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Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 27 · 1 year ago

Courage and Problem Solving with Christine Perakis

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Christine Perakis has lived through not one, but TWO hurricanes (in the span of two weeks, no less!) and it led to her writing her book The Resilient Leader: Life Changing Strategies to Overcome Today’s Turmoil and Tomorrow’s Uncertainty. She works with businesses to help them turbo-charge their growth and reach new levels of success, and shares her story on the podcast.

Oon Pop do thing: uponteseturingconversations with contrpreneurs writers, musicians and other creativeson your hostar. We held antedays guest is Christine Peracas, author of theresilient leader, life, changing strateties to overcome today's turmoiland tomorrow's uncertainty. Christine lived through two hurricanes and a spanof two weeks and has taken her experience from that and shared it with all different kinds ofbusiness, helped them grow and she serves as a business growth architect,helping brands share their stories, identify issues and overcome them totake things to new heights, probably could have used a sea term. Thereshould have done some word play, but here we are still wonderful. All theway around he likes to get in touch with the show you can do so in a coupleof different ways: shoull be an email at joy, at good people, cool things,dot com or leave a common on Facebookor tweed on twitterit's GPCT pod cast onboth of them. You can also support the show via the Merce Shat, good people,cool things, dotcom, slash, shop, check out all sorts of things and I'm doing aspecial old promo 'cause. It's my birthday this month and or the codebirthday when you check out you get twenty percent off, that's fantastic!It's wonderful, at's, great, but first here's the conversation with ChristineI've found more time to to try things that maybe I wouldn't have really gotten my hands into like I justI was playing around with some tshirt designs, which is something I've alwaysbeen like 'd be fun to do, but never really took the time to learn how to doit or anything about like printing on demand or anything like that, and it'sbeen. I certainly not happy that you knowwe're confined to our home, but I think if you, if you take the attitude ofmaking the most of it, then it's okay. If you can't go to a bar.Well, isn't that the whole of life right? If that attitude about no matterwhat comes is making the most of it and and and I may say, I've been on yoursite- you have beom, really cool products already so you're alreadydoing it and that's really fun. I like, I have to read them and then stell saytebout loud. The soges and stuff, because they're so clever and Um yeah.I thought that was great, but you know what I love about this time is how Um you know at times and- and I feel as though we all get a chancefor a reset. You know we've gotten into this multitasking non present type ofyou know Gogogo and constant motion, never really being president anythingand and thinking that we're behind already when we start the day, checkingemails, doing all the things that we do to keep us out of the moments andreally um the world had to flow down for a while,and I know it feels like. I was talking to someone today about how you know weall had about six weeks in us before iten over the edge and Um. You know theperson said well, you know we're we're such gradual people and e said we'rereally not. We just think we are rigt, it's all in the head, exactly tat' a just Sapo ssowell. You know I I guesswhen you've had the experiences I've had very recently N in general, I meanjust having you know. Eighty five percent of our housing was destroyed inthe hurricanes that we experienced down in the BBI and Um. You know when you'reliterally wiped away everything you have to contend with. What's left and what'sleft is what's true and it's who we are. You know the same thing here when youcan't, you know, go out, you can't, you...

