Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 59 · 1 year ago

59: Funeral Homes, Staying Fit, and Hollywood Magic with Chris Meyer

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

No matter where you’ve come from or what you’ve done, you’ve experienced things no one else has. And those stories are worth telling. Luckily, today’s guest gets to hear from all different kinds of people in his role as the owner of a funeral home. Chris Meyer channeled what he’s learned from those folks into his book Life in 20 Lessons: What a Funeral Guy Discovered About Life, from Death

Prior to his experience with funeral homes, Chris spent more than a decade in Hollywood as a screenwriter. And he discovered a fun secret about the town that he channeled into another work, The 'Wood.  

We’re also getting the scoop on Chris’s latest business venture, funandmoving.com. We’re covering it all!

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is Chris Meyer, who is the author of three different books, including life and twenty lessons what a funeral guy discovered about life from death as well as the wood, a satire on life in Hollywood and an upcoming book all about basketball. Four months and a lifetime, we're chatting what it's like to run a funeral home, how Chris kind of stumbled into this, but all of the great lessons he's learned along the way. We're looking at his writing process. We're getting a little bit of a peek behind the curtain, behind the silver screen, if you will, in to Hollywood, plus so much more. Chris also shares the sneak peak of a new business that he is launching later this month, fun and Movingcom, which is geared towards those sixty five and older and providing ways for them to continue to maintain good physical and mental health. Lots of fantastic stuff in this episode, so thanks for Tuning in. If you'd like to support the show, you can do so via the shop. Good people, cool thingscom. Shop live lots of good he's in there always a fun time, and a few more coming down the line, so be sure to be checking out the shop for all the latest and greatest. You can also get in touch with the show on facebook, twitter or instagram at GPCT podcast, or send an email joey at good people, cool thingscom. For now, here's the conversation with Chris. For people who don't know who Chris Meyer is, can you give us your elevator pitch, but can you also tell us the elevator that we're riding on while you give us this pitch? But there's an elevator pitch. I have had such a wide and varied life it's been really cool. I'm a New York state license attorney. I made a low budget film in New York City for about a hundred thousand dollars. One through a bunch of film festivals, I decided to load up my car with my film and moved to La I spent eleven years in Los Angeles trying to be a screenwriter and, you know, ended up getting a manager and agent in that time I was working for the one of the foremost fashion photographers of our time on guid named Herberts, and has a fashion production company and Commercial Company. I worked on a bunch of studio lots, most notably paramount, the paramount lot, and I did their ampus campaign, which is the Academy Award campaign each year for about three or four years. That was very interesting. And then I had a child and we decided, man, it's time to get real here and I bought a funeral home. Yeah, so it's really a natural segue from a...

...screenwriter to a funeral homeowner and that really is my quick elevator pits. But now I'm primarily in building text sites. So yeah, it's been a crazy life, a fun life. I have three sons and who are really the apples of my eye and been very happily married for twenty years. So that's it. Fantastic. Well, well, there's lots to cover there for sure. There I think my first question is how did you go like? What was the like? You said, it's a natural segue. I'm living out in La and then buying a funeral home. So how did that come about? You get into so we were in we had a friend of the family who would be at all of our family gatherings and he always said to me, you know, Chris Crest, he was a mortician and he would say, Chris, you know, the funeral businesses such a solid business and it's so good and you know there's always people dying and they'll always be a jim and I was like, you know, you like you. I would look at the guy and go come on, dude, really, I mean. But you know, we had a baby in Los Angeles and I, like I said, I had been there about eleven years at this time and my wife was really the primary breadwinner and she's like, you know, I really want to be a mom and I was like yeah, I don't, I think it's time to grow up. And and seeing this young boy looking up at me, and you know, that was the really the biggest dose of reality that I could ever see. And, Lo and behold, we decided. You know, my family was all in New York and hers is up in Northern California and she said I'd like to be close to my family. So that was really the best option that I had. At the time. I was an attorney, but I knew that I didn't want to go back to that because that would have been really crazy long hours and starting at the bottom again. And so this was a business opportunity and I figured I could be the you know, the business guy in the back end and this guy could run the front of a shop. And it was a small family home, funeral home, and you had to do everything. So, you know, to be profitable I had to be really a lot more involved than I that had it originally anticipated. But as it turned out it was like such a profound, profoundly great experience from so many different levels and it was just, you know, it was the basis of my first book and that was called it's called life in twenty lessons and and the idea was, you know, after about eight, sixty eight years into the business, I started hearing the same thing from surviving families who would always sort of caution me and say, do you have you know, they we get to know each other. Christ you have children these then they'd be like get be with them, they're young once. Take the time. You know, I'm here and I'm telling you, take the time, you know, really take the time. And so I really did heed all of those those warnings so to speak, and...

