Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 58 · 1 year ago

58: Traveling Adventures and Inside the Writing Process with Chris Coppel

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

How many times have you used the excuse of “I don’t have time” to avoid getting things done? I know I’ve done it regularly — sometimes I’m procrastinating on something incredibly minor, like cooking dinner or even walking to the mailbox. Because I’m just TOO BUSY, you know?

Well, this episode’s guest is having none of that. Chris Coppel has authored ten novels since the fall of 2019, and he is dropping all kinds of knowledge on how to write efficiently and in volume. 

Chris is an accomplished drummer and guitarist, too, so we’re talking some tunes — and the worst gig he’s ever played. Plus, the number one tip Chris has for writing, and why you should always take the scenic route anytime you travel.

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people cool things. Today is all about writing. I'm chatting with Chris Coppel, author of far from Burdondell, luck, the laune legacy, Lake bed and the upcoming liner. He's got all kinds of horror stories out there and thrillers that will keep you on the edge of your seat, on your toes and turn and those pages. Chris is born in California and has spent his time both in the sunshine state there, that's Florida, the Golden State whatever, for California's official name, is Spain, France, Switzerland and England. He's also an accomplished drummer and guitarist, so we're talking about his worst Gig, which I always love asking, and Chris does not disappoint with a fantastic answer. We're also chanting through his writing process, some of his inspiration and the tip that he has at the end of all of his writing sessions that put him up in a good position for success the next time that he's writing, so you want to stay around for all of that. That'll help. Even if you're not writing a book, it'll help get whatever you need to done as you're getting through your day. If you like to get in touch with the show, you can reach out on facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast. You can also reach out joey at good people, cool thingscom or support the show the merge store. Good people, cool thingscom shop. A couple of new items coming out pretty soon, so pick up a Hoodie, shirt, hat, mug. We're all of the above really line up your house with lots of good stuff, just like this episode. There's lots of good stuff this conversation with Chris. Let's get to it. For people who don't know who Chris Copple is, can you give us your elevator pitch, but can you also tell us the elevator that you're on while you're giving us this pitch? I'll give that a try. I always dreamt of of being a writer when I was a child and used to write little stories. My father was a very well known writer. He wrote Vertigo, amongst other things, and somehow, as hard as I tried to follow a career in writing ended up following a career in the technical side of film and Television, much like another one of your guests, Craig Leaner, who I and actually worked with and was in the Technical Operation Group of a number of studios and at one point to ended up in Washington DC working in the technical department of the World Bank and the IMF. Cut to a few years later. I find myself in England. I'm trapped here because of Covid I'm not sure what to do with my life and something just made me sit down and start writing. And that was September, a year ago, and I'm working on my ten novel since that time. So how well, we'll get to all that first. But going way back, you said you know you've wanted to be a writer since you were little. Do you remember the first thing you read that kind of inspired that? Was it? Was it something you're Dadd had written, or was it something else? No, I think it was something to do with the lifestyle and also that's what daddy did. I don't think there's any more depth than that. It was just like I want to do what daddy does, because, I mean I had no idea that it actually involved work, because all I knew is that he would vanish into his room with his pipe and come back three hours later and spend all day with me, and it just seemed like, you know, that's kind of cool. I wouldn't mind doing that myself. So do you also I use a pipe when you're writing? Oh No, no, okay, no, I feel like that's I feel like that's the you know, the the intrigue, I guess,...

