Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 79 · 1 year ago

79: Writing Raps and Breaking Down Movie Franchises with David Shabani

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

David Shabani started writing raps when he was ten years old, and his experiences have only made him more well-versed since then. He was born to Congolese parents in France and has made his way from Paris to Montreal to Dallas and now Austin. David was listening to rap before he could speak English and now performs with an all-Black band.

His latest EP Shabani’s Smooth Sounds of the Summer came out on August 6 and is full of songs that’ll get your head nodding. With a mix of English, French, and Lingala, it truly is an international record.

David talks about his early days of writing, the worst gig he ever had (and how The Fast and the Furious was involved), dives into his favorite movies, and shares his experience with multiple organizations working to improve the lives of others. 

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is David Shabani, a rapper who's perhaps one of the most well traveled musicians I have ever seen. He was born in Paris, made his way to Montreal, Toronto, Dallas and he's now based here in Austin, and he's just got such great music. It's so enjoyable to listen to. US got a new album out, he's got tons of other albums already out on spotify, and we're talking all about what it's like being a musician, because, hey, that's a pretty cool gig. David talks about how his content stands out from other people, how he's he's not rapping about that crazy money lifestyle, about having thirty five yachts that you're just driving around on the ocean. They're bumping into each other because you've got so many yachts. It's more of the everyday, common, relatable things that we always love to see because we're going through that stuff too. David's also involved with the refugee services of Texas and the Black Austin musicians collective, so he's talking about his work with those organizations. David's also a big movie buff, so we're talking about some of our favorite films. And Look, I know there's been a ton of fast and furious movies already, but we come up with a pretty great plot, at least theme, for an upcoming fast and furious movie. So we're going to hit up the producers and director of those films just to get, you know, quick little royalty for us, because we've got a pretty brilliant idea. We'll talk about all that in the episode. If you like to get in touch with the show, you can reach out via joey at good people, cool thingscom or on facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast. Can also support the show via the merch store at good people, cool thingscom. Get yourself a Hoodie, hat, shirt, all that good stuff so you can look stylish as hack. Why you're listening to this conversation with David. For people who don't know who you are, can you give us your elevator pitch, but can you also tell us the type of elevator that we're riding on while you're telling us about yourself. Heang the type of elevator. That's what's up. I like that. I don't know if you've ever been to Toronto, but they have this. They have a CN tower. This elevator goes up very high. So because it does that, it goes up very fast and it's all glass, so you see yourself rising above the city. So that is a type of elevator. I'd like to be on very scenic she will, and on this elevator because I have a lot of time. My Elevator Fish. So I'm a yeah, I'm my name is Davis Shabani. That's my as my rap name, but US also my name, my actual name, of birth name, and so we yeah, I'm a rapper, I'm an artist, I'm a rappers, I sing a little bit and I've a band as well. I am born of Congolese parents. I was born born France and then I moved to Canada and then moved to Texas after that. So I have a little bit of a multi national allegiances, if you will. But home, the long the home that's been my home for long time, as Texas and so that's where I really got, you know, my rap career, music career, really started, if you will. And Yeah, so, yeah, I mean that's essentially what I focus on, is making music. I make a lot of music. I release I've got like, I think, like five, five albums on spotify or on all the DSP's, and so, yeah, I think that's my identity. I don't know. Yeah, so I'm I'm a...

