Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 106 · 8 months ago

106: Being Curious, Creative Media, and Disneyland Rides with Damion Taylor

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Damion Taylor has long been fascinated by the intersection of data and creativity, and he's used a unique skill set to create content for brands and media companies such as Warner Bros., NBC Universal, and Machinima.

Damion also created the Professional Confession podcast after experiencing the murder of Ahmaud Arbery and the Central Park Karen incident. The podcast features those conversations from people that aren't frequently told, from people of color, women, and queer individuals.

Additionally, we're diving into the joys of traveling and being curious about others, and we go down a wacky Disney rabbit hole. 

You'll definitely learn lots from this episode, and I hope you tell someone — or maybe everyone — you know to check it out.

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is Damian Taylor, the founder of Prometheus digital studio. The best fifteen years, Damien has been applying data and technology to entertainment, combining the old science analytical side with the creative, outside the box sign he's bringing a unique skill set working with brands and media companies. He's worked with pretty big name clients like Warner media, the CW new form digital. Damian has also worked and making media more diverse and share some really fantastic tips on how we can do that and how you can be more curious, explore the world make the world a better place, giving you actionable advice. We're also talking about Disney world and Disneyland, and my mind gets blown here on a major difference between the two parts. So tune in for all of that. If you'd like to support the show, you can reach out via facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast. You can always head over to the shop or pick up a copy of my book, kind but kind of weird, short stories on life's relationships and get all that good stuff. A good people, cool thingscom and wouldn't you know it, it can also listen to this very conversation with Damien right there and right here, because we're hopping into it. To kick it off. For people who aren't familiar with you, can you give us your elevator pitch? We can you also tell us the type of elevator that we're riding on? Oh, this will be a fun one. My elevator pitch. I am a data geek who loves creative stuff. So do lots with data. Data is sounds really Dirky, but it is some extent my life, but in so much as I can apply to creative endeavors. And what type of an elevator would be on. I'm obsessed my signs as well, with hyper loops. So we've gone like a hyper loop elevator with super magnet, like a mag let elevator, if that's a thing. If it's not, let's make me now was this? Was this interest in data something that you always had as a kid, or did you kind of like stumble into it later in life? I think I stumbled into it. I was just I was, I've always been just good with numbers. It's not like I was passionate about numbers and anything, I was just kind of got it. And my dad was always very much that you have to be a scientist. Prooved everybody you're smart if you're not doing numbers. And Yeah, sure on, I'll do that. And so, yeah, I went to college and I did neuro science and yeah, numbers. And then I realize that I like to create a stuff too. So iways my...

...intern and art and then I kept trying to figure out ways to bridge the two. Didn't always work successful successfully, but yeah, it's always been a thing. But I realize that I can't have just data or just art. I go crazy. I'd have to have both, because one of them is like too fluffy, the other one is too serious and I'm the balance between. I always like to ask people a question they wish they were asked more frequently, and usually it comes up later in the episodes. But I think this is actually a very nice segue here of how do you manage to combine those two because, yeah, creativity science seems like it could be, you know, some clash and going on there. So how do you combine them? It's well, I mean are my company is focused on data and analytics and strategy for media companies and Technology Company. So, as you're creating content, who are you trying to reach? Why are you're reaching them? What's working? What's not? And that's build a model and see where you're making money on it. But Oh, wait a minute, when you do this, let's try this, create a thing. It seems like that really works well. So it's sort of like the best of all worlds. I get some technology, I get some numbers and I get, you know, some fun creative like some music or car two in or TV show or whatever it is. Do you have a favorite project that you've worked on? Oh, I know, it's hard to pick them. They're all like your children. I know they're all. I think there are two right now that buying for first place. The first was one I wasn't expecting at all. I just finished a project in like a year, year and a half in the making, a diversity project, which is probably the last thing I thought I would do, because diversity was not where I saw my career going. I always thought that was like the kiss of that don't do that. Like to do something else, anything but that. But this was a really great project that was looking at the language of diversity, how people talk about it, and I think it was so riveting, not just not because of what it was in the impact, but because it was focused on how can companies be practically inclusive, like what can they actually do versus theory and big learning? Some of them were just really obvious, but like first to define diversion, because everyone defines it differently and so people are let down. Are Always mad because you said you were reading diverse but you didn't do my brand of diversity or and so there's this conversation around clarity, because everyone throws terms around, thinking that we are all talking about the same thing and we're not. And then this need for authenticity that consumers and viewers and whoever you're trying to reach that they know more about your company than you give them credit for. They're watching you. So, whether they say it or not, they know who's on your board and who's leading. So if you're giving it a message of like we're all inclusive, we do Babbaba bit and they see the complete opposite. Internally. They know and you think you're protecting them by not saying anything, but you're not. They already know right. So that was riveting for that reason. But then on the other end is for the first time I get to dive into making an animated series, and so I never done animation before. So that's why I was like, they're buying for the top place, because this is animated series is indirectly born of that. That that work, but it's it's fun to just do something so creative like find music and what...

