Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 61 · 1 year ago

61: Dreams Aren't This Good with Matt Bennett

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Matt Bennett founded his craft salsa company, DREAMS AREN’T THIS GOOD, on five simple values: trust, transparency, trial and error, tenacity, and a belief that the team is in this together. The end result? A company that not only produces some darn good salsa, but does good for the world and has a blast doing it.

Each jar of DATG salsa is named after a song, paying homage to artists that are all about making us smile. Each flavor pairing also has a local partner that receives a portion of sales from every jar and bag of chips. Pretty spectacular.

Matt and I are chatting about how he got started in the salsa world, some of his more experimental flavors, the songs he has to sing along to whenever they come on, and much more.

Good people cool things. As a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome the good people cool things. Today's guest is Matt Bennett, founder of dreams. Aren't this good? SELSA and chips and man, this is a fun episode. We're chatting all about how matt first got into salsa, how he's had several different business ventures along the way, leading him to his current role at dreams. Aren't this good. We talked about the fantastic pairing with music that the company has, as well as several partnerships for giving back to local charities, nonprofits and other organizations that are helping people out across the country and across the world. And if you have any, any kind of enjoyment of music at all, which I would hope is most people, I remember I met someone one time. We've started talking about music and they said, yeah, I don't really like music, and I believe I fainted and passed out and woke up six hours later and couldn't believe it's still even after all of that, because how do you not like music like. You don't have to like all music, but just music in general still blows my mind to this day. If you like to support good people cool things, check out the march shop. Good people, cool thingscom m shop all kinds of fun goodies there. You can also get in touch with the show Joey at good people, cool thingscom or on facebook, twitter and Instagram at GPCT podcast. Always love hearing from you and for now we're going to hear from Matt. And Dreams aren't this good? If people don't know who Matt Been, it is. What dreams are this good or all about? Give us your elevator pitch, but also tell us the elevator we're riding on. Well, you're sharing about yourself. Oh Man, that's a that's a good it's a good general question. Right that it's very open. You know, I kind of share with people that you know per se like I'm kind of half manifest her, half half doer. Uh Hum, I truly believe I I'm a visionary, I'm a dreamer, but you have to put those actions into play or else they're just like these ideas that float around, which we have tons of them, but I think that's kind of at my core. You know, who I really am is, you know, I I tend to think I have a massive heart, tons of passion, almost too much to the point where, you know, I need to step back and check myself sometimes. And and really, you know, and this isn't really an elevator pitch, but I think that's who I am and who I love being, is the person that believes that it can be done, the person that sits and non stop thinks about something until it becomes reality. Generally, I have no idea how I'm actually going to do anything. You know, I'm not, you know, an excel with I'm not, you know, a finance person. You know, I don't think I'm again expert at anything. So I just really just put the pieces together. And that's really who I am and what I love doing and who I love being. And I and I'm fortunate to have found a vehicle to do that, a greater vehicle than any any previous thing that have led to this. Right. Obviously, life adds up and and and you know, all these, all these things I've done, previous ventures, previous jobs. I say ventures because I was actually part of those founding teams or kind of very much in the entrepreneurial lane versus, you know, a job and actually working for a much larger company, learning more so, right, and I think now having a company. So my company is called dreams. Aren't this good? I generally say that, you know, dreams are the best thing in the world, but they're not as good as our salsa. Just kind of you know, that could be the elevator pitch right there. You know, I think I've just found this vehicle in a company that we're two years in as far as selling chips and salsa as a product, and that's really our vehicle. That's the tangible thing, that's what you can obviously consume, literally eat, eat it. But I think it's a piece to the much bigger picture of what I envisioned for our company. And I doly myself to you know, how can I be that driving person behind this bigger idea?...

