Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 71 · 1 year ago

71: Producing Music and Toronto Raptors Legends with Akeel Henry

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

When Akeel Henry was five years old, he was already playing piano and drums for his father’s church. And he’s continued that musical prowess into an impressive music career that’s continuing to grow.

Akeel is a US Gold-Certified and Juno Award-nominated music producer, audio engineer, and musical wizard. He’s worked alongside artists like the Grammy-nominated Desiigner, Shawn Mendes, Ty Dolla $ign, Jeremih, Trey Songz, Toni Braxton, Swae Lee, and Daniel Caesar. He trained under Noah ’40’ Shebib of OVO Sound, the record label co-owned by Drake, and is currently signed to R&B singer Babyface’s record label Laface.

Most recently, he's produced the album Soft Thing by LOONY, which just dropped this week.

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to give people cool things. Today's guest is a Keel Henry, who is a US gold certified and Juno Award nominated music producer, audio engineer and musical prodigy. He's worked with artists like designer Shawn Mendez, ty Dolla sign, Jeremiah tray songs, Tony Braxton, Swaylie and Daniel Caesar. He's got lots of projects coming up to so we're talking about all of that. We're talking about how he continues making music. He started making music when he was five years old, playing drums and piano, kept it going turned it into a fantastic career. We're talking about his creative process when making music, how he kept that creativity up during the pandemic, including a harrowing experience, well almost with with Mother Nature and a Kiel is a big basketball fan, just like I am, so of course we've got a chat about our favorite basketball moments, including some of the magical memories from the Toronto Raptors, which is the keels favorite team. He's also got lots of good tips for aspiring artist and producer. So if you have any interest in getting in the music industry or taking your music industry career to new heights, because I know a lot of you are musicians, definitely tuned in because there's lots of good stuff are and if you'd like to get in touch with good people cool things, you can reach out on facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast. Can also send an email joey at good people, cool thingscom and we'll have lots of good time to chat. But in the meantime, sit back, relax and enjoy this episode with a Keel Henry. For people who don't know who you are, can you give us your elevator pitch, but can you also tell us the type of elevator that we're riding on? Well, I'm a music producer, musician audio engineer. I try to do all the jobs music. I also play live for...

...different artists, but I've worked artists such as trey songs, Tony Braxton, ty Dolla sign kidding Swaylie, to name a few, and as an engineer, I've recorded artist like Maje blies as a keys player. I've played for a played a Shawn Mendez, I've played with Daniel seeser and the list kind of goes on. So that's my kind of pitch, I guess. Lovely. What kind of element are we on? That's such a tough question. I don't want to answer that. Property we're on a very fast moving vibes switching elevator. I don't know. The music came every few minutes. I like that. I like that. So I doing, you know, doing my research beforehand. You you started playing music when you were five, by by playing drums, keys and bass. Is that corrector was it even earlier than that? It was around five when I started playing piano and drums. Piano became the main drums I would just kind of frequent. My brother became like more of the drummer based out at nine. Okay, so still very early for all of this. Yeah, do you remember the first song you heard? We're like, okay, I need to be I need to be making music. Terrible. I have a very bad answer for this, but I was. I was a cocky little kid and I was actually in piano class learning piano, and I'm like I hated the songs that they had in playing. So I like I can make something a lot better than this. So that's what actually inspired it. Wasn't listening to a song. was more like I can make a better song than the steps that they hadn't say. Okay, so you take us back at back in your five and you're did you say like I want to go take lessons? Did you make your parents get you a piano or a keyboard or something? Had that work? So my father is a pastor of a small church in Toronto. So I just...

