Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 96 · 9 months ago

96: Creative Thinking, Storytelling, and Rock Collections with Donna Loughlin

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

It's the last episode of the year! See you in mid-January when we'll be back and cooler than ever. We're ending in style, too.

Donna Loughlin has been around the world and back in search of the most fascinating stories. She's stepped foot in more than 80 countries and had numerous jobs in journalism in PR. Now, she's back in Silicon Valley working with some of the brightest minds in tech through her PR firm LMGPR, helping startups with storytelling and media relations.

Inspired by the forward-thinkers she works with, Donna has a deep fascination with advancements in AI, automotive, consumer electronics, and more. And she knows everyone's got a story a tell—it's just a matter of helping them tell it. Through both LMGPR and her podcast, Before IT Happened, Donna is exploring the human side of technology and how it’s enhancing our society.

We're talking all about creating moments that matter, cool advanced in artificial intelligence, making paper planes, and Donna's extensive childhood rock collection.

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing. And here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is the founder of Lmgpr, Donna Laughlin. She works with all kinds of fantastic companies in AI, automation tech, all exciting areas where there's a lot of growth, a lot of interesting use cases, both existing and future ones, and we're chatting through how she got started in this business, lots of different creative moments and processes that she's had throughout her career, her before it happened podcast and the fantastic reception that that podcast is received, as well as all cool people that she's mad out of it. And that's why podcasting is so great. You get to meet all of these good people doing cool things, and that's the name of the show. And if you'd like to get in touch with good people good things, you can reach out via facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast. You can also support the show by head and on over to Amazon book shop or Barnes and noble and buying this Fella's book, kind but kind of weird, short stories on life's relationships. It as a delightful read and you'll find it just as delightful as this conversation with Donna. For people who don't know who you are, can you tell us who you are, give us your elevator pitch, but can you also let us know the type of elevator that we're writing on? Boy, I love that question. I Donald Offlin, and I I am like a California girl that has traveled all around the world collecting stories, and the type of elevator I am is, in a supersonic, high performance, artificial intelligence, autonomous and electric elevator, and that's kind of the world that I live in, because I work with a lot of technology, particularly emerging technology, and innovators, and I'm about the future and however going to make it better. was that always something you were interested in, like where you were a Tinkerer as a child? I wasn't a tinker as as much as I was, bobably a thinker, but I did wander around with my father pretty much anything that he was working on, whether we're just you know, the a ranch is tractor, a plane, a car, transplanes, automobiles, anything that my father was, you know, hobbyist on doing, I just kind of troll behind. So, but I was always entering in science fairs and and writing papers when I couldn't create the project. But Science and and and and space and aviation and kind of how things work I always intrigued me, but I didn't realize until much later in life and my career when I was a journalist, how much that played into it. Do you...

...remember a top science experiment that you made? Oh yeah, any probably one of the the ones that I think it's a little funny is I needed to create a cell unifar biology class, and it was in middle school, and create a plant, a plant based cell, right, and had to be a threedimensional model. So one of my friends and I came out this amazing idea that we're going to get a fish aquarium and we're going to fill it with with all the components abuse buttons and we use other different types of found objects, do you know, to for the different components of the cell, and then we filled it up with green Jello and the Jello melted all the way to school on a warm summer day and in California, so of my time. We got the school we were literally had been slimed. So that was the best execution. But I think they gets funny to just I was able to give it a good pitch in the class with, you know, for the assignment and I had supporting paperwork that maybe the execution wasn't great with the intent was and talked my way through it and still got an a on that. I also created a number of planes using, you know, just going to the the hobby store and getting all the not a kit but all that the expert components of, you know, the the the wood and and shaping and learning how to use all the different would would. There were some things work car but others were using the pro tools. I was, I'd like to say, and getting permission to go to the workshop at School for my science project and and created some planes and the these were little little, you know, fossil fuel planes. I could fly and I went, you know, those are the types of things I was just dinking around with and and sometimes they work, sometimes they didn't. But my father was constantly taking me to grow up in California, proximity of Stanford and, you see, Berkeley. He had friends that were geologists and and archeologists and different types of alogists, right, and I get the gout with him and get to go hang out and do stuff and I started clicking rocks and and and, but I could tell you. I couldn't today. Well maybe, but I I could tell you you know, pretty much every type of rock in existence and mineral and that was just kind of a Geeky way to get an extra girls got badge because I was always good girl Scott. But I didn't realize that that type of process and thinking and challenging it would be conversational down the road. That is very impressed. I don't know if I can name you. You can name me. No, no, I don't think I can name any type of rock. On my desk I have a a really big quartz...