...know, do the things you're used todoing to make yourself look a certain way we have to let go of all of that,but what's left is the truth of who we are, and we have that opportunity to me.That's freedom absolutely and I do wan to chat aboutthat. A little more. I your experience, living through Tis, it two Hurricane Tin, two weeks,yeah back Quebac, Erma and Maria. So what's what's that, like 'case, my myexperience with hurricanes going to school in Miami all about the? U I'mholding up my haunts lik O you, as you know, be accompanyi right. My my experience, while I wasthere was my freshman year. There was tropical storm Ernesto, which was avery um initially was was looking like. It would be this reel intense hurricaneand then kind of at the last. Second, it got I downgraided and of course thisis through my eighteen year old freshmen eyes. So maybe I was just downplaying the significance all along since I it was like hurricanes likewhat's that we just have SOM non okay, R, more at all, hat age, Otoch, andthen I remember it being like we're going to cancel classes for extendedperiods of time. I think we ended up missing two days of class and it wasmaybe I don't know like an inch and a half of rain on the campus, like it was another rainy day, South Blorda- and I was just I justremember, being 'cause. This was like you know the tail end of hurricaneseason, so this is kind of right at the start of my college career- and I was just like-are the windows secure and all that and then it ended up being? I don't want tosay a disappointment like I'm glad that there wasn't a hurricane tiasn, tenyeahand, that's a disappointment. Isn't it that's kind of the hurricanes thatwe experience in the BBI for those Aus who hadn't been around for you know,since W Maryland sometime in the nineties, I think was one and everybodyyou know we'd get ready, do the things we do. You know secure the windows andthe homes and and then go end up at the bar drinking, because we ead anotherone. You know and Um. I think that for a while you know everybody always askedme. Why did you stay? And you know I think at that point I didn't know whatI didn't know you know and y. You can't imagine the experience of somethinglike that and in fact nothing had ever happened like that before you know, wasthe most powerful storm in the Atlantic Basin, so um they didn't have anythingto compare it to and in you know, my particular region. Ithad never impacted that way and Looke at Puerto Rico, which was far largerpopulation and more built you know, had dramatic suffering from Maria, whichwas only quote unquote a category for by the time I got there. You know snows,it's just weird how we have these perspectives and Um you becomecomplacent. You know, and I draw a lot in my work and at my writing about you-know seamanship and Um, how we get complacency in you know and seamanship.It's e number one rule of CEMANSHIP is COMPLACENC. He kills. You know so it'strue in business. It can be true in life right and Deathan. They look likeyou know, just never being fully satisfied, NAT living to the fullest,not experiencing your your passion or reaching the end of the you know:Adventure whatever that is meant to be and Um we can all get. We all get complacentin our lives. I think, especially when things are going along swimming way,ght. Where else he's comerdable absolutely, and I...

...can only imagine that a hurricane,probably I it probably really brings that to light about being complacantand if you hadnhim prepared for it, and even ifyou had the impacts, could really be devastated. Well, yeah! That's the thing you knowthere were places that were spared, as in all these things like Tornados, yousee them in the Midwest. You know certain neighborhoods to be flattenedand then there'll be one housestanding or you know different parts of the samearea that might survive just fine and Um. You know we don't know, and so we might be, even if we're doingthe best we can, we can still lose everything. You know, there's nostopping what Richard Branson called it category. Seven git was just lost thechart wind reeding until the charts broke. You know, so that's the kind ofthing that Um they can't. You know we we can'tprepare for that. Then there wasn't building codes to that and Um. You knowlife, but life is like that right. There are just things that happen. I Icall them. You know category five events these days and my work and in thmy most recent book, the resilient leader that just came out this month-and you know the irony of that is you know I've worked on this. I literallystarted writing the book. In the midst of you know, being trapped and buriedalive and my wind coufin as I call it and Um, I h started writing this book and I've beenyou know, working on it and getting it ready. I've had. You know wonderfulteam around me launches in the middle. WHAT TURNS OUTTO BE THE MIDDLE RIGHT? I thougt back in Marcs, I'm like. Oh thank God, mybook's not coming out 'till June it'll be fine. You Know Book Cour andspeeking engagements, all that and of course, no we're in the middle of aglobal pentemic and it's a day where the Um h protest were making their wayto my neighborhood and I'm literally hearing the helicopters buzzingoverhead as their threats of looting right down the street from around thecorner. Um- and you know we're we're taking on another issue of you- know:sytemic racism in the country and it's Ju t madness um how many things that wedon't predict right. So I get used to and I figure out the Glibal pendemic isfine. I've figured out how to be super busy and be productive and creative andit's been a fulltime and then we have, you know, protest all global protests,and you know these added inconvenience of some looting and Um. You know thelockdown that occurs from that and curfews, and you know it just keepsgoing like its always going to have that you know there's always going tobe another storm, so you know that's really what I speak to in my work andin my writing to Um that piece. You know not everybody's going to have anexperience of hurricanes like us, you know, but they are going to haveexperiences of financial distress or now the global pentemic or you know,death and divorce, and you know starting o Mov tes to Bei ot Agoy, five yeah, the murder Hornet Member Tho. You know I mean my goodness. Couldthere be anything else right? We don't even know these. Are Things we're notmaking up? You know it just comes, and so yeah life is like that and it'sinevitable that we're going to keep getting more of that sure and and to kind of go back to yourbook, I'm always interested for people who have written a book. What yourprocess is like and you kind of touched on it a little bit of how it soundslike you were kind of hunkered down. I perhaps well wind was roaring allaround you in the writing phase of this. But can you kind of take us through y? Didyou have the the vision in your head, or was it kind of like an outline? Idid you just start writing and didn't stop until you got to the end, which isalways impressive to stories like that...

