Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 122 · 4 months ago

122: Creative Risks, Trapped Mice, and Social Media Negativity with Will Wood

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Will Wood isn't like most musical artists. He incorporates standup comedy into his shows. He writes songs about topics most people overlook, like the life of a mouse that's been trapped. And he hates social media — even as it's brought him tons of new fans and millions of new listens.

Sure, social media might be the downfall of us all, but there's plenty of good out there, too. From connecting with fans at live shows to being more vulnerable in songwriting, things aren't SO bad. We're talking about all of that and more in this episode.

Good people cool things as a concast feature in conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people cool things. Today's guest is will wood, whose new album, in case I make it, drops July. We're talking about that new album, the inspiration behind some of the songs on it, how he got into music in the first place, how he incorporates comedy into his shows, his worst gigs, the downfall of society thanks to different kinds of social media and corporations taken advantage of people, especially during the pandemic with our crazy brains going all over the place. So we're really getting into some wild stuff out there. It's a lot of it's a fun I mean it is fun, but there's a little bit of doom and gloom in there too. But I think we're gonna end inspirationally because there's lots of good stuff coming ahead as well. So don't feel too bad, just enjoy all of the magic that is coming along here. If you'd like to get in touch with the show, you can reach out joey at good people, cool things dot com or sign up for the newsletter on the good people, cool things dot com website and you'll get all kinds of great stuff sent right to your inbox at a non alarming rate. I won't try to mold or shape your minds, just giving you great stuff like this conversation with will. To kick us off, can you give us your name and your elevator pitch, but can you also tell us the type of elevator that we're writing on? Oh Geez, Um, I love that. That's a a really cool way of kicking things off. Um, elevator pitch. Um. Well, first of all, I'm will would and second Um, Geez. So, I went to school for a little while where I studied. This is ridiculous, and it wasn't like a real degree. I mean it was a degree at the school I was at, but it's not a real degree. Um, I studied comedy writing and we talked about elevator pitches a lot and I was never good at coming up with elevator pitches for ideas, let alone for people. Um, I'm a pianist, I play Ukulele, I sing songs and I'm currently bald. How's that? That's UH. As for the type of elevator. Um, uh, a pretty uncomfortable one, I would say. Well, now I'm curious with your comedy writing, what was the most, I guess, unusual thing that you had to write about and or sell to your class? Um, I can't say that I recalled. To be honest. It was years ago now, Um, and I was in college. So you know, Um, I fried my brain pretty hard back in the day. Um, you know, just too much acid from the ages of like eighteen too. Geez, I don't remember what how old was I when I came out the other side of the fog? Um, and you know, I used to like I was the guy who would go to his comedy writing class drunk. So, you know, a real comedian. So that seems very on brand. Yeah, right, Um. So I don't know, I can't say I can. I can picture any of my head. There's a lot of SPEC scripts and a lot of like, you know, little pitch ideas. Uh. That's actually where I met my frequent co collaborator, Chris Dullen, was in this program he and I do a podcast together called life in the world to come, where we answer questions about the apocalypse in a goofy way and it's like an Improv thing. And he also helped me film a movie a couple of years ago. He was in and he helped write and Um, but yeah, I, I. I don't recall a lot of it. Fair enough. Fair enough. Now you mentioned how you're a pianist and a ukulele player. From my experience of knowing people that play piano and play Ukulele, it seems like...