...kind of had to, not not like I was forced, but I was. I just kind of had to play the piano, almost kind of the thing that most preachers kids end up doing, picking up an instrument or or something. So that that was the thing. They put me in piano lessons around that age when I started showing some interest. Honestly, the lessons were more classical and I ended up, like I'm learning a lot of that stuff, going more of a jazz way later on, but but yeah, that's kind of where it started. Was it hard to unlearned or did that kind of come naturally because you're like I'd rather play this jazz style. The jazz your style kind of came Nashville because of church. There's a lot of similarities in the Church chords and the jazz your chord. So I had a bit of a bit already, but some of like just the positioning of my well, I get I guess, like the properness. Maybe I still should have that. But that I was playing in classical music, I kind of t change my form on the piano and stuff like that, and it wasn't the hardest. Okay, okay, nice. See. I was like it's interesting if you've learned one way, like how easy it is to switch, because for some people it's quite the challenge and then for others are like that peace keg. I feel like when you're younger everything is easier for some reason because you just pick up on something new, so so much fast. But yeah, I feel like if I was going to change my style now, I would have a very hard time. For the production side of things, then, were you recording yourself when you were playing growing up, or did that not come until a little bit later? Production? That story I told you about what I'm like. I can make better songs in this. That was me at nine years old. Okay, that's when I kind of started producing. I was I just wanted to be very clear. I was very wrong about that's because the songs I was making back then were terrible. But but yeah, so I was. It was nine years old and I kind of started and I made my first beat. My brother got a Feo studio for me on the computer and that's a program that I kind of started with.

Nice do you I do those still exist somewhere, those early beats. Those somewhere on a computer. There's a computer actually in my parents House that I'm sure still has it, but I don't know if that can even power on. It hasn't been ten, I'm probably ten years. That could be so maybe maybe they've been lost to the either out there. There's early days of playing music and and you think like Oh, this sounds great and then as you get older, you're like, oh, wait now, no, I did not know what I was staring back then. Every every year or two, I look back and I feel like I've grown so much and I feel like if you're not, if you don't feel that way, then you're not really growing at all. So, yeah, like, but the stuff I was making back then was definitely everybody can agree that it was horrible. There's a consensus across the Ford. Yes, yes, we can, we can all, we can all, we can all agree hundred percent. So when you are in your producer audio engineer role, how does that process kind of work? Do you start with a beat? Does does an artist come to you and say like Hey, I've got kind of an idea for this, and then you kind of take it from there? What does that look like? It really depends on the artist. If I'm and and who brought me in the room. If if it's somebody that wants to do their entire project, it kind of starts with me trying to figure out the sound that they're looking to go towards and and I'll ask for example. So we'll like sit down, make a playlist on spotify or whatever, and they'll start to kind of like get this out together, vision kind of played out, and then we'll just kind of start creating, and I'll sometimes start with drums with a group, sometimes I'll start with music, but we just kind of just start making songs and trying different ways of creating, working with different different CO producers, different writers, just getting a kind of just like figuring out what the...

...sound is going to be. In one step sound is kind of figured out, we just lock in me and the artists and just and like finish the rest of the project. Do you have a favorite story from a time where that happened? I've got a plug the artist that I'm developing right now and then bigger. So this is so there's artist named Looney. She actually just dropped her EP soft thing today. That's exactly how that process went. We it actually happened during the quarantine period, so we actually rented the house together so we could not break any rules and just live together for months making that project and ever from everything I'd mentioned, from the trying to find the sound to finding it, to just creating with it and just constantly creating looney soft thing. Go check it out. You don't have to name any names for this, and this could also be your your answer for yourself if you want. But you're working so closely with these people, are there any quirks or like pet peeves that you've noticed from them where it's like Oh, that, like that's something you do regularly? I don't know. I feel like I do my best to work with an artist based on their working style. They're not many. I guess. The things that bother me, I guess my biggest pet peeve is I've worked a lot of artists that the artist that seem to have the least talent generally have the most amout of confidence, and that's why I don't love but I haven't really been doing those sessions recently at all. I've been in really great rooms with all talented people, but I've that's one thing I have noticed that really definitely does bother me when somebody would this is just not not. The greatest is is the most confident person in the room and believes their stuff is the greatest. So that that's the problem to me a little bit. But in terms of the workflow of things, I genuinely don't have any real issues. Nice, nice, that's good. Yeah, the irrational confidence exists across across industries, I think, and it's always,...

...yeah, always fun to say, but I think that segues nicely. I always like asking this of musicians. Tell us about the worst gig you've ever played. Oh Man's have been so many. I'm trying to not get in trouble so I don't want to name names. And I don't want to give any specifics. Yeah, don't get yourself in trouble. If you can keep it vague, if not, we can move I've played in so many churches and there's been a lot of church that I've been to where they're just a lot of problems with either the sound or the singers on the greatest or whatever the case is, so I don't have to put my best and worst performances that churchase. To be honest, this is a super specific question based on my church experience growing up in my hometown, of where the organist is like way in the back and the singer is way in the front and there's just naturally, with that huge distance, there's kind of a disconnect in terms of just the sound waves and so often the singer was maybe like a half step behind. Is that common or is that was this just a poor communication? I set up in my church a monitoring system so all the musicians have headphones on and the stingers have their own their own speakers with their own mix of their vocals on stage beside them, so we're all hearing everything at the same time and like yeah, I'm the musicians are communicating through I have a microphone to own the musicians here, so we're fully communicating the whole service and so, like my church set up is pretty nice where it's all it's all a communication is not an issue there. But I've been at places where it was like that, yeah, those are the least fun things and that's little.