...do these characters look like? And I get to be like a kid again and it's fun. Whenever I'm looking at something in my son walks in and he gets really excited and he wants to see more of it. I made that. He looks at me like suspicious, are you sure? Why did you make that? Are you sure that was you? But then he wants to see it again. It's kind of just fun. Yeah, that's I think that's the best sort of like validation right, like yeah, you ever get a big more of that place? Have you found that the sort of like storytelling structure of something animated? Does that vary a lot from a live action type of thing? Like you, you kind of have. You can almost like go out of this world to create things like that. But are you still trying to kind of like keep it in reality? Are you just like Hey, I can do whatever with this, so let's go, let's go wild. Right now. We're we're kind of out of reality. I mean it's about a pair of twins who are which is in discover they can control nature and technology, right, so they're not just nature, which is like everyone else, they can do technology as well. And Yeah, I can go wherever I want, which is kind of fun with that, and I don't care about keeping it real. It's that's not the point. It's fantasy. It's supposed to be fun. So yeah, I think I'm always like. I know I got not to a sidebar too much, but I was writing a book that just came out last year, book a short stories. Remember some why? Thank you. Thank you. It's been bananas, all kinds of Bananas, I'm but I remember my editor gave me a note about because I had mentioned that someone had drawn, like with drawn a non like divisible by twenty number from an ATM you know, it was like four hundred, like seventy six dollars or something, and it was like you know this would never happen in real life. You know what I'm like, this is a book that is not not really kind of got a best of real life. But like, you know what, if I want someone to withdraw forward to seventy six dollars, I'm going to do it. And I think there's there's some people that are like so steeped in reality sometimes that they they just like can't see or they're like so steeped in like one element of things that they're like Oh, this other, so other thing. That actually makes a lot of sense. I'm totally missing out. Well, if you if you're curious, I actually came across an Etm that did give increments of five dollars. So you could get down to four hundred and seventy five dollars if you want to. I like that. So where was the AXTM? I need to go travel are for out where we were? My wife and I were in Sanna Barber. Maybe I can't. I think it was not a barber. Maybe, but it was. You can actually determine. I want five twenties and tens and three five s or whatever it was. Yeah, on our way to a camping tripher actually think it was an oxen art. Is that a bank of America and Oxon Art? So if you're ever in a star and getting off the one one true way and want to just play with denominations, I a ATM. There you go. Know, you,...