...just delved into coaching and being with my son and everything. So that was sort of the short story of how I got into it and it was insanity. And again, I had I had no family history of being in the funeral business and no specific calling but for the fact that I had a really nice relationship with my grandfather and you know, he ended up dying and you know, that was I think the greatest thing was the empathy that I understood from him. He was my best friend and I saw him aging and that was as a young man. That was probably the most close experience I had to the funeral industry. But now it was. It's been wonderful. I'm still here. It's been about sixteen years now and yeah, what a what a crazy life. Crazy, yeah, but fun. That's that's always good. Yeah, crazy and fun is a nice Combo and will get into the book a little bit. But you mentioned how seeing your grandpa get old and eventually die was kind of your introduction to us, and I think that's probably true of a lot of people. Of that's kind of things, though they're yeah, they're introduction of like maybe it's the first time they're in a funeral home. I know I played little league with a kid who's dad ran the funeral home in my hometown, but I only like, my only knowledge of that was like, Oh, okay, he runs a funeral home, but like I never went in there. I never really had a reason too. But it's just kind of like Oh, that's like what your dad does. Cool. But then there's also, and I think this is a nice time because of your Hollywood background, there's the show six feet under, which I like, I still think that's one of my favorite shows, I think. Yeah, a lot of mean till you three finales right said yeah, have you seen the show, for one, and how accurate is it to what you're doing on a daily basis? So I wasn't a regular watcher of it, but everyone says, and I've seen a couple of them, and its spot on, you know, and it was really was it two brothers, right, and mine was like a young friend of our family. So it was a lot of people would come in and say, oh my gosh, this is like six feet on their ears, but no, it was. It was truly spot on. I think that's what made that the show so believable and so well like my people. It just felt real and organic and that's truly what it was. Obviously it was well acted, but yeah, no, it was. It was spot on. Yeah, yeah, and I think, I think another reason why, at least why I like the show is because, yes, while there's death present and literally every episode, because they show you how someone dies and then the episode kind of revolves around that at the beginning of each episode, but there's also a lot about life within there too, and and again like taking the time and like cherishing that those moments that you have with people, because you don't know when, Hey, a you know, an airplane is going to drop some blue ice onto you, or you know you'll be in a like a grinder and a clumsy...