...piano is something you learned real young. Ukulele everyone seems to learn that later in life. They're like hey, it would be cool to learn the UKULELE. Is that true with you too, or are you did you kind of flip flop up? How did how did you? Oh yeah, I started taking a piano lessons when I was like five years old, so pretty standard, originally classically trained. Eventually I got away from that and now I can't read or write music. But Um, Ukulele I picked up because I had heard it was easy and I wanted to try writing something, writing with something that I can strum and I could never really play guitar very well. There are too many strings and they're too close together and uh, so I picked up Ukulele when I was like twenty five, something like that. And UH so. And now I would say I write on Ukulele more than I do on piano. Um, so, I I usually play a tenor Ukulele or a Baritone Ukulele, the ladder of which most people don't seem to uh no, exists. Um. A lot of people are always asking me like why do you play such a tiny guitar, and I'm like, it's actually a very big UKULELE. Yeah, I don't know if I knew that exists. Is it also four strings? Yes, okay, it's tuned like the bottom four strings of the guitar and if you listen to my most recent singles Tom Cat disposables and Cicada days, you can hear it. It sounds like a nylon string guitar, but it's actually Ay. I love it learn and learning all kinds of new things today. I Love Awesome Man, do you? I? We definitely want to touch on the new singles that you have, but do you remember the first song you heard that kind of like made you want to create music? Oh Wow, that's a really cool question. Um, Damn. You know, I would say it's tough for me. It's tough for me to say. I I bet it was a green day song that eventually sold me, Um, but it might have been a Beatles song or a billy jewel song. I think I've kind of always wanted to create music, Um, since I was a little kid, since I was since before I can remember, you know what I mean. and Um, you know that doesn't mean that I ever you know, I didn't really ever decide I wanted to be a professional musician until I was already kind of in it, Um, you know, so like in my early twenties. But Um, I mean I tried pursuing it when I was a teenager here and there, but you know, it was always like one of several pursuits that I was interested in. It's just eventually music became the most promising route and also one that I just I loved doing. But Um, yeah, I can't say I recall. Um, I have memory of being very little and showing my piano teacher Um some music that I had written. Um, I mean like when I was like seven or eight years old and I just banged on the piano and told my teacher that it was uh a story, Um, and it was just me banging on a piano. I think I was probably just bullshitting it, just making up as I went along, but I don't know, Um uh. You know, when I say banged on the piano, I mean it just I was literally making noise. I was very much a child, and so I think I've always kind of wanted to do it. When it comes down to like when I decided I wanted to pursue it, when I decided I wanted to be a musician, I think it just kind of happened over time, you know, gradually. Let's jump then, from the early musician days to what you've currently done. You mentioned two news singles. What were what was kind of the inspiration for that? Because I think, especially during the pandemic, the music creation process, at least from musicians I've spoken with, seemed seems to be like a little bit almost like more experimental kind of because they're just like hey, the world is a mess,...

...let's uh, you know, let's try something that maybe we haven't done before, whether that's like a virtual zoom concert or just like let's throw in a Baritone Ukulele into the mix, like what? How has that? Has that been the same for you, or is it kind of you know, business as usual. Um, well, it's UH certainly hasn't been business as usual. I think probably part of the reason why so many musicians uh took on, took some new risks over the course of the pandemic. I think a good portion of them it was because they were presented with a world that affected their mental state so severely that it very naturally led them to that place. Um, I think that that's quite often the case. I think in other cases it's because everybody suddenly became terminally all online all at once, and so everybody just started changing their goals from putting on a good show to gaming the algorithms. Um, I think that. You know, that doesn't mean that I think that for everyone. I just know that. I think part of the changes in popular music that have occurred over the past couple of years have been because the goals of a pop song are different than they used to be. It used to be, you know, we gotta make this, you know, marketable to radio, we gotta make sure people like it and switch to we gotta make sure the robots like it and Um, so uh, I think that might be part of it. For me personally, it was, I think the former. Uh, I I don't use social media. I didn't get into the whole uh self promotion on Tiktok thing. Um. I'm I'm pretty anti social media in general. Um. And so it's like for me, I think it was just I went a little stir crazy. I think that was that was the case for a lot of artists. Um. Uh. It's certainly not business as usual from a creative standpoint. In that case, Um, I kind of had to change a lot over the course the past couple of years, partially due to the sudden increase and notoriety, uh, partially due to the pandemic and partially due to just growing up, maturation and recognizing things about myself that I'm even to change. Um. And so that affected the creative side. And it's also not business as usual from the business side because when the pandemic hit, a lot of musicians were forced to become content creators, which I like to think of as a slur for artists, Um, I because it's it's there's something just so creepy and Vapid and empty about the phrase content creator. It's like it implies that the thing that you're creating has no value of its own other than to be the contents of something else. And so I don't you know. So I have a patreon. Look at me, I'm wearing my patreon Hoodie, Um, and I have had one for years, Um, and I always tried to make my patreon rewards, for the most part at least, leaned towards the physical world as opposed to the virtual world, because I never wanted to be an online artist. I hate the idea of being considered an internet artist or whatever, because it's so antithetical to everything I think and feel. Um. But I had no choice. I had to make a living. And when the pandemic happened, I guess a combination of the Algorithms noticing that part of my material was likely to make people argue and therefore drive engagement. I think that happened. And then culture changed and Um, and everybody was indoors all the time and just looking for something to consume, and suddenly my business skyrocketed at the beginning of the pandemic. I got very lucky that it was something that I could already kind of do from home, Um, and because I you know, I got really lucky that I got it into the whole patreon game when I did. Um. So over the course of the pandemic...