...rock that I think goes back. My Dad called me rocky by the way, because I can look at rocks. But it started when I was about five. And so this one particular rock, I was just here the story about the pet rock, which is kind of a hippie DIDP California marketing thing. Well, this is, you know, my version of a pet rock was this this big beautiful rock I found at Yosemite and I remember my father saying I couldn't bring it and it was a river rock and but look put there's thousands of them, and so I was managed to get him to agree that I can bring anything I put my pocket. So it's a you know, about a size of a, I don't know, size of an ipod and or iphone now, and I brought it home and I put all kinds of beautiful gravel rock, you know, the kind of goose in the bottom of aquarium, and I made a beautiful it was an object of desire and I gave it to my father for father's Day. And again, I'm five years old and that rock still sits on my desk. It is a paperweight, but a beautiful paperweight and it sounds like a beautiful paperweight. Yeah, yeah, and you your plane story as well. Remind mastering to think of when this happened. I feel like it was maybe a high school thing where it was some sort of compo petition and there were, you know, several different both like brain and athletic type of things together and different factors of the school would play against each other and I remember the final round was this wild card round and everyone was like what's it going to be? What's IT GOING TO BE? And it turned out it was just make a paper plane and who could get theirs to fly the farthest and find the only rule was that it had to be made of paper, and I remember the team next to me, one of the guys, was like what if we just crumpled up a piece of paper like really tightly and whoever has the best arm just throw it as far as they can do? And they got like second place because they thought outside the box, like all these other people were trying to make planes in either the throw would just go straight down or they, you know, just didn't didn't get the right spin on it or anything, or they just weren't good at making paper planes like me, and I just ended poorly for them and I was like this guy, I like his creative outside the box. They GIG and I think, I think there's good appreciation you can have for for things like that, and I it sounds like, I mean from just looking at what you've done and and your company, Lmgpr it sounds like that was rooted in creative thinking and being curious about everything around you. So when did you go from I like to learn about things to let me start my own business. Well, I'm first I'm just want to respond your paper plants, as I love paper planes. Get I fly a real plane, so I'll try. Migrated from the paper planes to the model planes to the flying planes. You know, I started my business a little bit of a happy accident. So I was a news reporter. First I worked for...

Washington posted an internship with and then I work for reiters international and I was international. I lived out of a napsack and also BBC, and then I came back to the US and started my master's degree at UC Berkeley and in that period I transition from a news reporter into the tech world and, to be honest with you, was going to say happy accident. I was always going to be a diehard news reporter, but it was either take a pink slip or be really hungry and go try something else. And so I didn't take a pink slip because it was a period of time when you know things are being restructured. So I migrated over to the PR department and my first thought was those people, those are the people that make up stuff all day long, and I don't make up stuff. I'm all about the facts. And then I went over and he met the team, only to find out they're all former journalist. And so I spent the next kind of phase of my career, during traditional tech, working with, you know, with everything from storage to networking to Internet, to so many different evolutions of technology, predigital, daring, the digital and then everything else I'd like to say. And I had the opportunity to just keep doing more IPOs and and launching companies. I realize I didn't really like the idea of just being in one company all the time. I liked the diversity. And so I go back to my rock collection. The diversity and rock collection is very similar to my passion and night my desire to have, you know, different stories to tell. So ELM GPR started one one part with this the need to wanting to constantly create and not just work on one type of innovation or technology. And the second was I was in the process of adopting two kids from Russia and I knew a corporate job was just not going to allow me that. And so you've heard it before. It's like this. There's such thing as balance, but I least wanted agility and I needed to keep my creative, you know, value and check, and so that, ultimately, is why I greeted my agency. As someone who study broadcast journalism as well in college, I always find this interesting. You can, you can take this whichever route you want. What was your favorite story the report it on or your worst story? Well, one of the stories that was quite awakening. I was in Israel, in Haifa and with riders and I was doing a story on the cultural intersection between all the different sets. So you you have the Orthodox in their old U Orthodox and the Behigh and the Muslim and the Christian, and it just discruss intersection of what you and I would never really see on the...

