Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 129 · 2 months ago

129: Creating Comics, Musical Influences, and Crowdfunding Campaigns with Morgan Quaid

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Do you dig speculative fiction, steampunk horror, and kickass fantasy? Then you're going to be a fan of Morgan Quaid. But even if those genres aren't your favorite, this episode has plenty to help you thrive.

Morgan is a writer of comics, novels, and graphic novels. On top of that, he's a music composer and producer. He's done plenty of creative work, collaborated with great minds, and has tons of experience with crowdfunding campaigns.

If you're in ANY sort of creative field, Morgan shares solid advice throughout the episode. Come along and listen in, won't you? 

For more episodes and helpful resources, visit goodpeoplecoolthings.com

Good people cool things as a concast feature in conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is Morrigan Quaid, a writer and composer based all the way across the world from me in Australia. Morgan's talking how we got into this wild world of comics, some of the mistakes he made early on and, even though fail fast is kind of a Cliche, we talked about why it's good to make some mistakes as you're getting into whatever creative endeavor you're working on. We're gonna also talks about composing music, some of the fun things that he's learned along the way. There some of his curmudgeon LE, old cute type of behaviors and attitudes towards playing music live and why he sticks to just composing music nowadays. If you're ever like, Hey, I want to do a crowdfunding campaign for my x creative endeavor, Morgan has done several crowdfunding campaigns. He shares what's worked, what hasn't and how you can make them a little more fun, even though they are a lot of hard work. You can add some excitement and energy to them. Always a good time. If you want to get even more great, wonderful tips, head on over to good people, cool things dot com. Sign up for the mailing list. Gets thrown into your inbox just a couple of times a month. It's not anything wild. You're not going to have three thousand emails by the time you hit submit. Very simple, very wonderful, just like this conversation with Morgan. For people who might not be familiar with you, can you give us your name, an elevator pitch and then the type of elevator that we're writing on? Okay, I will, but I'll do it in reverse. All of that Sols elevator in deference to Charlie and the chocolate factory, uh, and that sort of stuff. Um, oh, I shouldn't have done it in reverse. Now I've forgotten everything. I am a writer, music composer, Um, chocolate connoisseur, I don't know, uh, and my name is Morgan Quaid. And whatever the elevator elevator pitch was, I've messed up. So, uh, find me and read my stuff. There you go. There's my elevator pitch. You won't regret it. We'll get into all the stuff. I think that was great. I think that that sounded great. We'll get into all of that stuff. But you mentioned chocolate connoisseur in your pitch there. So what's what are we talking here? Are we like like bars of chocolate, chocolate cakes, chocolate ice cream, all the above? What is it? Anything? Anything, unfortunately. Um, yeah, if it's chocolate, then it it wants to be in me and I want to have it in me. Um, yeah, now, I'm a big chocolate fan. I think it's a horrible, evil thing that is ruined the world for many people, but it's just amazing. It's what are they of those things that whatever set up our brain is wide for evolutionary terms or whatever. Chocolate for me is the thing that just you know, sets up all of the all the alarms, all of the buttons, all the bells and whistles and just yeah, so we have to limit the amount of chocolate we have. Yeah, but very fair. Usually another connoisseur. I okay, I don't know a good chocolate from a bad chocolate. I know chocolate and that I want it and that's it. I'm not. I'm not of a milk guy than a than a dark chocolate okay, okay, yeah, I think I think that's enough to qualify as a connoisseur. I don't know what the official standing is, but something like that. Something like that. So, aside from chocolate, you've also written comics and short stories and novels and you have a lot of different work that's out there. Like you said, you're telling people to go go find it. Hopefully, by the end of this episode they'll be smitten and the one read everything that you've done. But to me, at least from from an outside, since I have...

