Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 108 · 8 months ago

108: Customer Logic and Growing Business with Bryan Clayton

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

So many businesses start by identifying a problem people have and trying to solve it. That was the idea behind GreenPal, the “Uber for lawn care” that connects homeowners with local lawn care professionals. But as GreenPal CEO and co-founder Bryan Clayton discovered along the way, he was actually solving a differentproblem for his customers. More than speed, more than a good deal, they want reliability

Today, GreenPal has more than 100,000 active users and makes thousands of transactions every day. It’s Bryan’s second successful landscaping company, following the $10 million annual revenue of Peachtree, Inc., which sold to Lusa Holdings in 2013. 

Let's hop in and get your business growing!

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is Brian Clayton, the founder of green pal, which is like the Uber for lawn care. So if you're looking at your yard and you're like, Oh man, this is a lot of grass that I don't want to mow, you don't have to worry about it. You can just go over to green pal, get quotes from multiple different folks and get that lawn looking nice and groovy. Brian, prior to Green Pell, start another company and sold it and so he's got lots of experience in building a company. He's dropping all sorts of good entrepreneurial tips. I love his distinction between founder logic and customer logic. And sometimes you, as a creator, think you've got a brilliant million dollar idea and then you get customer feedback that maybe maybe it's not so good. But that's an important step, even if it's hard to hear rough to get that kind of direct feedback into your face, but it is all worthwhile in the end, because it'll help you create a better product or service for your customers. If you'd like to get in touch with good people cool things, you can reach out via facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast. You may have heard too, that there's both a Mer shop and, I've read, a book, and both of those help support the show. You can check both of those out at good people cool thingscom. There's tabs for shop and book, very simple. Not trying to be too confusing with the way that you find these things and, as always, feel free to drop onto apple podcast or pod chaser and leave a five star review. Make it magical. Write your favorite Corny joke, because I end every episode with one and I'm always on the market for more. Send them your way. Do all that good stuff and cozy up for this conversation with Brian. For people who don't know who you are, can you give us your name and your elevator pitch? Can you also tell us the type of elevator that we're writing on? Yeah, I like that as thanks for me on your show, Joey, my name is Brian Clayton, CEO and Co founder of a company called Green Pal and green pal is like the Uber but for lawn mowing. So a homeowner needs to get lot knowing services. Rather than calling around on craziylist or facebook or Yelp or asking friends or family, they can just download the green power APP, they pop their address in, they get to a free quotes in a couple of minutes and then they hire the longcare service they want to work for, work with and they come out and take care of the chore for them and if everything goes well, then they just set it up for autopilot for the whole year and kind I said it and forget it. And Green Pal is a ten year overnight success. So I guess you could say it's like a slow moving elevator. We who we've been at this thing for a decade and bootstrapped it.

Have not have not raised any outside capital and now we have over three hundredzero people using the APP, doing multiple ten figures a year and revenue and profitable and forty three people working for the company now. So it's been a long grind, slow moving elevator, but but we're doing well, still growing fast and and having fun. That's all of that is important, but definitely the having fun part, I feel like a big, big component that sometimes people overlook on that, but you absolutely you mentioned that it's kind of like the Uber for long care. Is Long Care something that you've always had a passion for? Like, how did you get into this idea initially? Well, so, I think when you're starting a tech company, authenticity can be a competitive advantage and so you can help to like be solving your own problem. And my first business was a lawnoing business. I started cutting grass in high school as a way to make extra cash and stuck with this little lawnmoing business I had all through high school and all through college and graduated college side. Hey, I'm just going to see how far I can take this little lawndoing business and I ended up growing like one of the largest landscaping companies in the state of Tennessee, where I live. Ended up getting that business over a hundred and fifty employees, got over ten million a year and revenue, and then it was acquired by one of the largest landscaping companies in the United States. And so growing that company from like just me and a push mower to me and a hundred fifty people, I learned a lot about about business and particularly the landscaping industry. And when I sold it, I, you know, took some time off, got bored and the side of well, what am I going to do now? You know, what can I do with my life now? And all was I came to the realization that I really was wired to want to be in the game, I was wired to want to be in business, and so I thought, well, and APPS should exist for like this industry. I know, like like there's Uber and there's lift and there's AIRBNB and these other apps that were emerging that we're making like these real world experiences is easy as pushing a button. I thought, well, an APP should exist for this thing. And it was kind of naivete as an asset. I didn't know what I didn't know and and I realize how challenging it was going to be to pull something like like this off. But we got in there, like to I recruited to cofounders and we started working on the first version and that was a total flop and and took like three or four years to get some good momentum going. But we just stuck it out and and and we kind of, you know, we were able to start on second base because we kind of knew the industry, but what we didn't know is like the technology execution piece of it, a product development piece of it. Building a market place your built. You have like two customers. You have, you know, you we have customers on the consumer side and then we in the vendors are kind of customers of ours as well. So we sell US satisfy the needs of both at the same time. Didn't know how challenging that was going to be. So was this a lot...