...of or the the characterization of the well, we've we've all seen CRAC CRAIG's picture. Yes, is doing it, doing US proud. He's using props. Yeah, I think I drank too much water while I'm writing. That I wouldn't. I wouldn't, or, I guess, to your coffee sometimes too. But I just have to keep taking the pipe. That's that's it's better than the alternative. I mean, you know so many writers drink something a little heavier. That's true. That is true. What is it? You write drunken, edit sober? That's the old thing. Yeah, fantastic, fantastic. Have as far as your dad and you did he kind of give you any, any guidance on your writing process or well, just kind of not been there. Nice now by when he passed when I was sixteen, by which time I was a rock drummer in England and my band was called monks silver and we were touring and we hardly talked for the two years before he died. I maybe we did, but I mean not any depth whatsoever. I'm not sure I had any depth in me at that time. Okay, so we're going to we're going to veer to rock drumming for a second because I always love chatting music. Can you tell us about the worst GIG you've played? Yeah, probably we supported led Zeppelin in the bath university wow and we were not the the advertised band. The advertised band couldn't show up and we were a last minute and my main drum kit was actually on in a rehearsal hall on the other side of town and all I had was this strange collection of bits and pieces and we got to the again a back of a Ford Escort van, which is the English way, and set up and my symbol stands had all been bent at some point and so if I hit them too hard they they started tilting and would go over. So the poor roady ended up sort of sitting in front of me having to hold the symbol stands with no air protection. Well, I wailed. And unfortunately that was the time when Long Drum Solos were the thing. Ginger Baker had done toad and from that time on every drum solo had to be twelve minutes minimum. Man, I'm just just picturing that and it sounds, yeah, like drums are so loud regardless. Yeah, and to not to not have it your pro time. I play, I pay play an electric set now, and it's so I can tone it down and not deafen myself. Yeah, it's an you still get all the all the benefits of it, I think, a lot, a lot less painful on the earth. My wife can't stand it because while I'm you know, I've got reverb and all sorts of things going on in my head and I'm doing some incredible moves, especially on the you know, the lower Tom Tom's, and so all she's hearing is click clack, click clack. She's holding up the lighter. Yeah, okay, we'll get back to writing, since that's that's what you've been you've been at for since September, Twenty units and you've written ten novels. Yeah, a lot of people don't even write one novel. So what his spurth this productivity? I I started I was watching CNN one morning and it was they were reporting on a particularly aggressive rally in the upcoming election campaign, and I won't mention any names of which, which candidate, but it was I just found it upsetting that the way trying to motivate people who I just couldn't believe...

...really felt the way he was trying to get them to think. And I turned off the TV and I've pulled out my Mac and just had this urge to suddenly write something and I wrote an and I knew the title. It was called luck and it was basically a from the time this baby is born, everything that happens is perceived as just being incredibly lucky, whereas in fact he had a power to influence people into believing whatever he was selling, and he went through real estate and went through various other things and ended up in politics, and the more power he got, the more criminally insane he became and his actions became more violent. And it's a it's a semi horror thriller, and I mean I ended up it was close to ninetyzero words in three months and I that was published in Chamber of the following year and then I thought well, that's it. That was pretty good. But I had this this sounds silly, but I had this like bad aftertaste and I felt I damaged Karma by writing this because it was his character was very dark and it took me into some very dark places writing it. So I said I just felt like I want to write something fun and I want to write kind of a semi comedic horror book about a Scottish Hunting Lodge where all the trophies and Memorabilias and taxi dermide animals and everything finally take revenge on the hunt hunters. But tongue in Cheke and I ended up writing the lodge and which was published by a different publisher in the same month, which was kind of weird. They both came out the same time. And I thought then that's kind of it, because I couldn't I didn't have any more inspiration, any more ideas, and Craig and I were talking and he said you have got to read especially of horrors. Your thing. You've got to read Stephen King's book on writing it. I'd never heard of and Stephen King is my favorite author, so that was that was a bit of a folk pop. But I I read it and it told me something that seems pretty obvious, but to me it wasn't and was a revelation of all revelations, that if you're going to be a writer and you want to write seriously, there's no such thing of walking around doing everything but writing, waiting for that inspiration to suddenly hit you. You may get a tiny concept to me, but I was waiting for the entire story to just download and you know, I could just transcribe it. And I I read the book and learn and learned a whole bunch of ways to do it and the Hidden Muse and all these sort of fascinating sort of things that just write and if you have the ability, it will just come pouring out. But right every day, if you can't think of anything right anyway, write an overdescriptive scene right, the ending right, a short story just right, and it will take you somewhere. I didn't really buy that and but I put it into effect immediately and started on my third book, which was called liner, which is coming out in three weeks I think, and it's by far my favorite book. Of what I've written and is bizarre. And sure enough, I mean my poor wife was during lockdown. All we've been able to do is the end of the day, at about five o'clock, is go out for a long walk. And we used to go out for walks and just talk about, you know, like the world, the universe with whatever it was. Now it's like just me trying to...