Because it's not Matt Salsa Company, Right, and I never wanted it to be. And I've come up with his bigger emotional play, basically within a company, and and that's what we're building and continuing to kind of elevator pitch to you is really how can we turn a chips and Salsa Company into a lifestyle brand, Ie red bull marketing, ie been and Jerry's on flavors and philanthropy companies of the sort. But how can we do that in a space where it's never been done? So long answer to the pitch, but I think those are the two context in which I really reside. Absolutely will get, we'll get into some of that kind of emotional connection, because I think that is something that's super interesting and something that I've never were really seeing in this kind of space. You mentioned Red Bull, which I think is certainly one of the sort of like benchmarks for for kind of connecting with people like that. But first, how did you get into making salsa? Like were you? I mean you, you've got Texas the roots, so you've was that just something ingrained in your in your blood, since you're a kid? Well, maybe, so, you know, I don't I mean right like. I don't know that answer to that, but I I do believe that in a way, for sure, I kind of we have on our website and I've kind of written like our story, right, and I do think that being born and raised in Texas, especially South Texas, very the state itself, but of course the south. Part of text is very Mexican culture, right, and I didn't really have any of that directly in my life. Unfortunately. I haven't even learned Spanish. I wish, I wish I did, but I think too late. Not too late. Yeah, true, true. I think growing up in southeast Texas had a piece to play. And then I think and kind of part of our story is were actually the beginning of the story is. So I went to Lsu and Baton Rouge. My whole family's from the south. My Mom side is from Louisiana, Dad from Mississippi, and so just having those roots, watching Lsu football, going to Lsu basketball camps as a teenager. I still think they should have won their their second round game. I know, I thought they had that ever, Michigan, I know, I know, but so just kind of having those roots, you know, kind of Cajun French ship roots, you know, my whole life and and then kind of mixing that with Kate, you know, Mexican culture essentially is kind of how things started, at least on the campus of all shoe and and that's why I started making salsa. So what our original is today is the first flavor that I had back then and and it's and obviously I was making it fresh and I was still making it fresh up until three years ago when I when I when I was like, all right, I'm gonna do this for real. So so it's been quite the journey to go from where it started as inception to actual reality. And so I started making it Lsu. I was like man, has I have something here, you know, in my head, I think that's initially what planted the seed. I had a marketing class as like a junior senior and, you know, in typical fashion, at least back then in college. You know, I don't know how it is today by any means, where they're like okay, create a business, and I'm like all I have three people on my team. Nobody has an idea. And I thought, well, I'm like salsa, like cool, that's our business, because I was I all right, and and it has evolved in so I think that really was the starting point of this could be something someday. I I know that the fresh also, this version, original is great. It's different, but it was, you know, a twenty one year old kid with just making its also like all right, cool, I give it the people parties whatever. So so that really sparked. I think those two things and kind of taking we're taking really just massive parts of my childhood in life and that put something inside of me that said one day I'm going to do this and and I know idea what this was right. And you know, fast forward fifteen, sixteen, seventeen years. I don't know how long it's been. It's been probably about I started this, I started the company about three years ago. To me, about a year and a half to get it...

...launched. So I'm about three and a half years in full time to this journey with dreams on this good. So I'd say, yeah, About Fifteen, sixteen years of other ventures, other places, life, travels, you know, whatever it might be, led me and kind of piece the puzzle together to give me, I guess, the confidence and or experience of like, okay, well, I know what it takes to build a company. Now I just have to figure out how to build this one. And now, I mean I don't talk about like the beginning parts of this often, so it's awesome to even just think about it like it literally. Sorry, twenty something years ago ingrained and and that seed became something and has grown over time. Absolutely, and I do want to want to chat a little bit about the the business side of things. But first I'm just curious, because I think this is always a fun question to ask. Anyone that's does anything and kind of the food or drink industry is, have you ever tried making a flavor that just like didn't work? You were like this is going to be great and then you taste it and you're like, nope, terrible. Yeah, well, I don't yes and no. So I say yes because I've actually made a ton of flavors. Right the beginning of Covid I mean, obviously I had a lot of work to do, but I went with I went with a few friends down to outside Charlotte, North Carolina, from New York and fortunately was able to get out of town literally right at the beginning when it was the work. New York was the worst place in the country to be right and I never really messed around with flavors too much prior to that time. Currently, to give you some context, and I know it's skipping around, currently we have six flavors that are out produced in in the world. I have three more that I'm sitting on that I've made. That will become flavors in time. And so I basically was sitting on nine flavors total, just messing around for the early stages. But during the beginning of Covid we're like let's just make some flate, like we had not, I mean kind of nothing to do in North Carolina, and we literally made, I think, like twenty flavors or something like five hundred dollar grocery bill and just like buying every ingredient possible, just messing around with stuff. We literally made wheel, like imagine like the wheel of fortune wheel, you know, or or what's the what's the other? I don't know, there's another game show with the wheel. But prices rights, got prices, prices right. Yeah, so we literally made two wheels and we put a primary flavor. We put like twelve or so primary flavors, and then on the other wheel we put all these secondary flavors, or ingredients, I should say. So, for example, Hawapeno Pineapple. Pineapple is the primary actually, but it comes second. And how we name products, so I'm very detailed on the primary secondary in the naming and the flow of how they come out. But we made these wheels and then we would spin them and just let the like the flavors collab right and I don't know. So we were getting create like, I don't know, I made a cherry coffee one, you know, and I don't know. I mean obviously can't give you too many of them because they might become flavors, but that and then we made lemon grass and I forget what use it was, just I was like this is lit like it was like lemon grass and like lime, and I'm like these two, like that's not even substantial enough to like make a thick Salta like a you know, let alone they're just to like punch you in the mouth ingredients. So so, yes and no, because I don't know if and what those will become. But I definitely hundred percent have made some weird flavors and it's a great question because that is a hundred percent part of what we're trying to do. Like I bay, I basically like before we even launched a company, I was like I was coming up with a strategy and we were like, I was like everything on the shelf is mild, medium pot for the most part, and some companies have different flavors, but I'm like you've been around for forty years and you have ten flavors now. Maybe maybe there's a reason to that, but but for us I wanted to look at and say we focus on flavor, not on heat levels. Just giving you where listeners context. Like none are really crazy spicy, but I basically want have...

