Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 121 · 4 months ago

121: Food Puns, Motherhood, and Cooking Essentials with Marie Saba

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

I'm a huge fan of wordplay — one of my favorite articles I've ever written is about the O. Henry Pun-Off in Austin. And I'm a huge fan of trying new foods — that's partly why I started my website Phat Phoodies. Put them both together and you've got some MAGIC. That's exactly what Marie Saba has done with her book Don't Worry Be Ha-PEA: 101 Deliciously Clever Food Puns.

Marie is a self-taught cook who's been featured in Bon Apetit, Food & Wine, and The Rachael Ray Show, among others. She pairs food and creativity to introduce more people to the wonderful world of cooking and photography, and she's having a blast doing it.

We're talking food puns, the cooking utensils you need for your kitchen essentials, and how motherhood can open up more creative thinking.

Hello, my favorite listener. Before we get to the episode, I want to take a moment to address the June Supreme Court decision to overturn row versus Wade. This decision stripped away the legal right to have a safe and legal abortion. Restricting access to comprehensive reproductive care, including abortion, threatens the health and independence of all Americans. This decision could also lead to the loss of other rights. We've seen the Supreme Court kind of hint that that might be the case. So to learn more about what you can do to help, go to pod voices dot help. I'll drop links in the show notes as well, but I encourage you to speak up, take care and spread the word. Hey, they are good people, cool things podcast fans, it's your Buddy Adam from podcasting business school. That's the podcast where I teach people about podcast launch, growth and modernization strategies. Check out episode two, D and Twenty, where I help you discover where you're at in the podcasting success timeline. You are listening to the good people, cool things podcast, and it's time to bring out your host. My pod pal joey, held good people cool things as a podcast feature. In conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey help. Welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is Marie Saba, author of the book don't worry, be happy, which is all about food puns, food photography and teaching us about some of the lovely items we can be cooking with as we grow our culinary expertise. Maria is a self taught cook who started a cooking show way back when she was just ten years old. She's come a long way since then and loves helping other people cook explore the joys of food. We're talking all about that. where she gets her food pun ideas, why she's had so much success with it, some of her instagram and Youtube Marketing and content going on. All of that good stuff. If you have any inclination of being a creator, of making content sharing it with the world, I definitely want to tune in, because we've got lots of good stuff going on in here, and if you'd like even more great content like this, head over to good people, cool things dot com sign up for the newsletter, whill you'll get all of these great episodes, plus so much more, delivered to your inbox, but not at an annoying volume. How you sign up for some newsletters and you get like sixteen emails before you've even blinked and fully hit like yes, I want more emails. You're not going to get any of that. You're just getting the good stuff, and not at an alarming pace, which should give you a little bit of peace of mind to sit back and relax and enjoy this wonderful conversation with Marie. To kick it off, for people who maybe don't know all about the lovely world of food punts here, can you give us your name and your elevator pitch, but also the type of elevator that we're writting on? Okay, UM, my name's Marie. Say that. And, Um, the elevator pitch for these food...

...puns is, you know, there's been a lot of strife in the world and we all need a reason to smile, and this, you know, food puns. They're so fun. They're these little word puzzles that, Um, the whole family can enjoy and when you guess them, it is just so satisfying. The elevator that we're in, we're in like the Willy Wonka Charlotte Chocolate factory headed somewhere, we don't know where. That sounds like such a fun place to be in, aside from, you know, kind of the I guess, the depths that a lot of people encounter while they're there. But outside of that, outside of that, the rest of it sounds great. Yes, so the your your book is on Food Puns, but you've kind of had more of a background around cooking and food and all of that. Do you remember the first thing that you cooked or like the first meal you had where it kind of made you take a step back and you're like, okay, let's let's explore this some more. Well, I remember growing up Um here in Austin, Texas. My family shopped at I think it was called Um. I don't know if it was called whole foods originally, but they would shop at at whole foods, a little tiny store, and they just made everything from scratch. And so people who were just always cooking in our house it was just like that's what you do, you just cook stuff. It was pancakes and you know all, I mean everything everything. So cooking was just a natural part of my growing up. My Dad Cooks, my brother's cook and Um. So I don't have an exact memory of something that was like this is what I wanna, this is this is it, but uh my, I think this is on my website. I don't know if you if you saw that. My brother and I, my brother Jim Hile, who is Um, he's three years older than me, when we were when we were kids and my mom was real strict on TV, is not watching TV. So got real bored and my brother went over to public also public access, and checked out some video equipment, brought it home and we decided to film a cooking show. And so I was ten, he was thirteen. I was the host and he was he filmed it and it was horrible. It was like Bob Ross, but worse. Um and uh, I mean when we didn't know what we were doing. And there were many times in the in the show where I would start a recipe and when finished, we ran out of time. There's my baby brothers in the background. But there was something about it where it was just these it was so simple and it was so just real. Public access ended up airing it for over twenty years. It was called kids kids cooking, and I actually remember seeing it when I was in a Dorman College. So, uh, and someone recognized me from it. I don't know what that says, but Um, so that really made a huge packed on me as far as...