...explain the oddity of me sitting down having no clue where I'm going and I'm just suddenly typing a new character and I don't know why. And then three days later in the walk I then that character I wrote. You know why I wrote him? Apparently it's because he was going to and I find that it. I saying amuse is kind of a catch hole, but it there has to be a word for it because it doesn't make any sense. I sit down and I come up with two thousand words a day that that weren't there before that. I had no inkling of where the story was going. When I started writing liner, it was nowhere near the book or the story I got. It was going to be just a ghost story on a ship and ended up being something absolutely completely different. And Ten Times, I think ten times better. And I found that ever since every every single book I've written, and I'm still when I finish one I've gone through five, six, seven edits and it's pretty much ready to go on to the next stage of of getting it out there. I start having this dread of sitting down and doing the next one and is there going to be anything there? And I'm writing one now called Lunacy, which is the first one where I've sat down comfortable that it's going to just come out, just and and and don't worry about not knowing what's going to come out, because it's something will come out and it and it has. I'm a I'm an eighteen thousand words. I've been at it two weeks and you know, I'm very, very happy. I really empathize with that feeling. I think of is there anything left? And so that's awesome to hear that switch of like Hey, I got this. Well, the scary thing I don't. A lot of writers have notes or cards and their wall is full of them and their they plot developments and arrows and everything else. My notes are on my ipad notes and for luck I had ten pages. For for the lodge I had two pages I now have two lines and maybe this one. I've taken no other notes. I'm just carrying on. I know vaguely the ending but I'm not sure. And quite often I'm really decided on my ending and that's where I'm going. And then when it comes to, you know, the final turnoff where, you know, I go into the desert or I go into the hills, I'm just ready. You know I've taken take an arm down to the TSHIRT head in the desert and suddenly that we're going the other way. It's like, okay, fun ride, let's see where we go. Do you have are you just jotting these notes, or do you like when you're out on a walk or you voice memoing it? Are you like, whenever inspiration hits, knocking them down? It's I'll, I'll write them down that they can come at any time and they're they're, they're sometimes they're big and it's a directional change. Sometimes it's just a tiny, funny little idea or a little little, you know, thing to add. Sometimes it's chronological problem that I've created and if suddenly comes to me you he can't do that, he was and I you know, I'll just go in and fix it. But all the good stuff comes just while I'm sitting looking at the screen and just you know, each day, as I finish for the day, I leave a one or two word note at the end of where I am of what the next scene should be, and that's all I really do. I check my...

...my notes to see if there's anything I've come up with that knee needs to take me somewhere or that needs to be but I will follow that those two word notes, which might be, you know, view house, whatever it is, and so far that's that's working for me and I feel like I'm cheating because so many people dig so deeply. Mind you, my books could just be crap. We don't know, we're not us. There's always that possibility as well. But so many people, in some that I know, really agonize over getting their story completely lineated before they put pen to paper for the for the first time. And I can't do that because I'm as I don't have a clue where I'm going and I've learned that. You know, I'm I'm not the I'm not the best driver. Whoever it is it's driving, needs to be doing it. I'm much happier to follow that person than any note. If if I had a rigid form to let me let me get a really good example. My father wrote a screenplay seventy years ago and I been thinking it would make an interesting modern book and modern novel. So two novels ago I gave it a stab and it was really difficult because I had no problem creating the modern version of it, completely different characters, different time frame, everything else. But I had a road map that I had to stick to. You know, I was I was going from city a to CITYB and I had to pass through these three towns on the way, and if it hadn't been my father's work, I probably wouldn't have held it in such reverence and just gone off onto something where ever it was wanting to take me. But this one I felt I needed to to do then, and that books cold like. I haven't started marking it yet because I'm marketing yet because I'm still I'm still fiddling. But that was difficult and that's what most people go through with writing. It's it's so I'm much prefer for my weird, eerie method. Yeah, that that just reminded me of a road trip over the summer where we're not to West Texas. We're trying to hit MARFA, big band, all the on the good sites out there, and there's it no longer exists. That got taken down because I guess too many people were graffiting it and, you know, being dangerous around it. So the person who had initially created it. But it was the smallest target in the world. It was, you know, no bigger than like a shed that you'd see in someone's backyard, but had the target logo on it and it was just maybe like ten miles down the road from where we were going, just like a little offshoot. But total really got mixed up via Google maps pointing us another way and then just meandered around for so long. Eventually found the target and I always feel like it was better that way that had just gone there directly, because it was like, oh, we saw these other things. We like spotted a lot of other kind of like, you know, small West Texas, enjoyable things, and I was like, I'm glad we did that, even though I'd love to stretch my legs like forty five minutes ago, because we've been driving for a while, but it made the payoffs so much more worth it when when I go, when I travel, in those days when we used to travel, my wife and I will when we go somewhere new, I never buy a guide, I never take a tour, I never do anything. We if it's in a city, we just start walking and, you know, if we try to stay away from dangerous areas, but I mean we find so many amazing things. And if it's if it's a different part of some more like France, which is...