...you mentioned how you what did you call the kiss of death? Is that it's getting into diversity. So you know, rave reviews behind maybe I I guess at two part questions, like how, how did you end up in this if this was not something that you were you were going after? And why is it so important? Why is it? Why is diversity so important to media? Well, it's so in the last fifteen of my year, my years of my career in media, and it's been a great ride and I'd loved it. But one of the things that was always frustrating to me is some it's necessary but not really, that people are treated like packages, like commodities. Right, Oh, get the black person, get the whatever person, get to such insense person, and they're never seen. Is Whole people. It's always you got to fill this space, we have a gap full a Blah Blah, a lot in whatever, and so with that there's lots of just other ring that happened and so to some extend throughout my career I've always been involved in diversity, but very much and I'm much more low key behind the scenes. Like if there's a mentorship program sure I'll interstal one or I'll be a part of it, but I won't make that my job. Right, and it's because what I saw, which happened a lot, is one point in my career I was up for a promotion and it was a big deal because I was a manager at the time and I was interviewing for a job that was a vice president. So it was going like three levels up from where I was and I was one of the top twos in the find the final two people interviewing, and I thought about it for a moment and then I decided I'm glad I didn't get the job because I would have been really pig and hold in the company with that right. It was a marketing role, but it was for either what were they calling you, like black community diversity something or other, or Hispanic marketing. So it was one of those two and you couldn't do both. And when I didn't get it, actually at the two people who did, and I work with them and talk to them, and one of the things that happened was they both were lamenting about the fact that it was in a zero some game that, Oh, you either pay to get these black and Sumers. We can pay to get these facts, but you'll never pay to get both, because they were always pitted against each other. Right, you get the money or you'll get the money, but neither of you can have it, like both of you can't have it, like there can't possibly be a day where it makes sense to just pay attention to both of you. Right, like I just can't be right. And I remember one of them talking about how they wanted to then move into a different marketing role. That was open and it was just the lateral move. But then everyone feedback was, well, oh, but you work in diverse us. You never really worked in Seneral market, and so it was always this thing where it's if you did diversion, you couldn't possibly know anything outside of that, or your world must be super my opic. And I didn't want that for my career. I didn't want to be stuck in the Oh, but you only know such and such and have to like that stigma. And so I had personally made and endeavored it.

I'll make sure to do whatever I can to for that conversation, to make sure it happens, but I don't want it to be through the very silod pigeon holed traditional way of diversity. I think that's that's shifted a bit, not tremendously but a little bit in recent years. But then I ended up being pulled into it much more front and Center in two thousand and twenty, as so many people did. But for me it was really this is going to sound weird, but George Floyd's murder wasn't a shock to me. It wasn't something that like had me up in arms and like I was pissed it on. It justifiably so it but at least I knew how to cope with something like that because I'd seen it so many times before. Right. And so my dad was in La Howd of share from uncle, is an lapd officer, and so they were inside those only lations and would talk for them. It was even hard and they knew about this and I heard stories from them, and so all of these things were things that I knew how to cope with and I could be sad and be upset and be angry but I at least knew how to handle it. And then when the whole or deal with the MoD Aubrey. And then there's the central park care and thing, both of which happened. Those two things, however, were different for me. Someone basically being killed, lynched for for like of a better world, when they're going on a run, and I mean I'm thinking out, oh, that's something I do all the time. I just go for a run and, to be really honest, I'm one of the few people who's black in my neighborhoods. Like that could be re and then there's like the whole pandemic going on and my wife happens to be Asian and people I go back Chind of food and should not even stars right. But then like so now I'm worried about okay, to my wife go to the go to work? Can she go to a store where she stops at gas station? And then can I go for a run? Can we go outside? Can go outside of the family? And then my son, like, where does he fit in this equation? Those then suddenly made it not just personal, because it was always personal, but it made it acutely more present, much closer to home. Right where there's a need to kind of sort of find for your own and protect yourself, and I was trying to figure out, well, what do I do, because I'll be frank, like, I'm not going to go out and protest in the middle of a pandemic like that. Just didn't seem wise to me right. But I what I realized that what I do have is expertise in media and from all my experience of one thing I know about media is that it's much more powerful than people give it credit for. And so how can I love wage that and the expertise that I have around data to actually start changing conversations and getting people to talk about things that they that they normally wouldn't and from there was born my podcast, which is called a professional confession, because one of the things that kept coming up when...