...of trial and error and success? By not giving up, it's gotten us where we are to day. I definitely want to dive into that a little bit. But let's go back to two thousand and thirteen, when you sold your former company. Was that what? What was that moment like? Were you just like dancing around for hours on end? You know, it's not, it's not. It didn't go how I thought it was going to be. First off, selling the business was was just really difficult. That doesn't happen very often, and in a service based industry like the landscaping business, it doesn't happen. Like acquisitions of that scale don't don't occur very often. So from the moment that I you know, decided I wanted to sell the company to the moment we were able to get the deal done. It was like two years. That was really challenging because there was a lot of things, a lot of block and tackling that I did have in place that I needed to have if I wanted to sell the company. So I had to kind of reverse engineer a lot of things grooming it for sale, and then when I got it sold, it was it didn't feel like I thought it was going to be, because I, you know, I fifteen years of my life I never had a job and so from you know, the only thing I ever knew was running that company, and so now that was gone. So I almost went through like a little mini identity crisis for like six months. And then you get the transition and like help the new owners like take over your baby, and that was that was a whole total like like difficult process that I didn't anticipate. It's kind of like if you if, if if you were like in you know, if you had your soul mate and then another man moves in the house and like now he's now he's the husband, you know, and then you have to like help like him understand you know how what your wife likes almost it was weird and so like. I did that for like six months and I didn't know how. I didn't really anticipate how challenge that was going to be. But you know, when all the smoke clear got done, then I got bored and I thought that I really understood something about myself. That was that was like okay, your wired to to conquer new new goals and challenges and like let's do something else going now what I didn't want to do, I didn't like. I didn't want to start another hard business again. I I was gravitated towards the idea of building green pal because it was a software business and I thought it was going to be easy. And little that I know, building Green Pal has been ten times more challenging than than building my first company ever was. And you touched on a couple of those challenges, but is there one that really kind of stands out to you, like it was it more of like the technical side of things, because that wasn't where your initial strengths and head lie. It definitely that. You know, I didn't know how to bright software. My cofounders didn't either, and so that was it's that was something we had to overcome, but we overcame that within about two years. We took every online course we could take. We my cofound I went to a boot camp to learn how to Code. I mean I I became like the world's crappiest front end engineer just off of Youtube. So we were able to kind of like just through sheer will, like, you know, got our way...