...rapper. That's is of an immigrant family and and that's just how I see the world. I like it. and great use of the lingo with the SPA too, but that might be our first usage of that on this podcast. So very well done. And I've got to ask you. Noted that your name is the same as your rap name. Did you ever have a stage name? Did you go through some different options? Like, yeah, it some some interesting names. I always really, really young when I first I rapped, I was like ten years old. You know, it's kind of like embarrassing with these names. When the first I wrapping, my first Roup name was big D, like just the letter D, like big D. I. Yeah, it was a big D, but like I remember trying to wrap some I was like yes, the cool name, but like you're like twelve and you're small, so it doesn't really like match. It's really mashes sthetic, I'm saying. So then I really wanted to be d money, but it didn't match my content because I never rapped about like having money, you know, saying so that didn't work. But thankfully I was really young at the time, you know. So I like I could be in middle school, high school with this name. You know, I didn't really put it out like that. And then, because my name is Shabani, I try to work on the alliteration, and so for a minute I was showtime, Showtime Shfani, and that was another thing. But then I think one of the best rap names I had. Honestly, it's because when I my name was showtime, I used to have a habit of spelling my name, but I would spell it sho t y em e, and then when I cut it, I was like, well, what if I was just tym eat, like Tym e would actually kind of be a cool name, like just time, like the DA abbreviation, another prevation. But I guess what you putty call that when you what do you call that? One board stand for something like you and acronym acronym, acronam. Excuse me. Yeah, yes, acronym, but I didn't have any words that tied to the acronym. So it's cy me. And at the time, then that's when Ti was getting crazily big, you know. So I was like that's not going this it's too close. So so then, yeah, I I in high school and honestly, till now most people call me Shabani already. You know I'm saying. So I don't really like the majority of people can know me call me Shabani rather than David. And so for a moment I was like, yeah, I guess when I when I really got back and into making music and got you know, and I was like, I guess this is when I was in college, when I was doing shows. I guess I was thinking I could just be Shabani, but so many people already like knew me, if that makes any sense. Therey knew me as David Shabani. So I was like I just got to keep that name because if I if I created a new rap name or whatever, you know, that was too far from my name, it would be confusing. People would be like wait, this is this person. You know, it'd be like you know. So the name I felt like stuck well enough to be like it's it's unique enough but also easy to say to you know, because I got I'm from my whole family, from Africa, so from Congo. So some of our names are very difficult for English speakers, if you will. But mine is simple and up and I was like, Yo, this is me, it's the real name. Is My music is not really like I'm not asking myself, I'm not putting on like a persona when I go into the studio. So it only makes sense to keep the same name. So yeah, I went through a lot of very bad rap names and then, full circle, came back to the my actual name. I like it. You had the brand already, so why not B for it, although I will say, as someone who got the nickname j money and high school, more so for basketball and being able to make shots, I appreciated your money. So that's that's probably my favorite of your of your failed names, but I like less. I don't know if the shots still is good. I'm probably...

...more like Jay, maybe like pennies. Yeah, well, now, if I see you hoop now, then I'm you gotta have to you have to like this big shoes to feel, now that I know your name is Jay money. Oh No, I've I'd like to say that as I've aged, my defense is really stepped up and maybe in an inverse of what the shooting has done. That's that. It's still that's sound like that's not older. You know, red basketball is like get the rebounds and get the defense, like that's going to be a lot, you know, but like, you know, some some other parts of the game that you might have had in high school might not be as like, you know, on point now as it was when, you know, a couple years ago. That's aged. Yeah, those, those are the skills that. Oh, there's always I mean this is more going back to the college day. Isn't shut early after college, but there'd always be one guy at pickup who was mid S. certainly not as athletic as anyone else playing, but yeah, I had the lockdown defense, had the rebounding a hundred percent from mid range jumpers. Anyway. I'm just like this is what I upposed to be when I'm that's what I hope. I'm just good at backsts up. Yeah, that the forty year old dude. Fifty year old dude that's always at the gym is always Nice, like he's gonna get his buckets, he's gonna get rebounds, he's always like a great pick up. We pick up. Yeah, and always, always great to play with to like he's never, you know, he's never a day or anything. Very very professional and cordial. I like that. Now, you did mention that you started writing raps when you were ten years old. Yeah, do you remember the first thing you ever read? Yeah, yeah, if I had like a song. So what I first started doing, when I really started like writing, I guess, is I used to listen to rap. Of course, a lot of rap music, and at the time, back then, I was this in a red man and messing man and I was listening Nas that was listening Minem at that particular time when I was like learning how to Reman, of Co Course Jay Z, but like I didn't do this with Jay Z and what I would do, and Biggie smalls, is just to explain. And so what I was doing was like back then, for one, we didn't have Internet. Where I was like I was staying with my Auntie and I was I was living my my Auntie and Hamilton, which is like it's it's in the Toronto area, if you will, greatest frontal area, and we didn't have Internet, and so I'm not I'm just explaining, like we didn't have Internet. And even if you did have Internet back then, this is like two thousand or two thousand and one. So back then you didn't have like accessibility to all the lyrics to every song in the world. You know I'm saying, like now, now you can google lyrics and there just there. Back then, even if you have an internet, you would have to like search pretty profoundly to find those, you know, to find those. Those literally wouldn't always be right either. Rights. That's another thing. They weren't even like checked. So yeah, so what I would do is try to figure out what these rappers were saying and the like. Method man and red man had a song called the Rock Wilder, and what I would do is rewrite their lyrics. So I was rewriting their lyrics just so I can understand like, oh, he's saying this, this, and then I would wrap that back and I would do the same thing with like back then I had the Marshall Matters LP and his rhyme schemes were really intricate. You know I'm saying. So I was trying to right back what he would they were writing and so I could wrap it back. And eventually, when I was doing this, I understood the pattern. I was like, Oh, I think I can do this on my own. I feel like I can write my own because it's aren't I get like certain amount of words hit here, they rhyme. I kind of like put it together, you know. So the first thing I wrote was this. I understood song structures on this. So you got to write no a verse and then you got a course, you got a verse, you got a course and has some song called, I guess it was called. It was called unstoppable, because I didn't really know what all that wrapped about. was like being good at rapping, you know, saying so...