...been in Jerry Salso like one day I want to have hundreds of flavors. We call them fantasy flavors, and just like put crazy things together and let community drive, obviously, but you know different strategies behind that. But let people create the flavors, because I can't come up with everything, nor do I want to, and some are going to hit and some on and and that's that's kind of the beauty in creation right. I think another fun thing that you do that. Again, as a big music fan myself, always love seeing see an elements of music make in its way into other parts of life. But every jar is named after a song. Care kind of give us a look inside the pairing process for that? Do you have a song in mind as you're creating a flavors? It kind of like an after the fact sort of thing you come up with. Yeah, do you play Music Yourself? I do. Yeah, the guitar. Okay, is that why you move to Austin? It's not. Now I actually had never played outside of like school bands. I had never played in a band or even really with people. Okay, maybe like once or twice prior to moving here, and then have since joined a band since maybe, yeah, but but yeah, it's pretty wild. How like how crazy the the music scene is? Yeah, it's really now. Where you from originally? I'm from Chicago Ridge. Okay, nice, Nice, yeah, I think I played. I played with a guy once who wanted to start some my some sort of like s comic band. Yeah, cover band type of thing. Yeah, and I was like, I've never played with people before, I'll do it. And he was auditioning a drummer and me at the same time, and the drummer was like Super Nice guy but just couldn't really stand rhythm very well, and I was like that seems kind of important for a drummer right right, kind of be the backbone of a song, and the guy was you could just tell. The guy that was auditioning him was just like how do I tell this guy nicely, like you're not, you're not in, this is not going to work. Yeah, like so I hope he's taken. I mean he was super young. He was probably a tune or nineteen. Yeah, I'm and so hopefully, hopefully, he's bounced back. And you're in a band now, though. Yes, yes, nic called burning years. I'll give us a shameless plug. Yeah, yeah, played in like over a year, though. We've been we've been doing some writing. But yeah, I mean the Covid yeah, but what do you do? You know, like now? Yeah, there are quarantine concerts that I know a lot of groups were doing at the start. But yeah, yeah, nearly looks Sim send me a simiar music after this. Yeah, I mean I'm always I mean, I know I'm like taught off the topic of question, but but no, it's interesting and I'm trying to learn, like in the music space. Like I think there's a massive opportunity and kind of you know, coming back to your question, you know, just there's so much music in the world and it's kind of what connects us right. It's one thing that massively connects the world and and I think what I've fount like how it became part of our strategy and I'm always listening to music and different types, obviously, but I'm always trying to piece it together, like can this song fit with a flavor? Right, and and every song is a personality, every like a right, so emotion behind it, and so it all comes together kind of organically. But the way I came up with it, and I'll just dive in a bit here, because it's all tied its tide to the donation piece as well. So I basically I wanted to get back. I had to find a way. But our product isn't right, like we make salt. It's in a glass jar and so, wow, it's not crazy expensive, it's not water either, right, so it's kind of expensive to make, obviously as a small company where, you know, I'm not making millions of jars yet you know production. So it's kind of small batch, if you will, and in respects of just quantity based on our size, right, especially the beginning, like we hadn't even launched and I was like, well, am I going to do this? We couldn't take the you know, the Tom's or were be parker model, like I can't do one for one. That'd be like twenty dollar jars and salsa. So that's not going to work. And so I basically how we do things to give anyone listening in yourself is there's multiple steps. So I basically come up with a flavor, right, so, for example, will just use how a pen your pineapple or what. We can go through them all if you want, but basically I take I come up with a flavor and I think about that flavor. I think about the ingredients, the colors of those ingredients, how it makes me feel. And the strategy initially started because I spent a year and a half to get the company off the ground and I had to come...

