Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 91 · 1 year ago

91: Eating Food and Holiday Treats with Madeline Cheyette and Catherine Wang of the Dished Podcast

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

It’s a podcast with podcasters! Madeleine Cheyette and Catherine Wang of the Dished podcast join the show to talk all things food. We’re diving into how cooking is an homage to both culture and creativity, what it takes to start a podcast, and some of the favorite guests Dished has had on the show—plus a scoop on a few episodes to come. 

This episode also might have the most wholesome moment in the entire show, when Madeleine and Catherine share what they like best about each other. It’s a segment that will most certainly make you say “awww,” and I encourage you to reach out to someone you care about and tell them something nice. We’re making people’s days today!

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guests are Madeline Cheyette and Catherine wing of the dished podcast, where they interview local restaurateurs, entrepreneurs and your favorite spots to eat and learn all about the inner workings because, as you may know, creating food for people is just a fascinating process and they're going behind the scenes to get you the goodies. It's almost as good as eating that, but I mean, if you're really dedicated, you can eat, let's say, Voodoo donuts while you're listening to the episode where they chatted with Voodoo donuts. There's lots of goodies involved with all of that. We're talking about their favorite and least favorite foods, why they got into podcasting in the first place and a very heartwarming conversation around what they appreciate about each other as cohosts. And after you listen to that, I want you well to finish listening to the PODCAST. Don't pose it in the middle. Finished listening to the podcast and then go find someone that is special in your life and tell them what you appreciate about them, because, my goodness, I got the warm and fuzzies just listening to this and I can't even imagine how Madeline and Catherine felt hearing from each other, because I was very lovely all around. If you like to get in touch with good people cool things, you can reach out via facebook, twitter or instagram at GPCT podcast, or send an email joey at good people, cool thingscom. You can also support the show in a couple of different ways. There's the merch shop on good people, cool thingscom and I wrote a book. It's called kind but kind of weird, short stories on life's relationships, and to see something that you wrote go from a word doc into a physical copy that you can hold in your hands is a bananas feeling and would highly recommend, a twelve out of ten much recommend. And you can buy it on bookshop, Barnes and noble, Amazon, wherever you get your books. Search for kind but kind of weird as by me, and I hope it's even halfway as enjoyable as this conversation with Madeline and Catherine of the dish to podcast. For people who are not familiar with you, can you give us your elevator pitch, but can you also tell us the type of elevator that we're writing on? Sure? So the elevator pitch. Katherine and I met in college and we now have a podcast together called dished. We are former college roommates and we met while we were in turning together at a startup in New York City and we really bonded over how much we both really love food and also just talking to people and hearing more about how they approached their careers. And so, after college, we've both been working like in the workforce for two years and when covid hit, I think we're both looking for something fun to do outside of work and we started talking about what if there was a podcast to highlight everyone's favorite neighborhood restaurant. So we started this podcast called dish, where we interview the founders of our favorite local restaurants. We've done a lot of really exciting ones, like Voodoo donuts, has been a personal favorite of mine. We got to interview Lucas in from he runs jons of kitchen and New York, and it's been really fun to work on together. In terms of the type of elevator we are on, it has to be something related to food. Thinking about this, I mean the best, I guess, analogy I could think of was the type of elevator were on. Is the elevator that Madeleine and I took going down from what like the forty second floor of purse tower when we were in turning together and we were Chie that's like we're Oh magazine and all those fun like, I guess female corporate magazines are in New York, and we would take that down and...