...like so, like it was like I'm unstoppable, like I'm this or whatever. But I wrapped it to my cousin. I remember they would like walk around the house singing that songs. I was like, okay, yeah, I could write hooks, you know, I got it. So all I could rap back then was about, you know, how that I am a rapping and how cool I am or whatever. But I remember I will go to the middle school back then and I would wrapping a schoolyard and people like Oh, you know, because it wasn't like everywhere that you could hear people rap like live. You know. I'm saying, Oh, this you can actually wrap. That's cool. And I remember one day I wrote some rap about like a crush. I wrote a rap about like a girl kind of, and I remember one dude was like Yo, y'all, gotta listen to this. The topic change. He's rapping about a girl on this school and I was like yeah, so you got to divert. That was I really understood, even early on, you got to diversify your subjects. But the first thing I ever wrapped was just like yeah, something. I don't remember what the rap skime was, but it was about being like you can't stop me, you know, I'm you know, I'm I'm kind of cocky or something like that. It was it was simple like that. But you know, I it's the fact that I started at ten is wide it. I got much I had so much room to get better. You know, many years I've gone by it since then and even at ten, you we're getting people to sing around the house. That's pretty good yeah, I mean I was obsessed with it. That's the thing. I didn't do anything, you know, saying I was. I was obsessing over it. So it gave me enough time to like really refine it, even in at that age. One of the things that I like to ask on the show is a question that you wish you were asked more frequently, and I liked yours, because things have changed from two thousand and one to two thousand and twenty one. Now there's a lot of music out there. It is a lot easier to find music, to find lyrics for music, all that good stuff. So you've got a wider range of musicians that are able to share their music with the world. So what about your content stands out? There's a few, I think a lot of rappers. I've also felt like a lot of rappers have for not having just rappers. Artists have certain platforms that they talked about, you know, like they might be the type of artist that talks a lot about love, or they might talk about tough upbringing or something like that, and or dom I talk about how like they're just always successful, always winning, and that's that's what's up. Like it's it's cool to have all those moods. But I think that because of the type of life I live, where all my family from Kongo. I was raised like in a konglis household, but I was born in Paris and so I was I had like very deep like Paris, I don't know, I guess French like like culture in my house too. And then but my my first memories of life were in Canada. They were in Montreal and they were in Toronto, because that's when I grew up, when I was a really young kid, and then I moved down to Dallas, and so all of that gave me like very different styles of music to listen to growing up and various different styles of people that I've meant growing up, like I've been around with. I've been around very different people, if that makes me sense. I've been around like, like a lot of people in Texas that, you know, the I guess you could even say like the the the stereotypical, like super proud to be texting person that's never left Texas, you know, and that's and that's cool that I like that person, that that's their identity. But then I've also been around the people who, like their whole life till they're thirty. For example, they lived in Congo and then you dropped him off in Dallas and it's like now this guy's been here for two weeks and it's a complete different world. So what a how does that person see the world compared to how does that the other textans you see the world? And so these have been people in my family that I've been around all the time, you know,...