...internal accidentally turn it on. Those are those are deaths in the show. That's not just me being like real spontaneous with my market. I thinks are, but I think that's like that's something that you had in your book and I think that's a critical differentiator of, you know, your book compared to something that's like specifically just about death. I think that. I think your spot on and I think the the the lessons that I was learning really had a profound impact on me and I was. I'm kind of an emotional guy anyways and I tend to get involved in people stories and that's probably why I thought early on that, man, I don't know if I can do this for my entire life. Like meeting, the meeting with Famili's part was very, very emotional for me because, you know, you, I think, to be good at your job and you kind of put yourself in the person's position and I wanted to kind of do or trying to make it easier for them, and they became, it became very emotionally taxing, and so that, you know, it's a blessing and a curse. And I think you know there there is this idea that the funeral director, you know, is really this person that either drinks at thirty am in the morning to kind of dull in all the pain or, you know, takes that converse side, and I chose the converse. I I broke away and went to my children's school for their plays and I went home and Tuck my son in and sons plural in, and so I think it's just perspective right, and how you can deal with and I'm very blessed to have had a great upbringing and, like I said, I think the empathy that you can learn, or that I certainly learned in being here, was really the the great lesson of owning a funeral home. And you know, I think you get beyond sort of that, the creepy stuff, you know, and obviously, you know, I always say, the smells or something you can't really explain to some people and really you don't want to. You want to the behind the scenes stuff needs to stay behind the scenes and you have to come here and give them, you know, the confidence and the proper memory picture that they want or that will give them their final ease of mind. And so yeah, no, it's a it's a real interesting dichotomy and again, I wouldn't change it for the world. It was so profoundly positive in every facet that I'm so grateful to have been here. Yeah, yeah, for sure. And the book is called life in twenty lessons. So do you have a favorite lesson out of the twenty? I I just they're they're all kind of a favorites, but I think for me I like to just say, you know, be thankful. Be Thankful. I think I think we we tend to overcomplicate things in our lives and I think with social media and everything, you know,...

...just hitting us all the time. Seven that idea of just stepping away, stepping off the habit trail of life and just being thankful. It's so easy to say but it's hard to practice and I find myself doing that a lot. I found I know it's weird, but I find I like I by myself waking up and say hey, thank you for today. You know, I'm not saying it's God or whomever, whoever you believe, it's fine with me, but I'm just like made it another day, you know, and I think that's what my grandfather because he was he was always like that. He just was like the day, I'm up again and, you know, upright and again. I think being in the funerals is very easy to do that for me because you're like man, you see every the worst of the worst, and whether it's family behavior or accidents or children or whatever it is, I find it very easy to like get up and it's like thank you again, it happened again. Yeah, much better than the altar in it if of like I woke up. Yeah, simple about right. Yeah, you know, yeah, really simple. Yeah. Well, moving from one book to another. You also I published a novel called the wood, which is way a satire about life in Hollywood. So well, definitely want to talk about the book itself, but for people that haven't lived in Hollywood, I lived in La for a little under two years, so I got a taste of Hollywood, but you were, you were ingrained there for more than a decade and there's plenty of people who's only kind of vision of Hollywood is, you know, through award shows or movies or things like that. So right, what is Hollywood like for someone that hasn't been there? I think, I think you know. It's so funny because I think when you hear Hollywood, you're like, oh, Hollywood, and how beautiful. Right, and I think you probably, if you've been there two years, is pretty good. You know that there's this whole underbelly and this whole idea. The idea of the wood is that there's really truly only about fifteen people in the entire town that can say yes to a movie, to getting a movie made in everyone else is sucking up to those fifteen, and I truly do believe that. I mean the inner workings of how a script is a conceived and written and then gets approval on the various ladders up the line to getting made is totally fascinating to me. And of course, me as a prospective SPEC writer writing on speculation that someone will buy it. That's the bottom of the bottom. You are the lowest form of life in Hollywood because you have nothing but the paper and pen to which you're going to write an idea that germinates in your head probably for a year two to get to maybe the idea of getting a manager and agent. So this whole idea, I think I...