...yeah, no thats, not bad eeno. No,actually, and in fact it was a survival mechanism. I'll tell you honestly, I umthere is the hurricanes if you remember theycome and Wave Ri, there's the first wall and then there's the eye and thenthe second wall and Um in the first wall. You know I've lost my rout. Thethe place is slooding, I'm you know alive. I've made it through to the Eand I'm doing weird things like I reached out and called my brother. Iwanted him to know and let my family know that I'd made it through the firsthalf. You know- and I didn't know when I'd be in communication with them againand in fact we lost telecoms, for you know, weeks and months, mostly and Um,but in the second wall I got trap in my shelter so that the my m had an openingthat was open to the storm. So I was literally coming in the pressure iskilling my head. It's nonstop, relentless. The sounds are monstrousand I realize that I am not going to be able to get out. I don't have an exitplan, my shelter is I'm trapped there and I have notelecoms, no ability to communicate with anyone, and I have no idea howothers will have survived this. So it's that moment of realization and as thepanic starts to rise- and you know I would ask anybody who's listening. Whatwould they do if everything was taken away? What would you you know? You D?Have no people, you have no Internet, no telecoms, no Um support system, youknow what is it no electronics and what is the one thing that we can do andthat is to start writing. You pick up a piece of paper and a pen and startriding and it activates the prefrontal Potex of the brain, the thinking partof the brain, the problem solving part of the brain. So I literally had thismoment of choice where it was. I could feel the panic rising in my stomach andI don't know what I'm going to do and it's dark and you know, 's monster israging all around me and I have to do something or curl up in a ball and justwait for it to end. You know we Morwa for death to come and I thought I'mgoing to learn whatever I can from this experience, I'm going to writeeverything that I can remember and ex and everything that I've experiencedabout this. What I did to prepare the mistakes that I've made and becausethere's going to be another storm right, I mean in life and in general, andthere was two weeks later, but you know that commitment in that moment to startwriting is the beginning of the book, but it was more about survival so thatI could get through those hours of the storms continuing to rage and Um, notknowing how I was going to get out of the situation that something wouldoccur to me or in the world that would shift the Situa tation as it was, so itreally was a survival mechanis. You know it's not something that I wouldever take lightly, and I I know that I Hav Wa complacant about that too. Youknow I've always been been a writer. You know I've had my first book out afew years. You know same year of the hurricanes actually and Um. You know, but it's that idea, that Umdon't take it for granted, there's something we can do and it's ouranswers are always inside of it, and so just taking that moment that makingthat decision was the life changing event and it's what kept me going and kept me through and it becameultimately my next book. That's such a fantastic story, and I mean it sounds very herrowing, but II really like that mineset of just this is helping me survive right nowand...