...and have very different outlooks on the life. And so that's why when I write, it's when I write lyrics or content or whatever, it comes from so many different angles and I think that creates kind of like a refreshingly unique content in in, I guess, I think, in a lot of like very popular hip hop artists. Yeah, I think that's what makes stand out a little bit. It's not so much just the sound, but also like the cutting out of the point of views and the contents that that you hear in a lot of today's music. Yeah, I think that's a very good point of you. You are writing about what you've experienced in life and what you've gone through and having such a varied background. I think it really does come through in the music and it's it's nice to see because, like you're saying, some rappers religious focus about money, like they're just rapping about money a lot, and I'm like, all right, that's nice, but there's other things to right. Yeah, so sometimes, sometimes, if you listen to like certain artists, I feel like, if I'm in this mood, I'm listening to this artist, if I'm in this mood, I'm listen to that artist. But then some artists are able to have all the moods and so you can listen to the same artist and you're going to go through different emotions and feelings and moves all in one maybe one album even, and so that's what I aspired to is to really create many different feelings from one, you know, one artist. Yeah, I like that. I like having my artists where I'm like, I'm real sad. I mean, I know everyone's on the Olivia Rodrigo train right now if they're like I'm in you know, I'm really in my feelings. I just want to a good cry, and there's definitely a time and place for that. But I'm with you. I like I like the variety, the emotional roller coaster, if you will, on it right. Yes, exactly, absolutely. I know, another element, obviously beyond just making the music, is then sharing it and getting it out with people. We were talking beforehand about how it's great that you're able to play shows again, because coronavirus certainly cut down on that was past year. But that's just, you know, one element of the marketing piece of it. So, as an artist, how have you been marketing yourself? It's funny, you said, because I my, for example, my instagram, like the little tagline it lets you right is says artists would have I think it says artists would a day jour says rapper would a day job. And I think I've always I've always marketing myself as like the common man. was, like, yes, I I do think that I'm very good at making music and wrapping and all that this stuff, but I am just like an everyday person. And so when you say things like a lot of rappers up about money, like I'm not rich like that, so I can't wrap about that. I can rap about certain money things that we all feel, you know, like well the common people feel. And so because of that, that's how I'm marking myself. You know, if we're talking about instagram or you know, if we're talking about whatever. What. However, you put the music out the the main way I'm marking myself is as like I'm and every day person. So you see my instagram post on my pictures, is like me doing everyday stuff. It's not me doing like crazily lavish stuff, because it's like okay, well, that's cool, but I know I'm not on that level. However, the other way I do marking myself to keep global fans is the reality that I do feel like I'm from many different places. So I do feel as African as I feel Canadian, as I feel Texan, as I feel French. Even so, I market that way too, as in like yeah, you can't really pinpoint me in one spot, and so because of that, you can't pinpoint the music on one spot, and so that's how I'm market I guess, like who is David Shibani, if you will, or who like the artists? How do you break down the artist? It's like I'm marking myself as like this everyday person...

