Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 124 · 4 months ago

124: American Idol Stories and Building a Music Brand with Kate Watson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

If you were staring down a legend like Lionel Richie, how do you think you'd respond? Country singer Kate Watson was faced with that very situation. She performed one of Richie's songs during Season 19 of American Idol — and she's kept the good times going since then.

She co-writes music with her father Jesse and dropped her latest single "Highway" earlier this year. 

In this episode, Kate shares some of her top stories from her American Idol experience, some of the worst experiences in her life, her top tips for building a successful music brand, and why it's important to always give your all in any situation.

Good people cool things as a concast feature in conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is Kate Watson, a musician hailing from Houston. She was on season nineteen of American idol and is racing through the country music world a terrific voice and perhaps an even more terrific person. Hence why she's on the show that's called good people, cool things. Kate talks all about her struggles with childhood growing up and how she moved around from city to city, bounced in between going to school, hating it, being homeschooled, hating it, going back to school hating it. It's tough being a teenager. If you're teenager listening to this, be nice to people. I know that's when we're at our most mean. You think a voice crack is super funny. I know I got laughed at going through things that every single person goes through Allah puberty in Your Voice Crack. Sometimes you don't have to make fun of people for it, but Kate has overcome that in a massive way and she's telling so many good stories in this episode and drops some real good knowledge about how you can better market your music, if you're a musician, were really marketing anything. I think these tips apply to any sort of profession or business or area of life. It's not just music, even though we've got a music backdrop here. Kate also talks about her time on American idol, how she had to wait. Well, you know what I'll let I'll let her tell that story. But Lionel Richie, there's a major character in this whole thing, so you're gonna hear from him, Katie Perry and lots more. They're all playing a role in this story from Kate. If you'd like to get in touch with the show, Holler on facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast. You can also always sign up for the newsletter at good people, cool things dot com, sharing all kinds of wonderful resources, conversations and just good stuff like this episode with Kate. To kick off, for people who maybe aren't familiar with you, can you give us your elevator pitch, but also the type of elevator that we're running on? Okay, Hey, y'all, my name is Kate Watson. I'm a country artist and I was on twenty nineteen American idol and I'm just excited to be here, to get to share my story with you guys and have a good time. So you were on American idol in I remember when this show first came out and I thought it was so cool to to see all these people from across the world, especially back then when it was a lot harder, I think, to discover new artists, and I think that was just such a well, I don't even know if that's true. I feel like it can still be hard today, but there's just more avenues for music, I guess. So what was that process? How did you how did you get on the show and and what was the experience like? So I remember watching it whene I was little and I watched these super talented people and then all the judges who were super hard on them, like Simon, who was my favorite by the way, because he's just honest. Um, if you want to know you suck, he'll tell you, uh and Um. But I always when I was young, I thought like I could never do that, I could never get in front of people and do that, I could never, Um, you know, amount to that much and have that much talent to do something, you know, and Um, you know, here I was at eighteen years old and I did it. Um, my vocal coach taught Danilovado beyonce, beyonce's background singer, and also some people from the Pentatonics, and so he was amazing, super talented. He ended up knowing a producer on American idol and the producer was like hey, Tom, like, do you have...