...never written comics before, is there kind of a man like a massive difference between the sort of writing process for a comic versus a short story versus a novel, or do you kind of take the same approach to all of them? I think, yeah, there's definitely a mechanical difference between how they're represented to readers um how they're consumed. So you kind of have to appreciate that when you're writing and it's it's a hard, hard thing because you're so the story ideas and the way that I would construct a story and everything. It's pretty much the same whatever format it's in. Um, you know, plot and characters and all those sorts of things, um, but how it's presented is different and for, for instance, comics you have to be a lot briefer than than what you would be with a novel. A novel you for me as well, the sort of writer that I am a novel, I'm always pushing myself to to have the reader in the back of my head saying to me more detailed, more detail, you need to tell us more, you need to give us more what's going on. Why are they feeling? is because I tend to write very quickly and very action oriented stuff, which means I'm always in a hurry to get to the point. So sometimes don't enjoy the journey. So, you know, whereas with comics, it's much more obviously visual and there are there's limited space within each page for text, so you have to minimize the text and you have to think about what's another way I can say this. It still gets the message across, but it's not using, you know, fancy pants words that I like to use in novels and other areas. Um. So yeah, you have to kind of respect the that the difficulty is how much does that influence you when you're writing? Um and I'm still struggling with that. So I will tend to just write the same kind of way more or less, and then in the editing process that's where I'll shape it to fit the medium a little bit more. Um and script writing is a recent thing that I've started doing, which is that's a whole other thing as well. Um, the most recent one that I've written is for a horror, horror film which a direct a friend of mine, is actually going to put together. So it's a bizarre thing because it's not just writing a script and hoping someone picks it up, it's writing a script for a director who already has a cast. It's like all backwards, so he already knows the actors that are going to do this thing. So that was a bit of a headspin as well because, like, I don't know if this actor could pull this off way you know anyway. But yes, that's hope. That answers the question. Have you gotten feedback on the script that? Like? Have you done anything that maybe an actor can't pull off? Well, I don't know. Yeah, so the feedback I've got was very good. And he loves it and there were minimal edits and minimal changes. We kind of spoke all the way through, Um, and that's really good. But it's also kind of like, Dude, how are you gonna like that? There's some of it that's just a little bit gory or action oriented and stuff, and I think, well, yeah, you could do that with makeup and prosthetics and all that sort of stuff. But there's a certain sort of dream vision sequence in there and I'm thinking, yeah, you're gonna need to add a ton of effects to to make this thing, you know, seem real, and I think there's ways to do it. I think I could tailed a lot of the really crazy wacky stuff that I might might do if it was a blockbuster film, Um, and tried to really nail it down to okay, if you've got human characters doing this stuff most of the time for the film, How can you do that? But we'll see. There are a few things I have no idea the range of the actors or anything or what I'm asking them to do, Um. So we'll see. But he knows them, so he'll do the translating and he'll change the script as needed. and Are we are we going to get a glimpse of you on screen too? I know sometimes writers and directors will will kind of throw themselves in as a little cameo appearance. Is that in the cards for you? Did you try to work yourself in there? I I out of sheer vanity idea at one stage. Have there. There is...

...a character in there who was kind of like an oracle sort of figure. Man. Talk talk about the EGO anyway. So there's this oracle sort of character and the idea was originally going to be there was a sort of broken eighties style television Um that they tuned to a certain frequency and then they have a bit of a blood sacrifice thing and it conjures up this image of this character who they converse with from this kind of other world, Um, and I was going to do that because I thought that's perfect. I couldn't record that here at home. It doesn't matter if it's a bit grainy and whatnot. That'll actually suit the thing, Um, and you know, he could just, you know, superimpose it on that TV and then be in the film. I just thought it doesn't fit with anything else. As you know, it's there's a lot of organic kind of natural stuff within the things. So in the end that the Oracle is actually a recently buried body, that they sort of scraped the dirt away from his face, and you know it's and which I can't do because I'm not there in the US. Um, yeah, so there was a moment. Then I'm writing another one at the moment, which I don't know how because it's potentially going to be a western horror and I think, how the hell am I going to get myself into that? Um, so I will see one day. One day I'll put myself into one of the films for sure, but not yet. Vanity didn't win this time around. Sanity prevailed, unfortunately, but vanity is under the surface, bubbling a little bit. I'd like it. I like it. It is gotta get my face out there, man. That's what it's all bad. Getting your face out there exactly, exactly. Let the world see your your star shining there. Now going back to comics, because I mean I'm I'm always impressed by really anyone that can can create comic, because I cannot for the life of me draw like my my I'd say my best drying is an evil Mrs PAC man. That randomly has a go to. I don't know how this evolved, but that's about that's about out, which is, you know, pretty pretty crude drying, I think, by any standards. And was there? Was this something that you were always kind of into growing up? Did you have a favorite comic or anything like that while you were getting started, or was this kind of something you discovered later in life? Yeah, definitely later in life. As a kid I wasn't really into comics, mainly because if you look back at the earlier comics from you know, sort of seventies and eighties, um the there was too much text for me, that there was images full of stuff happening, but way too much reading. So I was kind of confused and was thinking I would either want to read a book or watch a movie. I don't want to have to kind of do both in that format. So it was a bit stressful for me. So I just didn't really take it and I was never really into the whole Superhero I think for some reason it didn't. I mean, you know, I've watched you know, every Batman movie and you know, all marble movies and all thats of stuff. Um and DC. For those that are out there so we don't get upset. Um. So I'll watch anything and I'll enjoy them and all the rest of it. But yeah, when I was a kid I wasn't really into that. I've been writing novels for a few years as a failed novelist, trying to break through to the publishing market, and that's that's a pathway to misery and suffering. Um. And while I was in that sort of state, you know, working a job that I really didn't like and thinking about where I wanted to go and what I wanted to do, I've walked into a comic book shop in the City Um, and found all of these indie comics and thought, Oh, hang on, this is not what I'm used to that, this isn't superheroes, this is like, you know, real stories and all sorts of anything from horror right through the drama and action, crime, all that sort of stuff. So I grabbed a whole bunch of comics started reading everything that I could get my hands on, Um, and then thought this is amazing. I need to do this. I need to transition the novels that I've got,...