Are the works. That is weep sorry to your church. No, no, I just I'm I appreciate the validation that, but it's not unenjoyable and I feel for them because I'm like, I've had occasions like that to where it's like there's something off with the sound and you're I mean, I assume they know it, but maybe they don't. Maybe they they think that, maybe they've got that confident. They probably do in the justster just soldiering through it. I've soldier through a bunch of things. Probably you're soldiering. It's all we can do. Yes, yes, and of course over the past year with the pandemic, live shows basically been nonexistent. I love saying some of these quarantine sessions that musicians have done. I think Erica B I do is still one of my favorites with her bedroom sessions where it was like a choose your own adventure where she'd play in her house. She's like, I'm in my bedroom. Where my going next? Kitchen, living room, like you tell me, and I thought that was a very creative way to to kind of engage with fans. So my question for you is, during the pandemic, have you still has it kind of still been business as usual as far as working on music and working together with artists, or is it like very remote and you're just kind of doing it all from home? What's it been like? Okay, so I I couldn't do the the online session stuff. I'm I really feed off the energy of everybody else in the room. So I as I mentioned, with the looney stuff and quarantine, we went to the house for a while and we just worked on her project for a few months that. I left that house and then got another place to another two or so months or three months with with another artist, Lisa, and I did another artist that I'm kind of working with. So I was in person with with artists. Like the whole quarantine I was I kind of just like we rent a house two or three months at a time and then move and do it again and then do it again until because that's I thought I'd be over after the first one, but it just kept on getting longer and longer, so I just kept on doing it. So my quarantine experience...

...wasn't the same as most producers. A lot of them were just doing online sessions the entire time, but I just I after the first three weeks I knew I couldn't do that. Yeah, it was. It was definitely like at this should be over sooner than it is feeling for a good at least, I'd say, the first few months, if not longer, where it's like, okay, surely the end is in sight, and then it was like, oh no, this is this is going to last for a while. So when you're doing these rental house switcher ruse, were you looking for something in particular for like when you were looking at these houses, or was it just kind of whatever was available, for a change of scenery, to work with someone new? What we use the air bb and we do their monthly rent stole things. So yeah, though, there are a lot of options. People really people weren't traveling a lot, so they were actually amazing offers for very cheap. It actually kind of worked out. So we got we just we focused on making sure the house having a vibe and then making sure that we could be loud. Didn't have any neighbors. We had to get a place kind of secluded. So it was it was actually kind of fun because we lived like we're out in the middle of nowhere for most of these and it was just like it was just us in the music for my we didn't see anybody we knew, we didn't like. We just woke up, created too we could till we couldn't stay awake and fell asleep and did the same thing like seven days a week. Did you see anything unusual in any of these houses? One of the houses had me terrified because when we got in there, there are a bunch of books on how to fight off a bear if you encounter a bear. So I literally didn't leave that house until we left. I stayed inside. I left you like when the Cardia Groceryes, like I didn't that step outside. I was just Nope, I do not need to fight off a bear here at all. Did you read the books? At least I didn't read the books. I'm like, I don't need these books. I'm not. That's stepping outside. So yeah,...

