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Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 46 · 10 months ago

Working in TV, Writing Plays, and Hollywood Inside Stories with Billy Van Zandt

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Billy Van Zandt has been writing plays, TV shows, and films for nearly half a century. So, naturally, he’s got a few stories to tell about Hollywood. Luckily, he was taking notes along the way and has put his finest moments into his new book. 

GET IN THE CAR, JANE! Adventures in the TV Wasteland is a behind the scenes memoir of Emmy-nominated writer/producer Billy Van Zandt and his years making America’s favorite (and not so favorite) sitcoms.

Welcome Tho, good people, cool things,podcast, peecuring conversations with entrepreneurs, writers musicians andother creatives, I'm your host Joey held and today's guest is, I nominatedwriter and producer Billy Van Zant, who is the author of getting the Car JaneAdventures in the TV wasteland and writer of more than twenty five playsalongside his partner, Jane Milmore, and we're talking about all differenttypes of entertainment here, we're going through BILLI's playwritingcareer his time in Hollywood, he's got stories about Lucille Ball, MartinLawrence, Don Rickles, Dorothy Lamore, and just so much more working on newheart. The worst show he's ever worked on if you're not rolling with laughterthroughout this episode. I don't know what to tell you, because billy is veryfunny and he's got so many great stories and, of course, recommendchecking out Gett in the car, Jane Adventures in the TV Wastland for somany fantastic stories. It's part behind the scenes. Gossip Part Textbookall truth, and it is such an entertaining reed, definitely check itout and while you're at it, why not check out the good people cool things?Merch shop, there's lots of comfy items for you from hoodies to hats andeverything in between. So you can look stylish while you're getting yourlaughter on reading a very entertaining book, but for now sit back, relax andenjoy the conversation with billy. Let's say someone hasn't heard of BillyVans Ann. What is your elevator pitch for them and what kind of elevator arewe on while you're giving this pitch? Well, what my elevator pitch of me is:I'm a very I'm a hard working, hard working guy from New Jersey. That'spretty much at the yell at the moment the elevatorsgoing down, I think, but I've been e bit o the top. So it'sokay, I think you're the first person to bewe're going down on the elevator St Wan to mix it up there. Well, I plan ongoing back up to, but right now the world shut down. So I don't have muchof a choice that yeah. That is a a very good point. Then I I can imagine theHollywood world I mean yeah like what's been going on for thelast year. What have you been up to? Well, I've been doing a lot of podcasttalking about my book and I've been having lunch across the pool with mykids because we don't get too close, and I go for a lot of hikes with my dogsand and Teresa, and I cook a lot and we binge watch a lot of TV like everybodyelse. So that's been that's life in life in Hollywood this year, but thethe restaurants just closed up again. There were a couple restaurants, youknow you can it's easy to do it it out here, because you look weather so niceand you're far away from each other, but they even close those up rightbefore thanksgiving. So it's been interesting. I've done alot of reorganizing of my office and done a lot of scanning of old files andthat kind of stuff. So that part was that part wasproductive. I got ta say: Do you have any office reorganizationtips, because I I know personally, mine is a mess, soI'd love any tip number one. You scan everything and then throw it all out. That's one number, two. The only thingthat matters ar photographs- everything else is garbage as scan those photographs I for thelongest time, Alli have family photos that are scaned hat on on disks back in New Jersey and copies ofthem out here. So, if anything happens on either coast or covered and other than that...