...it sounds like it's helping a lot ofother folks as well. You refer to yourself as a business growth architect,which I really like that framing eye of it and just kind of all it evokes m.can you kind of talk about what went into that decision of of brandingyourself as that and how you kind of put on your? I was going tosay architectural boots, but I guess architectural gloves maybe is a better. I guess both yeah there's a wholethere's a whole outfit that goes withand working with businesses yeah. Well, you know, I always used tosay I love working with creative people, and I have people that I gravitatetowards me and me towards them, or generally, you know successful in theirlives and having other having been successful in other endeavors and Um,very creative, very visionary and with people like that, altropreneur trueentrepreneurs. You know we all have our Achilles right. We it created, peopletend to end up, they can get into a spin and just go after all these ideas.How many people do you know that have great ideas and then they getdistracted by another shiny idea? You know or another thing and and so I'vealways said, I'm the person who helps them put the walls and the floors andthe ceilings and the windows and the doors in you know, and I realize that,because I've worked with people from the idea stage to to the scaling stageof businesses up to eight figures that it's really you know the architects jobright and architects get involved at the idea stage of the design stage andhelp to craft that vision into something. That's real and solid andactionable and there's nothing that gives me more satisfaction than takingthat creativity and making it an actionable concrete reality and that'swhat' m, so often nisting. It's a difference between people who say youknow. Oh I've got a book in me. You know, or I have a business idea andthose who actually execute and get those things accomplished. You know soM. I I believe it's you know. That's my role in the world, as a small businessadviser you know is a is a architect to those creative visionaries and Um. It'sreally for the people who wan to make something real come of it. I'm sitting here nodding my head,especially around the WOROF, the a new shining idea coming out and meebinglike oo me, go down this rabbit all well yeah I mean and you're aninteresting guy right, because you're creative you're a musician. I mean youhave also this success around this and this business um activity that you'redoing too so you're working on all Pistons, IG Ow, all sides of your brainthat is um functioning and so um. You know you, you have it, you know leg up in that sense, butagain you know the thing that I learned from these hurricanesis. I ended upalone right. I I left a group of friends that I've been with all dayhelping them. Shore op a home that had you know the the partner was storing showing up his business Han. Wewere working on the House and then we had dinner together watching the leftWen the report and I left and it never occurred to me to say, hey Um. I don'tthink I should be alone for this. You know I just O'm a boatcap and I'm amariner. I've been you know at C. I've been in lifeany situations before I canhandle almost anything, or at least in my mind I could have, and I just wenthome alone h, not thinking it was completely unconscious and didn't havethe courage to say you know. I don't think I have this handled. I don't knowthere was a moment. I was with a friend who thirty five years on the islandhe'd seen a lot and he you know we were...

...watching this news and he turned to meand he said, I'm scared, and this is a guy whos life. I would put my life inhis hands because you know he's really accomplished experience. You know knowsa lot very wise, Um, very successful, Mariner and Um to think that thisperson was scared that wasn't even enough of a wake up call to me right. Ihad to endure this thing alone to figure out that Um Yeah Hm. I need to find in me thecourage to say hey. I don't think I can do this by myself thats something that,like I can totally picture myself and Ithink a lot of people can being in that position. I'm just like. Oh okay, I'vehelped you like. Now I'm going to go home and Kinda, you know wether thestorm and you don't really think yeah like basically what you just saidlike you, don't think of I the the repercussions of it, I guess of ofbeing in this situation by yourself, because it isn't something that you'veexperienced. So you kind of don't think like hey. This is something that's maybegoing to be the worst thing I've ever lived through, and I you don't like have that contactthere and it's just it's so interesting to kind of like dig really ceepinyourself and yeah. Maybe you have that team around you in this case yourfriend, who had seen so many different things saying hey. I'm scared thatmaybe that Throwsouf like the the warning flag, but it's just sointeresting how our minds work like that well and it doesn't even have to be asextreme as a life threatening situation right. It's like how many people duringthis cl global, pantenic or anytime. You know financial distress. We tend tosuffer alone in Silenc as a race rather than their culture, that we um would. Rather, you know weisolate howmany tonse, you know, there's a loneliness epidemic before the pen demake forty percent of our population had no one to talk to in the lateststudies. Twenty five percent of millennials have no friend, so this isthe social media generation right and Um. So these are people who, on theoutside, have lots of great. You know: Post Pictures, followers connections,you know social communities, electronic communities, but when it comes to thestorms of life or business, who do we know is going to come for us. You know,and it might just be something that maybe lots of us have experienced butwe're afraid to reach out, and we we. We hide our feelings from others and werefuse to allow our vulnerability to be seen, and I had to come to terms withthat truth about myself that I was unwilling to. They recognize my ownincapacity, because I've accomplished H A plenty. You know I got a good resumeon paper. I've done it a lot and Um. You know didn't occur to me. I didn'tknow how to fint that way, and I certainly had little experience asking for help.I mean people ware, paying me very well to give them help right. So I was quitecomfortable in that role. I've been a professional rescuer, you knownavigated businesses, Bothan people off of mountains and see, and en businessyou know, I'm the person you go to and that's the other peace right. Our ourculture is about. You know mastering these things being brave and and c youknow achieving and doing it on our own and Um. I, when I got my captain'sLience, it was a really long slog to get you know all the requirements, med-and I you know, have a handful of friends who are captains and lots offriends. Actually that e you know been through the process and I reached outto people um when I could, but I had a...