I had to become a content creator and I started, you know, living that life and Um, and so that has not that was not business as usual. I'm finally pulling myself out of that. Um, I'm finally I just went on Tour and it was so nice to exist in the real world again and do what I actually got into music to do, which was put on shows and meet people and travel, Um, and, you know, exist in reality, because the truth matter is that it's part of reality, but the Internet is not reality. It's quite simply not. I think a lot of people have forgotten that. So, Um, yeah, I know it hasn't been business as usual at all. But as for the experimentation, really, ultimately I think a lot of it came from the fact mostly that it was an inevitable element of my natural kind of progression through life as a person and as an artist. You know, Um, uh, things inside my head changed, and so things outside of it changed in accordance the when you were talking about the patreon perks, that made me think of this is perhaps my favorite marketing promotion I've ever seen for an album. Josh freeze, the drummer of maybe every band that's ever existed at some point. Like he's, you know, a session drummer. He's played on on, I think for I think his official credits are like three D or three fifty different artists, something like that. And for one of his solo albums he did a kickstarter where all of the perks were outrageous things like, you know, if you pledged ten thousand dollars, he'd go to Disneyland with you and then give you his car at the end of the ride and like he'd be like your personal cabanah boy for fifty dollars, like just to you know, have these ridiculous sort of things to get people talking about it. Of like he's like, I don't expect anyone to, you know, take me up on the I'll write a five song ep about you type of type of perk there. But he's like, you know, for for someone that doesn't have a lot of money to promote this and, you know, isn't a huge fan of I mean I guess this was probably back in like the late two thousands, um, like the decade two thousand's. It's secial media probably wasn't as commonplace as it is now for a long artists, but that's always something that's stuck with me that I thought was was a super cool way to kind of take something that a lot of people have been doing and and kind of turn it on its head a little bit. So, as someone that uses Patreon, have you found certain certain benefits are are kind of like more well received than some of the other ones? Oh for sure. Um, people definitely really appreciated getting something in the mail. Um. And I don't do that part of it anymore because I've got, uh, the workload is just too much. The grind is constant and I need to be doing whatever I can to keep myself sane and healthy. Um, and I'm it's not easy. Um and so, but I I found that people really did appreciate getting something in the mail. Um People. I did this thing, Um, and I just started bringing it back a little bit, but I'm doing it in PDF format as opposed to physical printing, so it's not quite the same. But Um, I had this thing. It was it's like a zine of sorts that Um, I called the prescription, and it's like it's just like a bit of writing and uh, some art that usually has nothing to do with the writing at all and just kind of a you know that you've also got new music. You've got your new album in case I make it. I talked about some of the singles that are from it. So what can people expect from this album? Um, the album's coming out on July. That will be on all the major streaming platforms and there's a few singles left between now and then that will be coming out of the course in the next few weeks. Um. And the record is it's pretty different from a lot of...