...the stories that I've got, into comic form. And then I just started doing it and proceeded to make every possible mistake you could make, Um from the beginning. So I'm I'm a writer, I'm not an artist. I can do graphic design sort of stuff, but I'm not not an illustrated by any stretch. Um. So the first step was to find artists and and all of that, that sort of bizoh U, which was great. But but, yeah, like I said, I've made every possible mistake you could make. I knew nothing. I didn't do the thing you should do, which is respect the medium, do your research properly before you start. No, no, I just jumped straight in and just started making them. So some of my earlier comics, Um, the lettering is all wrong, there's way too much text. Recently actually re remastered, if that's the word you use for comics. Um, a series, the first series that I did a series called idle thuggery, which, ironically, is a superhero story, but it's from the perspective an up and coming henchman. So it's kind of like the henchman story of, you know, their miserable life under an arch villain. Um. And I readied that and it took months and months because I'd literally just grabbed a novel and stuck it on top of the comic format. It's way too many words, and I mean I was reading it and getting bored. So, you know, I had to reshape that. That was also the formatting was off. Yeah, anyway, make mistakes, kids. That's what it's all about. Learn from your mistakes. Make as many as you can as quickly as you can. What's that thing that they say, that that horrendously annoying thing in business speak, feeling fast? Yeah, far, fast, fire, often, you love. Yeah, you love to see it. Love to see a good, good failure. Now you're also, on top of all of the things that we've we've already talked about, you're also a composer and I think by my account, I see, I'm gonna say, ten guitars and Banjo's behind you, which is great for an audio podcast to call that out. But but just want to set the scene, and I mean it looks like there's I don't know if there's some records and and albums mixed in with the books as well, but in any case there's there's clearly a love of music there. There's, or at least a collector of saying so was there a particular song or artist that was made you think like Oh, I wanna, I want to make music? Like for me I would say it was the beach boys. It was my first like foray into what music that was really well put together could sound like, if that makes it like just like the harmonies and like the different layerings they have on there. And I mean I was probably like eight or nine when I first heard them and I don't think I really understood particularly Brian Wilson's chaotic genius until much later in life. But that was the first artist where I remember being like okay, like this is something special and like made me want to to pursue playing music on my own. And I don't think I in any case, I have, I have come close to accomplishing something like a good vibrations, but it's it's and the style of music I be it's certainly not even in that realm, but it's that's always the one that I come back to. So is there something like that for you or did you just kind of be like hey, I want to play music one day? There's there's probably two phases to that. So that I grew up in a very strict religious um evangelical household. So, AH, anything from the bags to the beach boys or they were all evil and you know, of the world and you can't have anything to do. So my early years I have this huge gap in my musical knowledge, like ridiculously bad. The only references I understand from that era from films that I would watch that had little snippets of so usually the chorus or part of the course or whatever it might be. Um. So I do, of course, have you know, the petres and Amy Grant and that you know Michael, Michael W Smith. Yeah,...