...try to figure out in that course of time where we going to eat at lunch, like what, what should we get? And so I think that the genesis of our friendship was there. So I suspect that's the elevator were on. Love it. I hope it's a at least decently fast elevator. Forty two floors. Oh yeah, it's the kind of you like your pressure as you're going down, because I'm assuming so fast. Always love a good at your pop on an elevator ride. I'm a fan of it. So you bonded over food, as was just it sounds like some kind of shared interests as well. But has food always been kind of a passion for yours or did this was there like a certain meal that kind of made you be like wait, I want to learn more about everything around food, or it has it just always been an interest for you? I guess contextually, a little bit of background on me. I grew up. I'm, I guess, Second Gen Chinese Americans. So my parents immigrated when they were thirty to the US and when they immigrated their grocery budget was like twenty dollars a week, and so that meant there was no time to be able to order out or eat out when I was growing up. For my parents, cooking was one a form of survival because it was like, okay, we don't have money to be spending going to restaurants, and the second was money are cooking is a way not only to save money but also to connect back to the culture that they had come from, because in the US a lot of the fids that they liked weren't necessarily accessible that so they had to make it. And so my mom always jokes that she probably fed me into having a Chinese stomach because I'm probably a food I could eat for the rest of my life and I think the realization that I had about that was in eighth grade when I left home for the first time for like longer than just a few days. I was gone in New York for a week for school trip and I think we ate, I don't know, like normal things like sandwiches and pizza for a week and I went home and I was like, you know, what I really want to eat right now is dumplings, and I was like how do we make those? Please explain, like what are the ingredients? And I think from them we've kind of had the tradition every time I come home from somewhere, to make dumplings, and I think that's like the first connection I have of realizing how important cooking and eating at home and like having that connection to my parents and my culture was to me. I think food has just always been really like a really big source of fun in my life and my family definitely also really likes to eat. But Catherine is taught me so much about Chinese, American food and also just food in general, and we really do have a lot of good memories from that first summer that we were studying together in New York, where we got to try out all these restaurants together and it was definitely a huge source of fun for us that summer. And Yeah, I mean I have, like I was just also, I also just took a trip back to New York like a couple weeks ago and it was a little bit of a nostalgia trip. I got to go to all these restaurants that Catherine and I had gone to together and I think it's always just been a source of fun. And another thing I've realized in working is that food is a huge source of creativity and it emulates a lot of what I'm a product manager and I think that food kind of encapsulate's a lot of what I liked about product management, to where it's about creating something and testing it out and being able to like see how people react, and I just think it's it's always been fun and the only restaurant I've ever been banned from was in China. So that yeah, wait, we have to expand on that. woppened? It's it's probably a less interesting story that I make it out to me, but I studied abroad in China back in college and we had a graduate student with us that spoke Mandarin, so she was essentially our guide throughout really anywhere we went, because she was able to communicate...

...much better than we could via pointing and maybe I maybe knew a dozen words at that point and the pronunciation, I'm sure, was not great. So when we'd go to eat, we'd occasionally pick stuff, but a lot of the times we just asked her to order. Yeah, like we trust her judgment. Go ahead. So she went to a restaurant I honestly don't even remember the name of it. It was very good that we ordered a bunch of different plates, like everything was delicious. We're like we got to get back to this restaurant at some point because it's so good. And we went back and we said just order everything the same that you ordered last time, because that was perfect. Let's just do it again. So she orders and we got maybe like forty percent of the same stuff, but a handful of different things as well, and so she was like, okay, I'm going to call over the the server and, you know, get this sorted out. So she calls him over. They start kind of, you know, going back and forth a little bit, and then he calls over someone else and it's like a manager and at one point a third person came over really quickly to and then they left. So it was just like the two of them just screaming at each other for a solid two or three minutes, just back and forth, and then like they're all standing up, like our graduate student is standing up to to be like eye to eye with them, and then she just goes okay, okay, okay, and sits back down and she says they told us we're not welcome here anymore. Wow, what city was this? This was in Shanghai. So I you know, wide variety of other options out there and I imagine by now the statute of limitations. But it's possible they discreetly took a polaroid of us and have have it hanging up on the wall. Now. Yeah, that's a it's particular, probably particularly confusing, because I'm guessing you didn't have much of the context. It was just like we not have to go. I loved it. Yeah, they did let us, to their credit, they did let us finish up. They just said we couldn't come back again after that. So, wow, we just down nicely. It's a good story, though. Yeah, that's why I love to travel. You get you get things like that it's good stuff. Now we talked a little bit about some of the foods that you like, but this has been an ongoing discussion. This episode are after Halloween, but we're recording it before Halloween. So there's always debates around the best types of Halloween candy and we don't need to go down that route entirely. But I do want to call out candy corn. Apologies of either of you like it. I find it horrible. It's so disgusting, it's not enjoyable, and yet it always seems to end up in my presence around Halloween, and so I'm curious. What's a food that you just don't like at all and can't stand? Who? I talked about this with my friends a lot. Actually. We call it like the the unpopular opinion about food discussion. It's like, what's your hottest take on food? Mine is pretty simple. I don't like condiments in general. So like I hate catchup, Mayo, mustard, like all of that. So I I don't know why exactly. I think that it'd be easier to say that I started disliking them all at the same time, but I actually think I dislike them all for different reasons. And so like, for example, I think I have scarred by catchup when I ate school cafeteria catchup and it was so disgusting I was like I can't eat anything that like taste remotely like this ever again, and so since then I'm not like catch up. I was in kindergarten and from Mayo. I was actually allergic to eggs for a long time. So I just didn't, I think, grow up eating it and so the first time I had it, like, it's kind of pass the point where your pallet can begin to accept it. And so anytime I have anything with it, I can tell I don't like it. I don't know why, and then I'll look at the ingredient lists I'll be like, oh, the Mayo. It's...