...stuff, that you think is so priceless.Your kids are going to throw out anyway, so you might as wel now exactly cut out the Middle Mat. Exactly now you mentioned that you've beentalking about your book, getting the Car Jane Yeah. What was the the impetusbehind writing that? I know. Obviously, you've got lots of great stories, butwhy why now for this book it started withmy my sons, who hadn't no constant one day. They asked me what it was. Iactually did when I produced a TV show because they didn't they weren't partof that process where they know my plays, because they would come to thetheater and theyd sit throuh, rehearsals and they'd see that wholeprocess, but when it came to the TV shows, they didn't quite get all thethings that went into it. So I started writing it for them and I'm luckily forme, I had kept journals on all the TV shows that I either wrote or producedor created, and I had those the reference. So every chapter in the bookis a different TV show that we worked on Bob Newhart, Martin Lawrence, thewayens brothers, Don rickles of a whole bunch of things and and luckily thanks to those journals. It all came back to me and I had some.You know: Ither filled twit, funny stories, basically of things. I would tell at dinner partiesto get a laugh, you know, and so spart gossipig and also throughout the courseof the book a little bit of the time. You learn what an executive producer ofUSITCOM does, and you know I don't hit people over the head with it, but youget a taste of all the obstacles you have to jump through to get a show onthe air, the people you have to deal with the Egos you have to deal with andhow, how it works. Schedule Works and I've talked to a lot of students, college students, any aspiring writersand they've fall found it pretty helpful, but it wasn't my intention tomake it that it was really just to tell a bunch of funny stories. Well, definitely Succeedi on bothfronts. I think, and is this a common thing for people to do to keep journalswhile they're working on a show, or is that just something you always just had an interest in? I never. Idon't know why I started T. I never kept the journal growing up. I neverkept the journal other than the TV shows, and I think I started it becauseit was such a brand new thing to me and it was happening so fast. I wanted towrite down stuff that happened during the week so on the weekend. If I talkto anybody back home I'd have I could reference something you know and and then I just it just. I just starteddoing it after every show. Anytime. We'd have you know y have a fight withsomebody at the network. I start writing again so and and anything that I couldn'tremember my writing part to Jane Milmor. She mayshe remembered everything you know like a steel trap, so she helped me along onthis too, and she just passed away in February, but I was she was. She was around when I finishedthe book and she helped me edit it and she picks the pictures for the book. Soyou know it ended up being a nice tribute to her, which I didn't intendit to be n. We started it was just a book about the TV shows, but luckily I get to pay my respects to her in thebook too. Absolutely, and can you talk a littlebit about working with the writing partnerbecause you and Jane were? Do I have it right? Forty, forty six years together,forty six years together we met when I was negative, ten years old and we met in high school. She was at awere both in high schools in New Jersey. Here I grew up and we met at a competo drama competitionat a local theater. She was doing a scene with her school, I was doing ascene from migh school and that producer put us together in a Aneil Simon, comedy star, spangle girlthe following summer, and we toured...

...that around for two years and then westarted dating immediately and then we broke up when we dated and we broke up a ridiculous amount of times until weboth realized. You know what, let's just not do this again, so we stayedstayed friends and and forty six years we worked together all without missing one single day ofwork, despite the fact that we broke up- and you know all that stuff went on, but working with Li a partner has beenfantastic. You have to have the right partner, otherwise it's just two peoplefighting over who gets to the type the last word and with Jame and me she brought outthe best of me. I Brun out the best in her. She is. She was funny off the top ofher head. I have to work at it like I structure, everything and think thingsthrough, and then I come up with the you know: the right stuff. Anything offat top of Jane's head was usually the right thing that went into the scriptand- and she watched my back a lot because I don't enjoy, I m sure,they're very nice people, but I don't enjoy dealing with the studios and thenetworks. I don't like it to me. It's like just you hired me tobe the creative person. Just leave me alone and that's sort of my attitudeand Jane would always take those phone calls and for the most part, if we hadan ego on the set, she would be the one down there taking care of it wbile. Iwould run the writers room, so we s, you know she did a little of this. Idid a lot of that. She took care of the costumes and the makeup in the hair. Itook care of the props and the set, and- and it was like it was a great team- and Iwould say the key to a good writing partner in comedy is to find somebody,Yo think is funnier than you are and have them think the same thing of youand then keep trying to make them laugh, that's pretty much the gist of o. Whatmakes a good team I like that, it's nice and simple yeah yeah and we had fun. I mean had every even the things that I complainedabout in the book. We ultimately had fun and everything we've done. I don'tfeel like. I really worked Te Day in my life. Well, I'll. Take that back tore a coupleshows hit felt like I worked a w ole lot, but for the most part, between thetheater for all my plays and the the TV shows, it's just been fun. I'm proud of this and ashamed of this.At the same time, I've never worked outside a show. Business. I've beenvery lucky and I was either writing and running. A Children's theater companywhen I was in high school are just are acting in a couple offilms or also be directing somebody else's play, and so I always did likethree things at once. So if one thing doesn't work out, you you have theother two to go to you know so, keep him busy same in game exactly and do you have a favorite outof the three between TV, filmand and Broadway or plays, or are they all theyall have their perks? I usually like the one, I'm not doingat the time. That's the one but the I'm I'm most at home on stage,because we we wrote the playrs for ourselves as actors and and we wouldperform them and then we would tour them around. Do them in New York allthat stuff, and that's where I felt the most at home and also you know my myvery healthy ego would say that when you're in the theater nobody's tellingyou what to do so, so you know you come out to t you work on TV first time Iworked on a TV show. Sam Bobrick was my boss and he he was aplaywright. He murder at the Howard johnsons an a bunch of other shows, andhe set me down and he said Youre playwright and I said yeah he sai. Letme tell you how it works in TV in the theater. You are the top of the pyramid.Everybody works to. Please you welcome to television. You are a first draftand people are going to do whatever...