...so so many Christian bands from that when I grew up. That that we're influential, Um and we're kind of doing the same sort of music that the quote secular world was doing during that time. But but it's a strange filter to view music through. Then, when I was a teenager, Um so, I learned guitar when I was younger and then didn't really do anything with it. Then when I was a teenager, I picked up the guitar, started with a band at school and then learned Bass, learned drums because you know you're in a band, you just want to try everything, so try it all, Um, and then, Um, yeah, I really started to get into it and that's when grunge was starting to come out. So Silver Chair and, of course, Navana and although I still wasn't allowed to listen to Nevada, but enough of it kind of seeped through, so I got really heaving into the grunge scene. Um, I believe it or not, probably the most influential musician, and is weird to say, is Joe Satriani, because he was a guitarist and an amazing guitarist, but also because there were no lyrics to his his music. I was allowed to listen to them through this whole period and I was allowed to, you know, learn how to play the sort of stuff that he was playing. So That's how I taught myself guitar and all that sort of stuff. Um. So yeah, weirdly it's it's Joe Satriani because it was the one type of music I was allowed to listen to when growing up and it just sort of went from there. And when you're composing music, do you take anything from writing? Like, like, has being a writer of comics and stories shaped how you compose music? Is there's still kind of like a similar sort of like storytelling element to it, or is it completely two different worlds? There's there's there's one very clear similarity, and it's only dawned on me a couple of years ago that they in both as is the way I write typically, in the way that I'll compose typically is I'm looking for that, to use rob Ross's term, happy accident. I'm trying to experiment with something until I find something that works without being too structured. And so you'll start with structure and then you so writing. For example, I'll start with an essential plot point or a problem or something, and then I will make things as complicated and dramatic and heart wrenching as possible, confusing everything and everyone with no idea how I'm going to get out of it. Um, purposely because that leads to well, how how would these characters get out of it? But you almost have to ask them, what would you do in this this particular circumstance? Um? And it's a similar sort of thing with music. I don't like. There are certain styles that I really like and, believe it or not, Latin music is a big influence and I learned originally classical guitar and then did Latin not not Flamenco, about Latin inspired sort of music. I've done quite a bit of that, so I love that style. Um. So I'll start with something I know, but then always be trying to search for something a little bit different, a little bit odd, a little bit quirky, whether it's how the you know, the sound is made or what sort of chords are used or the timing or anything like that. Yeah, so it's that same kind of searching for that unexpected moment where you capture lightning in a bottle and then you listen to it or watch it or read it again and you think, wow, that however, that thing happened, that was that was awesome and I want to somehow do more of that. But it's not. It's it's never a thing that it feels like you've done. It's always something that you feel like you've just discovered, like striking gold or oil or something like that. So have you also taken these songs and performed them live? Oh God, no, m that's that's too daunting and too much work. I'm a much, much better producer and, you know, ranger than...

I am a musician, I'll put it that way. Um, and I really don't want to have to do the amount of work I would need to do um to be really viable, you know, in a sort of live setting. I have been in bands that have played live gigs. The other thing is I'm also such a crutchity old dude. Um, even in my twenties and thirties I still was the crutchy old dude. So I would play gigs and we were in a great band. The sound was great, singer Songwriters was amazing and I'd been looking out at the crowd thinking why are you here? It's like why, why would you come out? And it's like twelve o'clock and it's late and we're all tired, and so I was kind of never I've never really had the personality to be out late at night doing that sort of stuff. So the studio work just suits me down to a teeth because I can do the amazing stuff and make things sound also just editing. Being able to do a solo that is impossible for me to do without weeks and some weeks of work, but I can cover it together and it sounds amazing. Right, that's fantastic. Let's just do that and move on. Um. So yes, I'm not really big on the live love seeing Nice Nice. Yeah, I'm I'm with you. On the late night playing, playing in a band, there's been times where, yeah, it's been like a Tuesday and you know, if you're if you're towards the end of the lineup, you're never on at your scheduled time because everyone goes over and then it takes longer to set it like they're they're giving you like five minutes in between sets to get everything off and get new stuff on. It's like that. That's that doesn't work. Like even if we're sprinting and, like you know, we're, we're with the efficiency of a Nascar pit team, like it's still going to take longer than five minutes. And I've had that same mindset before. And our next show we're one of the first bands, which is very exciting. So I'm like, all right, we could get and it's on a weekend anyway, so it's not like the worst thing in the world, but where I imagine will be done by ten o'clock at the latest, and I'm like, all right, it's good, this is the ideal show. Yeah, my the store that broker Campbell's back for me was we got there at seven at night and we played at one in the morning the next day and we had to watch all of the bands and one of the bands I'd never forget that all these young, young guys um six guitars, h six, six guitars. One of them had slide, one was acoustic, all the rest were electric. One had a slide, one had you know those things that whiz around that makes the kind of humming, sort of had one of them. It was just such a cacophony of noise and guitars and just you could it was unintelligible, you couldn't understand it, but but clearly everyone wanted to be the guitarist. So it was. And then my band comes up at the end and I'm dead tired at this time. We have one guitarist and that is that is me. We have a guitarist bath play, a drummer, singer and that's it. And the sound was great, you know, I said, but yeah, that kind of did for me. I thought I can't, I can't waste this, I can't burn this amount of time on nothing just to, you know, get up and be angry about my life and people that have come out, these good people that have come out to see me, where I wouldn't go out to see any other band because I'm so crotchety, and that was what did it. Let's nest identify that. At least you can. You can move on to more more productive things. Yeah, exactly, exactly. Correct me if this is incorrect, but from what I can gather, you've done some crowdfunding campaigns in the past, so I think that's that's certainly become more common over the past few years. For you know, we've even seen still my favorite example of this is the drummer Josh freeze, who I has drummed for probably every band to ever exist at some point in life. He's at least played one show with them. So the opposite of us being Crotchety, he's like, I'll play whenever, I'll do it, and he had a solo album...