...try to demistify the the process in the wood and but I really try to explain to that person in Peoria who doesn't understand it. And so my protagonist is a woman who is writing letters to someone who we will find out at the end of the book, and in each of those letters she is a studio executive or trying aspire to be higher and higher, as we all are, and she's telling this person about all the various steps along the way, like who the development girl off is and who the SPEC writer and who the you know, the producers are, and all of the steps. So I'm trying to educate because when I was in Hollywood, I felt that there were tons of good movies made about Hollywood, but nothing that truly explained to the lay person really all the steps. So I love, you know, the player was one, swimming with sharks was another, and obviously the one that we all really know is the Netflix, the entourage, right, that was really the Mark Wahlberg series was really the probably the best depiction of how it's all goes down. But that was my genesis. I wanted to take my years in Hollywood and then set it against kind of a funky back drop with, you know, mentally ill people and drug addicts and, you know, guys who had been in Hollywood their whole life. But really I wanted to tap into how we all came where did we come from and how that shapes who we are. So for me, what I the common denominator and all my writing is family, right, I want to I truly believe that how you grow up and the siblings that you're surrounded with in the friends family, meaning your extended family, really defines who we are and who we become. And so I'm trying to always scratch the surface on family, and family meaning they could be friends that you call family, or truly your mom and dad and your siblings. So I really enjoyed writing the wood because for me it was totally opposite from this nonfiction thing and it I felt it was more about my personality. Writing Fiction, I could be more me because I didn't have to be confined to this the constraints of telling people about the funeral life. This was just more of my personality, being funny, being a reverent, being silly, and I really sparked to that. It ended up being it's my second book that published, but it was the third book that I wrote. I ended up writing the basketball book first. But Yeah, it was so enjoyable. And again I was listening to your podcast at Craig Leer Lanar and and he was talking about writing during the pandemic and it was the same thing for me. I mean there was a law in work and I was like no, I better just right, just sit down and right. You know, we're all confined in the house here. I'm just going to go...

...off in the room and just start ripping it and that's that's truly what happened. So yeah, that was it was a lot of fun. I think I'm going to gravitate more to fiction as we go on in years? Awesome, awesome. So can you, because I think that is an interesting dichotomy of going from this nonfiction, you know, serious topic, to a fiction and more lighthearted, like you're saying, getting to be more a reverend, kind of showcase your personality. So within the writing process itself, did you still kind of follow the same sort of formula or template, or was it radically different, because it's fiction versus non fiction? For me it was radically different. And again, so the funny thing is is, you know, we the difference. You and your viewers have to know that there's, you know, traditional publishing and there is self publishing, right, and all my books are self publicish. Not that I didn't try to find a with my first book. I did everything, created the abstract, sent out to the New York City publishing houses and sat and waited, and I've heard that you could wait up to a year to get responses. Certainly the the probably the fastest someone responded to one of my quarry letters was about nine months and I'm like, Dude, I'm not waiting for this, not with Amazon right here. So that that was the that was sort of the intrigue for me, and the second thing that I really sparked to me about self publishing was that I could kind of write whatever I want it right. So with life and twenty lessons, I felt like if I was with the traditional public, they would be like, all right, Chris, let's do life in the next twenty lessons, you know, and stay in your genre and try to create that brand that you can see with like the Guy Mark Manson, who wrote life is effed up, and every every seven books after that are all about effed up in the in the situation in your title. So for me it was really intriguing to be able to self publish and then just get out of that genre, nonfiction, and try something totally different and look it. I don't I don't hold myself out as some fantastic writer. I think I'm a little bit of a hack, but what I do is I'm a grinder. Right, I will get it done and I will put it down on paper. So your question was, what was it like? The too so radically different for me, very structured in the non fiction world. I wanted to hit my twenty lessons, I wanted to give up message in each really a structured book, whereas the wood was totally unstructured. I actually wrote it as a screenplay. I broke it down into three acts, like a three act structure of a screenplay, and my idea was meant, this is a movie and I want to make it. I still do to this day. I want to make this a movie because it's it's very visual. So that was intriguing for me and I encourage all, like young writers especially, don't just...