...anyone that you think could do a private audition for American idol? And of course my vocal coach was like, uh, yes, I'm sending you Kate Watson, and so I went. Um, I went through the whole process of the behind the scenes, right, so all the things that people don't see, of going to hotels, auditioning in front of three random people, um, just singing songs and whatever, and you know, nobody sees that stuff. And Uh gave me a yellow paper to represent the golden ticket and I'm like, I don't know what this is, but I like it. And then I went to the actual like first audition in front of TV, in front of Katy Perry, Lionel Richie and Luke Brian and I was in Denver, Colorado. They made us weight outside in the Cold Denver Air for fourteen to sixteen hours and uh, I remember when I first got there, like six in the morning, I was so nervous, like everything in me was just like doing this whole thing right here, like shaking and Um, like, holy crap, y'all, I'm about to go in front of Katie Perry, Lina, Richie, Luke Bryan and you know, waiting out there in the cold for that long, I drank eight cups of coffee through that time. I was ready to go. By the end of it. I was just like okay, throw me in there, Um and uh I actually had the largest group there to support me, which was one of the coolest things ever to know that you have a support system, you know, like people who love you and care about you and I want to be there for you. And Uh, I went in there with my dad, who accompanied me played guitar, and I I actually got to watch the girl go before me and they all told her know and I watched her like screaming, crying, balling her eyes out, running off the little platform like you know, and then I'm like, Oh, it's my turn. Yeah, so, but by that time I was just I was excited and I was like, you know what, I'm here to showcase what I love to do, and so, Um, I went in there. I had a huge smile on my face. Wasn't nervous anymore. I was a little horse from being outside in the cold, but Um, I just said Hey, y'all, my name is Kate Watson, Um, and I'm so excited to be here. Blah, blah, blah. And Uh, I sang what a feeling off the movie flash dance and my own little spinoff version of it, and they told me that nobody in the history of American idol has ever done that. So I was like yes, Um, and UH. They the most memorable part of it for me. For one, doing that with my dad was so cool, Um, that he got to be there whenever they said you're going to Hollywood. Um. But initially it was Lionel Ritchie who stood up and he said, Kate, I believe you can win this whole thing and you're going to Hollywood, and I was in shock. I was just like, holy crap, that just happened. Um. And the part that my dad remembers you eventually you'll hear this from him, but he'll say yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, you won. But I shook Katie Perry's hand and I'm like, okay, great, great, Um. Then from there I went to Hollywood. Um, I can tell you the whole experience of it all is one of the hardest things I've ever done in my life, because you get there and they had us all stay in hotels with the contestants. They had you wake up at these crazy times, eating at crazy times and they always had a camera in front of you. So, no matter, like, you have to be on point all the time, like what...

...you say, what you do, they will use it. So you know, you need to make sure that everything represents you and the way you want it to. And that was hard, Um, and not only that, but being around some of the most talented people in the world. Um, you know, that was intimidating for me. At Eighteen, I'm more was just beginning into what my brand was and what music I knew I was going to be in, you know, like my lane. I just started in it and all these other people are seasoned, they've been doing this for their whole life. And Uh, so that kind of thing. If you're not like truly just confident and everything you're doing. It shakes you to your core. and Um, I got to watch every single person go before me in Hollywood and, uh, I got to see the WHO got standing ovations, I got to see the people who totally did horrible Um. But I knew what Song I was gonna Sing in honor of Lionel Richie. I wanted to do his song hello. Before me, I got to watch some people go up there and sing different ones of his songs and he told them get off the stage and do not ever sing my song again. That was pretty scary. UH, once I got to go backstage, they prepare you, you're in a line, they have a camera in front of you, each person, and they go, Um, you have like five seconds. How do you feel? And then they send you on stage to sing. And I'm ready, I'm in the zone. I know exactly what I'm gonna say and I'm waiting my turn. And as soon as I get up there and I'm like and they go how do you Um, they said don't look at the camera and they they said something else and it was a dirty joke but they didn't mean to say it. I started laughing, as every and else in that room and then they shove a mic in my face and go Kate Watson. So they shoved me up there and I am like laughing, like hardcore, you know, gut laugh. Everyone in the audience heard me and they're just like what is she doing? And I just I turned it into okay, you know, like we're doing this. So I started dancing, like having a great time on stage. So Katie Perry stands up with me, she starts dancing, having a good time, and I made my way to the middle of the stage and I will never forget Lionel Ritchie asking me what's a you gonna sing and I said I'm gonna Sing Your Song. Hello, and he goes, this is either going to be really bad for you are really good. And I said well, Lionel, it's go bigger, go home and Um. Of course, on the inside I was shaken like hardcore, but I was like putting on that confidence face like test me, Linel, test me. Lionel. was such as I know. So I'm I'm going to be completely honest with you, from the moment I started singing, I don't remember, like it's almost like I blacked out. I can't tell you if I did good or bad or decent or whatever. All that I know is that whenever I came to Lionel Richie stood up and starts clapping and gave me this huge smile and thumbs up. And I am not a pro I was like, okay, I think I did good and I'm not a crier, but I mean I was bawling my eyes out just it was a dream come true for me. I did end up going home after that, but I made it for one who cares. I got a standard ovation from Lionel Richie. I'm good, like my life is complete, I can die happy. But you know, to be there with that many talented people,...