I would hear people or at the time when clubhouse was a thing, we were talking on clubhouses. A lot of people were scared to ask the question or scared to say the wrong thing or they didn't want to offtend. So there was this element of fear and this element of shame, and I was because I had nothing better to do and I've been spending you know, every waking moment with a two and a half year old child. I was trying to figure out what can we do to mitigate that fear or that shame that people have, so they actually have the conversation if it were anonymous somewhere, and they thought of old school radio shows where you call in, hello, call, or what do you want to know? And like, what if I can make him more anonymous than that? And then professional confession was born, so people could call in, send a note right and tell us about their experience, whether good or bad, around diversity and I could bring in an expert who could speak about what you can do today, what you don't have to wait for the government to do, you don't have to wait for your ball, have to wait for someone else to do, what you could do as an individual today to either make your environment more inclusive, to make it more healthy for you, or to handle a situation that may otherwise be difficult. And I felt like that was something that was missing. There's a lot of conversation around theoretical things and I came up with this theory and and back in this s we talked about in there's never a what do I do today? I'm in this today, and so I wanted to create that and coming from that, than I actually did a second podcast, which is the animated piece, started off of the podcast were. One of the things that I was really passionate about was being able to tell stories of underrepresented people through a lens that wasn't whatever that under representation was. It's not like, Hey, this is through the lands of a Columbian woman, or Oh, you must be a bisexual mail or you know. That just seemed always weird and kind of force where it's it's always the moniker first and then who the person is. That wanted to be able to tell stories of people who happened to be insert whatever that is right. So we may never mention it in the stories, but if you know, you know it's a was a real experience, and so professional confession is really my attempts to help people make those conversations. And then the content that I made after that was a an attempt to not only have those conversations but show the potential after we have those conversation, like what the world could be once from had it. has there been someone that's called in or maybe a discussion that happened on the podcast that has really kind of surprised you. I think it's a third or fourth episode, but there's an author, teacher who calls in, Andrew, and I'm blinking on Andrew's last naked and kill me, but really great. He actually wrote a...

...book called White Fragility. White men go from Agile to fragile. Oh, fragile, the add Oh, he's he's a white guy and he wrote a book about just how diverse he's actually good for everyone. And I did it at first like this will be a great topic and we can talk about things, and I was thinking of a very, very academic sense. But in having that conversation I actually had to confront my own belief and my own biases that I had. Right. I didn't realize how uncomfortable it was for me to have that conversation with someone who wasn't black to start with, right, and then like okay, well, if you're not black, then you're some sort of minority that I can relate with, and it just I realize that I if I was going to have that conversation and it was going to be productive and it was going to be able to do the thing that I wanted to do. On the PODCAST. Then I had to make myself open and willing to do it, and that was it wasn't easy. It was not something that I expected to come across that. You know, was like I'm doing this great work and then like oh well, you're not perfect like you thought you were, are you? So that was it's a weird thing because I never wanted the podcast and I still don't want it to be about me, but at that moment I think it had to because I had to learn. That was probably the biggest surprise for me. It's just having to taken an honest look at where my head was, because during that whole time I had been from the beginning, that midpoint in two thousand and Twenty Ju and it had all been about like self protection and what are you thinking about me, and you know, kind of I didn't realize how much I had bought into that US of Ursus, the mentality that was so prevalent at the time, which was not something that was I had been prone to prior but when it became very close to, you know, home, and suddenly the hackles were up and it was a lot of you know, Hey, who are you? Are you here? and kind of creating boundaries. Where they boundary? I mean on top of everything everything, like with the pandemic, like having all of that too. It's just so yeah, likes just such a like an onslaught, it feels like sometimes. But to your point, I think having those conversations, like you said, like that unlock something within you and you were like, I wasn't aware of this. So how can you encourage that with other people, to have those types of conversation, because some people don't like having difficult conversations, like they you know, they feel like they're being attacked or like they you know, it's just some people just don't like being uncomfortable. I'm like, bring it on, like a good love, a good conversation where we're on pack and stuff, but some and some cases people are just like Nope, I'm like, I'm getting out of here. So how can like in today, not you know, not on a one thousand nine hundred and sixty very get today? We encourage those conversations and...