...up with some way to differentiate ourselves right among all these bigger brands and in general in the space. There's not really any great marketing in salsa, in my opinion, of course, and I'm very like biased by around this, it's kind of the bet I'm making. And there's also no loyalty, like nobody cares about any salsa company on the shelf in any store. Pretty much. I get scale, like I've had one person tell me their favorite salsa out of thousands of people and I'm like, well, that's a problem, like yeah, you know you're in Texas, like we're both drought, like you know you're living there. From there and it's like, I'm not talking, I'm talking on the shelf in a store, right like and so I really looked at that and I said, okay, well, I want to give back. One I walking around doing research, you know, listening to these things, listening to music in New York. Obviously it's everybody has headphones on, just listening to music that I like right and like at different moments in life and time. And I started asking myself and I was like, if I could take a song and take that kind of ethos of that song, match it with a flavor, the ingredients that kind of make that flavor right at the core, and then I could somehow take that and pair it with a philanthropy that embodies the spirit of that flavor, then I think we can just kind of as a company and as a product, we can kind of be the connector right. So so how that looks to you today is, for example, we have a flavor called now or never, right, so we'll use that as example. So we have a flavor called now or never. It's a song by an artist called out of sight, who's from Westchester, New York, which is just like a little north of New York City. Manhattan. So, but basically New York City. And so I said, all right, the artist is from New York. Right. The flavor now or never is really about you know, it's on you right, like you're either going to do it now or never. You know, chase your dreams, go after it, whatever it is for you. Right. How I interpret that song is just like that really gets me going, super inspirational. The flavor itself is Avocado Pepper. So Avocado isn't in a lot of SALCES and it makes the product this also really smooth. But you don't taste a lot of out of avocado, but the pepper is hitting you. So it's kind of a Combo right there, like smooth and then obviously a little spicy. So now or never, it's like you got to choose. It's got to be one and and it's read. So it's a red bell pepper that makes the Salta actually read, the colors read it. We also put the colors as the train lines of New York City for now until I run out it, until I run out of them, and so and then with all that, so basically I've combined everything and I put New York in a jar kind of right. And then I look at it and I partnered with Ace, which is an organization here in New York that helps basically helps homeless. So, and I won't get too much, too deep into it, but they really like they're paying for education of homeless people that really want to change their life. They give them working opportunity, so they actually get paid to do work. So it's not just handouts and and they flip a lot of people's lives around and you step back. You're either going to do that now or you're never going to do it. And and for every jar of now or never that gets sold, we donate five cents. So how I look at that as every time we sell a case, that's thirty cents going directly to that partner. And we have seven partners, six SALSAS and one Tortilla chip flavors. So everyone has their own partner. Same kind of strategy. And that's how we tie in music. So we have six flavors and everyone is named after a New York musician as of now. So until I run out of train lines, then I'm going to and or we start getting into other markets. You know, if I come, if we launch in Austin Texas. Then, you know, maybe it's a new flavor with your band's name one. You know. Yeah, so, but that, but that is selling. It shows that's perfect. Exchanges our thing a god. Yeah, yeah, exactly, but that's part of the strategy. You know. How do you infuse music into it? How do you infuse philanthropy to it? How do little differences donations make a massive impact at scale?...

Right when we're selling a million jars of donations make greater impact. As we grow as a company, we're going to be able to do a lot of different things based on the strategy of and music is really what's infused to to keep us going, if I guess. That's how I look at it. Yeah, absolutely, I think it's such a cool concept. And you've got how many? I don't I'm not as familiar with the New York subway system as I am, yeah, with the Chicago l sure, grown up there, but how many? How many colors do you have left? How many train lines? Primarily there's nine. Well, I guess you could say ten. Yeah, I'll go with we're at six now. We have I think. I think I can get to ten and then after that it's kind of like, you know, the Metro Rail that goes over here. You know. I mean obviously New York is a, you know, subway heaven. So there's tons of smaller lines, but I'd say there's ten primary lines throughout the New York area. And so I think once we get to ten flavor and I don't know how long that'll take, when they'll get put out. We launched with three in April of nineteen. November of nineteen we put out two more. So we have original, we have the fighter, which is garlicks to Launchro we have just dance, which is how the Peno Pineapple, we have now or never, which is avocado pepper, and we have girls, girls, girls, which is blueberry coconut, which is our weirdest one. And then just last month in March, we launched my type and that's Chipotlei mango. So if six so far, we could do for more, you know. And then and then I think and I try, I do my best for the staying authentic. I really try to find a partner that lines up, that tells the story. It's like Oh, like, why is that logo on a label that? It doesn't make sense. So I do, yeah, I do the best we can to really have a nice partnership that makes sense, that can be marketed and that could be amplified, which is really our goal, and then trying to find the the song that also fits as much as possible and and hopefully, hopefully it's working and and that's part of the I think that's part of the strategy that I appreciate being able to share, because it's as a small company, it's very hard to get that message out there right. It kind of takes just doing the doing this, just talking to people and then they tell someone and I hope that it's a I hope it's a winning recipe. Right, nobody's really doing it and and I think for us the big piece is to build a roster of musicians that are very great partners within the datg family. And then on the other side is to really have lots of partners right, different causes, different communities, different reach, different impact, versus saying okay, x, Y Z, don't foundation, here you go right like. That's not that exciting for me or US as a company. And so we really want to take those pieces and and make a difference. Depending on where you are in life, I think to that that sort of mindset is a really, really kind of good reminder with any business of like building that community and having a team of people working together. I think it's so much more helpful and you're going to have a lot more success than if you're trying to do everything by yourself. Yeah, yeah, no, I mean a hundred percent agree with you. It's been very challenging right the last year. You know, we don't have and and I'm what I mean by that, and you know, obviously social and there's all there are outlets, but it has been challenging in the sense of like, and I ask myself, I'm thinking about this all the time, is like how can we get the partners more involved? But they're doing their thing right, like that's their purpose, and so we're here to support and amplify that. How can you know? Obviously the consumers. We call our community the cartel because because I, like you know datg cartel is our handle on social just to get it in there. And but I was when I came up with it, I was like, dude, I can't call it the our community, like that's whatever we that's what it is, right in some capacity. That's what everybody that's what every great brand one to build. But I was like we got to push boundaries, we have to do something different. I was like, we're the cartel, like, and...