...through that. What's really challenging. What I didn't understand was there's a big difference between starting a traditional business, in my case a landscaping company, or could be a construction company, a home cleaning service, a coffee shop, a restaurant, whatever. There's a big difference between running that kind of business, which is really challenging, versus inventing something brand new from scratch that does not exist in the world. And I and I didn't understand the how difficult that the the ladder was going to be, because you there is no road map. You have to kind of like figure that as you go. You're trying to build something that people will want to use and you're trying to solve their problems and and and and you're just, hey, you just kind of have to go from like failure to failure without a loss of enthusiasm, and I didn't understand that that it was going to be that challenge. And so it's the same as whether you're inventing a tech product or, you know, new physical product. Like when you're inventing something brand new from zero, it's really, really hard. Versus let's say you want to open up a new bakery in your neighborhood or you want to open up a dry cleaning service or whatever. You know, like those are those are hard businesses. There's a known set of things you can execute against. When you're inventing a new, particularly tech product, there's no roadmap and so you just kind of have to forge your way to the darkness. That was hard. I guess this is kind of a Combo question. You had talked about how you're on Youtube and like taking all the courses and tools and everything. Do you have one or two that particularly stand out, because I think learning by youtube can be a great way to learn something. But there I was just reading about this of learning guitar and how, you know, someone was saying how they were using Youtube to learn guitar and there like it was like some of these channels are great and they offer some good tips, but then some expect you to have, you know, baseline level of knowledge that maybe you don't have already, or it's like this one video was good, but I'd love a second one that kind of builds on what I just learned, but instead the next video you get served from that person is, you know, like playing chromatic scales or something. Instead of right how to like finger and F quarters that you know, something like like the the natural progression type of things. So was there any sort of resources that stood out to you? Is kind of the first part of this, and then the second part you're talking about the the product roadmap and everything, which I think is a very key component of any business, but particularly one that is kind of brand new. So what was that process sort of like for you as you ironed out those details? Part of like half the battle with Youtube University and learning things online is waiting through the BS. That sucks and I think I think that holds up a lot of people. It's like they get in there and they'll try a couple things and they didn't get values. Therefore, they they discount the idea of learning a new skill online when in fact like half the battle is just waiting through all the stuff and then keying in on something that's or be in it to...

...what what level of the game you're at and that's helpful to you. And then, and then, once you get what that kind of Doualt in, then not being afraid or residents like peel off some coin and and by the premium stuff. It's amazing, like how people just will not spend five hundred dollars on a resource that will save them three years. And so but then only maybe it's because they got burned and they bought an on a course and it was a it was a it was not helpful. And so so half the battle is is putting in the time, and maybe it might be all day and all days, all day Saturday, all day Sunday, every week, working on yourself, try to learn much as you can, and then doubling down on the on the instructors and materials that resonate with you, and then not being afraid to buy the premium stuff. And so it's half. It's half that and in half putting the time of learning. And and one thing that kind of I learned. You know not you're going from a blue collar entrepreneur very much is hand to hand combat and red neck as it gets to becoming a full scale, like Tech Entrepreneur. One of the things that kind of surprised me was to not believe your own bs and and to really realize that, while you might not have the title of software engineer, you might not have the title of data and an allay analyst, or you might not have the title of Copywriter or whatever, you can learn the twenty of eight all of these skills and a very short period of time online for free, and so don't believe your on BS. You can learn this stuff, because you're going to need to anyways if you're going to pull something off from scratch. And to your second question, you know, with respect to like trying to figure out what the hell what we were we doing, like, how do we develop a product, Road Matt, how do we know what to do? How did we know what to build? How did we know what's spend our time on? It was? It's very much like startups are a lot like poker and they're less like chess. There you're making bets, you're trying to figure and you're trying to like calculate the risk on your beds and you're trying to and you're trying to gather feedback in the and the environment to know what the best bets are to make. And so for us it was like, okay, we have this crappy product, we've had together on how we think it should be. We got to get a hundred people to use this thing by any means necessary, because we need those hundred people to give us the feedback so then we know like where to take it next. And as simple as that sounds, that's how we went from a hundred to a thousand people, two thousand to ten thousand, to ten thousand to Fiftyzero, Fiftyzero to a hundred thousand. was just incrementally working our way through user growth and then making it really dead simple for people to tell us everything they hated about our product. And for the longest time it was my cell phone number on the home page, it was my cell phone number on the bottom...