...that this must have been like thirteen years ago now when this album came out, but I still remember it because he did a crowdfunding campaign, more so to just highlight the album. Like I don't think he was expecting people to actually take advantage and like donate money to it, but he his his different perks that he offered were all outrageous. There was one where he I think it was like ten thousand dollars. He'd go to Disneyland with you and then at the end of the day he'd sell you his car. So you're going home with a car and a fun day, maybe a picture from a rollercoaster. And like another one he was a Cabanah boy for a week and it's just like the the ridiculousness of it is really what, I think, what's stuck with me, and he even said in some sort of interview around there. He was like, yeah, I don't expect people to take advantage of these but, like you know, wanted to draw attention to the album and I was like, well, I still remember this thirteen years later, so mission accomplished there. So for for you in your crowdfunding experience, what have you found has worked well and has there been anything we're like, Oh, this is gonna really move the need on? It didn't that second one. There's been tons of things where I've assumed, Hey, this is people are gonna love this. Nothing absolutely love. Yeah, there's been. There's many examples of that. Um, you've got to try a bunch of stuff and most of the stuff I try it doesn't work. Um, what has worked? So I only at this stage use it for the comics and as exactly as you say, it's to try and draw attention because I'm in Australia, I can't go to comic cons in in the US, Um, whereas this is like a virtual corn if you like, and people from all around the world can can find me. The first thing to say is it does take time. You need to run multiple campaigns over years and you steadily grow an audience. And one of the things is it's essentially a promise. So you're saying, I will give you this thing if you give me x amount of money. Um. So you have to deliver on that and you have to give them the thing and if enough people have seen that you've done that over a few years, they think okay, this guy is safe. Um, you know, we can back him. Um, in terms of the so my last campaign great fun. I made up my mind all right, I'm gonna really push this one and have as much fun as I can with it, almost like a carnival sort of sort of environment. So I did a bunch of stuff. I actually gave away, Um, tobaccers fall back as win your own theme Song Competition Essentially. So they won their own theme songs. Some of them are like one one's a guest speaker, so she used it as like her hype music before she comes down. There's another couple that were they're also comic creators and they used it for their own projects. Ones a friend and George, who's got a comic called Super Duck. And so I did. I did a wacky style thing for Super Duck, Um, which was yeah, that was pretty cool. So yeah, did did that. I actually have a campaign coming up in next month, in August Um, for a comic called enmity, which is a sort of post apocalyptic thing. The essential story is, Um, it's a it's a sixteen year old girl searching the post apocalypic wasteland to try and find her deadbeat dad, who happens to be Lucifer, and the whole post apocalyptic world has come about because Lucifer got sick of his job and decided not to do it anymore and as a result of that, chaos ensues and all the rest of it anyway. So it's good fun. It's it's lots of action, lots of stuff going on. I've decided for that one. I'm going to produce the world's smallest feature film. So I'm going to Um get people to record themselves on their phone and then stitch them together and produce a very small post apocalyptic kind of survival film, Um for some of the backers. So I'm not sure how many yet, but yet and again it's just a silly it's still the idea. It won't go anywhere, but it'll be great fun, Um, and I'm hoping people get involved with that. In terms of the thing that's worked the nest, Um, AH, having you know, having a lot of...