...pretty consistent. So I'm convinced that it's not just like a psychological thing for me. Yeah, that's that's my hot take on food. I guess it's a good answer. I also don't like Mayo. I can eat it and like some things in small quantities like, for example, I think it's sometimes good in sandwiches, but I only like a little bit or like I do like Aoli. That's the one exception to the Mayo rule. But another thing I was thinking. I like most food I am Vegan, which means that I feel like sometimes it's hard to answer this question because there's a lot of foods I guess I don't eat. But I don't really like drinking milk, like just plain milk or like soy milker, you know whatever, non dairy milk. I have a really hard time like just drinking glass of milk. I like that. I as a child, I used to drink milk all the time. Yeah, hound it like your sip and water or, I guess a beer if you're in, you know, really in party mode. I guess you could pound a beer too, but I would drink milk like that. Yeah, and now, yeah, it's it's I would say the only times I pour a glass of milk on its own is if I'm having a chocolate chip cookie or Brownie yourself. That is an appropriate to do it. Yeah, it sounds great. Maybe maybe after this podcast it's cookies, it just dip. So you've also got your own podcast, as you were saying, the dish podcast, and I think as the the pandemic. I don't know the exact step, but I know podcast. The number of podcasts started since the pandemic has risen quite a bit because people have more time. That can make it happen, but I think a lot of people also jump into the idea of podcast or may even start the podcast without really realizing that a lot of work does go into it to to make a good quality podcast. It does require some work. You're obviously chatting with people and setting up interviews and getting, you know, some background information on what you're talking about. So this is a very cliched question, but take us through your podcasting process. I will say that when we first came up with the idea for the podcast, we kind of anticipated that soliciting guests and getting people to come on and talk to us would be one of the hardest parts, but I feel like it's actually been. We found that people are, in general, pretty open and willing to share, which has been like really nice to see just how we're acceptive people are to share their stories. Yeah, I think, yeah, it's interesting because I think that our process has involved over time. We definitely both I mean so I work as a consultant and Madelon's a PM, so both of us are like spreadsheet people. We're definitely process creators, so that's probably helpful. But when we first started, I was honestly quite skeptical when Madelon approached like the idea of starting a podcast, because in my head I was like this sounds like a lot of work. I had done work on making documentaries and stuff in middle school, in high school, and I remember that process just being extremely painful just in terms of the amount of preparation effort that goes into it, and I was like, I don't really know, that's like something we're going to be able to do, even though it is only an audio form. So I was like okay, like before we invest and goal in on this, we should, you know, see if anyone wants to talk to us. Let's just test out like our kind of proof of concept by just reaching out to people and being like hey, we're interested in having conversations, like kind of you know how I built this style, making it feel conversational, just learning about how you built your your restaurant and knowing that our niche was local restaurants, we reached out to local restaurants that we already were sort of connected to through our college community, and then immediately they responded and we're like yeah, we'd love to chat.