...of every email. I personally handled the live chat. You know, I personally knew the first five hundred law care services that use our APP so to run their business. And it wasn't I mean, on the one hand, we kind of had to do it ourselves anyway. But the moreover, the real reason why we did that was because we were never at a loss to understand what's like the next three or four things that we need to work on, or because people are always giving you that feedback, they're always telling you where you suck, whereas a lot of founders are resident to that, to that feedback, and they make it hard for people to reach them. And because the reality is it hurts and it's not fun. But but if you don't have that, like that, that that flow of feedback loops from your from users, and then you're then there's then what happens is there's a gap that develops between founder logic and customer logic, and so the founder is looking at the problems and solutions from the founders point of view and the customers are looking at it from their point of view, and there's this gap, and that's get can get you in trouble and that can that can waste years of your life building something that nobody wants. was there something that you got? I think that's such a brilliant point, of the gaps between founder logic and customer logic, because, yeah, there's so many times where you know I've had an idea or I'm like Oh, this could be a good idea. I run it by some people. They're like now, like that's stupid, that's not going to solve a problem. or any are you know like maybe tweak this area and like you might have something sort of thing there, and I think there's Times where I've kind of been like Oh, yeah, that's like how did I not see that? That's a good point, and I love when customers make it are when companies make it easy even just to contact them, like there's somewhere it's like hey, I want to give you praise and it's difficult to do right, and so I love that you make it very easy for people. But was there any feedback you got that like really sort of took you by surprise and you're like, oh, why did not ever think of that? Yeah, you know, it's always it's always like block and tackling and your treas around the top two or three things. It's like you have this fire hose of feedback and then you try to trias around the top two or three things. One of the key things we learned early on that we never would have understood was the problem we were solving for people. So when I first had the idea for Greenpow, I was looking at it from a contractor's perspective, because I spent fifteen years at a con as a contractor and I believed, I thought, that we could drive the cost of these services down because we could open up a competitive bidding environment for the services. So when a homeowner signs up for basic yard maintenance, they get like four to five quotes back really quickly, and it was my belief, my hypothesis and assumption that they, because of the competitive nature, would be able to get the most cost effective lawn moist us and therefore that would be...

...the value proposition and that would be the thing that would like put the wind that are back. And what I didn't understand was, because I was looking at contracts perspective, that that wasn't the problem we were solving. The problem we were solving was reliability and speed, because there's this weird phenomenon with with little landscaping services in general, is like they come and go, they flake, they disappear, they they do good for a week and then they drop off the face the earth, or they do good for a week and then they start doing a halfass job whatever. And really people didn't really care if they were spending thirty five dollars versus thirty bucks versus twenty five bucks. They just wanted somebody to show up on Thursday when they hired them for Thursday, and then they wanted them to actually show up the following Thursday and this to do it and and get get the tore off their plate. And, as you know, through the course of talking with people, who weren't pissed off at they weren't getting the cheapest solution, they're pissed off because their guy, they hired outside of green poll didn't show up and now they got they hired in green pal showed up a day late or hitting return their phone call. That was the problem we were solving, and so architecting the workflows of the market place in the product in such a way to sure speed and reliability and price as a secondary factor was a key thing we learned very early that we wouldn't have learned if we hadn't this taken it slow, listen to everybody's feedback and at that according them that head very close to home. As someone who has had some of those those experiences of I. Yeah, like one week phenomenal, next week two days late and bad. Yeah, that's that's the problem we're solving. And and you know, the other thing that was surprising was everything that sucks about hiring a lawn care service and everything that sucks about running a law carries long care service is now our problem. Like like this, not like those problems just go away. Know those problems. The burden gets shifted to US Green Power, and we have to build technology to make those things run smoother. Man, those things run the easier and add value in that way. It's like a lot of people sit here and think, oh, there should be an uber for home cleaning and there should be an uber for valet parking and there should be like an Uber for get restaurant reservations and like all the things that suck about those that. Then, damn it, the dynamics of those businesses don't go away just because you build an APP like those are now your problems. And so so that was a key thing we learned early on. Is like, wow, the long care business is hard. I knew that, but now all those problems are ours and we have to solve them with technology. Ever, feel like you can use a little more knowledge in your life. Well, check out my podcast, where of the day with Comedians. Each and every week day, me and a...