...can be from everywhere and so many different people can see them, can see that story when you when you put it on, you know, when you put it into music. I like that I like that. I don't know how I have ended up on this algorithm on facebook and Instagram, but I get all the ads of people who are like selling a course or something of you know, here's how you can make your own money and live on a yacht all the time. And it's always it's always just a preamble of them being like all right, you know, here I am on my yacht or in my mansion, all that, and I'm just like, okay, I'm already lost, like you've already you've already just lost me by seeming like such a just a entitled Asshole. And are better every time, every time. I hate those so much. That's another thing, because I hate those because they'll be like, you know, like Yo, look at me, look at all these cars, look at his house. I got it from I don't know whatever. He'll like whatever hustle or trump put out there. And what what obsessed me about that stuff is they try to minimize or them like like they try to put down the nine to five person that just works like that's a job, that's a that's as a point of view, that's a person. I like, yeah, I have a nine of five. I'm saying I get this many days off and that's a whole industry. Why are we making it seem as if, like, because this guy's a super billionaire, there's no value in the dude who's WHO's Anne of five worker? Like, for example, one of my favorite I might be going on a tangent right now, a lot of my favorite one of my favorite lines from a movie. I don't know if you ever seen good will hunting, but someone says, I guess the therapist is talking to will hunting and he's sound. He's sound them like you could do this, you know, you could live this kind of life, as in, like you could be like, I don't know, like an astronaut and astronomy or something. You know, you know, like you go were for NASA, some crazy like that. or You could lay brick all day and then we'll hunting says, what's wrong with laying break? That's somebody's house. I'm building someone's house. There's the value in that? You know? Or someone, for example, that's someone that works at the airport. Thank how many, how many people you affect just by working at the airport? If I'm going to the airport, I might be going to see my my daughter that I haven't seen in twenty some years, and I'll be going to a baby shower and I might be a big deal, or a wedding, or I might be going to a funeral, which is sad, but that's a big thing that I got to go to. or I might be going for an interview for a job. If I work at the airport, that's an important role. So why are we trying to put down the working people as like that's a that's a we need people at the airport. And so that brings back to like the music, when I'm like, how come no one ever talks about from the point of view of the dude or the woman that just works, that just she's a nurse and that's her job. She's not, you know. or He's a nurse and he's that's that's their job. They're not super millionaires, but they have a point of view too, and so that's what upsets me about the as you're talking about. But that's also how I feel when I write songs and talk about being a common person. It's like like what's wrong with be in the Bush driver? That's what's up. That person needs to get to work. We need the bus driver. So we got to get big up the bus driver as much as we big up the dude who's got the house or whatever, the houses and a card. Yeah, and plenty of people who are enjoying those jobs too. Like a bus driver, you get to meet so many different people along your route, like if you're an extrovert, or even, you know, even just like meeting New People, like that's a great way to do it, and you're helping them out and all that. And it's like, yeah, they have that, they have that slant of like you must hate your job if you're if you're working down to five and like you got to get out of it and you know, just work an extra like eighteen hours a week and you two can be a billionaire. And I'm like not everyone wants to do that. Yeah, exactly. Now we also again, you've back to playing live shows here and you've we were time right before the show. If someone misses a show, you're like, I'm...

...thankful that there's more that they can come to. But as someone who is also played live shows, I know that not every show is created equal. Sometimes your soundic phenomenon, sometimes you're you know, you got your monitor that's like eighty times louder than it needs to be and your death by the second verse of Your First Song. But I always love hearing this from musicians. What's the worst Gig that you've played? I think I got two. One this one is not as bad as in next. This one time I was playing at this they said it was a festival, sort of like Yost is a festival in this town, and what it was pretty much is that like there's going to be like thirty acts playing in different places, and they had me rapping in this like this local pizza shop, and I was like in a corner and people are coming in like getting the orders, and it was the strangest as I people are not here to watch this. People are buying pizzas like I don't I don't know. Yeah, put me here, but I will say even in that show some people enjoyed the show. So it's like all right, cool, I guess is a crowd to wrap in front of us. So I appreciate that, but I always think about how I was in a corner, like right next to the like you know, people flipping the dough trying to make pizza. Is like all right, well, I guess yeah, book me here. So that's what's up. But one show that I really think was the worst, the worst gig Guy had, was it was an Austin. This name of the place. I don't think it it exists anymore. I think am I we call head hunters, but it used to be like a metal venue and for some reason I got booked at the show and I was like going to Tuesday night or something like that, and one of my friends lived in Austin at the time. You want to you you went to Texas and so he was like, Yo, where do you play? You play downtown. I'm ANA come check you out. He came by himself. It was just him. It was there was another dude in the corner that just happened to be in the bar, and then there was the bartender, and the bartender, you know, when you go to the Bardy have the TV on. HMM. He kept the TV on. So the TV might have not been like, the volume might not been on, but it was on. They had fast and fears on, like to fast your fears and one with tyree's it was on like right next this I on stage. So if you look at the stage, I don't even if I don't even know if you looking at me or if you looking at the television. So I at some points I'm looking at the television, like I I like to see. So they're like, but the thing is I was honestly rapping to two people and the bartender WHO's watching TV. And what's crazy is also they have but me for an hour set. I'm over there just doing songs. I guess I could do this one and then have a DJ. At The Times I'm just a pressing songs on my laptop. But I'll do this one. I'll do that. I do the next one. And I will say, though, at the end of the show was I thought I was just like yeah, just wrapped in front of two people. So that's what's up. Two and a half if you can't like half of the attention span of the butts. And but there was a do that do that was at the end of the table. When I got done, he's like, Hey, this long time ago to so like times, you know, times of different in terms of like exchanging music. But he was like when I got done, he was like, Hey, you wouldn't happen to have a CD or something? I really like your set. He was sitting. It was just by. It's not like he came to see me. He was just at this random ass bar that I like, no one like, you know, not much going on, and he enjoyed the music. So he was like yeah, sure. I was like yeah, sure, I had a CD and I guess, you know, I presume or assume that that man is still a fan today, but that's probably the wildest Gig I've them play. I was wrapped. I was competing with fast and fear. That's fantastic. I also like that you you were taking breaks to watch too. Yeah, it's good movie. Okay, that is Solom I.