I can and I like teaching people how to cook really simple things and it was all very easy. I mean it was. I was so young. It was like if I could do it, of course you could do it, and that really has been kind of the common thread throughout my life. I love teaching people, Um, how to cook, and so I have written a cookbook and have a website and a youtube channel and instagram where I teach people that cooking is really fun and really easy. And I think this food pun book kind of came just from being in the kitchen all the time, being with kids, being around food. It kind of evolved from that. Okay, I definitely want to talk about the book, but as someone who who I this is maybe five years ago I started a food blog for sort of similar ish reasons of like wanting to know how to cook more, I would say I definitely do less teaching because I didn't really have that much of a back and in cooking, but I was like, I'd love to kind of learn and and, you know, make some mistakes along the way, because that's part of the fun of it too. So for people that are are maybe kind of like how I was back then. Of Yeah, I we'll call them kitchen newbies, for lack of a better word. What are some kind of your your starter tips for how they can get in and explore the wonderful world of cooking? Yes, and really, I am self taught. I have not gotten. Didn't go to culinary school. So really, as you said, about's about making mistakes. I mean everything I know is based on mistakes that I've made. Um, you know, of course, it just is. Every time you try a recipe, practice, you know, you create a recipe, it's like, okay, I don't want to do that again, do something else. So, Um, as far as getting into the kitchen and getting some confidence in the kitchen, Um, there are some basic recipes that I think it's really good to start with. Um, Rice is surprisingly complicated for a lot of people. Um, so you can on to cook that and I've got a really good method. So, but rice. Um Eggs. You know a few different kinds of fried eggs. I think a salad dressing is a really important recipe, Um, and then maybe a good seared steak or fish, and then you kind of feel like you could you could put together a meal, you could maybe buy a side and then make a salad and sear some fish and that make the rice and you're kind of starting to build some confidence. So it's just like having a few basic recipes. You don't have to know everything, Um, but if you get some basics done, you'll start to build that confidence and and start to enjoy that feeling of this is really good. This is better than going out. I get to share this with my friends and see them enjoy it, and that, I think, kind of builds on each other. You know itself. Do you have a favorite tool that you use in the kitchen? We were like, I can't live without this. Yes, UM, two couple. I just did a video on my it's actually my twenty kitchen essentials and I broke it up into two pieces, and so it's...

...hard to be hard for me to narrow it down to one from twenty because I really think those twenty are essential. But one of them that Um, I love is a fish, Bachela. It's this spatula about smaller than most like big kitchen spatula is. It's maybe a foot or less and uh, it kind of bends in the front and it's really easy to fit under fish. It's real easy to it's real thin and metal. I just use it for everything. It's small and I love it. It's it's really easy to maneuver, so I love that. It's kind of a random thing. The other thing I love is a really good pair of tongs. Um. I use them all the time tossing salads, moving things, tossing things, grabbing, you know, things off a hot fire. So Um, some little things like that. And these are these are so inexpensive. You don't need a lot of fancy stuff. I do think you need a good quality chef knife and the real test for that is one that feels good in your hand. If you get one and it just feels too big or too long or one that feels too heavy, you want to avoid it. So but again, you don't need to spend a lot of money, just some there's some basics that that can just, you know, get you on the right track. No broadswords in the kitchen or anything. No, no, no, that did great sea and to watch, but I'm sure very right. There probably is an instagram with someone who can, you know, dice at meat in the air with broadswords. That's not not really my thing. If not, someone listening, it sounds pretty cool. I mean it's so yeah, I is. Second, the pair of tongues. Um as someone that do not have a good pair for a long while, it's one of those things you don't really know you're missing it until you use a good pair and then you're like, oh, how have I navigated exactly exactly, and I go through on my little video. There were some tongs that I do not like, like do not get the ones with the silicone tips. Those will melt. Do not get that. You want metal tips and you want a little locking mechanism in the back. That's for me, so it's not popping open, which mine have done, and other other kinds of gence. Of Yeah, I'm with you. I'm really ticking on my tongues at least fun Jack in the box when they when they pop open, I'm like this is I don't need this. You know no exactly, Tosh, you mentioned your book. Don't worry, be happy. Yes, PA, and it's it's like when I first heard the concept of it's a book of Food Puns. I was kind of thinking like, okay, it's going to be kind of like a list of puns, but you sort of made it almost it was like a challenge book for people, where it's like hey, here's some food photography on top of the puns, and then part of the joy of it is figuring out what the puns are. So was that always kind of the concept...