...it was a hundred and forty people in the entire United States or whatever that made it that far, it was an honor to just be that far. So that was my experience. It was unforgettable and groomy as an artist, for sure. Yeah, I'm trying to think of if there's any any sort of like comparable experience to that. I know when you were saying you were watching other people, it maybe kind of think of, on a much smaller scale, of going to Karaoke when you are like okay, I know the Song I want to sing, but I kind of want to like feel it out a little bit and see how you know, how the audience is reacting to things, except in this case much higher stakes. You've got professional singers judging you, which I hope there's not that many in Karyo, but who knows, maybe there are. But just I think that's just such a cool, unique experience and it's awesome you got a part of it. I'm curious because I know reality shows, like you're saying, although I guess it's it's, you know, reality adjacent, I guess, but the constant camera being on you and I think it's very easy to show things out of context or kind of manufacturer drama attention where there might not be any. Absolutely. Did you come across any of that or where did you kind of get out of there without unscathed? I'm the peacemaker. There were times where they tried and they had asked me questions and the confessionals and stuff that obviously they're trying to get you to say something bad. They didn't like me too much because I'm sitting there going it was great, and they're like, but how did it make you feel? And I'm like, I feel good, I'm motivated, and they're like, but how did it make you feel? And I'm like, I told you, and they're like, they're like get out of here, get out of all right. So we're gonna jump back to kind of the very beginning of your I don't even know if it's your career or just your love of music. I A question I always like to ask, is one that you're asked more frequently and usually I try to save these later for the you know, later in the episode, after we've chatted for a while, but I think this is a good kind of leaping off question of why did you get into music? So that is a good question. Um, Um. So when I was younger, for one, I moved around fourteen different times in my entire life. That's something that not a lot of people know about me, Um, but I actually grew up watching my parents travel in a band all across Texas and they played these different church camps and, you know, at seven years old watching that, I thought it was the coolest thing ever, Um, and I got the opportunity to see music speak to people on a whole different level and change lives and give people hope and Um, you know, at seven I didn't know how else to put that, but my parents are rock stars and I want to be a rock star too whenever I grow up. and Um, you know, as I started growing up, I you know, life hits you, the world hits you, it comes at you and Um, and it did me with all the Times that I moved, I was always the new kid. And, Um, you know, you face rejection so many times and then you finally go into this shell of okay, like I don't want to go through that again. You know, you touch the fire, you get burned, and I got burned so many times that I didn't want to do it anymore. Um, and so I was a super, super shy kid, like unrecognizable from right now. Um. And my most like life changing years were my eighth, ninth and Tenth Grade, and that's whenever it just hit me like extremely hard. I got bullied so bad. Um, my eighth grade year. I'm from Georgia back to Texas and jumped straight into school. Didn't even have...