...they want with your script and thesooner you get over that the better you'll be, and it took me two three years to getpast the fact that somebody wanted to change. You know this literallyhappened on Newhart our first series, the executive producer took one of ourscripts and somebody one of the characters entered saying you know higor something and the executive producerer changed it to hello, and Ithrow like. Why is that better than what I have you know, but you learnthat when you're on a writing staff, if you're, not the boss, if you're on awriting staff, your job is to imitate the writing of that boss of the creatorof the show. That's your whole job. You may think you're funnier than they are.You may think they're doing a terrible job. You may think they're brilliant,doesn't matter. You have to imitate their writing style. So every episodelooks like it came from the same computer and and then, when you get your own showyou do things to what you want and then you have a whole writing steff ofpeople rolling their eyes at the things you're changing in there Epsou knowSoit test something you get used to it was. It was weird for me at firstbecause everybody had different titles, some supervising producer. COPRODUCER.Writing. You editor O A story. Eor And it took me. You know it took me alittle while to realize. Oh that's just theyre, Rome writers. They just havedifferent names. The only people on the show that the executive producers, theboss produced by is the guy in charge of the money and the crew, andeverybody else that you see with a producer title is s a writerstaffwriter outside of that initial sort oflearning period of right, like whoever's in charge. Didyou find you were able to do that pretty quickly on the shows you workedon or were some kind of a steeper learning curd to kind of hit that style.It was pretty easy at first only because we had just come from thetheater and W. I don't know how many planes we'd had at that point. Maybeten plays published, then, probably not that many, but but after writing, a two hour playwriting twenty two minutes of a Sitcom Scriptlis, nothing for us. You know wewould they would give you two weeks to write a first raft. We do it in twodays and spend the rest of the time playing basketball outside of Ro and andthere were there was one particularshow I go about this. I go through this pretty detailed inthe in the book. I show that I hated working on and withreason, and I couldn't ivitate the writing of the boss, because the bossdidn't know what she was doing at all and we had a big staff of peopleand one by one everybody would get fired every Saturday. Somebody knewwould be fired, but they wouldn't replace these people. It would just geta smaller and smaller and smaller writing staff till at the end. It wasJane and me Ruce Ferber who ended up running home improvement and then theboss, and it was torture and Jane, and I Wu quit that show we walked out afternine episodes. I couldn't take it anymore. I didn't like the way theytreated actors. I didn, like the Assembly Line, feel of working on theshow and it took me took me a couple months after I left that show toremember why I liked writing. You know so, but you know the flip side of that.You know you work for Bob New Hart and every day is it's like a party withyour family and I loved everybody on that show. I wouldhave done that show forever same with t e Don rickles Richard Lewis show we didJamie Lecurtis as they were for the for the the bumps in the road and thereweren't that many it'd say two or three tops for havever long. Forty six years,I've been doing this. Every other time has been fun. My attitude's always beenlife is too short. If I'm not going to have a good time, I don't want to do it. I think that's a good attitude to havegenerally in most things in life yeah and that's a very solid success rate,only Havin, two or three sort of majores along the way. Yeah they andand I'll put up te, be fair, I'll put up with difficultpeople. If what they're giving you is brilliance, you know, Martin Lawrencewas so hard to work with, but I'm glad...