...and get people to have them. This is probably the hardest part, but what I've started to learn and it's it's been, it's been a process. I think I'm just barely getting to this point is being give people room to make mistakes, because part of the reason why everyone is afraid of those hard conversations or saying the wrong thing is because the reactions and the repercussions and the rejection or so swift and many times overwhelming. Right. I mean, you want someone to to learn and respect and listen and learn about you, but then when they ask a question that highlights something that they're ignorant and the reaction is, how dare you not know this thing and why are you asking me? And it's not my job to teach you, and all of those things may be true, but it's also not their job to endure sort of a very like unfair response. Or when that someone is making a genuine, authentic effort. Right, like there are people who are, of course, being patronizing and that's that's different. But when someone is truly sincerely making an effort in trying to figure it out and they may make a mistake, help them through that. That's how people get better, that's how people learn. That's a hard thing to do, though. I mean it's definitely easier said than done, but I'm I think I'm getting better at that, realizing that and the suddenly my parents seem so wise now what I'm an adult, but my mom needs to always say stop trying to deal with people where you want them to be. Interact with them where they are now, and it's that right. Like I can't always expect you to be where I am or where I want you to be, but if I understand where you are and where you're trying to go, the interact with you like that so I can help you get their versus potentially impeding your progress. I always credit my parents for they took US traveling, you know, from a very young age, and I think that's another great way to kind of get yourself, Oh yeah, into situations that you're not used to. You're not accustomed to. But then, like, I don't think I've ever had a truly negative overseas experience. Like you know, sometimes there's times where you like miss a bus or getting through Ryan are under the bus. They charge you like sixty is a ticket if you print your boarding pass at the airport. I'm like sorry, my little hotel didn't have a printer. Thanks, thanks, Ryan Air, but that's not that's neither here nor they're fine, but it's just like I've always found like people are super welcoming and foreign countries especially, where they're just like hey,...

...you're like I've never been to America and like I want to learn everything about you, and I think that's such an awesome way to be. And I I mean I'm not going to say everyone I've ever encounter, but I feel like there's not that same sort of curiosity with with people over here, which is like, I mean I love meeting a new person, like, even if if they're like down the street from me, like you know wherever they're from. Like I think it's so cool because we all have our different backgrounds, we've all come from different places, we've all had different experiences and I just I mean this is really just a PSA at a tramp, even if I have a question at the end of it, it's just and if you have a great travel story, share will turn it into it. Will turn it into that. Now that's interesting. No, I think you're right. Definitely I see the curiosity here, but it's different. It's not necessarily I really wanted to understand all about you and ask questions. It's I think in the US culturally, this been this where the center of the universe mentality so much that, oh, you're so unique, you're so odd, you're not from here, and so it's more like a I'm going to put you on the Nazerie and see what you do, or very much novelty sort of approach. and that's not everybody. I mean that's a gross simplification of it, but that's seems to be more than interaction versus when you go overseas. Here's a fun travel story. One of the things that really made me understand the power of media and in terms of just interactions with other people in their perceptions of groups or cultures or whoever the day they don't normally see. Is I was in South America. I lived in in Leos and Santiago at the time, and a friend and I we're going to we got on the subway. We're heading off to visit some prince who lived in the suburb of the city, and so we're sitting there chatting and clearly our accents weren't like Chilean, they were very Caribbean, and so every the guy's like, Oh, where you guys from? Are you from Cuba? Right, and my friends from Puerto Rico. He's all from Puerto Rico and I told him I was from Los Angeles and he paused and he looked confused and s wait, you're not white and you don't have blond hair. I've Seen Bay Watch and I'm like, no other people live in La besides just folks and Bay Watch, and that's actually a TV show. It's not real. But wait, wait, wait, wait, but no, you were speaking Spanish. So Are you Cuban? No, Oh, you must be Puerto Rican. No, Dominican. Know, I'm really just from Lah well, you must be Brazilian. Is that? Where's your family from? Brazil? No, are you African? No, and he followed us like he stayed on the entire subway trip. He passed his stop, got off the train and followed us for like six blocks, asking where I was from, and he's going down a list. You must be Dutch. I saw a documentary once in they were black people there. That was literally that. He was trying to figure out everywhere he had seen on TV where black people existed, to understand like, in this frame of world, where could you be from? Because I haven't seen you on TV from La and at that moment I realized that, wow, he is his whole context to people in the US, and even black...