We're like okay, so now we actually have to do this, figure out how it's gonna work, and so I think at that point we started to like iterate and figure out, okay, how are we going to actually approach these conversations, and what we initially built out us the skeleton, was we would have this intro call first with the potential guests, after we reach out to them and say, okay, like let's chat for twenty minutes. We just want to, you know, get get rid of the awkwardness of, you know, the initial introductions so that when you get into the conversation they already feel like they know you a little bit. It's more comfortable. And then in that twenty minute intro we would explain a little bit about the podcast. We would also we would also ask them a little bit more about what questions they have and what they what they might want to talk about over the course of the conversation with us, because, you know, everyone has different experiences with podcasts. Our first guest had done so many he was like, I don't want to talk about my origin story anymore. Like okay, we won't do that, it's fine, and other people are like, oh, we really want to talk about sustainability or community etc. And so we know that we can make sure that on the day of the interview we have those questions that are ready to prompt those stories and then we'll schedule the actual interview and the day of will interview them. And then the part that I think we didn't anticipate is just how much comes after that. Yeah, I mean I think that maybe we did a little bit. Like that's where, when you say like podcast are a lot of work, like I think so much of it is outside of the actual conversation, that editing, in the social media, I think especially. I think I think we might have known a little bit while we were getting into but it definitely is a lot of time. But I think that one thing that's been helpful for me at least, is consistently checking back in with Catherine and one thing that Catherine said to me when we launched our very first episode, I was a little bit stressed and I was like everyone needs to hear this, like we should be doing all this publicity and Yada, Yada, Yada, and I think happen. Said something along lines of like why are we really doing this? And I think the answer for both of us is that it's just been really fun and we both enjoy having these conversations and we also enjoy having them to reflect back on and having them in that recorded format for us to to learn from and being able to make these connections with these restaurants is also just been really fun. So I think that it is a ton of work, but it has been nice to kind of have that reminder that we can change it at any point because for us, is just for fun. Yeah, I think that's a good reminder because a lot, I think a lot of people do get into podcast thinking like, Oh, I'm going to be the next Joe Rogan and get, you know, get a million dollar an episode deal from spotify or whatever that ended up being, which, first of all, no offense to the people that like Joe Rogan, but that it's just not the the types of podcasts that I want to listen to. So I you know, Kudos to him for making it successful, but yeah, I definitely think it's so rewarding to chat to the types of people that that you're talking to, and this obviously being an interview podcast as well. There have been times tonight it's not one of them. I was excited for this podcast, but sometimes where I'm like hey, there's a lot going on, you know in life, like maybe the dogs have been barking for an hour beforehand and I'm just like, Oh, I hope you stop for the recording session, and of course they don't and I have to edit it out afterwards and I'm just, you know, do so nerve racked going into things and then I come out and I was like, Oh, that was great, like what was I so worried about? That was fantastic. Like it's always awesome to meet someone new and I think you learned so much from doing podcast to just from the people that you meet. And then, on top of it, like I'm sure you've had trouble shooting along the way, we were like hey, I figured out something that was wrong with this, you know, audio workstation or you know, whatever the case might be, and when you solve that, you're...