...easy to get to from here, we just know where we're going to end up. But find whatever route we feel like and if we see a turnoff that looks cool or a bridge and where does that go, we just go. And these poor people who get it get on, fly over to Europe and do twelve cities and fourteen days on a bus and go home thinking they've seen anything they couldn't have seen in Vegas. A quite all, quite frankly, just a shame. Yeah, yeah, I I don't know how people do that, because it's it is just like so surface level and I feel like you're not getting the INS and outs of stumbling into a random rest are in a random corner of town. And maybe. I mean here's a perfect sample. The last the last international trip I took was to Ireland and in the UK and in Ireland just happened to stop in a bar and there was a guy doing old Irish folk tales. He was just like this. He was probably like in his s already and just had all these stories from growing up in Ireland and wow, was like, you know, half half truth, half like folklore kind of thing, and he's just coming and he's doing all these wild voices and it just it's like a random Tuesday night and if we had it stumbled into that bar that was not really in like the main part of town, never would have heard that it was so much fun. Oh that's great. My wife and I did. We had one of those. We went to Oxford for the first time. This is quite a few years ago, and we didn't drive. We took this funny old local bus that we've had to change once or twice and we were only like ten miles away, but it was it was surprisingly difficult to get to and when we got there there were all these roots you're supposed to take and they were marked out and there were tours and and we said no, just just not going to do that and it was the week before the students came back. So there were a lot of kids in in the gown and the CAP and ready ready for for the start, and we just went meandering where we shouldn't have gone. there. There get guests. Cannot just walk through the within Oxford. It's a university town and there's I don't know how many universities, but the entrances are not like an American University. It's one like small arch. It was built in the sixteen century or something, and it'll say what it is but it says no visitors. Well, we just ignored that sign completely and we would walk through and we were walking down these these colonnades we've seen in movies for forever, and we walked I think at this was in new college. New College is was built in like sixteen, twenty seven. There's something. We walked down and too we saw the chapel up ahead and we went in the chapel and there was a man at a grand piano, four singers and a cellist and it was a most beautiful sound I've ever heard in my life and the acoustics were and they were just practicing and it was like, you know, we'd never would have done that. And then when we left we thought it's you know, it's time for a pint, and they're all we'd passed all these very sort of touristy looking things and there was this tiny alley that looked like it went nowhere, but it obviously went somewhere and it was right in the middle of the college area. So I led Claire, who's used to be doing this, and it was all cobblestones that were there were worn down and shiny, and we went down and then turned a corner and there was the oldest pub in literally the oldest pub in Cambridge, and it's not on the tourist apps and it's you walk in and I have to do I had to do this and fire going in the corner. I mean it's much better to explore yourself. Absolutely. Ah, that's so fun. What did you order? What was your pint of choice? Back then?...

It was probably log Er Stella Stella Artoi, which is over here. That's considered the the log or lout beer, lout being the you know them at soccer matches who drink a few too many and get a bit violent. So just a tradition. Now I want to go back a little bit too. You mentioned how you have multiple books coming out but with different publishers. So can I think for writers, obviously writing the book it's only half the battle. There's also the entire getting it published, the marketing elements to it. So could you kind of take us through your process for that? Well, I'm the first book was it's called Traditional publishing, which is where they pay basically take ninety percent of the profits and take, you know, forever to publish and leave you out of it entirely, and I didn't like that experience very much and that's the hardest one to get. I mean to try and get a publisher to publish you is almost impossible and then you're treated, unless you're Stephen King, you're treated very poorly. So in talking to Craig he he was talking about self publishing and the way that he's found that works best, and I spoke to a bunch of people in England and did a lot of research and found a place that are very choosy who they take and they do a partnership publishing and they charge what I thought was very little to do a spectacular job, and that includes marketing and they do absolutely everything for you and including the story at it. I mean all the different edit stages, the proofreading stages, you know everything, and I was very happy with with them and the way the way they handled it, and the second book was was done the same way. And then I found a company to give the book a little extra marketing push called Publishing Push, which is a good name, and while talking to their their managing director, and may be the only one in the office, but he's called a managing director, he was telling me that, you know, we publish as well, we do publish and we do a different type of publishing. It's not a partnership publishing at all, because publishly. I forgot to tell you the pup the partnership publisher retains fifteen percent, which, compared to the to the big boys, is is nothing. This company. If you sign on for their marketing package, which I was going to do anyway, they do everything and take it right right to to Ebook and and pod print on demand, cover art and hold and hold your hand through the whole thing. I mean to ask you, but everything, and they were half the price of the other ones and and they retain zero. There's a part of me that you know there's two books that I have put aside that I think would be nice to have them published because I don't mind if I lose control and it's for some reason they're I still have that slight aftertaste of a stigma that that self publishing is a bad thing, but I think it depends on the company. If you if you look online and put self publishing problems, they will come up with the company and as I won't mention them, but they're just nasty people. When you're...