...that's kind of an intimidating thing to see when you want it too, and it was. It was a beautiful place, but that was just like there were so many books on bears. I don't like Whoa this is. This is a thing here. Yeah, at least they're preparing you for it and the worst, but I think you made the right decision and not venturing a yeah, yeah, it was three of us in my house and none of us left unless it was groceries. And because of the cold situation, we're trying to not go out as much as we would not leave the house, and this is the only time I ever done this, like not stepped outside for like two weeks at a time, because you try to buy at least two weeks of groceries. So and we literally never stepped outside. That was super weird for me because I'm like that I've never done that before my life with the groceries. Do you have an indulgence, like a creative you know, is it like sour sour patch kids or something where you're like this gives me creative energy, or are you just pretty much pretty much a good, good nutritional diet? I wish I could say a well, but I don't think necessarily helps on my creativity. It's just I'm I need more self control with food, honestly, but I do love sour candies. Those are my go to for snacks, but I don't think they help creativity at all. It's just, yeah, it's just nice to have. Yeah. Yeah, and as far as the marketing side of things, because obviously live shows, like you're saying, feeding off the energy of people being in the same room as you and having that environment, and some artists kind of had to, you know, put album releases on hold, put to our plans on hold, all of that with the artist that you've been working with and just yourself to in the music industry. How have you seen that kind of shift in terms of marketing during the pandemic, or has it has it already kind of been staying the same over the past year and a half? Well, it depends. Some teams decided to hold the and not release any music, so...

...it's so. But some people wanted to rush to release the most music because, you know, people are at home to listen to it. But everybody was definitely in a creative mode on so everybody was working the like I was sending out loops to different artists, different producers, because everybody was looking for things, because everybody were just at homeboard writing songs. So on that side I was that. On the marketing side, I feel like social media really was obviously already a thing, but it just became even more of a thing and the artist who just who didn't really want to embrace that now learned they have to. Like you, you need you need a real social media presence in today's Day and age or feels like, to have a real artist career. So yeah, so it just kind of kind of just shine a light on that and it was. It's been great from the artist that I work with, because that's where I feel like some artists, especially the the small artist, I don't have as much budget to constantly be creating content. They now started to see it as a as like really important part of the career, almost just as important as the music itself. Absolutely, and Arthur, certain types of content that you found perform better depends on the artist. Depends on the artist in their fan base. Some pip some artists people want to hear them sing because they're just their voices are so great. So you just got to do a bunch of live videos and that'll work. But some artists people want to hear you talk because you're entertaining when talk. So just depends on the artist. So I feel with tea pain I'm like, I could listen to this man talk. I mean he's a great singer too, but I love his rants. Oh yeah, honestly. Yeah, and like, yeah, there's some people are just entertaining human beings. I would watch videos of. I don't know, like hardly be very entertaining as a character.

So I love I love her wrappings, but I'd love to hear her rap as well on Instagram, but I would also love to just hear her talk and be her. So yeah, and you mentioned instagram. Are there other platforms you'd recommend people being on? Any of these? Obviously tick tock is crazy. Big clubhouse was hot for like two minutes and probably already on the way out, but any any other platforms that you've either seen for yourself or some of the artists you've worked with? It of worked well, I'm not really I'm terrible. I need to get better at this, but I'm only on instagram. I never really ever use twitter or tick tock, but I can tell you how important they are, because I've seen people's careers blow up off of this, off of those. So I just say to be on everything when you if there's something you hear about, don't wait for it to become popular, just start posting on that too, because the pioneers of any social media platform really have a successful career. Look at Sean Mendez off of Vine. He's one of the early, early viners and his he has a whole career off of that. So just just any new thing you hear about, just jump into it. I'd say, man, you got me to STALDIIC for vine. Now what a time. But we got something. We got Shawn Mendez, we got Bozzy, I think was on fine. We got a few good artists from from vine. So I'm sad. I mean it was a good error. Yeah, it was a it was ahead of its time. And then, yeah, now there's IT. Paved the way. Paved the way for sure. Yeah, good. I'm also not on Tick Tock, so don't feel too bad. We're we're you're not alone. Honestly, there's a reason, like I really want to get into because, okay, I have yet, but my friends send me, they'll send me like something over text and I'll and I'll open it and then I'll be on it for like an hour and I like at I'm just like, I don't know how it got that, I don't know how that time passed. So now I'm just like I do I really don't open that unless somebody sends me something, because I know that I'll just be on it wasting time. Yeah,...