...sit there waiting for a random house or, you know, penguin to pick you up or hatchet. Do it, just pound, because you're creating content and you will have something that will live in perpetuity and who knows? You know there are, there's so many famous writers who weren't famous until the fifth and sixth book. Right. We've heard that all on. That's and the perfect example is the queen's Gambit that we all watched her in the pandemic, which was awesome, and apparently it was twenty, twenty five years in the making. So I'm one of those people that say, you know, don't talk about doing it, just do it. You know, we all say, Oh, I got this great novel, will shut your mouth and write it. You know it's it's hard, but put that first step in front of the other and write it. So yeah, that was that was the greatest thing for me. That so different in styles, but something I wanted to try. Yeah, for sure. And now you've got a third book as well. Yes, tell us about that. The third book is is called four months in a lifetime and it's very it's gone back to not nonfiction. I told you that. I actually wrote it as my second book, but then I got the idea for the wood and I thought it was what's much more commercial and much more visual. So I want to get that out first. But four months in a lifetime depicts my life with my middle son and his friends. I coached them in basketball from kindergarten to eighth grade every single year and we were we were really good team and we played in the parochial league, but then we also went up and played in like a super competitive a you league and where this tiny class of I think there are twelve boys in the class and I had eight of them on the team. So this this really close knit group of boys and each year me and a couple Dad's coach them. You could it was cool, so cool. You see them getting better each year. And finally, you know, in eighth grade it was our our sort of swan song together, and this talks about specifically that year. That's four months. Is a season in our parochial league and the men Marie's, you know, for me you will last a lifetime because I mean, what could be greater than, you know, coaching your son and his friends for nine years straight? So that's that's the entire book. And then the other half of the book is about how I fell in love with basketball from a very young age and it shares those two stories. So it goes back and forth between real time that we're living and my history of growing up Nice. That's so awesome. I'M gonna have to give that a plug in my basketball newsletter. Oh Yeah, for sure, yeah, I'll get you the complementary copy. Yeah, let's do it. Let's do it that also. That also gave me a little bit of a flashback to I think it was eighth grade for us as well, seventh or eighth grade, where our middle school team very good and we played in like a traveling league...

...as well. Awesome, but that competition was such a step up from the other middle school it's like it was such a wake up all it was amazing. Yeah, but that's good for the kids. I mean that was the whole thing. You know, we I tell that story also, the first four years in our parochial league we didn't lose a game and then we went up like you, like you're traveling team. We went up to this place around here, it's called Hardwood Palace, and we got smoked a couple and it's so good for the boys because they're like, you know, Oh, we're not we're not perfect, you know, and in our little sphere it was very comfortable. But no, that's a great reality. It was. It was fun to experience that with them. Yeah, I think in the moment you're kind of like like this is much but then afterwards that was good. That was good. Yeah, yeah, we were talking before recording. This was news to me. I didn't even know you were doing this. You've got a new a new business venture going on called fun and moving and it sounds fantastic. So what's it all about? So, yeah, thank you. It's called fun and movingcom and it's a website specifically designed for those over sixty five to exercise and the genesis of it, like I said, I had a great relationship with my grandfather and I distinctly remember him. He was just avid outdoorsman, German immigrant, came over, worked the streets of New York City in an unair conditioned truck delivering milk and eggs. He's and you know, it was, if not fascinating story, six days a week, twelve hour days and and he and I just had this great, once in a lifetime grandfather grandson relationship and was more than that. We were really friends and we would do a lot of stuff together. But he as he aged, you know it was funny because he's just really kind of wasn't really cut, but he was ripped and he would be like, you know, I see the gray hairs and the wrinkles, but inside I feel really good. It's and so as I've age, I kind of Feeliz. I see the same thing right like I'm feeling good, but like it's starting to get a little grayer and you know, the hairlines going up. So all those things. So I said, you know, this would be perfect and I got the idea really at the funeral home, having all these relationship with the assistant living communities around here and seeing people not properly exercising, and so we started this site. We started creating videos, first in the chair, couple levels in the chair and then finally standing. But then also we have these what we do we call bet exercises. We exercise people who are either nonambulatory or had a stroke or something like that. And what what differentiates us is all of our routines are created by an ace certified trainer, and aces the...