...for me it's a cartel for good, right, like we're we're just to be clear. Well, you know, we're trying to do good. We're making great products, doing good things. But, but, but, I hundred agree with you and I think it's trying to find new ways to do that where we are in the world. And additionally, like we're not. We as a company aren't like a brewery, right, like we you know, we don't have our we're not sitting there, which is barrels, like we're small manufacturing, so we're not able to build community through that type of footprint presence physically. We're very much focused on the consumer connection, but it's happening at the store level very, very much more, especially as we grow as a brand in the northeast, especially the more accounts we get, the products getting out there. But how do you how do you bring those people back to actually add value to their life? Is is a great opportunity that we're focused on, but it's very challenging to do. I'm sure not made easier by a global pandemic. Good, no, backcrap, no, like can't hang out, like I can't throw a party. You know what I mean? Like, yeah, it's just I mean, it wouldn't be the right thing to do, even though, even though we want to. And that's where I think, you know, hopefully everywhere is getting better, right, but that's why the partners and that's why the music is so important and and in a in an ideal scenario world, those are the things that will be brought together through our product and through our brand in physical presence and then obviously bleeding over into the digital space. Right. So we're we're getting there. Yes, yeah, yes, what? And and as a country to we're getting that we're back in exactly exactly when, at a time. Yeah, now, from the business side of things, and this can either be with dreams. Aren't this good, or any of the the previous jobs that you were you kind of talking about, has there been anything that surprised you about running a business? For me, understanding, and I'm I'm pretty philosophical in a way, or at least I've become so as I've gotten older. Like I really I'm curious. I ask a lot of questions and and I think those are the types of things that it's surprising how much early on, I should say, right, is like, so this is my fourth venture, you know, many failures, some successes, right, but I think all different industries, so a TSHIRT company to an oil company, to a Social Tech Company and to a food and beverage company. The surprising pieces are as you go, you know, in one I become less surprised by things, right, because you start to, like I started learning. I'm like, there's always something, right, like it takes longer than you want it to, it's more frustrating than you want to you know. So there's always something. But I think continually being surprised at the things I can I personally or as a team, depending on your team. Right, what can be done with focus and energy towards something like this. Is What we're doing, and I think it's more rather than actually being surprised by something and getting caught so off guard and that way, I think it's more being surprised and turning that surprise into knowing and believing and trusting that if you take this energy, these people, these resources, whatever that is you have, and taking, like most surprised you could actually do something and then be like well, now I know how to do this. What what else can we do? And for me that's probably that's at least what showing up for me now is being able to almost surprise yourself in accomplishing something, no owing you could do it, but almost on the brink of like I actually don't know if we can do this, mainly because I don't know how it's going to be done. Right, like I don't have twenty years of food background and be like yeah, of course I know this and I know this and I know this person. It's like I'm actually surprised and or surprising other people of like how the Hell did you do that when, like, I didn't even know that three days ago? Right. So, and can just continuing to learn and the capacity of which you can do so that it. It's really ultimately the end...