...news and people are living in harmony. And that's the story I wanted to tell. was that there. It wasn't a religious story, wasn't a political story, it was a human story. And so I'm on the friendly boarder and I had just finished having lunch with a group of Lebanese in Israeli soldiers. I'm literally breaking bread at the border, having lunch, having the fabulous fresh apricots from the from just picked from down the road, and Hummus and and Peter and Schwarma at all this great conversation talking about there, you know, the things that that that that were similar, right, and there were more similarities in human nature of food and laughter or common you know, just common bonds and connections that people can make. Right. And no sooner do we finish our lunch, all of a sudden the air raids iron went off, the border was shut down and I was rushed into a bunker and I thought, what the heck is just going on and I relies. This is not the story that I wanted to get, but what ended up happening out two and a half hours later, being in this this bunker with a collection of people, and I to this day I don't exactly know everybody who was in there, but I do think there was some intelligence. There was military and both intelligence from both sides. But I I was a you know, a business and economics reporter, so I was put immediately put into a situation. It was probably better equipped for somebody studying world politics and and on defense, but that left an impression on me of that, no matter where you are in the world, that you know people have just come from a general understanding of humanity and so started out to, you know, just being a very great experience and that being kind of intense. But what I learned from that was just like okay, so that was just check, check that one off right, and the next day, I think, was at the local zoo during a story. So other just general stories. You know that I personally, you know, if I passion with was not necessary the stories that I was reporting and covering. And I grew up in a publishing, journalistic family. I had uncles that were journalists, that had magazines and published magazines. My father owned up publishing printing company and all the community papers and you know, the twenty some cities surrounding me the family owned, right, and so I was writing and reporting, you know, as a precocious ten year old, which is not a normal career path. Right. So I had access. As sometimes say, what's the difference between you and someone else's is? Well, I had access, but I love just people. I think people in general or interesting. And if you sit, I always say like if you're sitting at at Edward Hopper, yest nighthawks, you know seeing,...