Have you watched the newest one? Seen it? It's getting a little skin little ridiculous. That's what I've heard. I haven't made it out to the latest and Grad I didn't see Hobson show either, but yeah, I just see that one. I got. I got a friend that's like obsessed with that, with the with their with that whole French franchise. So we set up. I've seen them all, except for how to shock, because that's like a you know whatever, but like yeah, I mean I feel like it's so ridiculous that they know it's ridiculous. So every time I see certain I think they're thinking like how much more ridiculous can we make this? And they they talked themselves. So I will say that, Oh, absolutely, this is a this is another tangent. But back I used to live out in La and I was on an Internet reality show that was like American idol but for Youtube creators, and I had no business being here like I had. I had a youtube channel but was like, you know, I'd may be, posted like two or three videos to it in the span of a year and did this this show, and I think they they probably just picked me for the top ten because I lived in La and that's where they were shooting it. So they were like, all right, you can make it to the shootings. You're not like taking time off work or like flying, you know, halfway across the country or anything like that. But one of the perks of making it to the top ten was we got an inspirational pep talk from Justin Lynn, who directed, I think it was the sixth, fast and furious, and so he's like giving us this, you know, this talk about filmmaking and all that good stuff, and then at the end he's like, all right, you want to see a scene from the upcoming movie that like no one's soon yet and everyone's like yeah, and there's no context of it, but it's just this tank like driving through all these cars. Yeah, it's like, Yep, that sounds about yeah, that's a mess. I don't know how they yeah, I guess I was going to say I don't know how to come up with that stuff, and I'm not trying to be disrespectful with the riders, but like a child could come up and then a tank came and it broke the bank open like a chocolate wrote that, but people like it to this. So, yeah, it's a I don't know what the latest is, but probably like a two hundred and fifty billion dollar, you know, through all of them combined. I'm saying it's yeah, they're making money. So if, yeah, they found their market, for sure. I mean I'm will amount of top. I want to see the move. So, like you, yeah, yeah, exactly, I'm part of it. Yeah, I think you know what you're getting into. It's Ye, Canna, it's not yet. I'm not trying to ask philosophical questions. I really do want to see how we did. Was it guess. I'm like, what are gonna do next? Like, let's see, how can you top this? I can eat top a tank in a sears. The last one is just normal driving. It's just a running areas brings it back. He's he works for Uber. Uber eats fast prison. Yeah, of Fast Food, man, we might be onto something here. Will reach out to the yeah, my writing steath, I take. I take given a one percent royalty credit, right for I mean, yeah, right, and like what would that be? Might already be like a million dollar. All Right, we're on board. We've got our action items from this call. It'll be great. And one other thing that I wanted to chat about is you're involved with a couple of different organizations. The refugee services of Texas, which helps translate French for refugees from Congo, and you're also involved with the Black Austin music musicians coalition, which started last year and the black lives matter protests. Are In the wake of those, I should say, to help advocate for black musicians. So you just talk a little bit about those organizations and why they're important to you? Yeah, so the refugees. Yeah, the refugee services of Texas. I started volunteering with them because, like, honestly, just personally, I have I've had, I've...