...really close friend who you know Iwouldhave been so grateful to have his health and- and I never asked- and hesaid to me afterwards. I thought you just wantedto prove that you could do it by yourself. Iuhow ridiculous is that notthat he said it, but that that's what I'm that's e message? I'm communicatingright like so what you know. I don't think any of US really achievesanything on our own. You know, there's always a community around and that'sanother. You know major lesson that I gathered from my storm experiences andfrom life in general is that we need our tribe when it comes to weatheringthe storm, and so that's m really important, and when the secondhurricane came two weeks later, you can be sure I was with a group of people.You know N in one of the homes, Thad had survived and done well that we feltwas the safest place to be, and I did not let myself make the same mistaketwice. That is great to hear that you shouldnot tak the sametaless. Well, you know that's Te. Twenty seventimes twenty seven times of making the same mistake right, that's Wi, that', so of Tis take longer.You know I gotto be hit over the head a couple of extra times exactly yeah. We just need a little.You know some of US need more nudges than others nters right it isn't. Who Do we want to be right? That's ourchoice, exactly I! I want to go back to what you had said about. We all needour try, which I think is superimportant and totally agree, but like you're saying it can bedifficult to reach out to people like that. So if let's say you have I mean this isn't true, but let's sayyou have no triber, that's how you feel like is that you, you don't have anyonethat you can kind of turn to I or you know, c n can confine in with some ofthese bigger concerns or questions or anything like that. What should people do to start to to find those peoplethat do exist out there, but maybe they don't know where they are well. You know it's a great questionand in fact it is absolutely true for me when I you know those hours when Iwas trapped, almost twenty four hours trapped in my shelter. I had no ideahow I was going to get out of there. I didn't know I couldn't reach my friendseither down the road or abroad. I didn't know my neighbors and lots of USdon't know our neighbors right and so um, it's the. So I was in that positionof what do you do? I didn't ask for help. I didn't even know at that pointthat that was my major flaw in the in the scenario, but I I had no way of knowing what was goingto happen to me and I had no friends around me and I didn't. I couldn'treach my friends for about ten days, so I had to figure out how to first getout of my my my trap. I had to figure out how to survive running water wasgoing. We had no electricity, no running water, notelecomes IAD UPCOOKING gests. So what is the first thing we can do when it seems likethere's no one around and, and so for me, you know in my first step was to become somebodythat others could rely on. So I started by you know, taking whatever I had.That was left that didn't that I didn't need and giving it to my neighbors,offering you know what o the resources I had going out for supply runs,tracking down water and food for the community. I've had a UM, a U S, phonein the island that had never worked before, but if I climbed up to the topof this hill above my house, I could get a signal. So my phone became asuperpower that worked intermittently...