...you know, the painting Edward Hopper and and and I see myself visualized myself sitting there, but having the conversation with those people, because none of you can tell from the picture and when you go and sit into a cafe or setting, whoever to left and to the right probably has something interesting. And I don't know why, but people have always told me thanks. And when I was a news reporter I think it was one part that I looked a lot younger, but then I was and so I was really unassuming. But I was just telling somebody last night when I was a reporter and working on Capital Hill, I I I knew that if I waited later in the day and certain hotels had certain happy hours with certain congressional people and and other selvery tons would show up at a certain time. So I would get my best stories after hours, because that's when people's guard is do sure, so if it's on the foot so and then I and I worked with this another person and she could constily said, how do you get these stories? How do you get desert I didn't want to give her my game because she was hanging out on the footsteps. You know, you know of Congress and she was hanging out and capital hill and I was like, okay, I'm gonna go to Dupont circle. I'M gonna go to that part of you. I'M gonna go hang over here. So that's that's where I get my stories. It's a brilliant stress, like a little bit of a Nancy drew, you know, a little bit naughty to write. I mean it's a fantastic strategy. And having just gone to a medium mixer your I'm in spot. I'm like everyone. It's more well into chat and it's just, yeah, especially, especially nowadays, like it's just so nice to see people in person, which hasn't been a thing for a while. Yeah, isn't it? Well, I'm looking forward to it's been a couple of years. The big computer consumer electronic show is in Las Vegas every year, but it wasn't the last two years, and so two years I went and we were all very aware that something was happening in viral format and some people being cautious and then everything going to shut down. So going back into the under the big top, so to speak, again, with these new world roles, I think it's just something that's become the norm and I think they you know, everything old is new again. I still at nostalgic like a movie, like I don't know what it's like to go to movie theater. I got to see the new James Bond movie. I gotta get my Daniel Craig thing on and I was like, okay, but it's the movie theater, like what's that like? Have you been in the movie theater? Because I have it and I'm thinking, I don't know, do I want to go to movie? I finish a one and we rent it out a movie theater. So it was a group of like twelve of us that we all knew, you know, what...

...we had been up to and everything, and we watch the movie free die, which was much better than I expected it to be. Well, another thing is that, to me, the unfortunate part of the pandemic is that, you know, it's it's altered a lot of people's lives, in some ways worse than others. But we have stories, which is the good news, is because everyone has a story. Everyone has a story in general, I think, but everyone seems to have a story. When San Francisco Bay had a huge earthquake back in eighty nine, I have a story about that and it was quite an interesting story because I ended up the building that I was in, where is rolling it was an earthquake, you know, proven to architecture design, but but the building litter was like we're swaying and rolling. And I was on a conference call with my boss and we're talking to the CEO and founder of a company and he's talking about the his company and also we said we're having an earthquake here, and he's always okay, it's snowing, and I'm like, this is not the weather report, and she and I are literally underneath the desk and the buildings rocking. And then and then he come, because you still there. Still, then we pop back up because it we're run a conference phone and we said, I think it's bigger than we even realize. And this is is predigital. You couldn't just go check right away, like we ended up calling a hot line at California earthquake hotline to see what just happened, and that's when the bay bridge collapsed. In a lot of things in the city collapsed and and I remember driving home so, so ridiculous. I remember getting in my car and driving home, thanking I'll just go to the APE ATM then also I realize, oh wait, there's no power. California often doesn't have power, as we know, but this was like a crisis scenario, right. But I have a story and I think that's what covid was talking to a group of college students a few weeks ago, and and I oftentimes you hear when you know you're in and you always have to pick a theme and something to talk about. So when I was in college studying journalism, I studied business and economics. It was was like a topic finance and business was a helpful topic for business, business reporter, but I also love history and and so the to combine gave me least some repository, you know, to be able to talk about. And so with the students I was saying, well, you make write down three things that sparked your imagination. And covid like, how did you actually need to restructure, Redo or rethink something? And then think of three things that you're happy that you eliminated in your life that ultimately made you, you know, have a better lifestyle. And it was really interesting to see the responses. So that everything from the three things that you know that that you got rid of, that refine was. It was the commuting and some...