I've had a lot of people in my family, family in that situation where they come to the United States or even come to Canada and they just got here, they don't speak like any English and but they need to work, and so it's really tough and it's really it will be stressful for anyone and I think that we when we when we think about everybody's like problems and lives, we don't like if you think about your own problems, for example, it's hard for you to understand like other people who's different problems. I'm not saying some problems are above others or under others, I'm just saying people have different problems that you might not think about. And one problem that people might not think about is when you move here and you speak zero English and it's like, but I have to get a job, you know. And so because I've seen that, I was I didn't realize that there was a organization in Austin in particular, that I already worked with a lot of people from my country, and so I was like, oh, that's what that's. I got up that's like, you know, a sign. I think that if I can do something to help them out, I'd love to, and so when I did started volunteering with them, that was cool. You know, it's very rewarding job. But also afterwards they asked me to do a to do a like a benefits concert, like live stream. So that was really dope because it was like a combining of something that I'm passionate about, which is like, you know, immigration reform or in you know, helping out people who are immigrants, and also music. You know, I was able to put that together and it was just like generally a very rewarding day to me, you know, something I got to do the stuff that I love to do for people that I care for, and so I think it is dope that a lot of people, you know, if everybody had all the time in the world, I'm sure everyone have like their their organization, that's, I guess, Charitable Organization, you know, and I think it's dope that the one that I care about is already in Austin and very prevalent. It's refugee services of Texas. So that's what's up. And Yeah, so anybody who's you know, if you're would say, check them out, you know, send some donations if you will. The other one for the the black musicians and Austin coalition. That is an interesting thing because, you know, it deals with a lot of stuff. Austin is supposed to be the music capital, live music capital, the world, and American music, like, since the dawn of American music, has always been forefronted by Blat musicians and so like, or at least yeah, exactly. So it's tough as a black musician in Austin. You see a lot of gigs that don't book many black artist at all, and so I think it's cool to get together, excuse me, to to get to get us all together, put our minds together and realize and as a union and be like Yo, what can we do? What are we doing wrong? How we booking these things wrong? The ones of us that we are happen to be more successful, the ones of us who happen to be not successful? What? How can we share our minds to figure out, like how to maneuver in this in this in this music town, you know. And so that's really what the the platform is, you know, like the the point is for that that union and it's working. I think. I think that we're able to even now, when I walk around, I do seem more representation for black musicians everywhere we go, everywhere I go, O, where I see, you know, the for it was not very likely that I would see a bill where every artist on the bill is black, and that's not like it's not a I love all musicians. However, you very often see in Austin bills...

...where everyone's white and sometimes the bill will be like twenty artists and all be white artists, and that's shout out to them, you know, saying, but like, how is it? Why is it that it's very hard to see that same bill but black artist? And so what do we need to do to like try to, you know, you know, enhance the representation in the music world? And then a part of that outside of the Union is also up to us as individual artist is I I have a band that I play with. I play Solo also, but also play with a band, and in my band all the musicians are black, and so I it's even that is difficult to see, but there's a lot of black musicians and all. So why, what are we doing? How we like so disconnected to not make that happen as well, you know. So generally we just need to do a better job of like employing or represent you know, representing more opportunities for black artists in this town, equal opportunities, and I think that's what the coalition is about. Love it. Yeah, both such great causes and we'll drop links in the show now for anyone the wants to donat or at least learn a little bit more about them, because they're doing great things. All Right, David, you're almost off the hook here, but we always like to wrap up with the top three and we've discussed we discussed a cuple, we've talked about the fast and furious franchise, good will hunting. So do these movies make it onto your top three movie list or do you have other movies that we need to go check out? Yes, so top three movies is very difficult for me because I do love movies. I like a lot of movies, and so it's a little hard. But all right, so not in any be any particular order. The first movie is very it's very complex, but I'm gonna have to like, hopefully I can combine them, is godfather one and to like, if we can make that one. That's on the list, because what I love about that movie personally is is that the main character, Michacoleon, when you first see him and got farther one and then when you last see him and got for the two, is two different people. So I don't know if you've seen a movie, but that's what I love about that move. And so it's realistic, because people change a life like we grow right, we look at things differently, we we progressed in life and and so that's why the Godfather, I just say the one and a second one, the first and second one. That that's one of my best. Yeah, one of my top three ever. And then, man, this is hard. I don't know. It's funny. It's funny because I see jesting this, but the other I'm kind of torn, but I'm just say Shit Up. The other one is training day. I say training day. It's it's just a great film because, like, I don't know, I explain it, it's Denzel out of his element at that time. You know you back then den's I was always the good guy and then you see like a very villainous Denzel, and so I feel like, and also what's crazy is it's his it's his Oscar movie, but a lot of people haven't seen it. So but I love that movie classic. And then those are two very heavy movies. So to like soften it up a little bit, one movie that is one of my favorite movies that if it's on TV, I'm sitting down, I'm watching it, no matter what. Back to the future. That is a movie right there. That is an advention. It's an adventure like the storytelling. It's timeless.