...in certain spots where people couldreach out to their families and get news and get wored out and Um. You knowfirst, so the first step any of us can do is to be come. The person thatothers can rely on and that's a far more natural state I ht most of us.Well, I would say all of us generally have a desire to be helpful. You see itall the time and so by offering up and stepping forward to help others. Thenit's not so hard for people if you allow them to help you nd, so thingsthat I needed I car you know I had a running car mostly, but I needed a jumpstart half the time there was, you know, had neighbors helping me get. You knowha sharing of food with me as I would go, get supplies for them, and you knowall of that. Making ourselves helpful and others in turn can then help us. I like that and I I would hope thatmost of us don't have to endure what you did to Tobe, able to kind of putthat into motion. wellbut again, you know. Storm looks like a lot ofdifferent things right. It might just be a global pandenic where we'retracked in a home. You know I might be running out of toilet paper is mybiggest fear, but I'm not really in danger. You know it just feelsuncomfortable and so reaching out to say: Hey. How are you doing you know?Are you Oky M ho? Have you spent the last? You know how re you gettingthrough your days and just being there for others in thatway, suddenly we're not alone B t. So it's so simple and I I totally agreelike one of the I guess side effects of all of this being at home and you knownot going out into the world and trying not to infect other people. I, which is,I think, a good goal generally, as well being you know there for people fromafar es still effective and I've reached out to several people that I you know lost touch with over the yearsor maybe had only chatted with once or twice and just checked in w t howthey're doing what they're working on Iwhite you know they're if they'veadopted a dog recently I just asking about that tall and I could reminde toadopt ont shop and and really just you know, seeing what people are up toand in some cases these were people I haven't spoken to. I would sayI mean in person for for sure, over a decade and probably even through anykind of email or messaging for a few years and in some cases also like therewas one since I since college. I hadn't actually spoken to him and I we justhit it off like you know like it was a day later after after the last time wehad hung out- and it's I, I think, with people like that, they're glad to hear from you- and Ithink, that's kind of getting out of our own headsometimes is the hardest part and it's it's kind of showing that vulnerabilityand and asking people how they're doing. But I think it's such an importantthing to do. Oh, my God, I mean I'm sure that Youreoutreach was hugely impactful. You know, and I think you're underestimate. Infact it probably really helped change people's experiences. You know, if notlives, I mean just to hear from someone to have someone. You know know thatthey're being thought of that they're not alone an an experience that theyhave somebody out there a little lifeline, even if it doesn't feel likeit consciously. That is connection right and we all need connection, andthis is a time when we're hen we're in a stay at home. You know situation. Weneed to feel that all the more so that's really powerful, and yet whatdoes it take right? If it's you, if you,...

...if you were in the state of I need somehelp, I that po would weigh three tones. You wouldn't be able to dial T, but tothink about you know Gosh. I could REAC out to this person I haven't talked toin ten years. It's so much easier because you're thinking of them and notyourself and what you need absolutely- and I think that singuaysKINDOF nicely into I some of your your work that you do. I particularly aroundleadership and building those relationships. Is there anything that that surprise, you as far as either I relationship building strategies ormethods or anything like that or in terms of leadership in general thatsomeone, his maybe said to you or common challenges that people haveencountered that you were kindof like? Oh, I never really consider that before well, Huh. You know one of the thingsthat that came of my experience and my experiences and is now a a regular T.heart of what I talk about is how we interact is group and this idea of Um.You know Tuckman's behavior model for group interaction. You know, Umstorming, norming, forming and performing right at natural stage ofsorry, forming, storming, norming and performing is what happens when peoplecome together right and an until I went through these experiences and reallymuch more consciously notice. You know like there was a period where everybodyis reaching out, and this is true in the pentemic it's true and everynatural disaster wher, we all come together. We need- and you know we- weseparate our differences out and we just find our commonalities and we worktogether and M and we help each other, and then you know everything just goesback to normal at some point right and and we in our case you know there wasirritation. That was anger. Frustration start to come out and that's what we'reseeing now with the pendemic is people are, you know, protesting getting madthey're, not thinking about a e hundred and twenty six thousand people thathave died in the two million and Chans that are are sick right now and Um. Youknow that idea that weare, not thinking like a group and so we're in this stageof dorming. I literally you know not understanding each other, not trustingeach other, not being creative and productive and working together as agroup and so watching the thegroup dynamic of how that happens, both inyour own community and your group of friends or your family, into your citysinto your countries. You know states and countries, and so um you're in anatural glowa thing till we get this right and that's what I think all thatH. all of this h disruption is anopportunity for which is to become more trusting of other people andacknowledge our differences and find the value in those things and to beable to move forward together in a way that got a greater common understandingand knowing that there are commonalities, even as we have ourdifferences. So that's been part of the learning yea I feel like that needs tobe on a bumpersicker or something ther are ven. I wer Love Yeah Er Li spranpaed on the side car. Mayberight I mean really. You know that's the thing we we got toget something out of all this right. It has to be, and I hope I live longenough to see it Um. I want to do my part- and I I hope others will too andthat we'll all come together to these experiences rather than further apart o. that's what you see when thesecategory five situations happen. There...