...people got rid of the cars and the other people started. Just you know why? There a lot of transportation reasons people change. Transportation was one. The other was health and physical fitness was, you know, changing, having more time sitting in the car doing more things. And then on the things that that other side of things, that the just, you know, the values right or key thing. I think people we realize that piece on. Everybody has, has always had values in their back pocket, the same way people often don't have manners of their back pocketway was take by take out your values and manners put in the front part. But I think there's a lot more empathy and I think that, you know, if we look at the news and all the crazy happening things that were in general and the roller coaster we were all on, I think people in general just had this human, empathetic like okay, you know, I hear you brother, I hear your sister, like and people have gone through a lot and so hopefully, I you saying we two thousand and twenty grant, you know, just kind of crawled by and two thousand and twenty one and a flew by and my opinion, and we got to start paddling up stream with two thousand and twenty two. Like we I actually went to get at a daytimer and the two thousand and twenty two calendars were on sale and I wow, it's into year, like why are they discounting? He's already and then I asked the girls get twenty and twenty three to go. It's only two thousand and twenty one. So I had a little bit of a brain fog. I was thinking we were already into twenty twenty two and I missed it. As kind of how I felt. You. Have you felt that way? I have not, but that's super interesting, right am I? Oh, Gosh, I don't want to miss I'm trying to reclaim part of two thousand and twenty one. But yes, I'm a little bit of a collector crab. I think with my my stories and so on, my working with my clients, I think in seeing them, you know, Excel and succeed and get funding and to bring products to market and not being a situation where their products are delayed, is, you know, is a lot of optimism and a lot of hope that some markets and some things are working really well. I had a client just had an IPO. I had three others that actually got their funding. Took them a little longer, but they did it and see me those types of triumphs on the on the on the business side of things. I'm excited, but I'm also excited to hear like, you know, the kids are going to prom and there got into college and Beep, some people are getting married and and maybe some people are getting deport whatever works. There's lots of options, but there's, you know, conversations of thoughtfulness of how are you doing today, joey? Are you haven't? You know, and somebody asked me. You know, I always think people don't genuinely answer that question. How are you right? It's usually like I find you like really, how...

...fine are you? And then you'll find so I just think, you know, we all just need to continue to be empathetic and thoughtful going into the new year. I think that segues nicely into another thing I wanted to talk about. We're chatting a little bit before recording. I'm realized I don't know if I ever actually answered your question of why I do this podcast, but largely it's because of getting to hear people's stories and helping them share them and tell them. I think it's super interesting to meet someone, even if I've gone into a podcast recording where I'm not at my most alert or, you know, maybe I've got like you're saying, maybe maybe things aren't fine, maybe I've got like a nagging headache or there's some I got like bad. Well, I don't think I've ever really gotten like traumatizing news before hopping into the recording studio here. But regardless, you know, it's we're not always at a hundred percent, but I've always left feeling more energized and invigorated and sometimes I'm like, I've got thirty things to do now, because I was just taken notes that whole time. And you've got a podcast as well. Like you said, it's a labor of love. So why did you start yours? It is, you know what, I was going to write a book and books take a little bit longer and I really didn't want to be alone in writing a book, so I said, know what, I he b read a couple of friends along with me on this journey and I sat down and I had a piece of paper and I made a long list of you know, like store people actually have really authentic and interesting stories that I not necessarily technologists and and futurist, which is a big portion of the people that I work with, but I also had chefs and I had artist and I had book authors and just a whole Cornucopia of different people and all of the world. That is thought that I knew. And then I made a list of people that I don't know that I would like to know because, and not necessary famous people, but people that are really changing the way how we live or really work that I wanted to know. That authentic, like that moment when they they said this is it, I'm going to put my back into it, I'm going to let you know, mortgage my house, downsize my dog to a cat, I'm going to, you know, just take all these risks and give it my all and come out the other end and in with their passion. And so my biggest challenge was not finding the content and creating the content, because I'm a writer and and so I feel okay, I had that Nube, but to do it yourself component was a part that was tripped me up and I tried everything. I took a tutorial, I asked people, I listened to tons of blogs, I stocked other blog blug podcasters and and I I bought a lot of equipment that I tried and there's a lot of platforms that are I thought, wow, I'm just...