...my last release previous releases. But it's funny. I think that I I explained a lot of my intentions with the record a long time ago and while I was doing that I was also playing a lot of Solo live streams and showing the Ukulele a lot more in that context, and I think people got the idea that I was going to like switch genres or whatever, and it's like I always I thought that was weird because I don't think I ever said that I was going to switch genres, because the one thing I've consistently said throughout my career is that I don't have any interest in trying to stick to or commit to a particular genre and kind of the one thing that most people have consistently said about my stuff is that I switched genres between every other song, Um. And so while song by song and as an overall record, the new stuff is quite different, I also kind of like, I don't know, Um, I don't want my statement to not be made. I don't want the differences that are there to be ignored or, uh, not being noticed. I hope that they are and I hope that they make a bold statement. But also, at the same time I'm like, well, what did you expect? I've, you know, I had do op on my last record, Um, and the one before that I had like, I don't know, Scream, oh, with saxophones. So it's like, Um, it's like I I you know, it's, it's, it is. That being said, it is quite different, partially because I've learned a lot about the process of writing music, Um, and composing it and arranging for a band, partially through experience working with a band one on one and partially through I I learned some new skills while composing for a soundtrack uh in, and because I had to learn those skills in order to compose a soundtrack. I now was able to take those new abilities and put them into the new records. So the orchestration is a lot more Um, it's, it's a lot more detailed and it's a lot more Um. It's a lot bigger in some ways and smaller than others. It's a lot it's, it's a lot more complicated. The orchestration and UH has a lot more uh, I don't know. Nuance, I guess, is maybe the word I'm looking for, but I'm not sure it's just the instead of focusing on being as impressive as I can and trying to do cool piano runs and uh jam as many rhymes into a single line as I possibly can and try and be clever and witty and fun and Quirky and cool, instead my focus was on being as on a and true to my real immediate artistic desires as possible. Um, immediate is the wrong word. I don't know. It's hard for me to explain. Well, there's a lot more intimacy to the record and while at times it's very big, it's always as a means of commuting communicating something very personal, and so the album is definitely a lot more personal, almost confessional, kind of my goal with this one is to try and express parts of me that I feel I have gone unheard or unseen or unexpressed. and Um, because I felt like, because I became suddenly significantly more popular during at the height of a pandemic with primarily Ah, a general subculture that I don't personally understand or have a lot in common with, I found the majority already...

...of my public persona and image being taken as something so different from how I perceived myself and so different from how I want to communicate with the world. Uh, and I think the point of art, at least to a certain extent, is to have an authentic connection with people. It's not about trying to, you know, get a lot of streams or get a lot of record sales. It's about finding the people who need to hear what you have to say, and I think that I've been lucky enough to experience that. Don't get me wrong, no part of me feels negatively about Um, you know the fact that, like anybody who connects to any of my work on any level, is something that I see as a positive thing. But I also want to have a genuine, real close connection with people out there who really do need to hear the kinds of things that I need to say. And, Um, it's about, I think, relating to people. It's about connecting with people over shared trouble. The songs are intended to reach like minded people on a hopefully deeper level than I've been able to reach people before by virtue of being transparent and by being maybe a little unwisely unguarded. You know, it seems sometimes you look around and it's just a lot of negativity around us. I'll get those CNN news alerts that are like Hey, a child was abducted, this person that you once watched on TV has been missing for eight years. Oh, there's still war going on, there's still a pandemic going on. Start Your Day here and I'm like, CNN, why are you trying to make my day real upsetting? I don't want to listen to that, I want to read that. Why don't I listen to something that is more uplifting, like agency for Change podcast from Kid Glove that tells the stories of people using their power to address real issues and improve lives. So we've got nonprofits, programs, people making products or services. They're using their power for good instead of trying to make me sad, like CNN. They're playing major roles and making positive changes for other people and it's so heartwarming and upbeat to listen to these stories that are on agency for Change. You can check out new episodes every Wednesday, which, if you didn't know, that's when this show good people, cool things launches every Wednesday. So you've got two great podcasts coming out the same day, perfect for you to get your spirits and the good spirits. Don't let a crummy news update keep you down, because there's lots of good out there in the world and agency for Change is talking to those people that are making those positive changes and making the world a better place to live in, which we could all use some more of. Checkout Agency for Change every Wednesday wherever you listen to podcasts. I think your music videos are are very entertaining. I think the music video is almost kind of a lost art, like Um Tom Cat disposables, which I believe was based on true events, with with your encounter with a mouse, which my the only accounter I've had with the mouse in this house was when my dog either found a dead one or probably more likely killed one outside and then brought it in and paraded it around the house so proud of herself, and I was like please, please, let go with that right away. So so can you? Can you kind of talk about where the inspiration for Tom Cat disposables came from, and then also what the music video process is like, because I think it's it's kind of like a lot of people do, just kind of like you know, the performance video, where it's it's a real simple sort of thing, but I love the storytelling element of music videos that take the time to do that, which I think is something that you do. So is that something that you intentionally try to do or is it just kind of it's worked out like that? Yeah, Um, it's...