...like all right, this is great. Yeah, absolutely. I actually think one like there are a few things that come to mind with that, but one thing that I really like them model and suggested when we first started was we use this platform called Zencaster to actually record our interviews, because it's sort of like a helpful platform where you were able to see people, but also the audio tracks are recorded separately so you can edit out weird noises and stuff like that. But it is challenging because at the beginning Zen caster hadn't fully platform yet and so you needed to do a separate zoom and then do your audio recording on Zencaster. So just trying to coordinate all of that was such a such a struggle. was the night there. So people going to affect one and not the other. You could see them, but then you're going to be able to hear them or vice versa, and madeline and I were talking about like how do we, how do many sure this doesn't continually happen with our guests? After we had issues with our first guests and we ended up writing up this like little how to guide of like okay, here's like the different steps, here's how we can connect. Just you know, check it. And then that was actually one of the reasons why we've been scheduled. That initial in intro call is you get to do the trial run of all the tech problems you're going to have and then day of, ideally you don't have any of those issues anymore, and so I think it was by iterating our process that we managed to kind of figure out how to like get better and faster at all of us. I feel like that was a little dig at me for having totally understand you, because we have gone through it and I think there was one, guess where we literally had to reschedule the call five times. Yeah, because we could not connect with her for the life of us. So you are doing much better than yeah. Yes, I used to use and caster back in the day as well. Do they still have this was always my favorite part was they had like the little audio files that you could place. You could play like the little like did it. It did a while someone was talking, and I always thought that was we should check that out. I guess there are so many features we haven't explored on the platforms were using. So, yeah, we've learned something new today. Excellent. Yes, I look forward to the next audio drop because I think you can upload your own too. So I don't know if you have, you know, a favorite like blooper or something, but you could throw it. We do have like a nice woosh sound effect that I've heard people like in our intro so maybe we could start incorporating that she straight into the interview. Yeah, there you go. Just, yeah, just turn into like a morning Dj talk show. Yeah, just got all all kinds of wacky sound effects throughout. We'll become the audio engineer in addition to the interviewer. I always like to ask musicians about their worst GIG and so I'd be curious what was your worst? Was the five having to reskeutle five times. Was that your worst podcast experience, or is there something even beyond that? That was pretty good. I think that's probably the most frustrating because it like I felt like there was nothing that we could have done differently, m and it's one thing to feel a sense of Oh okay, like this was on us or this was on the other person. It was just genuinely baffling, and so that was definitely frustrating. I can't think I'm about worst experience. If I can definitely think of times where I've walked in, are not walked in, clicked into the interview and just not been in the head space and be interviewing. And I think just transitioning into that mode sometimes it's harder than other times. Like there are times when you start and you're like, I'm already ready for like to have this conversation, I'm in my social like mood, and then other times it feels like it takes you a while to...

...kind of drag yourself into that mode. But I feel like I always leave every interview feeling better than I did before I went in. Yeah, yeah, I would agree with that. I think that. Yeah, the five rescheduling thing was definitely the most logistically frustrating, but other than that I've thoroughly enjoyed like every episode we've recorded and I'm really happy with how they've all turned out as well. There is one in my head that I'm thinking of where I know I was like not in the right head space going into that interview. There was just a lot going on and I was like just kind of out of it and Catherine said to me after we recorded, like are you okay? I was like, Oh man, but I think that editing helped a lot there and that one. So I guess. Yeah, I don't think our listeners mentioned anything. Yeah, so I think she got away with it. Yeah, but I think that it's a good reminder to, you know, be intentional and in the moment when you're trying to do this, but it is sometimes hard to get there. I need to share this with my former cohost for another podcast, because he there would be sometimes where he'd have, like if we'd record on a Thursday, for example, he'd have Thursday night football on in the background. Let's focus up. Yes, like you said, you can fix a lot in editing. Yeah, maybe not always the focus, but at least sometimes you can. You can get away with it, which is always nice. HMM. And having a cohost helps to like I think Catherine probably helps me out there a lot, and so that also helps. Why I think Malan doesn't give herself enough cred of I think a lot of the time I love that she starts all of the interviews because it helps me just get into the mode of okay, like I can listen and respond to the questions, but sometimes I think the intro starting off the interviews the hardest part. Thanks, Kathern. I think you just segued nicely into the next question here, which is a question you wish you were asked more frequently. And for Y'all it's what you appreciate about each other as cohosts. What I appreciate about Madelan was a cohost. To be honest, I think the best part of working with madeline is that, like, I think she's both enthusiastic and also persistent. So I feel like, when I think about enthusiasm, I feel like madeline is the person who first of all got me excited for the idea of doing a podcast in the first place and convinced me, no, this is going to be a good thing, like we're gonna have a great time doing and I got brought along for the ride and I'm so glad because I do think it's been so fun and exciting. And she's the person who's always kind of the person that I'll talk to about, regardless of like what's going on in my life, just kind of the things that like I'm reflecting on or like experiencing, and she's always the person who's able to then kind of play it back to me and be excited for me or talk through things with me. And I think being able to work on the podcast with her means that I talked with her more frequently and so I get to experience the enthusiasm more often, which is great. And then the persistence piece, I think, is something that I'm not great about, I think, is being able to consistently kind of be on top of the different things that are going on. I think I've always been cognizant of an issue I have, which is that I sometimes will say yes to too many things and overcommit on things, and so I'm I'm trying active as I get older, to be more conscious of what I say Yes to. But I think that Manlin is the type of person who will also be good at kind of holding you accountable to things without it being like a pressure. She'll know to be able to kind of follow up on things and check in on how things are going, and that's sort of the element of her that's able to push the process along of creation, and that's what I think is made us...