...a chance to truly make friends or anything, and I sat alone at lunch for the entire year. Um, I also got like people picked on me for being fat, being ugly and throwing things at me in class and, you know, just all the typical like you know, yes, yes, so it was more of the typical kind of stuff that year, but I just didn't know how to deal with it because I normally just stayed in my corner and people left me alone for the most part, you know, and I couldn't do that here. Um. And so then that whole summer I spent begging my mom like don't make me go back there, please. Um, I can't do it. And she told me, she said, look, I'll do whatever you want. If you want to go to a different school, if you want to be homeschooled, like that's up to you, it's your decision, but running away from your problems isn't the answer. And of course eighth grade me is like sign me up from for running away from my problems, and she's like, but that's and I said, you gave me the choice, that's on you. I said I want to be homeschooled. So she was like, all right, I told you I would, so I will. She homeschooled me my freshman year. It ended up being one of the worst years in my entire life. I started my first job and working and my first boss actually put his hands on me and told me that I was worthless. Then ever mounted to anything in my life and Um just wrecked me as a fourteen year old. Um. And I tried to stand up for myself in different things, but at fourteen you don't know how to communicate to people and like truly, you know, say hey, here's exactly what's going on. You know, it just sounds like, oh, you're just being dramatic, and that's what people told me. They would say, do your job, like respect him, and so I'm just like this goes against everything that I've known my entire life of boundaries and lines and things that you know, people are not supposed to cross. And I was like okay, and I'm like okay, I'll respect him and do my job. Um. So I kept going through that and he turned everybody in my workplace against me and just making sure that everyone treated me horribly. Um. So then the next year I was like send me back to school, give me another chance. I can't do this anymore. Um. So tinth grade I went to a smaller school. I thought it was going to be great. Immediately I got there and it was like hell, I mean literally, and I mean it hit me so hard with everything with my boss. He was still doing all that, plus this added thing of school, and it was to the point I was having panic attacks. Um, and you know, just hit rock bottom in my life. I started making bad decisions because I stopped caring. I was like, you know what, nobody cares about me, no matter where I go, no matter what I do, there must be something wrong with me. and Um, you know, I started doing a whole bunch of stuff that I shouldn't. and Luckily I have the parents that I do, because they noticed and they sat me down and they said, Kate, something in your life needs to change. We don't know what's going on with you. The only thing that they knew where, was that I wasn't myself and that my grades were slipping, and they just said something in your life needs to change. And that hit me really hard, Um, because I thought, you know what, I can't keep doing this anymore. I can't keep living like this. I don't want to. and Um, I spent the next this month, just truly finding okay, who am...

I and what do I believe like? What do I stand for? And I found out through that month that I'm a masterpiece and I'm beautifully and wonderfully made, that I am worth so much and that nobody can tell me different, and that I have a purpose and all these things for my life. Um, and I started finding joy in the little things. You know, I have a family that loves me, I have a roof over my head, all these tiny things that sometimes you forget about. Um, I got reminded of all of that. And, Um, that's whenever I started noticing things like the fact that these people were bullying me. Right, but if you take a closer look, they're not, like there's nothing wrong with me. They have things going on in their life that you may not see first glance. That I'm they're punching bag, you know, they're just hurting, and that's what that is, Um. And so my whole perspective changed. My situation did not change, but my heart did, and I started seeing this instead of my personal hell, I saw it as my mission field, a place where I could be a light, a place where I could love people. And that's whenever I realized I wanted to use music, that thing that I got to see when I was younger, speak to people on a different level, give people a hope, be a light in the world. That's what I wanted to do with my music. I wanted to help people, no matter where they were at in their life, no matter what they've been through, and not only that, but be an example with my life, with what I'm doing with all of it. I've worked so hard to get to the point where I am. I've never compromised myself and I won't, and I want to make that clear to people. You can do what you love if you work hard for it and you be yourself. It's possible. You can do it and and just show them like look, that is what I did and Um, you know it's not impossible. I'm Adam Wayne Right and I'm at Canard and we're the host of the greatest song, every song poorly, the podcast that takes Karaoke exactly as seriously as it should be taken. No interview was complete without our quick fire game where we ask everyone the same five questions, culminating in the most important question we could ever ask. If you could magically strike one song from every Karaoke playlist forever, which song would you choose? Don't stop, Oh, ice, ice baby, great, just because that song needs to be destroyed for all times. Easy lover by Phil Collins. Pure picture is just a song of love and heartbreak. Uh, and it just it ruins nights, caroline, probably my heart will go on by only one, only one. Um. Can I kind of pick one band? So Hey, if you love Karaoke, you have sang Karaoke. You've been in a place where Kario he was happening, or are bagally weird? That's something called Carrie yoki exists. Come hang out with us. All episodes and Info are available at Sung poorly dot com. And remember that singing golf key is still technically singing, having moved so much. Are you an expert packer now? No, I throw things in a bag and it goes to the next place. That's about it. That's why I am similar to that. So I I am so getting back to music you. I think that's that's so spunt on about how, and I mean this is not saying anything groundbreaking, but how much of an impact music can have on people. You know, you'll see like a youtube video, you'll just see the comments of like, Oh, you know, like I listened to the song with my best friend and they just died and like this brings me joy. Hearing this or like this got me through a tough time in life and it's it's so cool to see that. And then to see it at concerts in in person, you see people who would never probably cross paths in...