...must not be, not be grasping this. But then I realized that the type of format that I wanted to do as much more a documentary style format, which did require a narrative and some additional writing and editing, and I didn't have the tools. So I realized, Oh, it's okay to ask for help, and so I finally found the the team that I that could help me, you know, take the journey and the thought and put it into action. But once I did that, it was really fast. But it's just finding the right team to work with. Yeah, I think the the interesting thing that I've found, at least with podcasting, both in my own experience and just talking with other people's, that it's a pretty low barrier to entry to actually to do a podcast, like it doesn't take a lot. But to do a podcast well, I think that there is quite a bit of a leap from just kind of the rudimentary. You know, you could theoretically just record into your computer and talk off the top of your head and put it on a hosting site and there you go. You've got a podcast. But to I used to have a rock collection. I now I was speaker clips, because I tried every speaker and then I'm like finally I was like, okay, so I think this one's going to be the one. But I I think there's eight. I personally excited when I actually when I first told people are so about, Oh, you gotta be another part, another one. When, how many podcasts do we have? When I said, well, there are a lot, but there's also a lot of other there's a lot of blogs and there's a lot of magazines and there. But I just think if anyone wants to create a podcast is should just be fearless and just follow their instincts and give it a whirl and and if it doesn't work out and try, you know, another, another medium or platform. But for me it's a little liberating because you know, go through a process of asking, you know, thoughtful questions, but then taking all that content and research them, playing into a narrative with my writer, who seems to be inside my head. He really, he's gotten in there. It's like this really weird marriage, but I like it. And then the editing process is another thing. They and I always tell the my team, I says, where you can't may be younger and you can't make be thunder, but you can make me look good and smart. And so they they I really appreciate in respect with the with they helped me create and make it all look really magically easy. But I also have learned to respect the celebrity, the celebrity podcasters that are doing this every day and growing. Wow, each episode is like twenty four hours and I don't have twenty four hours to do an episode every day. So that that I think I've gained more respect as well. It's just for those who are blazed a journey to make this a livelihood. Like hats off to them, because it's a Labor love. Oh it most certainly. Most certainly is not another question that I like to ask,...

...and I say it's because it's less work for me, but it's asking you a question. You, as you were asked more frequently and I like yours. What's the difference between an ACORN and a Unicorn? And as far as I know the only difference is one you can find in a tree, but I'm sure there's we can we can dig deeper than that. So what's the difference? Yeah, that's this a little analogy that I came up with a few years ago. ACORNS are young, entrepreneurial, spirited companies or founders that have a vision. You know, the plant seeds you plant take an Acorn, but just ultimately become a majestic oak if you nurture and take care of it right. And I think that every company has to go through an acorn stage of growth. As individuals, we do too, as discovery and growth. Ultimately, if you continue to do that, you might become what the industry calls a Unicorn. Everybody wants to be a Unicorn. I'm like, what's wrong with being a galloping phony? Like, be a galloping pony first and learn along the way, learn from your trials and tribulations and your mistakes, and then, ultimately, you know what, maybe you'll become a billion dollar Unicorn. But not everybody make sit to that. So I think embrace the the fact that you, if you are creative and you're making the creating a podcast, you're a blog, or writing a book, which I eventually will do. Is like my podcast was like planning, you know, as a Unicorn. I mean acorns like planning the acorn, planning to seeds, developing it and it keeps growing. This my Nice Majestic Oak. But I think it's just really the wisdom is I have a vision board and on my vision board, I mean my podcast is I'm a top one hundred. I might top one hundred dollar, but my quest is I will be. And so that's the Unicorn goal right but right now I'm still an acorn. I'm growing. We just, you know, finished twenty seven episodes and we have another twelve in the vault and I already know that I'm fifty episodes next year and I have to be really selective. But that's just, you know, my analogy of kind of how we also develop and create few life. I it's I love it. It's such a such a good analogy and makes me just think of as a sidebar of the s twirls. Yeah, grown through the neigborhead and seeing them just jump between trees is always very intertaining. You know, this is but a funny this is a squirrel the masthead of my local paper, and I might have a joke and there everywhere, and I told her my friends with daysis well, you know, they were here before us. So the fact that they actually to the masthead here's no and a friend actually was doing a relocation program would trap the squirrels and take them to another part of town. I'm like, you need to stop that. The squirrels. You're displacing them, their family and their ecosystem right, displacing...