...community and get together, we pick a word and try to come up with the most absurd, funniest andance weekend using that word in context. I guarantee you it's the funniest way to expand your vocabulary. Check it out. Everywhere podcasts are potted and on Youtube. And now back to good people, cool things. And have you found? Because are your prior company? From what I have seen and what we've talked about, was just in Tennessee, as I correct, that's correct. It was. It was read. It was like outside of Nashville, Tennessee and all of what they call Middle Tennessee, we serve, but but we did. We were not multilocational. You know now green pals is in every major city United States, all fifty states, but it what didn't start out that way. We were in Nashville, Tennessee, for like three years, only Nashville, just trying to figure out how to build the product, how to solve the problems that that are inherent to this service and how to, you know, quite frankly, how to make sure the log care service shows up on Thursday because he wants to show up on Thursday. It wasn't like this top down, heavy handed thing. It was building the product in a scentivizing contractors to do what customers needed them to do in a natural way. That took us a long time to figure out. was that something was going nationally, something that you had always wanted to do but, to your point, wanted to figure things this out first before that happened? Or was it once you figured those things out, you're like, wait a minute, we could expand this. No, it was a bit definitely the former. In fact, it was very, very, very, very humbling the first few years, like it took a lot longer than I expected to go national with it, and that was one of the hardest things about it because because I was running, you know, one of the biggest landscaping companies in the in the state and doing well, you know, really good, profitable business, and then and it started all over again and like begging, begging dozens of people to use my crappy little ass order their twenty dollar Lo onally, like it was very humbly and and I really expected us to be able to go fast or quicker, but I knew there was no need to expand it outside of our own backyard until we could like make ninety nine percent of people happy with that. And in the early days it was it was less than fifty most of the time. When somebody hired somebody to come out and do the do this service, it didn't go well, and so we had to figure out, okay, well, what why is it? Why are these things not going well? Like we had to look at the problems on US case by case basis, and at the time we were reading a book called the Lean Startup and then lean start up. They airic grease. The author talks about this methodology of Toyota lean manufacturing, and one thing that Toyota does is when something goes wrong, they asked why five...

...times, and so you ask why five times, you can get to the root cause of the problem and then solve it there. And so for us it was like going through that cycle thousands of thousands of times. Okay, so why is this homewder pissed off? Well, because they had a party on Friday afternoon and they ordered a lawn money service on Thursday and the guy didn't show up and now their grass looks terrible for the party. Okay. Well, why did the guy show up? Well, because the guy quoted it and he got hired, but he didn't know. He didn't know they were supposed to do it on Friday. Well, why did he know he is supposed to do on Friday? Well, because we emailed him, but as it turns out, God love him, he doesn't use email. Okay. Well, now we need to send him a text mess well, we did send them a text message, but he uses this crappy like voice over ipe, cheap off like brand carrier, and it doesn't let our system communicate with his phone. Okay. Well, why did we know that? Well, as it turns out, there's this callback function with with our API that should have told us that we were on successfully able to communicate with him. And so now we have to implement like a check whenever that happens and somebody needs to physically call him whenever we don't have like assurance that that Goddamn so like that's one of like tenzero things that can go wrong and it's just an example of asking why five times. It's solving at the coast. I've lived in several different places, so I grew up in Chicago, then went to school Miami, lived in La and now live in Austin. Little bit of a different climate, you know, in those those different places you'll have in Chicago several months of snow. Down here in Austin we had our snowpocalypse last year, Snowma Getton, whatever you want to call it, whatever Snow Pun you want to use, where it was, you know, legitimate. Like I was like, Oh, this is like almost the Chicago snow, like it's like four or five inches, you know, a lot of ice. The obviously, like electricity could not handle it. The grids, we're all shut down, like people were losing powerlors and water. But then later that week it was in the S and I like that's just phenomenal, you know, like very brutal on on any kind of really kind of anything, you know, infrastructured long care, all of that. Have you found in certain states that like there's a higher demand for your services or and you offer snow removal as well for the states where that is necessary? and was that something that you found? You know, you were getting feedback on that, like Hey, this would be nice too, and you added that in? or how did all of those sort of elements come together to make sure that each state and area is getting what they need. Yeah, to your point, every one of these cities metro areas has to be built from the ground up and tailored to how business is conducted there, because you don't really want to like go against people's natural understanding of how the service is performed and how they're accustomed to doing it. For instance, and some parts of the country it is called grass cutting and other parts of the tree is called lawnmowing, and...