...other areas of life, but they both like whoever is performing and they're both just enjoying the heck out of it and it's fantastic to say so. Going to your writing process, what is that like? Do you do you start with? You know, musically, are you are you focused on that first? You have just lyrics all the time going in through your head and you're like, oh, that's a good line, let me, let me write that down. How does that look? So here's how it works. So my dad, he's actually one of the most amazing talented songwriters I know ever and uh, he actually helps write all of my songs. He's more the songwriter out of the two of us. Um More my part is I have ideas, I have stories from my life that I'm like, I don't want to write about this, and he you know, I'll tell him the whole story, I'll tell him how I feel about it. I'll go into detail and then he'll wake up at like two in the morning going there's a song and then he just starts writing Johnny at down voice, memoing it. He plays guitar as well. I do too, Um, not that much, but he, you know, actually plays Acoustic Guitar in my band, so it's cool. Um. So yes, I'd say it's more him who does all that. Um, the other thing that I do whenever it comes to my songs and all that is, you know, he'll bring me a song and then I take a look at it and there are times where I'm like, I would never say that in a million years. We're going to change that. What's one of those rejected lines? Oh, that's a hard one. He likes to use the word soul or like Oh my soul, you know, or something like that, and I'm like no, we're not doing that. Um. Or cake. There was a line. I don't remember what it was, but it was something about cake and I was like I don't like cake, like I've never liked cake. On my birthdays I'm like, Dad, you know this, we have we have ice cream. We don't even have an ice cream cake. It's just ice cream. I was like, so that can't go with my song. Sorry. So you change cake with ice cream and it it didn't really work out too well. So you know, we're still working on that. Do you have a favorite ice cream flavor? Coffee ice cream like it. I like I was always surprised when I used to work at a cold stone and the people that ordered coffee ice cream. I would like, never, like it seemed to be a lot of like younger people, but I would just never like, you know, peg them for I guess you're not really drinking coffee. There's not like that much coffee in it. But that is true and that is why you see the younger people get it. It's because it's more like white girl coffee, just mostly sugar. Yes, it lightful, lightful. I think it's always interesting to read about songs in his really like I was just reading, I mean anything from the sixties. It's just like, Oh, the temptations were recording and like aretha Franklin was next door and she just popped in and was like I'll lay down the chorus here real quick and then I'll go back to my studio. Or I was reading Um the band rise against the lead singer. I was saying in some interview I was reading where he didn't want the Song Savior, which is like their biggest song. He was like, I voted to have that off the record. He's like, I didn't think it was a very good song, I wanted it off the record, and it's become their biggest hit. And I always think that's very funny when when songwriters almost like misjudge what what is going to resonate with people, because it's hard, like, you know, it is a song, like what does the Fox say? I would have never pegged that to be a you know, a million billion views, however many that you know that got on there. It's it's such a particulous song, but it's like it resonated with people. So when you're writing, do you kind of have a sense in your mind of like Oh, okay, this is gonna be the single, or like this is going to be kind of like the sort of like tentacle that...