...be able to really solve that episodes at the Times that we have to have been able to have the quality that we've been able to keep up over the course of all of our recordings. So I think that persistence is something that I really appreciate. So sweet there are a lot of things I appreciate about Catherine. We've also been friends for a while now, like how many years? Like son, it's been a while and we've only been working on this podcast for like ten months. But there are many things I appreciate it about Catherine, but I think the two that we're coming to mind were. One is that she asks like incredible questions, which is useful in many ways, and then she's also very like I don't know if level head is head it is the right word, but I'll explain what I mean. So with the first thing, like every guess that we've had has told Catherine that she asks amazing questions. I'm not kidding, it's incredible. But I think that it's also helpful, like not just in the interviews but throughout the it means that throughout the entire process of developing the podcast, I feel like when I don't know what to do, Catherine is the one who's able to really like it's because you're very perceptive. So, like, if I'm confused about something or like flustered, you're really good at like taking a step back and seeing the whole picture and reflecting and saying, like, okay, well, what are our goals for this podcast and like what is the process that we can implement to stop this from happening in the future? Like things like that. You're very you're very perceptive. You're very reflective and I think like some sort of combination there means that you're like really good at seeing the big picture, which is Super Helpful, and I think it's also helpful for our guess, because it means that you ask questions where they're like Whoa, I didn't even see that coming. And then the second thing is I think that we balanced each other out a bit in the sense that if I'm stressed about something, I like I'm not very good at hiding it or like I feel a need to talk through it with someone, and Catherine is always the type of person who, outside of the podcast, to but in the podcast context, I know I can always go to her and say, like, here's what I'm stressed about, I don't really know what to do. Can you help me talk through it, and she's, I don't know, like you're just very good at handling handling problems. I don't know to say. I guess that's why you're consultant, like I'm you're very good at talking us through stuff and kind of helping us think through things in a very productive way. And there's probably a ton of other things that aren't coming to mind right now, but I would say those are kind of the the first two so heartwarming. I think it's the end versus us in us that we we joke about the Myers burag sometimes, and the part where Malin I are the like most different, I think, is that, like I think I'm an end and she's an ass, so I'm the big picture thinker and she's kind of the detail oriented to think her. So probably is reflected when we just talked about that was very heartwarming. Good job. I like that question. I'm going to ask everyone that now well appreciate about? Well, I guess if there's just one of them it would be about something else, not their coast, but you know what I mean, like like a good appreciation here and there. And because we're all about speaking things into an existence, is there a guess that you want to interview but haven't gotten to yet? I will say, like I said, like we've people have been so respective receptive. Like I think when we first start at this, two of the restaurants that came to mind that I really wanted to interview were Voodoo donuts, just because they epitomized like a corky restaurant chain that's grown a lot in my head and I was really excited about them. And then I was also really excited about a pizza chain in Berkeley that my family loves and we just interviewed them yesterday. So but there...

