told to make pleasant small talk. My God, handle that. Yeah, like Chit Chat, and that's it. Like people are people are ridiculous, and I hope this book open some people's eyes. I really do, like I makes an impact in anyway like that. I would make a smile make me feel really yeah, I think I think it. Well, I'm and it's it's great that you are writing it, because I do think there needs to be more, I. Consistent Light Shine on show show shined. We need to shine...

...more consistent light on. So what's like a little bit of a hard turn? You're almost off the hook. Care I but we was like to wrap up with a top three for you. Let's see your top three favorite authors. Okay, so hunter as Thompson was. I feel like young men in general, like they get it's like heavy way or something like. You read that sort of thing and gravitate towards it. But I remember like reading him my early s and I was just like this guy's like speaking. It's like he's like speaking for me, like this dark view on the world, like how it feels like everything's kind of fucked like the government, the the whole organization is against you and it's just it is fascinating. It made me fall in love with writing. was like this is absolutely amazing, like chewing. He'sn't journalist, so a lot of it was nonfiction and the way he liked created turned it into fiction was phenomenal. Khmu, Albert Khmu, would be a big one for me. I like like this book is really about absurdism in a lot of ways, like the it's an absolutely absurd thing that daniels pushed in the situation and like I treat a lot of scenes in there, like with his with his neighbors, and the reason I had to fictionalize it because I want to like really bring that home that like this this like scene with to Linda's arguing and Daniel has to get a burrito that's right behind him and they're arguing and argue and then all of a sudden they start talking to each other like they like each other, like they change everything, they give each other tips and Shit, and he just needs to get a Burrito and he asked if you can go get it. They don't want it. He goes around them and brushes them, and then everyone you can't do that, you just broke social distancing, and so they start yelling at him about social distancing. Everyone around him starts yelling at him about social distancing. It becomes it's like a claustrophobic feel and I wanted to bring that home and I thought Khmu Kamu definitely influence me in the way that I think in general, philosophically. But Um, finally, Bred Easton Ellis, I would so say is my favorite. Is Very flat, like deadpan look at the world, kind of very dark, also somewhat beautiful writing. The Joan didion would be like like the non fiction female her well, and and her fictional works very similar too, but like and she's a lot older, she influenced him. Yeah, the very bleak we're look at the world I find fascinating and like all too often we don't really like take that into account. We want everything to be rosy. Yeah, let's got some blankness sometimes, right. Yeah. Well, Adam, thank you so much for hopping on the podcast. This...

...was fantastic. If people want to pick up a copy of the book, they want to learn more work, they find you. Um, thank you. This is really amazing. Joey, I really blast dude. So you can find out amazoncom. It's life on the grocery line, a frontline experience in a global pandemic. And Yeah, that's the best place to get it. And Yeah, please go out and do it and support and be nice to grocery store workers. Just, yeah, give a smile and look him in the face and say their name when you acknowledge them. That means a lot. Like that. I like the yeah, treat people with kindness. We can do it, we can do it, we can do it. Well, Adam, thank you again. Of course, we got to wrap with a Corny joke, as we always do. I've got a really good friend. She's a writer and a Baker and she makes phenomenal synonym rolls. Good after sat people, good people, cool things. Is produced in Austin, Texas. If you were a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here at the show you can send me a message Joey at good people, cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people, cool things. Check out all the old episodes via good people, cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

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