...it's definitely something I I do intentionally or I try to do. Um, this the song is about. The song is written from the perspective of a mouse that I uh, that that I trapped in the winter of it was uh, I have a weird sort of affinity for rodents, pests, insects, animals that people generally regard as unworthy or undeserving of life overall, Um, and whose lives they're just willing just going out kind of just at a moment's notice Um, partially because I know that they don't deserve it. You know, I think that there's like maybe part of me that relates to the idea of being just, I don't know, by by just just being by natures, seen as beneath or seen as just, you know, a source of disease, Um, and easily written off. Um, I think, or maybe I just think they're cute. I don't know. I just get sad if I step on a bug and I ah, I feel an urge to befriend most animals that I see, especially small, defenseless ones like mice and rats and Um, and I keep pet rats. I'm I'm weird like that. and Um I. So I found this mouse in my kitchen last winter and I had no problem with it being there. I tried to give it food, I tried to feed it, I wanted it to be its friend. And then I read about hand of virus and lyme disease and my landlord was like here, take these disposable poison traps and kill it, and I was like okay, and I ended up doing it and I cried for like two days. And so Um, so the song kind of was written. It's written from the perspective of that Mouse, uh, trying to like kind of explore its headspace, and I guess my hope with that song was to try and create empathy for uh, something for which people tend to not have empathy, Um, and to express, I think, also on a metaphorical level, some of my own feelings about my own lot in life, that there's something kind of relatable about a searching for cheese and getting poison once you think you found your bounty. And as for the music video, that was that was a collaborative effort between myself and the animator and engineer, Ivan Fisher Owen, who built all of the pieces and all the puppets and did the animation itself. And so he's all the way across the country and we just had zoom calls, phone calls, text messages where we kind of discussed what we wanted to do with this and he felt a lot of affinity for the mouse as well, and so we ended up really vibing really well together on this concept and then he sent me some rough cuts and I took the edit from there and, Um, he's he's incredible. He does incredible, incredible work and UH as a really admirable guy, Um, and the process was, yeah, trying to tell this story in a way that included some of the more abstract, I don't want to say cosmic, but almost cosmic, element of what I you know, of what we wanted to say about the world on a larger scale as well. And so everything is kind of...

...clockwork and mechanical and Um uh, you know, it's it's about, I guess, nature and how Um and the process by which events unfold and the maybe inevitability of everything and the coming to terms with and accepting all of that. Um. For me personally, it's partially about that and then in other ways it's partially just about a mouse. I used to be really committed to the idea of trying to make every song as big and as lofty and as grandiose as possible. I wanted to say the biggest, most deepest thing that I could, and as of late I've been thinking a lot more about like, I know, I'd like to write a song about a mouse, Um, because I don't think that meaning is always, you know, found in grand proclamations about your vision for the world or your thoughts about the nature of humanity and existence on this plane, but a lot of times profundity is found by people connecting over something small or over something very ah, very tangible and very real. You mentioned one of the reasons you got into music was to go play shows and travel and see people and connect in person like that, and that's been one of my favorite things of life kind of opening back up after the pandemic, is that live shows have come back. Of course, not all shows are created equal and I always love asking musicians this. Do you have a worst gig that you've ever played? Um? Oh Boy, uh, you know, it's hard to pick Um. I think that the the pandemic and the way ajor corporations took advantage of people's fragile psychological states over the course of it and their constant connectivity to the Internet really messed with people's heads and has altered the way they interact in the real world, especially young people, whose minds are still so malleable and impressionable and who have been the most predated on by these companies Um. And so there were a number of shows on my recent tour. I don't want to say a number and imply that there were a bunch of them. There were a couple where there were younger crowds who quite simply could not grasp that they weren't in a twitter thread. Um. And so it was. It made it impossible to do my show on a couple of occasions. There were a couple of shows that I just I couldn't do my show. Um, you know, I'm a stand up and a singer songwriter and ultimate I couldn't do my stand up at a couple of these shows because, you know, and which is fine, I like playing songs too, and it's, you know, ultimately, what most people went into it to go see, because they had no way of knowing that I was a stand up, because it doesn't say it on my Wikipedia, I don't think. and Um, I hadn't played shows in two years and the last time I had played shows, nobody knew who I was. You know, my fan my fan base of them at this point showed up long after, Um, I had last done a set where I went out on stage told jokes and sang songs and told stories. I was I was pretty taken off guard by some of the behavior at in some of these audiences and it got pretty, pretty strange on a couple of occasions and pretty difficult um where I just had to kind of keep my head down, play the hits and try and get off stage before I had a nervous breakdown because I...