...grabs people? That's a more morbid way of thinking about it, but like do you have that sense while you're writing? So I think this is the most important part is, no matter what you release, it should be something that you love, like you are in love with, and that's what I go off of, is at my shows. Whenever I perform things live, I always experiment with my songs, Um, not only about how I feel about it, but also watching the crowd. How did they respond whenever I sing this, you know, Um, and because that's that's something about me that also is a little nugget for people that they probably don't know about me, is I'm very observant. If you don't think I'm paying attention, I really am, and I'm noticing everything. Um, and especially whenever it comes to crowds. If you're not feeling out the crowd, if you're not paying attention to how they feel and what they're thinking about it, then really you're just having a concert for yourself, because you are like involving these people and inviting them to have a moment with you. Um, sometimes, on the fly I'll change a song because I can tell okay, this is a song that the like, this particular crowd is going to love, you know, different things like that. So I get the opportunity to try them all out at my live shows of what people respond to the most and what they like to hear. Then, as well as for me, how do I feel singing that like, does it truly just you know, explode inside of me of like this amazing feeling, Um, and does it bring me somewhere? Does it take me somewhere, because songs are about something, right, and so it's kind of like whenever you read a book, book and it's a good book and you can see it all in your head so clearly, just happening. That's what a song should do for you. It should paint a picture, it should bring you somewhere, make you feel something, and that's how I decide for each one on the album. Um, for the ones that don't do well, I'm like, all right, nick it, you know, we're gonna write more. The live experience, I think, is is such a cool part. But not all shows are created equal, and I love to ask musicians this. What's the worst Gig you've ever had? There was one where we played outside. It was like a hundred degrees outside, there was no covering over us, and not only that, but we were on a field and there were kids everywhere and they were having a it's the how her paint stuff in balloons and you throw it at people or whatever, something like that, and I remember my musicians just freaking out going. They're coming towards the instruments. are like tons of money is gonna be gone, and I'm sitting there going no, no, no, no, I don't want to pay for that. No, no, no, no, you know, like telling these kids like you stay away, Um, and having to like Oh, and then it was so hot that during a song, my one of my musicians turns to the side and throws up this song and he told me. He said, I can keep going, and the other guy was like, nope, I got it from here. Just go sit down or something. And so, Um, it was really, really, really rough. I love the people who put it on. I loved everyone there, but it was scary, to say the least. That it's...

...with a summer in in like in Linge Texas. Uh No, it was around Houston Texas. Okay, so, yeah, that Texas. I'm in Austin. So the Texas heat is no joke and it's dangerous people, people that don't live here, I don't think, fully appreciated like Oh, yeah, it's hot, but it's it's something. Well, I'm glad you made it through. Did all the instruments make it out without without children destroying them. They did, because I love kids to death, but I'm also not afraid to be like you step away right now. You walk away, I will throw one of those paint things that you and will see how you like it. It's so they're like, okay, plot twisted, backfires and that's just they all rich and just throw all of them. See. That would have worked out good, though, because I could have ran away, you know, like I'm leading them away. Pack it up. I would have taken a hit. Yes, that's very noble of you like. So, writing and performing the music is half the battle. But we we kind of alluded to this earlier, that there's so many ways to discover music now. Twenty years ago it was maybe that, maybe even then you could kind of they started having like lime wire and Kazab but well, like in the old old days, it was, you know, you maybe heard it on the radio or like happened to to stumble on a live show. I say this like I was alive in the sixties and seventies when that was the main, main way to do it. But now it seems like there's there's so many different avenues. You know, spotify will play you finish a playlist will play related artists and I've discovered artists that way. Pandora playing related types of things. You know, everyone has a soundcloud. If they get a viral tweet, it's like the next thing is like, check out my soundcloud and I was like, I didn't even know they're a musician. That's cool, and there's so many different ways for that. So what have you found to be effective in marketing your music? Oh, okay, so, for one it's a lot about who you know. Um, and for me, you know, throughout my entire career I'm sitting there going, okay, I don't see an open door heading my way of like what I was supposed to do next and how I get to the next level. But it seemed like it's almost like whenever you're doing what you're supposed to be doing in life, like your purpose, it's almost like it just every door that needs to open, it does and the ones that need to close close in your face. And so, Um, I went from different things of how I found my vocal coach and then American idol and then Um, the next biggest thing that happened for me was that really jumped started my career and music and all of it was being discovered by Parker mccullum and Um. It was the craziest thing. I my dad as the leader, worship leader at Lone Star Cowboy Church in Montgomery Texas the largest cowboy church in the entire world. Cody Johnson goes there, Jesse ROB JR UM, there's a governor, Patrick something Um, that goes there and someone that I did not know that goes there is Parker mccullum's uncle, which, by the way, it's his birthday today. Happy Birthday, Parker Um. Parker mccullum goes to our church and I didn't know that. And another thing I did not know this was all happening during covid. His uncle was sending videos of me helping my dad lead worship every single week to him and would say like hey, this girl is a country artist like we love her, you'll love her. You need to come see her one Sunday. and well, it's Covid, nobody has anything going on. So Parker showed up and was in the audience one Sunday and I had no idea. So I'm just doing my thing. Up they're like praising the Lord and everything...