...sending off samples of your writing to publishers, you find them in a book like writers and artists who, by the way, this book is published by the people who published most of my books. Little irony there. The you'll you'll find a publishers who are accepting submissions and you'll enter their name on on Google and you'll click the one that comes up first and you'll start this, and I did this, once you start going through the process of getting everything they want together to send it to them, and then you find that's not them at all. It's one of the one of these people who have basically hijacked the first spot and they're not they're one of the ones that come up on the top of every list of don't go near them. They don't answer your phone, calls, the arts bad, the printings bad, you know everything it. They took forever, they charge you five times what anyone else does and they retain ninety five percent like a real publishers like what. So there's very bad ones. But if if you feel in control enough to work with someone over everything, I mean the little blurb on the back of the book, you know, the back art, the Front Art, the style of text, everything, if you're comfortable with doing that, these companies that are intermediary and look them up. Get look them up on trust pilot. Find the ones that are well reviewed. Publishing push has a hundred percent five star rating. So I mean that you know they're a good one. And my first experience with them is just released a couple of days ago called Lake bed, which is a creepy one. When I spent I spend a year, but two years ago, in the High Desert of Utah and we were we were an hour and a half from the next big town and the village. The town was four thousand people, spread out a lot of farm country. It was a right on the Arizona Northern Arizona border and it was something out of a movie. It was very, very mormon, but not fundamentalist. They were. These were sort of very varied about very good people, very good family people. Really can't say a bad word about any of any of the ones I met so helpful. But at night, as still as the light started to change, all these these little canyons and and little gaps and narrow things and caves up in the hills, because we were surrounded by Red Rock. You know, everywhere starts getting really creepy. And this is before I was writing, but I just thought it would be kind of a neat idea to do something that goes on up there. And at the same time Claire was working at an animal sanctuary and we went up there number of times. At one point went to where they bury the the their the their animals that die, and I know it's a bit pet simitary is, but it's there. was there was something really wonderful about that, but also obviously a little bit creepy. And so somehow I the writing gene. I didn't know I had kind of squallowed these little nuggets of interest. And Lake bed is a combination of people following a too perfect dream of when everything in their life's going wrong in La, they get this offer to come up and join the sanctuary and then things go a bit badly. Well, fantastic. CONGRATS...

...on that launch, which, at least right now, is the most recent one, but in a couple of weeks, who knows, it might be yeah, like lion, old old fairy liner will be out. One of the most exciting things that my wife and I did a couple of days ago. When I say we, I mean she with me, rooting on from the sidelines, is she built a website from scratch, having having never done so, and used one of the top companies that walk you through it, but it's hard to describe how much they don't let you know what to do when you're trying to there's an expectation of having a background in wire framing or something, because we'll both read this the instructions a guy. I don't know what that means, but she sat in there diligently and she's working from home. Every day after five she would spend like an hour and a half just doing this. And my website, Chris Koppelcom is now is now up and running and so all my books are on there and some reviews and things. Yeah, the the website design. I am I want to say I have like a rudimentary knowledge of putting a website together, but the people that can really do it at to it from scratch. For me, it's anytime there's an error message of just how vague it is and I don't understand what the problem is. It's just an error code, but that error code can mean like one of ten things and there's no context. It's always great. Well, we were trying, I mean we were trying to do something so simple. We are trying to line up all the books and and each time a new one comes out we wanted to add it, which means the size would obviously shrink of all of them. So Claire Shrunk. We had three and we needed to add lake bit. So she shrunk luck, and when she shrunk luck, the other three went blink and went double the size, and it was like walk a Moole. She you know, you moved one and it popped up again over here and and she somehow worked out. It took about a week of learning what spacers were and how to use these nasty little things to be able to do this. But even now when she goes into makes one little change. She wanted to do a little black bar at the bottom and she did it and then she clicks save and the bottop bar went purple. The money my name dropped to that size. It's like, well, why love the love the simplicity. Yeah, I love the simplicity of websites. Now that that's another good element that I think obviously people, despite the saying of don't judge a book by its cover, people still do it, and especially if people are looking at an online website. I'll give bookshop dot org a shout out, which donuts to local bookstores and you know you're scrolling through or even at a physical book store you're looking at, you know, several books on the shelf. So for you, what makes up the elements of a good cover? I like simplicity and power. I don't know if you've looked up any of my books. This is the haunted one where the all the member animal killed memorabilia comes alive, and that's what they came up with. I sent them something completely different because it was it was a Christmas and I sent them you can go to stock images or any of these places and find things that are close and then tell them what you want change. But I sent them a mask. It was a reindeer mask for a party, as it was Christmas, and I just said just have that in the center with one red it was a golden colored mess with one little blood drop coming out of the eye. And they paid no attention to me whatsoever.