...couldn't even sing a song without children in the front row screaming, uh, dirty words at me, like I'm like the substitute teacher. They're trying to roll Um, you know, or like they're spamming a chat. You know, it's really what it felt like. It felt like I was doing a live stream, only the live chat was people yelling instead of people sending messages. And Uh, it didn't used to be like that. Even at my most heavily attended shows, it was never like that. Even at the most high energy shows I ever played, it wasn't like that. I've had shows where I went on I went out on stage with like ten instrumentalists and played this huge, over the top show with aerialists and fucking, uh, you know, Horn players in a giant bird cage and everybody dancing and screaming and singing along, and still, when I wanted to say something, I could still get a word in edgewise. Um, and I think it's because of just how one desperate people are to be back in reality. Um, desperate maybe is in the right word, but you know how how you know excited they are to be back in reality, although I don't know if they know that that's what's happening. And I think it's partially because a lot of people are, Um, just destabilized by these algorithms that are designed very consciously in order to destabilize them and who have spent the last couple of years indoors being told by machine learning programs, uh, how to be the worst version of themselves possible. Um. And I'm not saying that these are all rotten people or something like that. You know, the vast majority of the shows that I've played in, the vast majority of the fans that I met were fantastic, um, but I think that there were some people who were victimized badly enough by these companies where I don't think the psychological ramifications of being on these platforms all day for like two years is something that people have talked about enough, um, because the psychological ramifications are very real and they are very observable. And you know, this isn't me saying, Oh, these kids in their pesky iphones, I don't care about that. I send text messages constantly? I mean no, I don't. I don't like to text and I'm hard to get ahold of. But the point is it's not about that. It's about the fact that there are these incredibly predatory companies using incredibly predatory, you know, psychological conditioning models in their programs, Um, in order to have a very measurable effect on People's Behavioral and emotional patterns, and to suggest that it hasn't worked would be insane. It has worked. It has very much changed our culture. You can see it the second you go online. People are just parties of themselves out there. And yes, the Internet has always been a place for people to go to anonymously be monsters, but now people don't even bother with the anonymity part Um and they are starting to take it into the real world. I had, you know, I had some very strange interactions. I had, I had to I had somebody objected from one of the shows because I was able to draw them back to like a threatening letter they had sent me in the mail because of some social media mishap that they had gotten involved in that they decided was just like me somehow. Um, I had people giving me really weird, creepy gifts, Um, and I had some shows where, yeah, I couldn't get past the spam...

...and so, you know, I had to just kind of sit there and just sing the songs, which, once again, is fine, but Um, there were like there were like two shows in particular that were impossible. I played a show in Austin on my last tour and it was one of those crowds where I simply couldn't do my set. And it wouldn't have been that bad if weren't for the fact that also, I had just played like seven shows in a row and my voice was just gone. And so I was on this stage for an hour and a half, playing to one of the biggest audiences I've ever played too, probably playing in the biggest room I've ever played. It was that it was an Austin city limits room, and I'm used to dive bars and cafes, Um, and I get up on this gigantic stage, there's a gigantic screen behind me that says will would on it. This is totally not my world and I can't sing and I can't talk either, and Uh, it was a nightmare. Um, it was truly a nightmare. Um, and that was a really tough one. Um. And it was funny because I had also played a show in Pittsburgh the week before where I had a similar experience, only I could sing, but I was running on like an hour of sleep and eight hours of travel and I was just fried beyond all reason and I hadn't even practiced in ages and the audience was extremely challenging and, Um, they're like throwing ship at me and stuff and Um, you know. And I had figured, okay, well, that was the worst time I've ever had on stage. It couldn't possibly get worse than that. I'm sure I can use that as a barometer from here out to the rest of my career. And then Austin happened and I was just like, Oh my God, there is no bottom. You know, I don't ever want to come across as ungrateful for the opportunities to perform that I have, because I do very much appreciate it and I'd rather play a nightmare show than no show at all. That's not true. Never mind to take that back, but I do, Um, you know, I never want people to think that I'm like one of those artists who like hates his fans or something. Um, it's just that there, yeah, there were a couple of shows where people were I couldn't, I couldn't connect with them. These platforms are driving people crazy, is my point. And the world is we're gonna blow each other to kingdom come if something isn't done about this. And you heard it here first. Um, I give us ten years. I give us tops. Honestly, at this point, um too dramatically alter the course of our society, or we're gonna either blow or blow one another to kingdom come, or we're going to get we're going to descend into our basements, where the air conditioning is good and we're safe from climate catastrophe, Jack Ourselves into the oculus rift and just bathe in deep fake pornography for the rest of our natural born lives. Um. So that's yeah, anyway. Sorry. Well, on that, on that great note, let's let's go into the top three, which is always, always a nice way to wrap things up. Well, we'll go from horror shows and flames circling all around us and to just your top three favorite places to play. I really love the bitter end in New York City. I love that place. They've got a great piano, a great stage, great audience layout. I love seated venues like that, cabaret and comedy club style places. Um. So that's one of my favorites. Another one of my favorites is a place called the Juggling Gypsy in Wilmington, North Carolina that I just Um, I would love to go back to. I don't know if my booking agent would let it happen because the last time I played a venue that small it was like it just it couldn't it didn't work. Um, but hopefully, I don't know, maybe we can still make it happen someday. I just...