...offer is really good. So having a lot of books is really good. One of the things that I did in my last campaign I opened it up and said, all right, you pay x amount of dollars to help pay for the artwork and you will co write an issue of the last campaign was called shadows daughter, was the name of the series. You'll co write an issue of shadows daughter, an eight page issue. Um, what you're paying will cover for the artwork. You'll get a CO writer credit. Um, it's published through my publisher, Markosia, Um, so it'll be published worldwide. You'll get your name in there. So it's kind of a perk for people that were they want to get into comic writing but they're not really sure, they want to dip the tip or they want some help and guidance and sort of going through it. And it's an existing series Um that did really well that Um. So that's something I'm looking more at and it's great for me because it means I get more injection of ideas from other people, because I'm I'm flat out of ideas at the stage. You know, I think there were nine books in the series at that stage and I'm thinking, man, what am I going to do next? She finds a marshmallow man, you know. So rather than do that, you get an injection of new ideas from people. It means they're invested, it means they get a writer credit, but it also means I get more more to the series that that can expand. So I'm thinking I'll probably do that with enmity as well. That the next campaign. That was that was good, but yeah, it is it's a hard slog. Takes a lot of time and effort. It is not a bookstore, so you don't immediately get the money. So there's a certain amount that pledge but for one reason or another they drop out, so you don't. It's this thing that success looks bigger and better than what it is. So my last campaign was just shy of ten thousand dollars Um. The reality of what you actually take away from that is less than half. And the amount of money that the artwork costs to produce is an average issue, maybe two, two and a half three thousand dollars minimum, upwards to sort of five thousand for an indie comic. So it's a it's a huge investment over a long, long period of time, but it's also kind of amazing, like when you see the artwork and the thing, it's pretty cool. Yeah, anytime I see artwork that I could not produce, I'm just like, okay, this is worth it. It's it's great, it's so good when the art comes I've got I've actually got coming through as we're speaking from the enmity project. That artist is coloring the pages and every every hour a thing will come through and I'll look at Oh yeah, it just looks so good. Yeah, it's really, really cool. And this the Segway is nicely into another question I always like to ask, which is a question you wish you were asking more frequently, and you're talking about people giving you money. Is there any way people can pay you more money for your work? I'd love it. I'd love people to pay me more money for the way. It's one of these things that, for for a lot of creators, it's a really hard thing for them to equate what they're doing with. This is a product I'm selling and it deserves to be paid for. You know, it's a really most of us, I think, tend to be a bit more I just want to create the thing, I want the thing to exist and I want people to read it or listen to it or but the idea of charging someone money for this thing just feels wrong and horrible and that's not what I'm about. But then the reality thinks in that's like, man, these things are three grand of Pop. You know, if I don't recoup my money, I can't keep doing this thing. Um, so it's this kind of yeah, I almost think like there's every creator needs to be sort of split down the middle and have two personalities. One is the writer, creator, you know, musician. The other is the marketing bastard, if I can use that term. So just a guy that doesn't care about anything and it's just I will throw your face in front of everyone, I will put this anywhere, I will charge any amount that I can. You almost need that sort of Yin and Yang of part of you. That is shame lisson wants to promote everything, because otherwise you just and that...