...other parts of the country is called lawn care and other parts of the country is called yard maintenance. And so you have to not only communicate using the words that people use in different parts of the country, but also you have to orient it in such a way that they're accustomed to buying it. So in some places they want to pay by the Individual Service and they love that about it, and in some places they want to pay, like Florida, they want to pay one flat monthly price every month year round. And so we have to like we've had to stumble our ways to understanding and through talking with users that this is how it has we have to adapt the offering on a city by city basis, and so that that's makes it, you know, and challenging on another dimensions, because you have to like customize the offering on a city by city basis, not drastically, but but you do have to adapt to what they're accustomed to doing. And then, like the northern markets just flat line from October to April and and but in so it's like we don't, we don't, we can't sell long mooly services in those markets during those times of the month, the Times of the year. But but we decided to offer snow removal as a way to just stay relevant to our user base throughout that time of the year, because it's hard you get to reactivate your client base every single year in this business, and but if you're able to kind of like stay in their lives during during those those dead months by offering snow removal, well then there's a lot easier to say hey, remember me and May to reactivate them. So that was one reason to do another reason that we did it was because PR is a big channel for us. We are always in the news. We were we were on television at a local level like something like a hundred fifty times last year and and offering snow removal services feeds into that strategy of being relevant, being newsworthy. Big Storm Coming in Chicago. Here's a new APP that you can consider green palates in the APP store. You can download it today. It's free. You'll get five quotes for snow removal services and you can push a button hire our snow removal service. Like that story runs all the time in different markets in the United States because we built the snow removal now quite frankly, we don't make a whole lot of money on snow removal because it's not consistent, it's not recurring, it's kind of one off, but it was something that we did from a strategic standpoint to stay relevant, stay in people's lives and stay with them throughout the year. Now we've touched on all kinds of of tips. There's like this is like a mini youtube course as well, but an audio only version, and so I guess Youtube is probably the bad example for but that kind of you know, there's a lot of good stuff in here. So you might repeat this for this question or maybe you have another tip. But for an entrepreneur that's kind of just discovering what they want to do and you know, maybe have an idea but you know, haven't, haven't taken sort of those initial steps to try and turn into a business or anything...

...like that. What's your one piece of advice that you give them? It's it's it's closing like the space between you and getting something in the hands of an actual customer. You used to be like five, ten years ago. These weekend like these weekend hackathongs, we're really like popular where people would come together and like two or few people will come together and they would hack together a product and they would try to get people to use it in something like forty eight or seventy two hours. I did one of those a couple times and man, you learned so much more about whether an idea is good or not and how to get a product off the ground and those two or three days then you will in two or three years of reading books and going to business school or something like that. So and and the mistake I see a lot of entrepreneurs make, founders, and I myself have made this mistake. It's like focusing on things that don't matter and spending very little time on validating at the ideas any good or not. So, for example, we made this mistake when we were starting green pal. We we we had we we had no customers. We were about to launch the website, but we spent like a week trying to design, or maybe even more trying to design, our brands mascot. And we designed this guy named Gary yet a strong jawline and a goodlooking uniform. Hell, you can see him on the on the home pace today. And we wanted this brand mascot to embody the hard working long care services that use our platform, because we felt, like, you know, that would that would add like a storyline to the to the user's journey, and would give the product a soul. And we spent like a month designing Gary. And what kind of wow, what color should his hat be? And should he have like tennis shoes or work boots, and should he have a name tag or not, like, as silly as all these things are, like, we did that and and as somebody, I wish somebody to come up to me and slap me in the face and said, Bro, you have no customers, like you need to get twenty people to use this this third you've built, because you're that's that's the path to to to the promised land. It's not. It's not trying to do something you read in some blog posts because you think you're supposed to do it. Get something in the hands of customers, get feedback and then iterate and stop doing anything else other than that. And I made the mistake, as he found her do it all the time. Because here's the thing. Working on designing Gary and and like illustrating Gary is fun. Sitting at such at some starbucks, with some with some person that tried your crappy product and listening to them tell you everywhere you suck and how your product sucks. It's not fun. And so we're like, we're resitant to do the things that aren't fun. Do the things that aren't fun, because usually those are the right things to do. Pantastic and I'm glad Gary still living on Gary's lives and maybe a...