...people, is based on TV, right, and his whole interaction of it was based on TV, and we often think of TV's being benign, or even just media in general is being benign and sort of you can ignore it, but it actually it's much more influential than we give it credit for. And so, yeah, that that was my version of a travel story. That kind of tied back to I realized that one of my superpowers, and I could actually love reach in this whole conversation and start the conversation around diversity, was using media so that people who might not have access to me or something who looks like me or someone looks like anybody right, from any group, would then be able to start having exposure and understanding their experience in life. Yeah, and I think that's that just reminded me. That story reminded me of when I said he to run and shine. It was kind of the same thing. We went to a think it was a high school and just, you know, just to see kind of what it was like, and they were asking us what's High School in America like, and they were like, is it like American pie? It's like I was like, Um, not quite, but then I'll started at the Hass like I don't know. I'm like, is there a good example? I mean this was what two thousand and two thousand and eight or nine, two those knives right after the the year after the Beijing Olympics, and so I was kind of like, I don't, I don't know if there's anything that's like exactly like high school. And like also your high school spirits could vary wildly, even even within the same high school, like depending on, you know, who your friends are, who your pure click is out then all that good stuff. What time you have lunch? Even some Dyah, remember one year I had a late lunch and I was like, I feel like I'm going to different these people out of the problem. Yeah, I know sons go to school with this people, but yeah, it's just it's so interesting of what like what people takes. Like there their point of reference, and I think to your point, like that's why it's so important to have these different depictions of media and especially for like kids growing up, to see someone that is like them or, you know, exhibits some of the same personality and different traits that they have, which is always sometimes hard, to hard to get it out there. Yeah, and I think it's a really big deal. And even though we like to think that we don't need external validation, we do have this sort of subconscious need for external validations. Oh wait, you're like me and you did acts and we've done it since childhood. It's something that's I don't know why, I should probably being in your scientist, but it's something that's just a nate to our behaviors that we validate ourselves through the social...

...interactions that we see in the sort of shape where we think we can be and what our life can be and what it should be and how we should behave and what we want to do. And so it just takes that one thing that you find either inspiring or that commonality at to to sort of set off on the entire life to journey, and so I think it's really important to do that. But it's also great to, at least for me, just to learn new stuff and start to read think how I'm looking at the world. Sometimes my best solutions have come from places that I would have never expected. So having more of that is yes, believe is right. Yeah, yes, I'd like to learn experiod says, seems so simple now. All right, dam mean, you're almost out of here, but we always like to wrap up with the top three, and for you we've been talking about things we can do now. So what are your top three things people can do right now to make the world a better place? I think for me it's really don't be afraid, don't let bear a failure, saying the wrong thing, doing the wrong thing or just not being successful, be the thing that holds you back, because go into it and z quote, you know, shoot for the moon and if you miss, you still be amongst the stars, like it's a true thing. Right, you'll shoot for it and even if you don't, you'll learn so many things and pick up so many things along the way to the journey would have been worth it. So don't let fear a failure be the thing that holds you back. And we talked about this a little bit earlier with the diversity piece, and it ties back to the failure is the kind of people allow a room for others to fail it, don't be so judgmental when they make a mistake and instead, I think, encourage in Durt of them to continue in whatever that endeavor is. In terms of learning or becoming a better part whatever that is, because at the end of the day, it doesn't help you or them to break them for those failures and by helping them, I think that, in result, becomes a much more positive experience and you might actually gain something from it as well. And the third part, which is, I'll be honest, I'm very bad at this, but I'm working on it, is I think it's listening to be listening to truly understand, versus listening to be not to be heard right. You want to make sure you're paying attention so that you can understand and truly empathize and make sure that the person who you're interacting with knows that you're listening and trying to understand, versus the I'm waiting for my turn to be heard. Right. It's the saying is what we have two years in one mouth, to use them in proportion, and it's true. Once you start to do that, and those occasions when I actually realize that I'm actively doing that, I'm much more understanding of the person sitting across from whether they agree with me, you're on, I can at least see the...