I did it. I thought I thoughteverything he did was pretty pretty great. It was rough to go through it,but the work that he did, I thought, was quite good. Alane, stritched, Broadway, you knowlegend. She came to work with, thus on a show with Andrew dice clay and KathyMorialridy, and you know everybody who said you can't hi she's a pain in theneck. You can use her, you can well, she was brilliant, so I was happy and Iwas happy to do that and and yeah and then, if somebody, youknow somebody rubbed you the wrong way, you don't hire them again, it's realsimmlyou know, but I usually we usually have a company of people. I've workedwith probably for forty years actors when we do our plays, and I writespecifically for them whether they do the role or not. I liketo hear the voice of O, whoever I think I hear in my head. You know and, and we just have so much fun- it's justfun. A doing the plays is nothing more than nothing less than fun. All the timehave you ever written for someone who ends up with another role in the sameproduction, or has that never happened? Huh, let's say no either either well. Some of oursome of our shows areso old. I've seen productions of somebody who played a younger roleplaying the older guys, roll but like our first play, was love sex in the IRS,which is a pretty broad forest and we wro one thousand nine hundred andseventy nine, and now, when I see productions of it,because it gets done in summer stock and regional theater all over the place, itsit's a period piece that they saidin the S, and it's like what was wasn't that when I did it, it was just ha show.But, and one of the guys who played are are younger lead in that in theoriginal production he ended up playing the the janitor in you kno anotherprouction of it. When about thirty years later, I like that, coming fullcircle. Yeah Yeah, you kind of touched on this a littlebit, but I always like asking people about their worst gigs aright, butsince ou you sort of dove into a little bit. How about? What's like one of theworst shows you've you've put on like a play. My playes are all good. It's the TVshowthe, the worst TV show was a show called nurses, Ou Kno. It Ran Aran three years towhich just blew my mind and I just didn't care for the way itwas run. There was no respect for anybody on thelot that I could tell case and point, and I tell the storythis is the week before I quit the show, because I couldn't take this kind ofstuff anymore. It was a show that catered to an olderaudience. So I suggested that you know why don't we bring in some old mgmmovie stars to play the guest tar spots because that's the audience too, youknow, and they said. Oh that's great and I said the script we just wrote has an olderlady. In it. I just saw Dorothy Lamoore in a play and doing a Steven Santimeplay down in Long Beach. When don't we bring her in to play the grandmotherand they said- Oh, that's a great idea. They called her up and she shaid. Inever audition for anything in my life, not even my paramount contract, but ifyou really want me that bad I'll be happy to commit and Meeti with you andshe came in at a retirement, big gold rolls roys pulls up she steps out. Shecomes into the waiting room where there are thirty other women reading for thesame row, I pras I went nuts, I said you got other people coming in and theysaid Yeah. If she wants to you know she wants to work in this town is the wayit's done.