...their acre. I mean the whole life is a mess. And this one particular Squirrel becauld. She would take and would come back. Should take, no come back, and they said, Oh, you have a pet now it's beyond you know, relocating the squirrel. Yeah, that's squirrel belongs, or I guess she belongs to the Squirrel now. It's probably even a better way to to phrase it. And she's really secretly a squirrels whisperer. She's think this is a story there at the Squirrel whisperer. We'll look forward to think that story come out. But in the maintop you're almost off the hook. But we always like to wrap up with a top three and you've got to take this in whatever direction you'd like, but I think with your background, I'd be super curious to hear of your top three. Will just vaguely call it cool use cases for AI. Wow, top three. Four, Hey, I you know, I fly, so I would like to see artificial intelligence more integrated into, you know, a traditional piston plane. Don't, don't, not, not change the whole flight deck, but I do use an IPAD, you know, some flight things to plan flights and and whatnot. So that's pretty cool. The other I think, is, you know, artificial intelligence and just you know it. I not a really big fan of like Lisa and what's her name? Alexa? Yes, yeah, we Alexa. I call it Lisa. Lisa was a my first computer. Alexa. Not a very big fan of her. I don't I don't know. In my car, I mean I have a Sophia who is my my views that sometimes gets it right and sometimes gets it wrong and give me directions. So, you know, I like to travel, I like to drive, believe her, in California nobody's on the road, seems, so I'm times I'll just like, okay, I gotta go for right, I got to see and then right in the beginning to pandemic, I needed to get out and I need to see if the ocean was still there and I needed to see, you know what, like did the world just stopped? Or we like living some weird, you know Ray Bradbury novel and everything just dissolved, but no driving and AI is really key. I think. The third one, I think is what I is not me personally, but I've seen this more and more. It's just the next generation of kids and the importance of stem education and using artificial intelligence as a mean to enhance and able and advanced ourselves. So whether it's in education people you know who might have some form of of in mobility and being able to see intelligence be used to people become more mobile, for law enforcement, for making the world safer, for transportation and, you know, for making things just, you know say not...

...just safety but connected as well. But I think the future of artificial intelligence is probably what I most excited about. Is like, what is the next generation going to do? Robots are not going to take over our life. They might take a few jobs at none of US wanted anyway. And I work with a lot of robutants companies and it's amazing to see how, you know, it can be applied. But I really curious with the next generation is going to be doing with a I I am too, and I think will be very pleased and impressed with it, but I am excited for minds that are much more creative than mine and that world to develop some good stuff. Well, Donna, thank you so much for hopping on the podcast and Chin through all this good stuff. If people want to learn more about you, want to learn more about LMGPR, where can they go? LM GPR is easy. It's LM GPR and it stands for leadership, momentum and growth, because that's what I help businesses do, bringing products and services to market. and My podcasts before it happened, is on apple, Google, spotify, all those places, and my linkedin is probably where I'm hang out the most. So it's just Donna Laughlin and love to hear from anybody who has an interesting story or, you know, wants a share fantastical thank you again, Donna, for coming on. This was delightful and I got to go find an acorn now I you know what, there's a drink called the acorn. Next time I thought, yeah, that might be the acorn that I find. But in the meantime we always have to wrap up with a Corny joke, as we do. What pet name did the young computer geek call his aibased girlfriend. Oh well, I guess I was just this is still from the movie. What's that movie? Her with Jessica Johanson. Oh, yes, great movie. What Keen Phoenix and a scarlet Johanson? And he is it was the answer. I The answer is his databay. Good after it today, people, that is funny. Well, you know what, I'd better collecting rocks and thank Joe. That's fair. That's fair. I like. Good people cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you were a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. You can send me a message Joey at good people cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people cool things and check out all the old episodes via good people cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

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