...of the day, I think, and it might be like a lame answer, I don't know, but I think it's just surprising yourself on what you actually can accomplish if that's your focus. Yeah, I think now I think that's fantastic and yeah, I have felt the same way of like and the other podcast I run parts and wrecked perfect example, the last time I was editing it it took probably double the amount of time just thanks to both a combination of technology and just a few parts within the episode where I'm like what didn't come out very well, like I'll have to go back now and like cut and like resplice some stuff around, and so it's just planning for that, I think, is one element of it, and then seeing like what your team can do with things that you're like Oh, that, like that's fantastic and that it opens up so many more doors. So yeah, I think that that's totally spot on. I love being it's almost like now being surprised is actually something that's more rare than five years ago or ten years ago, right just within your own journey. So like if I get surprised, I'm like Whoa, like that's crazy, like I didn't what just happened, because the more you learn, the more you the more you execute things and more you're living it, like you actually know way more than you think you know. At least that's what I found. When I start Shit, I'm like actually know this and this and this and this, so I'm not surprised by that. But when something shows up or you get like a clip of a of a podcast and you're like that's actually way better then what I plan for, because what I plan for actually didn't work right. So by by and not working, you're surprised that you actually get a better result, often right. So that's that's what I'm continuing to to learn and to try to try to be open to. I'm like, this is what we're doing, and then I'm like, yeah, that didn't I just it doesn't work most of the time. So so you just have to keep doing it. Absolutely. Yeah, still worth trying. Still worth trying. And speaking of doing, I like to wrap up these episodes with a top three and you kind of gave me carn't blanche on this. You said whatever you want to chat about. So, yeah, this was inspired by the other day was listening to a playlist and the song sweetness by Jimmy World came on. Okay, a big jam from I think two thousand and two is when it it originally dropped and it came on and I just like immediately started singing along. Like it starts right with the vocals. There's no kind of like guitar, Drum Intro. It's just like we're going right into it, and it made me think, I hope this is as fun as I think it'll be. Of A top three of songs that you have to sing along to when they come on, like you can't skip them. You're just like, I gotta start singing. Oh Man, that's that's actually very tough for me because I don't know a lot of names of songs. Okay, you can give us a couple bars, if that's easy. No, I'm singing. You can recite them. Marry the musician, not me. Well, not. See, now you got me thinking about Jimmy World just because you put it my head. why. I kind of know why actually, but so I'd say I have the Tiger by survivor, right. I think survivors the band. Yeah, so, I mean, yeah, that comes on, you just gotta. Yeah, I gets things. What's this song? I'm going like back, I'm going back in my history here. So when I was a freshman in college at Lsu, we used to go to a bar called Murphy's and it's no longer around. Like it was crazy. I mean it was insane. But they just they just played the best music. And I could be wrong on the name of this song. I don't know who sings it, but basically is the ninety nine red balloons. Oh, yeah, yeah, I believe that's Nina does the original. But then Goldfinger has okay of it. That is delightful. Yeah, I think that makes sense. I think. Yeah, that so you like if you talk about it, I'm like, yeah, I know who that. I know that, but nine, for some reason, that song, I think you just have to sing it. But it like puts me in such a good mood. Yeah, it's a jam. Yeah, so good. But all the versions of that that I've heard are fantastic. Yeah, and then I don't know, I mean again, these are just showing up out of nowhere, like my mind's the best one. Yeah, my brain is in my brain about them, but you're like Ah, yeah, well, I also think, I guess it would be the title of so long as hypnotize, right by biggie. Yeah. So so my yeah, my my actual roommate here now that he's one of my best friends. I've known him since Lsu and so he lived here.