Every time I watch it I'm like, Damn, they gotta go back to the future, like that's wild, what a story. Whoever came up with that store? Because, first of all, we live at a time where a lot of the movies and TV shows now are either old books or old comics or the remad movies. I that's not I can't think of the last time I saw a a original story, or they're sequels like fast and Furres, you know number twelve. But back to the future is an original story. It's like, Yo, I'm stuck in whenever I got to go back to the future, I got this machine. Everything goes wrong. It's the perfect like quest for a character. So I love bathroom future. I also got to say it departed. You know, I wanted to keep it soft and I know I supposed to be use three, but the departed is just a great film. To put it, like a bunch of actors in it and it worked. It wasn't like people are fighting for screen placement. But those are those are, yeah, my top three and then honorable, but honorable mention. I put the departed in there, but I like it. I feel like you could, I mean this is kind of a stretch, but you could shoe horn the departed after the to Godfather's. I feel like that could be likely. You know, after the closing credits they usually have the boat. One hundred percent. Yes, one's just a full two and a half hour movie. Yeah, I'm kind of funny. It's like I love mob movies, like I love like mafia, any kind of like. That's just I just love the storytelling in those. But then I also love like comedies, and so, you know, I love old school, I love coming to America, I love Friday, you know. So it's very like night and day when it's the style of movies that I like. Like those are good ones to like, though. That's all right. Those are both solid it's all genres, for sure. Well, David, thank you so much for coming on the PODCAST. If people want to check out your music, learn more about you, working that out. So my name's David Shabani. You can look me up, real name, no gimmicks, as I'll be trash used to say. And Yeah, you can. I'm my website. I feel good right now. Is My website. We can find all my music. It's this spelled exactly how you expect. I feel good right now. Or just look up David Schavani. I'm on spotify, I'm on Apple, I'm on all the goods, all the DSP's, as we said earlier. And and yeah, play in Austin often. I'm going to go on a small tour in a couple weeks or I think in a couple months, and so all the dates and tickets will be on the website. I feel good right now. If you're on Instagram, you can just look up I David Shabani. That's my instagram, my scram handle. Follow me. Come check it out. Some of what you think about the music. I just dropped the new album on spotify called Shabani. Smooth sounds of a summer so I hope you all enjoy that. A lot of a literation, if you will. But but, yeah, but just look up David Shavani and check out the music, check out all the socials and let me know uch. I think for sure good stuff will David, you are officially off the hook. Care and maybe, when it clears up a little bit, will go play some pick up basketball and hopefully be at least like fifty percent of our peak. Sounds good man. I'm down. I'm down all right, and we got to wrap up with a Corny joke, as we always do. Try to keep it a little musical here. What's Beethoven's favorite fruit? I don't know. Let's go to One ben and Oh, okay, all right, all right, good people cool things. It is produced in Austin, Texas. If you're a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. You can send me a message Joey at good people cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people cool things and check out all the old episodes via good people cool thingscom. As always, thank you for...

...listening and have a wonderful that.

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