...are definitely some. If I can, I could think I bought you a little bit of time, but I would say for me, I think I have too. The first we're about to manifest into existence already. So there's a gelato place that I've loved eating at since I was in high school and they have the most incredible flavors and when my friends heard about the fact that we were going to be interviewing them, they, like multiple people texting me and asked, can you ask them if they're bringing back X, Y Z flavor? So I'm super excited for that. We haven't done the interview yet, but it is in the works, so I guess it supplied. The people have to stay tuned because it's very exciting and I'm really happy about it. I think the other one is there's actually I don't know how this would functionally work, which is why we just somehow have to manifest it. But I think one of my favorite memories of traveling with Madeline is when we were in Paris, we went to this creepe guy and in the Lattimo Rai area and he was just at this sort of like hole in the wall playing music. It was like a slightly rainy day in Paris and so it is the evening time and he was having such a blast making crapes and I felt like somebody who is a to sort of enjoy life in that way has to have fun stories about the people he's seen, experiences that he's had, and so I don't know exactly how it would manage to overcome some of the language barriers, but if it were possible, I think you would be really fun to be able to expand beyond just for us local restaurants in the US and be able to do something also internash. I guess you gave us a scoop on the gelato episode. Yeah, you're almost off the hook, but we always like to end with a top three and when this episode goes live, well, we'll have started hearing, I mean, if you haven't already maybe started hearing, Christmas songs all over the radio rack. Harry's already warming up her vocal cords and we've got, you know, all kinds of decorations all over the place, but my favorite part, of course, is the holiday treats. So do you have top three holiday treats? I'll start. I feel like I have to start by giving a shout out to my parents cooking, since I talked about the beginning as well. So this is a holiday treat that isn't super common in the US but is super popular in China. So in the winter, my favorite holiday is actually in February and it's not Valentine's Day, it's Chinese New Year. So Chinese new years, Lunar New Year, is sort of when the lunar calendar switches over to the new year and there's basically fifteen days worth of required foods that you're supposed to make an eat, and one of the required foods is this dessert called the young gall which is, in direct translation, a sticky rice cake. So it's a type of kind of like a Mochi like dessert where you usually have some red bean, maybe some lemons ass. So it's like a little it's a little bit sweet, a little bit sticky, but it's always a fun treat and the reason why it's always made is because it's actually also a common em. So it also can be interpreted to mean every year you kind of become better and every year everything gets better, and so that's a treat that my dad will only ever make in the new year and we will all eat it together. So I think every time I have it I'm like Ah, we're about to hit a new year and the Chinese calendar, which is always exciting. So...