...you wanted to make? Was that? I you know, like, how do you? How do you come up with your Pun Ideas? Is there a favorite one that you have out of the last time, several questions thrown off right. Um, no, and you got the you really captured my book. Well, I think it is. It was supposed to be really lovely food photography and really highlight these beautiful real foods. Um. A lot of puns are just hand drawn or Um. So I thought this was a really kind of unique concept with the actual real foods in there, which I'll talk more about. How I that's so good for for kids to flip through and learn Um. But let me real quickly how I came up with the puns and how they started as this sort of puzzle challenges rather than just the puns just set out for you. Um, my kids, we have to have two young kids, Um Jack and Elaine, and there they were younger at the time, but we it was almost Valentine's Day and we had to buy Valentine's for all their classes, and so we went to the grocery store, looked for Valentine's. Couldn't find anything that we liked. My kids didn't like him. So we said, you know what, we'll just go home and make some our own this year. And so we went home and I had these little letter cookies and so we put them out on this, you know, marble I have from food photography, and we said we put came up with like I am bananas for you was the first one, because they were kind of there. was just be Valentine's for these grade schoolers, and so it said I am bananas for you, and then we did when that said I am nuts for you, with some nuts in there, and then we did we are meant to be with a sprig of mint. So we made several of these that we were going to use as Valentine's and just for fun, I put him over my instagram, which is at Marie Saba. We put him on there and I think it was within a few hours going appetite magazine emailed me and said We'd love your Food Valentine's we'd like to do a story. Are you doing more? And we were like well, I guess we're doing more. So, Um, from there we just so then it was like okay, what else can we do? And we thought of Uhum, trying to think of some of the early ones. Um, one of them was you made me melt and it was a melting ice cream. That one was a tough one. People didn't get that quite as well, but anyway, it kind of went from there. We just kept making new and so what was fun about it on Instagram was that, Um, you know, when you're scrolling, something's got to make you stop, and these puzzles people stopped because it was like, Oh, I want to figure this out. It's not just you know, they really sat there and figured it out and then they comment with the answer and then a lot of people suggested new ones that I did end up using, and so, Um, it it actually became, you know, it was unique and different to have this challenge on instagram rather than just photography, Um, and I think that's one...

...of what made them so interesting to people. So we've been doing them since then. Um, and they just we and I keep thinking, you know, I'm gonna run out of food punt ideas, like really, this is the last one. But I realized what you do is you just change categories. So we've done all the Food Valentine's one, or all I could think of for now. And then so we now in the book there's categories like celebrity names. Once you add that in there, you have Brad Pitt with an avocado pit. Um, you have one of my favorites. It's UH Claire Danes. It's e Claire Danes and I Claire Claire Danes. So and then, you know, we run out of those and say, you go, what's the next category? We did cartoon characters and Um, one of my favorites is in there and it's it's capital P, and then the pasta called Noki, and then, Oh so it's Pinocchio. Um, yeah, and so it's just there's tourist attractions. There's Um, kind of the slang that you might see on instagram. There's one that says on fleek and it's with a leak. So Um. And then uh, let's see what was I gonna say? Um, I can't remember. Remind me of another. One of the questions that you asked, uh, how we came up with them, the puzzle factor. And well, I was going to add to is that the since these came from, we made these with my children originally, that this whole book is designed to be fun for the whole family. It's family friendly, and I two things really of why it was been so good for my children. One is to learn all these different vegetables. You Learn, you see pomegranate leak, you know sugar, Snappias, Nocchi, and so you even if you're not able to serve your kids all of that every day, you're just learning about all these different foods, which I think is really valuable. And the second thing that was valuable for us was that my son is dyslexic and part of what part of dyslexy? It's different for everyone, but for him has yet a very hard time associating sounds with letters, and so having these letter cookies and then a food in place of a sound or blend of sounds was so helpful for him to learn Um, these sounds. So you know, if you have kids who are starting to learn to read or starting to learn sounds and and also what a great way to them for to learn different, different ways to kind of mishmash things together, food and words and jokes and I just think so many, so many things are good for kids and all of us to just kind of think outside the box. I think that's a super cool maybe not even an intended result of...