...it's I was reading something somewhat recently that I'm blanking on where it was from, but it was all about the ticktock algorithm and how it's designed to get you in those rabbit holes and just keep you for like an hour at a time, and it's like, yeah, I think it's the best one of them because from the first time somebody send me something, I was on it for an hour the first time, I. E. I'm like, how do they know everything about already to know that I love all of this content? So, yeah, they're great. It's but they're also dangerous because I don't like to waste the much time on my phone, so I don't spend like my I'll barely be on tak talk, probably like one hour month nowadays. Yeah, that seems that seems like a good, good self control with that at last, because I definitely know people who are on there a lot more. Do you have a favorite tip for Instagram, for for someone that's maybe starting out or wants to be better about using instagram? Post, don't stop posting. And people think for some reason there's a there's a something out of the people think it's you get less. The Algorithm works against you if you post more, and that's so incorrect. I've had like multiple artists tell me that and it's the opposite. Like instagram wants you to post. So I just post a lot of content. Don't focus on likes, because you focus on likes, not everything is going to get liked as much as the next. But like post. If you post a lot and this good content, it will it will blow up because the algorithm will help you. It's next, I've heard that too, of like post less. Yeah, I've look all the top instagrammers that blew up off of instagram. They post a lot. If you look at like obviously there are some people who like you can't use like a beyonce, for example, as as an example of how to post on instagram. Why she got her followers know she's already beyond see before. But if you look at somebody that's blown up, they all post quite quite often. Yeah, and do it in like other in other...

...capacities to like they're posting stories, they're they're using reels, they're using all the different all of them's. Yeah, because instagram definitely does care about anything new. They bring on. If you use that, they push it like crazy. Yes, yeah, like, what is it now? The filters are like the main one where it's like you can make your own filter and get in front of people that way to like, yeah, that's yeah, the bill chairs, and I'm hearing we're still reals are like very big on the you'll push you really well if you're if you're putting reals up right now. You know what? We're transitioning nicely from instagram into basketball, because you are a basketball fan and I'm a basketball fan, and so we'll have to talk some we'll have to talk some hoops. Have you've been playing at all during the pandemic or review? Has Your game dropped a little bit? My game is definitely dropped, because I don't think I've played at all. I've or no, that's not true. I at some points when Jim's opened up for three minutes. I I played for those three minutes, but otherwise I haven't been playing. Um So, but my shot never goes though. I'll never lose the shot. Nice. Nice. Yeah, I was gonna ask what do you have, like an NBA comp I'm really not that good at basketball. I's hey so, but because, like, shooting is my main one of my only things I can really do, I'm going to say Steph Curry, even though I'm not even close, obviously, but yeah, I'm put it there. Love it. Do you have the Mouth Guard game two where you're like it's hanging out of your mouth the whole time? No, actually, I don't think I've ever played with him out. I think I have either. It looks I'm sure it's great and very protective, but it just looks really uncomfortable. Yeah, no, I don't know that that's for me. Yeah, yeah, I've got for me it's my defense. Will never go. I can always give you a solid defensive effort even if the shot is not there. And I played for the first time in over a year a week and a half ago. I visited my sister out in La and basically got up at like four am for my flight and then a friend...

...picked me up for a Sunday morning pickup game and it's so I was already up for like six hours by the time it was like ten am already and I was like, all right, we're doing this, we're going to get you. Still have defense, still had the defense. Yeah, I used to be a great defensive player, but I'm way too utter shape to put the effort in on defense right now. So I could. I can play defense for the first twenty or thirty, or not thirty, probably the tens to twenty minutes, but after that I'm lazy when I can be lazy, as long as you're setting the bar. At the beginning you said a high bar with the defense and everyone's like, all right, he's good, he's good, and it helps having long arms and big hands as well. Then I found I've neither of them. So yeah, are we are going to stick with basketball. But I have to jump back to because I like asking you a question. What you wish you were asked more frequently? It's less work for me. I put put the onus of this interview on you at least for that question. But Yours is what advice would you give to aspiring artist and I feel like you got a little bit with that instagram in there, but what other advice do you have for some of that's just getting into the music industry. Okay. So, if you're being a producer, try to collaborate with everybody. You can get better by working with people who just have different skill sets and you you take that and you kind of add its fears and chained it, make an adapt to within your workflow and like collaborate with everybody. And that's when you collaborate people that have relationships with bigger artist. That's how you kind of get your foot in the door. That's how I did it. I was working with a producer named diesel and he was he already had a bunch of big songs and I was I was just playing piano for him on these on these beats, and I was also producer Boles. I was like his keys, producer that he would work with, and then that's how I got my foot in the door. So collaborate like crazy. For artist, I'd say find your team, find yourself round, and...