And and did this and but this stands out. I mean it's a great the new one, which is lake bed. We were trying, I was working with their artist for probably two weeks, back and forth. I had this vision I wanted. If you read the story, it's back when native Americans were living on the land. Something terrible happened to them there, which which created the whole problem in in the Lake Bread Canyon and I wanted just a super black lake with the shadow of the red rocks in a canyon and the incredible night sky that you'd have in the desert and it almost be, you know, a geometric shape and the star field up above to be reflecting perfectly off the lake, so it's almost just a mirror. And coming from the center of the lake, I just wanted the tiniest wisp of a small fire, Tornado and no matter how I don't think the person had ever seen a Red Rock Canyon or possibly a starfield like that and it in it. We weren't quite getting there and I said, well, look, if we got to a point that I went okay, let's just do that. And it was. It was close enough and it would have been fine, but it didn't get there was no wow factor. And then the producer said what what you want for the back and I said I was I was thinking about this last night and I what I think the really cool is if we could have a dream Catcher, a really nice dream catcher, on the back but have one half of it beat sharred as if it's been in a fire. And she went, Oh my God, that sounds wonderful. Anyway, so she sent me the first sample of the full book with the Dream Dream Catcher here and the the the not quite working this of the canyon, and I said to where, I know this this will drive you crazy because we've been doing this forever, but I think that dream catcher is amazing that she's created. Can we swap? Said, I'm so glad you said that because I feel the same way. So it's now this Black Matt background with this beautiful colorful dream catcher and she's created a little sort of frame around, just a golden little line frame around the side of the book and the tail of tail feathers overlap the frame. They stick out slightly across. But one side is charred and it's there's nothing else, no explanation, very, very simple and incredibly powerful. But they some people say it doesn't really matter if the book's good, and I think that's nonsense because even online I look at the at the cover, even even if it's that that bag on the device I'm looking at, I will blow it up and I will look at it and that helps. For instance, if I want to get a haunting, a good ghost story, and I if I see another eerie looking house shot from that angle with a skull in the cloud, I'm you know, I'm just not going to go for it. I want to see something completely different and those are the ones I'll go for. So I think it matters a lot of people when they go with the full self public Bush root, which is where you do everything yourself, including try and find a stock image and build your own cover page. Don't do it. If you do nothing else, that you can find artists and sites that will do you a custom cover page...