...missed the way things were before the pandemic. The last time I went on one of those self booked indie tours where I just got into a station wagon with a couple of boxes of t shirts and my keyboard and just went to various holes and walls, cafes, special interest little you know, places around the general eastern area. Um, I don't know, I I miss I miss basement shows at houses. I miss little tiny things like that. And so honestly it's not even about the places it's it's about the type of connection that you can have with an audience, Um, one that I I really I've still been able to have even at some of the bigger shows that have happened now, and it's been an incredible experience and, Um, you know, but it's really it's it's it's kind of like going back to what I was saying was my intention with a new album, in case I make it. Um, and that is intimacy, direct authentic connection with your audience on a real and deeper, more visceral and, AH, unabashed Lee honest level. Being able to look at my audience and really know that they actually see me and sharing that experience with them is and it is an honor beyond any other. It is such a thrill and it is I'm so lucky to have those experiences and I hope that I have the opportunity to play more intimate shows in the future and I hope that I'm able to figure out a way to make some of these bigger shows that are now a necessity because of where my career has gone, uh, into something that can still capture that feeling and can still give my audience that experience and that I can share that with them. Um, uh, you know, I'm going to be taking a long break from everything after, uh, the album comes out. I'm going to do another tour afterwards, supported and then after that I'm going to be taking a long break. It's not it's not about the place. It's about the people and it's about the UH, the depth of the connection that you share with those people in that place, and I think that when I think about all of my favorite places I've ever played, it hasn't been because of the place. Um, it's been because of what I was able to share with the people who I played for their best of luck with the new album, the tour and the break. I think that's a very important recognition, even just to to have. I don't know if if a lot of musicians take the time for themselves like that. A lot of musicians uh, you know, turn to drugs or blow their brains out, you know. So it's like, I don't want to be that kind of musician. We don't want that. Don't what that would if people want to check out the new album or some of your old music and and kind of learn more about what you've been doing, where can they find you? I mean basically anywhere where music usually is. Apple Music Itunes. I. I itunes. Is that a thing anymore? I meant to say spotify and then itunes came out of my mouth. Yeah, I think itunes is just apple music now. I don't know when that happened. Um, I am absolutely a lot, I. I. I'm such a technophobe. And, in case you haven't gotten that impression, uh, yeah, you know. Uh. I tend to mention spotify first because that's where my numbers are the highest, but honestly, apple music pays like five times as much. So check me out on apple music. That's what I would say. Look Up Bill Wood on apple music and no other platform. fantastical world. Thanks for taking the time to chat.

This is great. Thank you for having me. As we do with every episode, we have to end with a Corny joke, and perhaps you even have one, but but I've I've got one. Preps. Not to throw you on the spot here, but why did the chicken join the band? Why? Because it was the one with the drumsticks. Good after it. Today, people, good people, cool things. Is produced in Austin, Texas. If you're a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. You can send me a message Joey at good people, cool things dot com. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people, cool things and check out all the old episodes via good people, cool things dot com. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (141)