...a lot of artists I noticed like don't invest in stuff on their own. Any artists, I'm working with. I. They have to learn how to record themselves, because it's it comes in such it comes in hand you so much when you can just like you have an idea, literally recorded your own house. A lot of people like just wait to go to the studio or save up to go to the studio. Like no, you want to be creating every day, like right, right, music every single day. Don't be lazy about it. It's like it doesn't take a long necessarily to write a song, and if it does, it won't take long. If you if you're writing every day, you'll start to learn how to speed up with it. So yeah, I would just say just yeah, for this is put the time and every day, try to find your team and lock in with them. When you get a nice sound, love it, love it. Well, you're almost off the hook, but we've got to do our top three. And you, being a Toronto Raptors Fan, first of all, my condolences. They did not make the playoffs this season. I have a long suffering Chicago Bulls fans. It doesn't matter, because we got a ring. So I'm okay, you're I mean you're good for like a decade and so, yeah, you can be like all right. Now, now let's do it again. Yeah, exactly. So for the top three, we're going back Toronto Raptors history all what is it? Twenty six years now? Is that where we got? Ninety Ninety five, right, is when they first first started. So your top three Toronto Raptor Years of all time? Oh, see that. The issue is I'm twenty six years old. I missed the are like growing up, I wasn't. I was even I was more of a baseball guy than a basketball guy. So the errors when I started, I'm really watching the raptors or what Chris Bosh? So I definitely got to choose that era because that's when I really got into to him, to the at a basketball and then that, obviously I got to save Vince Carter, naturally, naturally, and then the team that want a championship...

...right there. That's three, boom, but the championship teams is on the top of the list because we won, so I've got to put them at one. Yeah, yeah, I did like, I did like that to him a lot, and I'm not, I'm not even a raptors fan. I was just like it's a good group of guys. I like them. I was a great year for us. When I was I lost my voice a lot when we went in those laffs. Did you get to make it to any of the Games? Are In the playoffs? Actually went to one of the Games in I went to one of the Golden Stake Games in Oakland. Oh yeah, so one of the final games because I needed to go and I was actually in Los Angeles. So I'm like I need to I need to get to one of these games. So I went there nice and they want all of those, right. They went all the road ones, didn't they? Um, I won when I was there. I can't remember. I think we want all of them. Yeah, thinks, because I was. I was very surprised. I was like like pleasantly surprised, but I was just like, I'm man, I mean we all know that if if Kevin Durant was healthy, if clay was healthy, we're not winning that, but we're we're happy nonetheless. Yeah, you can only you can only play the team that is on the floor against you, honestly. So. And if Katie didn't, when Katy came back, we all lost a little bit of hope because he started killing us in the first few minutes and when he got injured, like, I mean, obviously we're happy he got injured, but it was definitely a wow, we actually are going to win this thing feeling, yeah, like a collective sigh of relief, like you're not cheering for it, but you're like, oh, he's not going to score ninety five points this game, like he was on pace for. Yeah, so good, he's are my favorite players are no, man, so good with his big ass feet, like he was saying. Man, yeah, it's amazing just how he's come back from an Achilles injury to still be like the best player in the NBA. Never happened before like that. That's crazy,...

...but he's he's not human, he's not, he's not. He's very he's very entertaining to watch. Yeah, honestly, good deal will kill. People want to learn more about you here, some of the music that you've made. Where can they find you? Go to my instagram at a Keel Dot music. That's a KL Dot Music and yeah, I don't really use anything else, so that's kind of where everything is. There is a playlist on apple music, if you use apple music that they carry called behind the boards a Keel. So if you search that up, you can find a lot of my music there as well. Awesome with thank you so much for taking the time to chat. This was great. I hope you get some basketball and in the coming months keep that shots. Oh Yeah, I definitely. I'M PLANNING TO GET BACK TO TORONTO AND IN THE NEXT couple weeks and I already have some game set up, because people are talking a bit too much trash. I hope you can. You can silence them. Oh, I will, I will, I definitely will. I'm not nervous at all. That's why I like to hear and of course we got to wrap up with a Corny joke, as we always do. What do you call musical dentures? What do you call musical dentures? FALSETTO teeth? Good after you know what I want to keep it. I'm going to use it. Good people, cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you were a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here with the show. As always, you can send me a message Joey at good people cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people cool things and check out all the old episodes via good people, cool thingscom as always, thank you for listening and have a Wonderful Day.

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