He's lived here for about six years in New York. And so when I moved up here, he was like, yeah, I move up for like three months, you know, sleep on the couch, do and I was with a different company. We were trying to come into New York. So it's a long answer, but but it's just showing up because where I am in life, I think, and it's a good question, but we used to we used to rock biggie and hypnotized and is it is thunderbird like. So there's like Camaro like t top thunderbird and we used to drive around. Man, is crazy thinking about this. And this's like one thousand nine hundred and ninety seven and and that song I like. But when that song comes on, you just like you can't help but spit the lyrics. Absolutely. Yeah. So so I think those will be my my three for today. Yeah, I feel like this is a question that would change like regular oh yeah, hundred percent every day. Yeah, I'm I'm also, I'm also very I'm not. I listened to a lot of different music, but I will get in modes of like I'll go like years where I listened to like the same, similar music or even an album like on repeat, almost right. So like shiny toy guns is my favorite band and you know who that is. I've heard the name. I don't know if I could name you ans. I'll be I've got homerik. I'm checking. Dude. Shiny toy guns like when we drop, when we drop a flavor in La. I'm hundred percent first song that I'm naming it after. But shiny toy guns is like to be I say they're the biggest on unknown band, like they have a massive following, but they're like under the radar and I don't know, they're just my favorite and and so, but like unless it comes on, I like I don't know the words. Yeah, but but I'm bad about getting in modes, like I'll listen to their album like literally every day. This is a years ago and I would listen to it and now so. So it's shifts, like with everyone, but I don't go back to a lot of old stuff. I kind of kind of stay in a lane and I'll only go back to old even I'm talking about it now. So I like going back to that, those old hits, but somebody, somebody like yourself, kind of has to bring me to them and then I'm like, Oh yeah, that song makes me feel so good, right. So, yeah, I'm music. Music is a big piece and, you know, hopefully, hopefully, one day we have hundreds of flavors with hundreds of artists and and that's what I'm trying to manifest. Yeah, that'll be also, and I think you your answer with hypnotize especially. I like you have a specific memory associated with that, and I think that's what's so cool about music is there's there's songs that come on and I'm like, Oh, this brings me back to like, yeah, like drive in, driving around in a car, or like getting there. This is a real obscare one. But the album infest by Papa Roach. Okay, it's back at back in my middle school and high school days. I'm like, let's get some Angstea music on that. That's someone with last resort cut my life in, okay. So you know they're they're big hit. So yeah, so I got a story for you. Oh, has to go for it. Yeah, so that time period, right, like that album obviously put them on the map and like massive tracks, right, and the music, the music in that era was obviously way different, right than now. A lot of PUNK, some fort ones coming after that, etc. And another one I have to sing when it comes on fat let. Yeah, yeah, so, such a dam. They're out. They're out there right all like there's tons of music. But but yeah, so one of my friends that I worked at with our pre the startup I was with previously, is, and we didn't know this when he was on the team, like we just found this guy who's shooting some video for us, and this is when we were in Austin. We started a company in Austin and we're trying to grow to New York and that's what brought me to New York. And so so he was like yeah, one day is like, yeah, so my and I don't know the lead singers name of Papa Roach. I should, but but so, anyway, one day he's like yeah, so my brother Soandso, and we're like what? He's like, yeah, my brother's the lead Stinger. Papa wrote. Like no big deal, right, like just a casual yeah, yeah, Kobe I think is his name. So yeah, yeah, so, you know, minimal interactions throughout that journey, but just on the paper Roach Front. And and they're still crushing it. Yeah, they're still dropping music. Yeah, there's still and they have number one hits like they're. Yeah, they're doing really, really well. I don't keep up or listening to a lot of their music, but that album obviously similar to you.