...decade later, Gary is relevant, but Gary was not relevant at level one of the game. All right, brand, you're almost off the hook care, but we always like to wrap up with a top three and I'm gonna let you choose. It's kind of choose your own adventure here. Either your top three just general lawn care tips or, and this one's maybe a little more selfish for me. Your top three plants, I that you have in like a backyard gardener things like that. We tried landscaping this past summer fall and everything was looking great and then we had our winter freeze here and, despite our best efforts to try and protect the plants, several of them to not make it. So I am I'm always for new ideas and recommendation. So whichever route you want to go. Okay. So top three long care tips? Well, one my I guess my first tip will be a lot of people have trouble hiring a lawnmowing or landscaping service, and it's because what they don't understand is these guys are busy as hell. And let's say you have like a renovation you need to get done. Rather than like calling around a bunch of all over like Yo for crazist or so or stuff like that, or facebook and begging people to come look at it, take a bunch of pictures, video, Google imagery, like, try to put your contractor on first or second base so where they can quote you over the phone or over SMS and do basically do it green pill does, but but do it manually and that can help you get a good contractor quickly. A lot of people to still call and leave a voicemail. Hey, will you come look at my yard to give me a free estimate? Nobody has time to give you a free estimate. People like you need to put them on second or third base. So that would be a tip. Second tip is when it comes to long care. A lot of people want it now. They want it today. Likely say you want a great looking, beautiful yard and you want it today and like to say we're talking like first week of May. Well, if you wanted a goodlooking yard and May, you needed to start thinking about it in October of last year. Lawn mowing service is in long care and Latin and landscaping is kind of one of those like reminders of how the universe works and how it's all about proactivity and prevention and literally like sewing seeds for benefit later on. There's no way to get a great looking law in today. You should have done it last fall, unless you want to spend a bunch of money and have it transplanted in. So that's my second tip. Third tip when it comes to plants, plant material. You don't want to innovate on what kind of plants will do do well in your yard. Like people like I was always kind of baffle when I was in the landscaping business. People like wanted palm trees and stuff and and the reality is palm trees will die in Tennessee. So you can't put palm trees in Tennessee and so like. Don't try to innovate and put things that that aren't conducive to the climate zone your end. You can get you can get in. The problem is people get inspiration by looking online, like I want this and like now, you probably just need to look around like your community. So...

...don't. Don't innovate on what plant material will work in your yard. That's my third, third tip for landscape fan task. I got a little nostalgic to for the the palm trees that were all around the University of Miami campus. But yeah, it would not thrive another look. Nope. Awesome, Brian, thank you so much for hopping on dropping all these great tips. I mean I learned a lot. I hope everyone listening did as well. People want to learn more about you or maybe you know get some quotes. Where can I find you? Yeah, you know life's too short to mow your own yard, so there's download green power in the APP store or play store. Anybody wants hit me up personally, just hit me up on Instagram, Brian M Clayton. Drop me a DM there. I'll hit you back. Fantastic. Will thank you again. Lots of good stuff and I'm excited for this warmer weather. Awesome, Joey, thanks for having me on the show. Of course I got to end with a corning joke, as we always do. I was actually walking down the street the other day and I found my neighbor slumped over his mower and his yard and he was just crying hysterically, but he said he'll be fine. He's just going through a rough patch. Good after today people. Good people cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you were a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. You can send me a message, Joey, at good people, cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people, cool things. Check out all the old episodes via good people, cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (142)