So she came in to read which wasembarrassing to make somebody like that read and I was alr. You know I wasalready waiting to hear the good story, it's about working with Bob Hope andbeing Crosbie an all the road pictures and all this other stuff. So she comesin and she was nervous. You know she had never read for anybody before and Shewas very sweet as she walked out.The door wasn't even closed and one of the bosses says now we can do betterbring the next one in. I said you're not going to cast her and he said nosaid well. What are you going to say to her? He said I don't Callim, notcalling her, you don't call everybody, it doesn't get a job that summed up what I was working withN. I didn't like that at all and since them, U I learned a lesson there.Since then I have never and when I'm running my own show, I never bring anan established actor to audition. You know there's a reason that they werebig or big and I treat them with respect and I would never do that again.Never Yeah. I think the way you do it isreasonably Rit Yeah Yeah Yeah. We had fun. When I did the Donrickle show we brought you know we brought in all the people at we, one ofthe perks of being the boss when you're the creator. The show is, I got tobring in all the people. I grew up watching on TV. You know, so I broughtin came ballar from the mother's, a law to do a role, and she thank me forbringing her back. Tho Television, we brought in Albe Moore who, as Cank Kimbal on Greenacrs for another show- and it was just it- was crazy fun. Just watching theseguys, you know get back at it. I brought in hunts hall from the BoweryBoys. He pulled him out of retirement cause. I thought Oh he'd be funny asthe Pretzel Celler on the street Onr, and so it's great it's one of the one of the only perks. Really you getof when you're running your own show that's fantastic and your last production with Janer. Your lastcollaboration is the boomer boys musical yeah that started the the the guy wrote the music for it.Walin Picard Lives Oup in Vegas, and we worked with them while long while agohe was a musical director from my my den wife Adrian Barbos Night Clubet,and I produce an album that he he did for her and he called us out of theblow, and he said I have got an idea for a show. I want to do the changes that men gothrough when they hit a certain age and we'll do it as a comedy review. It'llbe hilariously funny. What do you think and I said? Well, I don't know I don'treally do stuff that other people suggest and Jane said we're Goinna doit. I said why are we going? No do it. She said I'd rather write about it thanhear you complain about it all the time. So we did, we wrote it's such a funshow it's four guys. So it's like sort of like the ratpack for guys, fourfriends talking and singing about the changes that men go through when theyhit a certain age and the response have been fantastic. We tourd it for thecount we tard the country for probably two and a half years before thepandemic hit, so we're waiting waiting for vaccine. So we can get backout on the road again and and I'll enjoy going back out on the road withthat. First of all, the fun show two of the two of the four guys that Ido it with I've been friends with forever oneactually from like kindergarten, clani leave it or then, and- and it's also the last thing that Janeand I did together. So it's almost a continuation of where we were so it's Idon't. You know it's been a very weird serrel year of mourning her death andnot being able to have a funeral and just the whole thing's weird, but it'llfeel, like you know, we're still back in it once once we get back it on theroad again. Have you seen any kind of you mentiondhow you've been kind of binging on...

Netflix, but as far as like the live,theater experience, that's a little more hard to recreate virtually, buthave you seen any good examples or people doing things we're like? Oh,that's kind of cool. I saw I've seen a couple of very goodzoom readings. I guess can call Thim, but they really have to be directed.It's not just a matter of everybody talks. When tyou line comes, they needto be directed. You need to see you know one guy handing handing a prop offcamera and then the guy on the in the other box, picking up the same prop andit sort of all flows together, it's kind of fun. I saw a good Tim pintme play. I can'tremember the title. A couple of our shows have been done on zoom you've got hatemail, whichreally was set up for who knew was set up for zoom call it it's five people,it's a story of one of Jane's divorces, told through emails, so you have onstage when you do it live. There are five actors at five desks with IPADSand laptops and you're reading and emailing each other, and so that fit perfectly into his room.Call I've seen tha a couple of different productions of that that waskind of fun, but I've also enjoyed the a don't, evenknow what it is. Maybe it's Broadwaycom or one of those things seeing a lot of London plays that theyrecord and they get to see, plays that you never got to see. So I'm enjoyingthat and I just ithink. I hope we get back to. Ihope we get back to live theater soon, because I'm so itchy to get back onstage. I hope so too it is. It is just like there have been some great efforts:Virtual andsome, you know some great productions, but yeah there's justnothing like it. It's it's so gah yeah and I don't know what they'regoing to do in terms of when I saw there was a sixty minutesepisode on right when the pandemic hit and had been recorded. You know monthsprior, so this wis before anybody knew any of this and it took place in Japanand it showed people going to the theater and every single person in theaudience had a mask on and little didn't. We know. That's, we know hello,that's where we oo that's wher we're going to be, but it was just normal forthem Ho. That's what they do. So I thought well: Okay, we got a shout atthis and yeah the what well what what a lot oftheaters are starting to do and I don't think it's going to work frankly isthey're taking out like every other seat in their theater, and I like theidea of trying to get open again, but I really don't know how a theater survivson fifty percent of the capacity you know most theaters a hundred percentcapacity plus sponsors to case to stay open. You know so, but you know we'll get there we'll getthere and may take longer than I want, but we'll get back there yeah and Ithink there's I mean I never can count out thecreativity of people to to get yeah the content out there yeah, even if it is alittle while before we're we're back in theaters there's. Here's always whyit's Sa and I'm enjoying the like. What's the name of the thing belowstudio, fifty four whats that thing called, but all the nightclub performers theycan do virtual concerts. Those are kind of those arefun to watch. Just I'm in a piano player, but who cares yeah? Absolutely. I remember seeing atthe start of he pandemic Aricabadu doing bedroom concerts and oh kind ofdid like a choose your own adventure, where whoever was watching would votebetween like Oh. Where should I go next like this room and play this song orthis room and play that sign? I was like thits, pretty cool, that's cool,that's cool, yeah, yeah...