Probably is like a classic for you. But yeah, so just one of my buddies like yeah, my brothers. So inside I was like what? So, so, you never know. It's a small world, my friend. Yeah, that's super small. Also much better than my story, which was just that the first time I played that CD, it's called infest. It's got like bugs all over the cover. Yeah, like a giant, I don't know if it was a cricket or a Cock Roach or something like, came out from under the couch while I was listening in my parents basement, my family home. I grew up there too. Yeah, I'm the basement. I'm just sitting there listening that. I just see this giant cockroach come out like twenty seconds into the first song. Is that? Huh? This the CD summons bugs? That's cool. Yeah, that's a sign. How long have you been playing music? I've I've we've been a band since I've bleeve twenty thirteen. Okay, our first sure, I kind of Middle Ish of two thousand and thirteen. I first started playing guitar probably in like two thousand and four and then first started sticking with it and like two thousand and nine or so. So a dozen or so years. I say, there's so many other guitar players. I'll see. I'm like nice to know how to do that, like some of this like crazy technical stuff. But yeah, I don't. I don't think it's ever been my goal to be like the most technically proficient. I think I just like having fun. Yeah, playing and like I can, I can read tabs, I can read music from playing in band. But yeah, I'm I try to just find songs that are fun and then our band we write our own songs and have have a good time jumping around and yeah, the other guitarists in our band is definitely a better guitar player than I am. So I'm like you can take all the like crazy little rice. Yeah, not our I'll keep our rhythm going. There of you the occasional little octave play and I still think we need to get like a wild solo where he's standing up on top of like maybe maybe the bass drum and he's like playing, there's like wind blowing in his hair, like really just over drum drops little, are they? And are you on spotify or anything? We Are you okay? Yeah, so, so you like, as far as like I'm concerned, like you're legit right, like yes, yeah, so you're like, yeah, we absoutable where you can listen to music, right, yeah, so, yeah, I'm just the avid listener. And am I okay, where can I listen? Like, okay, well, you know, soundcloud, Youtube, whatever, and I am I all right, but yeah, I'd love to hear. What in general, what's the the genre of music? When we started, we're very pop punk. So your favorites, a supporty one, probably would be along those lines, and we've kind of veered like a little more dressed towards, I would say, just like General Rock, but still still have a lot of fun and and yeah, try to get you to Bob your head a little bit. Our places opening at all, like more so in Austin or no, somewhat, somewhat, some, some places the the mask. The governor said, like you don't have to wear masks, were opening up a hundred percent and a lot of businesses, in Austin at least, are like yeah, we're going to still require that and like keep things socially distant because, you know, we tried this once before and like we can wait a few more months. Yeah, so it's been it's been interesting to see. I kind of forgot about it last time I went grocery shopping that people could kind of choose to wear masks right. So I was seeing people just like casually walking around and I said, Oh, yeah, that's a that's a thing, and let me move out of this aisle real quick. Yeah, yeah, a hundred percent. Are Venues opening a bit or I haven't heard too many. Actually, a lot closed from last year. Yeah, I'm sure. Yeah, and I know at least a couple are planning to reopen in other capacities. I don't know where they'll be. I don't think anything is really fully happen from that yet, but I think a few places are starting to open up. I know there's a I guess it's a bar and restaurant, since they serve food, but primarily a bar that just opened up pretty close to we're talking before in South Austin. Yeah, I'm pretty close to Moon Tower. It's called Armadillo den and I know they've they've got live music going, but that's a I'm fairly certain that's an outdoor stage. Yeah, popped over. That's I was going to say as like at least the time of years good for it. So I mean, like you can live outside most of the year in Austin anyways for sae. So hopefully that'll help. You know, to so many outdoor venues and it's hot and like it. Just hopefully don't make it easier. And there's lots of space there now and there's not. There's not a lot of space here in New York because so, yeah, you're a lot of a lot of crammed basement. Yeah, yeah, so it's they're trying to hear. I don't know, I'm still apprehensive. You know, it's getting better, but they're trying. And we have indoor dining. I think maybe like fifty percent maybe. But they're trying to push venues and I'm like I'm good, like...

I'm no, wait a pretty long while before I go cram myself with, you know, a lot of other people. So we'll see. Miss playing shows, but yeah, I know, yeah, I know, I will wait and I'm like what am I supposed to do? Like my first year living here, I went to more live show and I living in Austin. I never it's kind of like when you live there, you're like, okay, I don't remember, I'm gonna go see this. You don't just you don't do it right. But my first year living here I went to more shows than I've been to in my whole life, like can combined. And you know, and obviously that every year and I'm in your five now of living here and obviously the last year and a half has been zero. Unlike, what am I supposed to do? Like either work and build the company or I go to shows and that's kind of my thing. But man, so I just got a cancelation option for a show I had. I had tickets for me at the end of two thousand and nineteen for like May two thousand and twenty, and then this week they were like, Hey, do you want to like exchange this for like venue credit or just get refunded? I was like I'm just get refunding because I don't know, I will forget about this otherwise exactly. That's good. I have tickets to two shows same situation, that I bought for two thousand and twenty and I haven't heard from the I'm just waiting I'm like, are they going to come play or not? You know, like I'm hopeful because but I think I'd take the money right now, just like you. It is like give me my two hundred dollars back. You know, Matt. For people that want to learn more about dreams, aren't this good? See all the flavors by, hopefully several cans, because it's very good. Hopefully, where can I find you? So dreams aren't this good? Literally spelt out. Obviously no apostrophe. So dreams aren't this goodcom is our website. On social, primarily on Instagram, is at datg cartel, obviously stands for dreams. Aren't this good? Cartel. So datg cartel, we sew, we sell on our website, we sell on Amazon as well. We sell. We're in a couple stores in the Houston area. Just for any Texas people, we haven't really landed in in the central Texas area yet, but we sell in a couple stores local foods, some other smaller stores in the Houston area and then the rest of our stores are primarily in the Northeast and mid Atlantic for now, for now. But yeah, dreams, aren't this goodcom and instagram and then Amazon if that's easier for you. Well, Matt, thank you so much. This was awesome. Lots of good chat and I've got thank you music, homerk. Thank you. Yeah, man sack China tell you guns is getting a plug and then out of sight, obviously for ourn hour, never using as example. So yeah, and we'll wrap up with a corny joke, as we always do. Did you hear about the guy who lost his whole left side? I didn't. He's all right. Now, get up to it today people. All Right, I've never heard that one. Good people cool things it is produced in Austin, Texas. If you were a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. As always, you can send me a message Joey at good people cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people cool things. Can check out all the old episodes via good people, cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

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