...sort of official national organization that certifies the NCAA and all that. So they're lit there, a doctor has looked on over and so we feel that we have a nice little niche in the exercise community and we're just about to launch here in the next month. So it's very exciting and it could be you can downloaded on your APP and, you know, grandma and GRANDPA can go off an exercise on their own and it's very, very affordable and yeah, we're really excited about it. Yeah, that's that's so awesome and I think definitely an under served market, I think for sure. I think you know, obviously home exercising has grown quite a bit over the past year. I've even had a few guests on this very podcast that I have launched either new products entirely or new services within something that they've already had. But again, yeah, largely targeting either. You know, younger people are like a certain, certain subsection within that, and so it's it's good to see, especially, I mean both of my parents are over sixty five, so it's I hope they're okay with me saying that. I think. Yeah, but I'm too minorcle is to be saying it para perfect yes. So yeah, I think I think that's super exciting and congrats on the the launch coming up very shortly here, and you can either for this business or any of the ones that you've had. I always like asking this, since you've had a lot of experience as an entrepreneur, what's something that surprises you about running a business? It's a great question and I think it changes every day. I think that's the thing. I think you don't know what to expect. Every day there are a lot of fires, if not bombs, and I think the if you're into a more traditional line to five existence, than it don't do it, because it's you know, it's Saturdays, it's Sundays, it's the clock starts to not become you lose track of the days and stuff like that, but I think it's truly truly rewarding to be the sort of the master of your own domain and control of your own destiny, and that's, I think, that's what is attractive about it all to me. I grew up, I was very fortunate, in the ninth grade, when I started my high school career, my father started a business in our house, literally in our house, and I got to see him grow this business from, you know, having people come into our living room at night and work with my father and my mother cook meals and all sit around the table and eat and then it would grow. Then he rented a place in town and then he bought his own place in town and that so I truly, I truly believe, even more so than my other brothers, believe, that the spirit of the that entrepreneurial spirit was sort of injected into me at that early age and I in seeing him do that. He was a very smart man and he really loved what he did. Like he he would talk about like slew and...

I would probably talk about sports with the gale on our face. He would talk about civil engineering that way and and and that was really cool to me. I mean I knew civil enginery wasn't for me, but I can see the joy in his face and I was like, HMM, that's pretty cool, you know, if he's happy what he does and he's making money at it, that that that was the first, you know, sort of light bulb moment at a very young age. That said, I like, I like this thing that my dad did here. It's very cool and, although I don't like his field that he's in, I want to do something like that. So, yeah, I think, you know, again, it goes back to family, right, it goes back to is that seed planted? What if? What if my dad didn't do that with that seat have been planted? I'm not certain it would have. Yeah, I think I think that's a very interesting I tie back to like you're saying, back to family, and I think also a nice little segue into our next question, which I always like to ask. What something you wish you were asked more frequently? Yours is what is the meaning of life? Let's get real deep here. Yeah, no, it's you know, I feel like, and it sounds a little pompous actually to say that I wish more people ask me about that, but I I mean it in a more simple way. I really do, and I think that for me I just sometimes wish that people would stop me in the street or my friends would stop me and say, Hey, tell me, what is the meaning of life, because I feel like again, I'm reminded on a daily basis here at the funeral home and again speaking with people, hearing those things. And you know, there's one thing you can't get more of. It's so trite. You can't get more time right, and I think that we all in our society tend to overcomplicate things with everything that we do, and I think the the simpler, smaller moments or really truly what has meaning and what gives you that buoyancy in life that you need. And for me, again, I have I grew up in a family like that, really tight nuclear family, grandparents very involved, very much in our lives, and that's the way I want to do with my sons, and I have three sons and it's the same thing with us. Although look at don't get me wrong, they're up on their xbox and, you know, doing what normal teenagers do at times, but you know, they're in my house and we're together and that is the greatest thing you could ever be. Just forged those relationships with your children or your parents as soon as you can. If you're you're not taking advantage of it right now. So yeah, absolutely, and we're going to take a skirt like a hard right here, going from the meaning of life to our top three, which I'm very excited for this, your top three candy bars ever made. We're not just talking current day here. It sounds okay. Now, I'm I'm hoping you're. You're a younger man. So I don't know if you...