...yeahand and you know a lot of people. I don't know if you know wh Mary Neelieis, but she got us through the early part of the pandemic, because she's anactress who simply filmed herself lip sinking to every Broadway musical withher own playing all the roles directing it herself. It was just her and therthey're, brilliantly funny because she's so earnest an what she's doing-and you know, got a crappy wig on to play this role and a cloth on her headto play a nun in the sound of music but they're funny an hell, and you know,there's creativity right there and I'm sure I'm sure they've got deals goingleft ten right for now, and Sarah Coopru did all the imitations of DonaldTrump. You know people people will make dowhen they have to yeah and getting great milage out of those old wigs tooyeah really yeah, sir. I'm glad you mentioned SaraCooper she's. I just like applaud er, like I can't even tell atthis point, what's what's real and what's Ha parodys, so it's as grew milk.That's true! We've been talking about lots of different memories and momentsthat you've had, but at the end of the episode I always liketo wrap up with the top three, and I think your top three Hollywood momentswould just be fantastic to hear about. We can talk about the good ones sincewe've covered the BAT oneg. I hope so top three Hollywood moments was be getting to meat and work with Lucille. Ball wasnumber one she's. The reason I went into showbusiness. I wanted to do the kind of comedy that she did ID learned from hera learned timing and learned how to structure a script from her writers, and quite simply, that show made melaugh more than anything else as a kid watching that, but I finally got to work with her.That was absolutely number one and she turned out to be everything I wuher tobe. She was just just fantastic: it was a master class watching her work andand we got to be friendly for a couple of weeks, so that was that was number one. For me, number two was working with Don rickles, just the sweetest guy in the world. We, unfortunately for for us, we debuted the show is Don'slist. Sitcom called Daddy dearest with Richard Lewis, and we premiered at the height of thebeginning of political correctness and dones wholt career is aboutpleguepolitically incorrect. So we had a lot of fights with networks and the critics hated us. The audience islike this, but regardless it was just the most fun I ever had on a show.Every day was just party and I loved everybody working on it. Wekept, I would say we kept that entire crewthrough a couple of different shows. Just I liked everybody on the crew got to work with Rennee Taylor, who one of the first professionalproductions I did. An actor was in one of her plays so w. We hired her to playDon's wife and that's the show where I pulled in hunts hall and Ke Ballar, andall these other people that I grew up with, and I would I wish that show had runforever and we should have, I think, but and third atould be. My third thing might be. My off Broadway show silentlaughter. That was a silent. This was one of those things where every timewe'd go to write a new play was like okay. What haven't we done? Let's trythis. Let's try this and if it scared me enough, it usually was the rightchoice that you know. Let's try this, what we never wrote a musical before,who cares? Let's try, and so this silent laughter was asilent movie. Silent slapstick movie...