...perspective of where they're coming from and sometimes end up finding a commonality that I wouldn't have seen otherwise. And so I think those are yeah, those are the big three for today to make a little better place. I agree. I think that third one is kind of the hardest for a lot of us because there's it's almost like the knee jerk reaction of like Oh, you disagree with me, like you're wrong, and it's like no, like you, I might not agree with you, but if you're if you can present your you know, your case, for lack of a better word, like in a in a more you know in a way that it's like, okay, I can see where you're coming from, at least if you just are dropping obscenities everywhere, and that that's like a way to escalator where it's like no one's no one's going to have a happy, happy part to it. And I this is a huge tangent, but being in La and the in the La area, have you, I assume you've, gone to Disneyland? Yes, for the years I was I was referencing this when you mentioned shooting for the moon and still being in the stars. I believe this is also in the La Disneyland. I know for sure it's in the Disney world one. It's a it's some sort of space adventure where Gary Sinie is your narrator and you like fly on a rocket shit and it, like you know, moves you around a lot. I get very nauseous every time I do it. And I was telling someone about this and they're like, I've only been to Disneyland, Never Disney world, and I was like is it not in both? So can you clear this up? I'm never cry see read. No, no, I'm wondering if it's what we have here, which is flying over California. So it's something similar. You fly over like frozen California and you're by the beach and you're in the mountains. So I think it's called soaring over California and that's all narrated that. You don't have like a space one with gears dei not that. I mean it's been it's been a few years now, but I don't think this's made any big remodels since the pandemicy. I think I think I've done. Are you in like an auditorium in that one? Yeah, yeah, it's really stream for anyone's auditorium that. Yeah, the whole room basingly turned towards that one. I like that one. But yeah, this one you're like in a rocket ship. It's like you in like six people and you you can choose either the easier hard route and for some reason, like I get very nauseous on like lateral movements, and that's what that whole ride back at the beginning. And then if you choose the hard route, there's like aliens on Mars and there they're like they're like get out of here, like this is our place. So then they start like attacking you and it's a whole thing, and then eventually you make it back. Look, I gotta go to dude now. You might need to yeah, me world diny Paris, just to see what the differences are. This is blowing my mind. That it's not a boat, like what an obscure exclusive right, right, or maybe there's twenty five year old right, it doesn't have room for it is. It's all so much smaller. That is true. That is true. So yeah, maybe, but yeah, I know the last time I was there they were just I think they're building like a hulk ride and there were a couple other ones that were either...

...down for maintenance or about to be built and I said, man, this timing was real bad. Two months later I could have written like six other thing right, but sorry, we'll make another trip there. He'll be great. That's all you gotta do. It's not going anywhere, hopefully not on wood. I know another one. If to see Disney land or world close it right, we will play this enjoying well. Well, okay, in case, in case Disney closes, give the people some good news. If they want to learn more about you, if they want to check out the different podcast all the stuff that you're working on. Where can I find you? Yeah, so you can find us on anywhere you find podcasts. Professional Confession. We're on a brief hiatus button about three weeks. Will be back. Or you can look for tech which, which is our other podcast and it will soon be an animated series. Very excited about that one. Also anywhere. Yeah, congrats. PODCAST. And then my company from me pus DIS little studio. So you can pretty much go anywhere Lincoln, facebook and bill ups digital studio and you'll find me. Fantastic. Will Damn. Thank you so much for coming on the PODCAST. This was delightful. I feel energized. To go out and tackle the world that. It's awesome. Thank you so much, ory. This is great. I really appreciate it. This is a fun conversation, Lovela. Of course we got to end with a Corny joke, as we always do, and it's actually it's a kind of a success story here. I used to be really addicted to the Hokey Pokey, but I turned myself around after to that paopop. I love it. It's kind of funny because I think this has been my favorite part of your show, just waiting for that joke. I think the woodworking one is probably my favorite one, when you're talking to the guy who did cutting boards. Yeah, thank you for being here for it. Simple pleasures, good people, cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you're a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here at the show. You can send me a message Joey at good people, cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people, cool things. Check out all the old episodes being good people, cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

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