...are a chance each time for us to cometogether and put more glue into the connection to keep us together. I thinka great place to wrap up, although you really have been dropping droppingthese lessons, an knowledge throughout this entire show. So I maybe thiswilljust be more of a recap than anything supergroundbreaking. But can you give us your top three lessonsfrom wethering the storms of life and business? Well, I think we've talked about acouple of 'em. You know, which is one is having the courage to recognize thatyou might need help that you do need help right. Let's not you know, listnot mess around Withim, just say what it is, and you know from that is theability to communicate it right. It was the thing that I felt was um serving ofme at the time, and it continues to teach me in my communications having toreally own the ways in which I am not fully honest with others or withmyself at different times. You know the truth of my situation or the truth ofwhat's going on for me or how vulnerable it might be in a moment, soI think it's being able to communicate what we think need feel and Wat is socritical. You know in in saling we have an expression. You have to keep Um theemergency channel open channel. Sixteen you're not supposed to leave the dogwor the boat without having the radio tune to channel sixteen, which is theemergency channel Thou. If something happens, you can hail the coastguard oranybody in in re in Um in range, and so it's the idea that you recognize ourresponsibility to keep the emergency channels open and always communicate. So that's one of the most criticalpieces and then just understanding. Another expression that we have inboting is m one hand on the boat, Ri ht, I don't let anybody come on my boatwithout knowing that wherever they go, they've always got to have one hand ontether to the boat so you're, both aware of where you are and you're awareof. What's around you and wher you're stepping what's coming what's outsideof you, so it's both, you know being situationally, aware and self aware andhow important those things are, especially in the category fivesituations and that's one of the most important things I I' talk about. Allthe time is keeping one hand on the boat. It's it's such a simple Blesson,but I think it's such a good one. Well, and you know, there's nothing newunto the Sun Right, t abouthow, do we? How do we get it right? I I hear peopletalking about the same things. I write about all the time that we ma usedifferent language or we have a different experience that we bring toit or we can tell different stories around it and that's again, part of thecommunicating right is how do we communicate our journeys so that otherscan go ahead of us faster, easier and more efficiently than we did yeah? And that's so helpful like when Isee someone else, that's doing something along the lines of what I'mtrying to do and they've mapped it out in a way, that's comprehensible and youcan kind of see how their path went and what they learned along the way. It'sjust tremendously helpful, yes and how many of us will giveourselves that gift riot on looking at? How do they do? Who else might haveencountered this experience before me? You know that has figured it out or hastried some thing that might have worked, and so we all WAN to be open to thatand allow for that kind of Um input. You know, Reda May Brown says Experien Judgment C. Good judgmentcomes from experience and experience comes from bad judgment, so you know...

...we want to learn without having to gothrough too many bad experiences from bad judgment. That's a great quote that one 'll go onthe bumper sticker. It's also, maybe that word o well in my bok you'll, see it c osthink you so much for hopping on andand chatting about all of your I I can call them adventures, so just allyour grain, insights and knowledge and everything,and if, if people wan to check out your book or want to learn more about you,we're going to go well Christine Peracus, dotcom,hopefully, you'll have a link in the show notes, and I book is it's onAmazon. It's the resilient leader, life, changing strategies for today's turmoiland tomorrow's uncertainty, Magical Christine. Thank you again.This was fantastic and just so many so many good things. Ifeel like I've gotten days worth of of advice out of you andit's on S. Otley been like wow minutes. Well done! I thank you so much to Iappreciate the opportunity to chat. I knew we'd have a good time and I hopethat yer listeners have gotten something of value from thisconversation and M that all of us can just have it a little bit easierbecause of those who've gone before. That's a fantastic wish all around andI am sure that my listeners will feel the same as I do and him as as a stuit listenersknow, I always like to end with the Corny joke. So let's do a sea themedone, hopefully a little Li, it's not toocringeworthy, but where does the killer Wal go for braces? I've not heard this one tell me tit isa workadentist. I love it yea. Remember that that's great! Well! You can't beat thatand on that no thank you again so much for having me.

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