...that's my first one. My first one this isn't tied to a specific holiday but more just like the time of year. My mom has a really good pumpkin bread recipe and she made her secret is that she makes it with coboca squash. It's like the Japanese squash and it's so sweet and so good. So every time she makes that, I mean it just like does it a fall food? Yeah, it's more of a fall food than a holiday food, but we make it around Thanksgiving and like yeah, it's pretty good. That's my first one. HMM. Okay, my second one I actually discovered last year during the pandemic and I've ordered it twice now. It's in Leesburg, Virginia, kind of random, but so I live in the DC area. It's like a forty five minute drive from my house. My Dad and I were just driving along like the random farmland of Maryland and ended up by this actual hole in the wall called Mom's Apple Pie, which apparently is a could following, because at the on the day that we were there, as almost thanksgiving and there were, I could you not like fifty people standing outside this tiny shack and I was like what is going on? So naturally I had to get in line and I got this this apple pie and Barry Pie, but the Berry Pie that I got had this piccan crust. That was incredible, like I'm not really a huge pie person, but I had the pocan crass pie and I was like wait, this is actually insane. So we got that and we ate it for part of Thanksgiving and I we went back on Pie Day this year and and celebrated again. Yeah, the next thing for me that came to mind was like Thanksgiving stuffing. My family does a pretty typical Thanksgiving dinner, like we'll do Turkey and stuffing and mass potatoes and stuff, but I feel like this stuffing is always one of my favorites and what I really like is when you put chestnuts in it, I just think it tastes so good. It's not a treat. Well, I don't know. We only doing dessert. I saw. Doesn't have to be treating. Doesn't have to be treat is, treat is whatever you want it. I mean my favorite Thanksgiving dessert is probably Apple Pie. Kind of similar to your answer. HMM. You did like a in you like a pie baking contest with your sister. Yeah, so one thing. So I mentioned I'm Vegan. No one else in my family is Vegan or even really close to Vegan, but I do have a nine yearold little sister and one of her favorite activities is to have a competition with me about who can bake like the better thing, and we do like a Vegan version in a non vegan version. So yeah, last year we did a pieoff. It's pretty fun and mine was pretty good. It was it was a good crust. So vegan pies that so were you? Were you the winner then? Well, I honestly can't remember. I think I think it might have been a tie because I think she did a different type of Pie. So it was honestly a little bit hard to judge when I'm remembering, but my pie got eaten, which I feel like means it must have been good enough for people. It's the side of a successful Pie, I would say. Yeah, okay, Um, my last one for holiday treats. I'm I love cookies, like I think my favorite probably is just the classic chocolate chip cookie. But last day I wanted to branch out and I was super bored at home because you know covid and so my friend Hannah I come came up with this idea that we were going to bake tons of cookies and do a holiday cookie box delivery to our friends who all lived around us, and so I think for Christmas I bates like six hundred cookies and I think my favorite one was probably the...

...we did like. Oh, I did like a white chocolate orange zest oat mule cookie that I think I baked probably a hundred fifty of and according to all my friends, that was the first one that disappeared and I think that was true in my house. So that one was a new favorite that I discovered last year. Yeah, I was going to say I think my third favorite. My family's a big fan of chocolate, so I feel like I always associate Christmas with like getting boxes of chocolate, because that's always something in the stockings that we get. So I guess in my head, when I'm picturing is like your typical seas candies, like truffle box, as a favorite treaty, which truffle goes first? Well, so of my family does is we cut each one in half so that you can see what's inside. And also I have a pretty big family, so I guess we need to share, like the really good ones. Usually the caramels disappear pretty quickly in our house. Do you feel like that ruins the surprise? It's good to know. Mean, someonoeuld definitely say so, but when you have a lot of siblings, it's nice to because otherwise one person gets all the CARAMEL. This way at least you're like sharing things. Yeah, we don't cut ours open, but my parents and I are the people who like get the truffle box and then we'll be reading the the manual. Yeah, that comes with it, but we have an excuse, which is that I'm allergic to peanuts, so if I pick the wrong one I might actually die. That's why we do it. That's right. Yeah, I think, I think I've done reading the manual because, yeah, because sometimes you're like what is this spiky chocolate one. Yeah, and it turns out it's like Tu Maric or something, and you're like yeah, chocolate, but I also are family always has frango mints for us when we come home and my sister and I will usually destroy a box within hours, if not minutes, of arrive. Yeah, Love, love, I won't metal and Catherine, this was fantastic. Thank you so much for taking the time to chat. If people want to listen to these upcoming episodes, maybe tune into the Voodoo donuts or all the great episodes that you've done. Where can they find you? We're on spotify and apple podcast at dished, so the name is dies hed and you can also find us on instagram at dish podcast. Fantastic. Well, thank you again for taking the time to chat. This is great and I'm glad I did this right before dinner because I have a crazy already. Yeah, you'd everything. Yes, yeah, yeah, thanks for having us. We had a good time to yeah, thank you so much. We had so much fun, of course, and we got to end with a Corny joke, as we always do. What do pirates pay for corn orn? I don't know. Yeah, what do they think? Very go a buccaneer's pretty good. That's good. Nice of it. Good people cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you were a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. You can send me a message Joey at good people cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people cool things and check out all the old episodes via good people cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (141)