...and I came out the stage and all the suffer stuff and I got a text he's here, and for some reason I knew exactly what that meant and I have the biggest freak out moment ever, like I I was on the floor one holy craps, like, did I do anything wrong? I can't remember. Did I hit every note right? And so I walked out after the service and he came straight up to me. I didn't even have to go up to him, he just walks up to me, puts his hand out and goes, Hey, my name is Parker mccullum, and I'm inside my head going yeah, I know. And so he was like, Kate, I specifically came here to see you and there are tons of girls in Nashville, in Texas and all over the world that are talented and that can sing, he said, but you do something that can't be taught, and that is making connections with people. and Um, he said, I know you're going places and I want to help you get there. So that I want to help you go all the way. Um. And so from then on he spent hours on the phone with me and my family talking next steps, what we needed to do, who we needed to be connected with and all this different stuff of, you know, just preparing me for everything. And he said now you have to do the work and you have to grind it out, and he said and as soon as you're ready, you're going to open for me and I will walk you into my label myself and get you signed. So that is one thing, all right, who you know? Another thing is having the funds because, I'm sure you know this, everything in the music industry costs so much and it's all very expensive and money goes like that. And, uh, the craziest thing I actually played a show in Austin for the first time last year, Um, maybe October, somewhere around there, and I remember my booking agent was like, Hey, I have a show, like maybe it's August. It was somewhere in there, but he just was like there's this show in Austin. It's a tiny place, they're not paying much, but you know, like you can break into the area and make some new fans, and I'm like absolutely, like sign me up. Well, my dad at the time was just playing for free for me, Um, and I couldn't afford to pay him or anyone else to come play, Um, and it was the craziest day ever. We had to drive three hours, I had allergy so bad it was running down my face. I'd taken four Ben a drill by the time I got there and was loopy as mess. Okay, and Um, the venue had promoted the wrong time on every single platform, like crazy times. I'm talking, yeah, like four hours earlier, four hours later, and I'm just like man, like this is this is a crap fest. And I get there and the staff ignores me as I walk in. I'm like Hey, I'm trying it, and they would just walk past me and I'm like they did not. Just too bad, like not today, not today. And I went up I said to the bar bartender, I said, Hey, I need to speak to a manager now. They're probably like Oh, no, it's Karen. I'm like no, you have no idea, you know. And so he brought me a manager and the manager is like yeah, yeah, like you set up over there, big deal, you know. So I set my stuff up and I remember before the show, for one,...