...know this one, the marathon bar, and I know of it. I don't think I've ever had it, though. Okay, now I don't think it exists anymore. Maybe in some novelty shops. It was a chocolate covered cable and inside was just caramel. So milk chocolate cable with Caramel, but it was about this long. Loved it. Great, Great Candy Bar. Second, great one. Not a lot of people know this one, the what Chuma call it? Who Remember that? I do. Yeah, mill chocolate crisps and caramel with a little peanut butter flavor. Okay, third, love it right. Third, what was their dirt? I was gonna say snickers, but that's too pedestrian. I think it was. Now we'll go snickers for now. I remember the third, but that's that's the top three. But again, I want to see more whatchama call it, and more marathon in my life. Yeah, I mean, well, how are you three? Oh, that's a I mean, that's a terrific question. I mean, I kind of think a hundred grand is pretty that's that was it. I wasn't perfect. Well then, that's phenomenal. Yeah, I think a hundred grant. It took me a while to finally get into I don't know why. I think I had a friend who did it like it, so I was just like, I don't like it either, and I had never really given it a fair shake. I mean it's Caramel in it. Yeah, yeah, yeah, it's very it's very nice. I'll have one right after us. Maybe go find what now. I don't know if Reese's counts as a candy bar, because I'm sure the kind of cups, but class. I also feel like that's pretty pedestrian. And then I don't know if this like. I don't think I could eat as much of this as some other candy bars, but I've always liked Charleston shoes. I think those are a fun little like. That's yeah, that's close on my list. So that for me was like a public pool memory, because the Charleston she would come in vanilla, chocolate, strawberry and then they would freeze them and then you whack it on the concrete and it breaks up in pieces and that was like a great summer treat at the public pool. So I'm with you on the Charleston Nice. I've never tried the strawberry one. I gotta. Yeah, I got it with strawberry. Look it up. It's awesome. You were a vanilla guy, right. Yes, that's the the wrapper. Yeah, that's pretty good. Well, I got I got some homework to do after this. It's you do really a marathon? Bar done writing that right at that. Well, Chris, if people want to learn more about you or learn more about anything that you're doing, where can they find you? Yeah, so, Chris Meyer, authorcom. That cite'll be up and going pretty soon. I have I'm on Amazon, all the book stores,...

Barns and Noble, wherever you want. My third book will be coming out in September and please, please, get parents, grandparents, friends to fun and movingcom word of mouth is the greatest way to spread and we believe we're truly going to help a lot of people with this site. So we definitely GRANDMAS and GRANDPA's wanted, as they say in our logline. So that would be great, fantastic. Will Chris. Thank you so much for Chatt and this was fantastic and looking forward to all that's to come. Yeah, I really appreciate that you have in me and let me talk about everything. Thank you for the time. Absolutely and of course we got to end with a Corny joke as always. I tried to even make it a little death related, but hopefully I don't think. I don't think this is two more of it at all. But be the last, last one to let you down kind of thing, sort of. Yeah, yeah, there was. I actually feel like I may be told one recently that was sort of similar, about by a coffin being the last thing I needed. But will be. will be a little little more historical, I guess, with this. On his deathbed, Achilles realized that his side wasn't going to win the war and so he uttered his last words. Defeat Hurts, very nice. Yeah, good, after today, people, good people, cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you were a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. As always, you can send me a message Joey, at good people, cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people cool things and check out all the old episodes via good people, cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

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