...done live on stage with a big whirlitor organ playing along with the actors. There is no dialogue, it was in untitle cards above our heads and thewhole show was in shades of black grey and white. It was fascinating to do it.I was scared to death until on opening ight. It was like anybody. GOINGNAlaugh at this thing and we got great reviews in the New York Times and itwas just it was such a joy to do that. That was fun. That soundssimultaneously a blast to do, but yeah, like you, were saying, also terrifyellespecially, because the night before we had an audience I had you know acouple of friends sit in the audience and this one woman who I'd work withfor thirty years. At that point, I got puled me asignment. I don't know aboutthis on billy, like, Oh God, okay, but we did it and we got our laugh. So itwas good Clo and I went also say trop dead. Thethat was the first off roadway, show I produced and that we wrote and then I did it out here. We did thatforever. We did that in New York and then we did it out here in La and we had fourof the cast members from NewYork and then we had again me mee kid in the candy store I had rose Maray forthe Dick Frandyke show Donny Mos from happy days. Who else was in that has Barny Martinfrom Seinfeld and we just o an and forgetting and aWomano became my wife Adrian Barbo, and that one was so much fun so much funand thank God that was at the same time I was doing that terrible, show nurses. So I would do the TV show during theday and then do the play at night and thank God for that. Ori Would haveblown my brains at working on the TV yeah good to keep for sanity. A littlebit yeah yeah, exactly no, obviously with the pandemic. We don't we don'tknow, what's what's coming up, but I assume you're not totally justbenwatching Netflix and eating across the pool. Do you have some ideas thatare kind of percolating a little bit for two thousand and twenty one twe oto whenever wel back out the her thing when Jame got sick and she got sick outof the Blue Shi no symptoms, she just turned yellow overnight and the nextday foundactually had pankrehadic cancer, which blew t our mind, but wethought it was a misdiagnosis because she was the healthiest thing ou eversaw, and so for the fifteen months, and it was fifteen months that she foughtthat thing we kept thinking, it's m misdiagnoseits you know, don't want they'll find something else, try different pills, anright, and we work two three days a week, the entire time, because sheconsisted she wanted to work. And so we have a bunch of half written projectsit on shells right now that I'm gointo plan on finishing all of them and couple couple screenplays and couple of books. I want to finish to soyeah. I don't believe in sitting around doing nothing at all my I have. We gota a great work ethic from my father. I think we we listened a little tooclosely because we don't we don't know how to turn it off in our family. Wejust do stuff ilt. We do a lot of stuff, but but I also to me this is fun. I don'tfeel like I'm working, I don't feel like I'm working when I'm working, youknow, so I I'm one of those people that wakes up and go straiht to the computerand starts writing stuff yeah. I think that's more fun than justsitting around yeah for sure yeah good deal well billy. Thank you so muchfor taking the time to Chand. If people want to learn more about all thes stuff, you'vedone if they want to check out the book, where can they find you Gettin? The Car Jane Adventures in theTV wasteland available on Amazon is available, Barnes and noble, and if yougo to my website, vansant milmorecom,...

...you can learn all about all theupcoming shows when we have them all the TV shows weere done all the films,all the all the plays, and I think they're actually selling hard cover.They are selling hard cover copies of the book on there too, and that's for twitter and Instagram I'm on there andhave no idea what my handles are so o. just look me up. You'll figure it out,there's all as the only one O me out there we'll do some we'll do some Google andwe can add it in the shownotes. For you thank Yournad. I know I'm the same way with mypasswords for a lot of them. I'm just like. If I ever get the automatic logout I'll be I'll, be screwed for sure I actually am ashamed to do this. I havea five page list of my passwords that I keep when I keep one with my laptop. Ikeep oning with my in my desk, so it w'as like and th N. it's my phone too. Thank God.They memorize you're ashamed by that. I think that'sbrilliant! I should just start doing that. Well, it's fine until somebodyrobs your house and finds your pets. That's true! That's true! You! No IGOTTA, invest in the what is it the one password or like last past aeits Yeahaput some of my DNA in there and then that's a little harder and parter to Rob Tats, true right, maybe for two thousand and twenty onethat can be the projects give my pas password life in order and scan mamurder scan on your stuff exactly exactly and throw away all the all thejunkerrih everything ECA photokeep the photo. That's it all hat matters,wonderful, billy! Thank you! So much! This was fantastic at a great time andhighly recommend your book to everyone. Listening. Thank you. This was a lot offun enjoyed it absolutely a of course. We got to end with a Corny joke and th. This will probably make you grownmore than laugh but we'll say ai all right. What's even better than TedDancing, I don't know, what's better than Tedman, Ted singing and dance in Tti all right, I won't be stealing that one of myshowes mother but thethat's great. Thank you. Thank you for listening togood people, cool things always appreciate you checking out the show ifyou're a fan, you're listening on Apple Podcast, I'd appreciate a five starreview or rating head on over to your apple podcast that tap those five starsand leave a few kind words if you want, if not the rating is totally fine andfor listening on spotifying love a subscription as well subscribe ing,then you'll be notifyeng any time a new episode comes to devices. Thank youagain for listening have a fantastic day.

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