...it was empty. There was seven people in that Bar, seven, two of them were passed out drunk, and I'm just sitting there going man. But the cool thing was my dad was being so awesome, I mean so encouraging, so helpful the entire time and I just had a moment where I looked at him and I said, you know what, I don't know how many shows we're going to get to play together, but let's make the most of this and just have fun. It's just you and me, like let's do it. And he was like all right, let's do it. So we played to those seven people as if it was a million people. Okay, we gave on one of the best shows ever and it was so fun. and Um, afterwards, so there were the two pass out drunk people and then there was a family. Um, the dad of the family came up to me and my dad it was just like hey, I'm just a business guy, like you know. If there's anything you'll need to help with or whatever, like just let me know. And Um, my dad was like, you know what, like we're in the process of trying to find investors, Um, if you would just look at our contract, since you're a business guy, you look at contracts all the time. Just look at it, Um, and if there's anything we can make better, like you know. Um. And so a week later, after he'd already gotten this contract and looked through it. He facetime all of us, my whole family, and he said, Kate, I don't want to just be this amount for this amount of time investor. He said, I want to be your lifetime investor. I want to provide everything that you need and I want to do it because I see the purpose in you and that you're being a light in the world and I want to help you do that. And that that is a huge moment for me because I'm having all these people in my life that you know, with everything in the past that happened, of people telling me I was worthless, that I've never not to anything of my life and Blah, blah, blah, and then I'm having these people just come up to me and say, Hey, I believe in you and I want to help you and to help you spread your mission and your love and your life with people. That was like insane for me, huge, and so those are two things that have just progressively just exploded everything that I'm doing for one Um, not that I do this and use Parker's name or whatever, but you say Parker mccollumn and people are like, Oh, let me do anything and everything for you, and I'm like, okay, you know. So there's that and then there's the fact of I have the funds. I don't have to worry about anything. Um, all my band members are taken care of. I don't have to worry about them trying to, you know, find other things to help them make money. I can take care of them and provide for them so they can focus on everything that we're doing. Make it tight, make it amazing, Um, you know, get the right social media people, get the right marketing team, get the right Um people to help with the album and produce it. Brett Tyler is who I have, with Trent Willman, advising, and Trent Willman is actually cody Johnson's producer and he, Um, I met with him basically had like a audition type thing, and he was like I love what you're doing and I want to be a part of it, and he said, I don't have time to give you the time that you need, but I have somebody that I want you to use and I want to advise on it. So I have an amazing team around me. The I'm currently just building and growing and we're...

...all growing together to make this mission, to make this ministry come to life, all the music, all of it, and so that's the long version of saying do you need all of those pieces, Um, to make the music, the streaming, the all of it to reach the people that you wanted to love it? And a great reminder to that you could you could have easily been like, oh, there's seven people here, like I'm going to phone it in, but to still treat it like it's, you know, a massive sell up, because it is like to those people like they are there to see a show and you don't want to let them down, and I think that's an awesome full circle moment there of coming back. Alright, Kay, you're almost off the hook here, but we always like to wrap up a top three and for you, who are your top three music artists? I think this is a great question as well. Okay, of course, Parker mccollum, obviously. Um, okay, Parker mccollum, Carrie underwood and cody Johnson. Do you have if I mean, I would think people are familiar with all three of them, but if they're not, do you have a song recommendation for each one? Um, before he cheats is one of my favorites by Carrie underwood because one of my favorite things that my shows is to go all right, everybody, right before we see it. How many tires is it that we slash? And everybody goes and I'm like is it one? And they're like no, to, no, three, come on, I don't like it's all four and then you're bump on and it's so fun. Um. Okay, so that one. Um. For Carrie Underwood. For Parker mccollum, I'd say either pretty hard or can't breathe. Um. Both of the those are hit me in the heart. Um. I love both of them. That make you feel something. Um, and he sings them absolutely amazing. Cody Johnson, welcome to the show. It is a rocking, killer song about the Houston Rodeo. Um. Even if you've never been to Houston Rodeo, listen to the song you'll feel like you're there. Okay, it's still on my bucket list to go. I'm like two and a half the way I need to. I've done the rent fest out there. I just need to halfway there. Okay. Thank you so much for taking the time to chat. This was fantastic. If people want to learn more about you or check out some of your music, where can they find you? You guys can go to my website, the Kate Watson Dot com, to see my merch, to see all my upcoming shows and tour dates. Um. You also can go to all my social media platforms are the same, which is at Kate Watson Music, Um, and check out my instagram, facebook, Youtube, snapchat, tiktok. I got it all, Um. And if you guys want Merch, like I said, you can go to my website, but also you can come to a show. Come get you some merch. I'd love to meet you guys. Lovely. Well, thank you again, Kate. It was fantastic and yes, we'll drop all those links in the show notes so people can check it out. And Yeah, I go up and go out to a show and of course we've got to end with a joke, as we always do. A drum set fell out of a tree but UMPS good after it. Good people, cool things. That's produced in Austin, Texas. If you're a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. You can send me a message, Joey, at good people, cool things dot com. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people, cool things and check out all the old episodes via good people, cool things dot com. As always, thank you for listening. Day I have a wonderful day. m.

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