...for two hundred fifty, three hundred dollars, and that's going to that's going to sell the book more, almost more than anything else you're going to do. But also have have a vision, because they may not have one. They may read your book and have a completely different vision of what you want to get across than you do, but you're the author. Yeah, I totally agree. I think, and even I don't even say maybe even less than two hundred fifty, if you're really strapping for cash, like a site like fiver. I've gotten some designs for shirts from there in the past. It was like this, twenty five dollars, and then you can you can choose to tip the person. So I was like, you are very much underselling yourself, so I will give you some some extra money here for five designs now, just like and I was so impressed, like there was so one of them is being out here in Austin. We love our Queso at here, so it's an everything will be okay. So sure, and I gave her what I thought were like real, just silly, ridiculous directions. I'm like can you make a kyo swimming pool where there are some chips jumping into it? I don't see anything wrong with that. She put it together and I was just so impressed that I was like thank and she's not, I think she's based in Pakistan, so not, you know, she said that, familiar with or swimming pools. Yeah, so I was just like can you, can you die this? And then for the other ones, just so vague, and she she nailed them all as a I'm I hope it was one on the diving board him. I'm seeing that now. Yes, there's one. Well, one jumping off the side. Okay, they so as if, as if a die right board. But yeah, and one of them has sunglasses on. It's perfect, so magical, so so much better that if I had tried to do it, it would just be I'm punch a triangles that look terrible. Well, Chris, you're almost off the hook, but we always like to wrap up with the top three, and so for you, how fitting the top three horror novels? Number one, we mentioned it before. I mentioned it before, has to be Stephen Kings pet cemetery. It's I've read since taking more of an interest in writing. I've read up on his philosophy and the problems he had writing it, because it's incredibly dark, the subject matter involving the child and every everything. He took it to a level that no hor writer had ever done before, as he's done many times, but this was this was into a darkness that was, you know, pitch black from which many may not recover and but it is to it was the most terrifying book I've ever read a lot of his books, I mean shining. I'm embarrassed to say I read it when it first came out and it was definitely creepy, but I wasn't scared. Pet cemetery had me terrified and and that's really, I think, what you what you want. Another one, and this is not one that you would normally consider as as a horror book, but Dean Koons's watcher, which involves which I love. It involves a golden retriever which has some powers and is incredibly creepy and incredibly scary and wonderfully written and a wonderful but the O, the owner of the dog, they have a an interaction that that's just incredible and they with as a as someone who really loves dogs, which obviously he does, but the book just gets scarier and scarier and scarier and you don't know where it's going. And I've I read that one probably thirty years ago and it still stayed with me. The third one, actually I've got to...

...see what the title is. It's right here is an author that not every one knows about, though he's I mean, you think I'm prolific this, this guy's done, I think, to a year for just unbelievable length of length of time. It's the influence by Bentley little, very very imaginative, heart, very sharp. He doesn't he doesn't pull any punches. It's their profane there they get really quite nasty, but but very well written and very, very absorbing, and you just this particular one was one, as it's on my top three list. It's it. I'm it's in a tiny town in the middle of Arizona, in the way, in the desert. A man by a circumstance goes and stays with with relatives as an alien presence arrives in the town and it just from that. You wouldn't think it's creepy, but it builds and builds and builds. Word by word and till about halfway through. First of all you can't put it down, but you else can't sleep. So I mean that's my criteria. I want. I want that if I'm going to read a scary but I book, I want to be scared. Yeah, I think that's fair. So do you? Do you read them at night then so that you you can't sleep, or do you try to do it earlier in the day? So maybe you can get my ritual is that I read with my Morning Cup of coffee, which is at a at about nine o'clock in the morning. Ashe what I'm saying is about eight o'clock in the morning. I read and and fiddle around for about two hours before I settled down to writing. And and if I do read at night, I won't read our story. It's I'm yeah, I'm too susceptible. Yeah, I can't, I can't do it. And anythink that's making me think too much before bad. I'm like, I don't want this, I don't want my brain doing doing that many sire. Well, a couple of the ones I've written and the one I'm writing now will be. I do get to the point where the spook factor of what I'm writing is creeping me out, and there was. There was one point when I was writing, I think it. I think it was the lodge. No, wasn't. It was legacy that it gets very scary at a certain point and when thing, the little things, start to happen, and people who've read this say it really creep that does that. That section gets you creep down and you stay creeped out. But it creeped me up to the point that the house was starting to scare me a little bit. And because we live in a two hundred and fifty year old little English, English house in the countryside and it's got all sorts of creeks and grown some funny spots and you know so well you're doing something right that if your own house is starting yeah, if, yeah, awesome. Well, Chris, you mentioned it earlier, but if people want to visit you want to pick up one, or perhaps all of your books, where can they find you? Chris Koppelcom the newly minted Chris yes time, and from there there's also rush out they and there's links to facebook and instagram and twitter from there as well. So that's the best place to start. Awesome, Chris, Coppel. Thank thank you for hopping on. This was a blast. Hope you get some good, good music play in today in addition to all of that good writing. And of course, we got to end up with a Corny joke, as we always do. I'll make a topical since I have this this beard on me. I actually I actually didn't like this beard at first, but then I grew on me good after today. People, good people, cool things. It's produced in Austin, Texas. If you were a fan of this episode,...

...go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. As always, you can send me a message Joey at good people, cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people, cool things, and check out all the old episodes via good people, cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (142)