...was one of the good things about I started with music earlier and started running a business and, you know, making enough money to essentially pay for the artwork for the comics. But the experience of running a business was great because when I got to do the comic stuff, you are running a business, you're you're paying contractors to do work for you. You get all the ups and downs of that. You get unreliable artists, you get amazing artists, you get some that are more expensive, some that are less. You know, Um, you get the stresses of time. Then you get contracts with, you know, publishers that are all different, and so it's all the complexities of running a business, which most creators aren't thinking, Oh yeah, it's gonna be great, man, I'm going to write this awesome story and that that's it, and pick a gonna love it, and it's then Netflix is going to knock on my door and say hey, we want to give you many millions to make this into this amazing thing. It's just it's just not like that at all. So, to give an example, I started writing a script yesterday for a new comic. That's that we're going to start in a couple of weeks, and that phase of writing the script and coming up with the idea it's it's a little bit agonizing coming up with the original idea, but once you've got the idea and the things start coming out, it's amazing and I can see in my my head kind of the characters and they're really cool. The story, it's it's got some and I know that this artist will make the best of it because of his style. It's it's really, really cool. But already at this stage I'm thinking what's it going to cost? How many am I doing? Because if I'm doing five of these and they're costing three or four thousand dollars each, that's a huge investment of money. How long is it going to take me to recoup that money? Can I run a kickstart a campaign for them, because I have two other campaigns I have to run in the next six months. So it will be, you know, a year until I can recoup money that way from it. So there's and and then if I sign it to a part Blisha, how soon are they going to want everything done? Because they want to make sure that the artist gets everything done and we don't break up or whatever the case may Um. So the business side of things does come in a lot and that's something I think most people don't appreciate with and most artists don't want to think about, but it is a very key part of what we do. Unfortunately, we just we need to go back to the olden days where you have a patron, you just have this super rich person that just says I like the stuff that you do, I'll just pay you to do it and that's it. And you can just do that. You know, Michelangelo Sort of style, you can just do that. Or Da Vinci styler should say, Um, yeah, that would be cool. So any patrons that are out there, they just want to pay me to write weird stuff and publish strange, weird stories, get in touch. You know, I'm unavailable like like. Well, we'll keep our eyes out for the patrons. Maybe maybe start a patron website or something where people can can network, like. All right, well, Morgan, you're almost after Hook here, but we always like to wrap up with a top three and a patron probably among the best gifts you could receive. But we're looking on the opposite end of the spectrum here, the crappiest gifts you've ever given or received. So one of them was a we we had to deal with it and made of mind that every Christmas, the deal is it had to be under three dollars. So it was the worst possible gift you could find under three dollars. Um, I think he gave me like a little pop gun sort of thing, like a little kind of nerf, but before NERF was a thing. Um. And I gave him a used doily. Which one? So I think I think I kind of kind of won that one, but I did cheat. I didn't actually pay for it, I just found it and gave it to him and it had a suspicious looking stain on it. That was pretty bad. Ah. Other than that, I mean you'd have to go with socks, just but not not good socks, bad socks with a vaguely offensive...

...message on them. I think I gave those to someone once. I can't remember what it was, but they were, you know, the socks you get the messages on them and all thats of stuff, and this was to someone that just wears plain socks every day, does not want to know anything out there, and they were very bright and very colorful and with some sort of obnoxious message. I can't remember what it was there. Yeah, but the do really stands out as a that's a classic. You know, find yourself a doily or used Hanky or something and oh no, there was one there. There is one. Okay, my son and I did this from my brother. Uh, there are two. So one we wrapped it up very carefully in a can, in a box, in another box, in another box, all beautifully wrapped for Christmas, and it was a chocolate bar in a little bed of kitty litter made to look suspiciously like a Cat Turid Um, and he had to unwrap all of these layers to get in there to get it. That was pretty amazing just to see his reaction and the disappointment in his face. That was great. Um. The other one we did previous year or a few years earlier, was we had a big box and it was addressed to myself and my son and my brother, and so we opened it and inside were nerf guns and we just pulled him out and started Um firing them rapidly at him as much as we could. That was pretty cool as well. And then, but he didn't get I did get him another present after that. But yeah, that were pretty good. The cat turned one probably is a good one. Yeah, yeah, I'm a big fan of putting a very tiny gift in a small box or in a series of small boxes. It's, like you said, the disappointment on their face. This is huge, it must be great. And then, yeah, uh, yeah, I love it, fantastic. Well, if people want to learn more about you, I want to hit you up for more terrible gift ideas or learn more about your work. Where can they find you? Uh, nice and easy. They just need to go to Morgan Quaid Dot Com and all my links and latest projects are there, as well as links to social media, so feel free to get in touch. I also do advanced reader copies for novels and some comics, so if you're the sort of person that likes to read and do reviews online, you could snag yourself free copies of my stuff as well. But that's all on Morgan Quaid Dot Com and tastic. Well, Morgan, thank you again for taking the time to chat. This is a blast. Thanks so much for having me. It's great and of course we've got to end with a Corny joke, as we already do, as we always do, I should say, and you kind of alluded to this actually before, but I I like bringing it back full circle here. You know, being a writer keeps me in great shape. I'm always running out of ideas. Goot after its people. Good people cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you're a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. You can send me a message Joey, good people, cool things dot com. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people, cool things, and check out all the old episodes via good people, cool things dot com. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (141)