...things, but then you see it happen and it's like, oh, that's that's awesome. Is there any food or drinker or anything like that that you haven't used that you're like, I want to try and get this in here. AH, there's a couple. Let me think here if I have you know, I really wanted to use hummus because it's so popular, and so I've really been trying to think of one for that. The only thing I can think of is like Hamas, but that doesn't it's not a funny kid friendly. So you'll have any ideas and how to use hummas and a food pun, reach out to me. I would love to know that one. And then I feel like better nut has to be in there somewhere. I haven't come up with a really a phraser for that yet. So, but butternut squash. Um. So I'm sure there's there's tons more. Yeah, now my brain is you're gonna be in the kitchen. Now I'm being like, Huh, I'll think of it at like two a m this morning. I'll just pop up bed and like that's it, that's it works. Well, that's what's interesting to me is that, Um, I think a lot about creativity and where what it is, where it comes from, and Um, I think a lot of that is when your brain is sort of not consciously thinking. You know a lot of people say their most creative when they're exercising or when they're in the shower, when they're falling asleep, and so, Um, I I think that is probably when people come up with creative ideas like that's that's why you get him in the middle of the night. I think that segues nicely into another question that I always like to ask as a question you wish you were asked more frequently, and for you it's how his motherhood influenced or creative pursuits. And I think you've touched on it a little bit, but I'm sure there's there's more creativity there to. Well, now that my kids are a little older, what I what I really like love about this question is that, Um, I think when I was first younger mother, I would have I was really wanting, like I need some time away so I can work on my staff. I need space, you know. It's like they're separate. But what I've really learned is so much of this book is because of them, and I mean they thought up some puns. They were the Valentine, the reason, you know, I was there with them. The balandince was the reason we started this Um and I remember one time I was struggling to come up with another food Valentine and I had I wanted to put like be mine, you know, as it's a common Valentine. So I was thinking and thinking and thinking. I couldn't think of it. My daughter was like, come read to me, come read to me, so I went to read a story tour. It was fancy Nancy, this popular book anyway. The the main character's best friend's name is bree, and so I was sitting there reading and I was like free,...

...free, that's it. Bring Mine. And once again it was just a reminder that just, you know, dive in with the kids and and it's not gonna be all planned out like like you know, and organized like you you want, you think it needs to be. But there's so much richness there and there's so much creativity and there's so much that just that they have to offer and so, Um, I less and less now as I'm older. I I welcome them in, like, what do you think of this? You know, come help me with this, and because they have great ideas. And actually read recently a Harvard study that studied five year olds. They did a creativity study on five year olds and they were creative genius, geniuses. According to the study. They ranked creative genius, and I think the reason was that they they don't know, they aren't already taught to see it disassociate certain things like they already. They weren't already taught to not put food and words together, you know, they weren't already taught to that. No, you know, you can't make a volcano out of your mashed potatoes, like they're still doing that. and Um, so I feel like it's actually as close as you can get to that little bit of creative genius. Is Um, you're just really fortunate to have that so as in hindsight, as as as a kind of like older mother. Now I look back and I think, well, I wish I'd known that a little earlier, but I know, I think I feel like I read something sort of like on a related sort of study of like our our brains are most adaptive and receptive to new ideas when we're like two to four or three to five, something like that, but because we're so young, we don't always know how to fully capitalize on that. So that it's right. Yeah, it's great to look back and be like, AH, I would have loved this information when I was that old and I could have right. Yes, who has what I could have done with it. So yeah, I just think, Um, it's easy to to kind of get tired of your kids and kids craziness and and everything, but but they really do have so much to offer. So so you've got the book has a hundred food puns in it and I'm you know, there's more to come, obviously down the road. Are there other sort of whether or whether it's related to cooking or something else, that you're working on, the other projects that you're like okay, this is this is my next focus. Now you know. Um, I really want to write another cookbook. So that is kind of in my focus. I am not sure exactly what I want to call it and what the exact topic is going to be, but I would really love to write another cookbook that really kind of encompasses everything I've been doing over the past ten years in the kitchen. So that's my next goal. Um, as far as the pen stuff,...

...we do have Um statulas with the food puns on them and Evan Mits and some other merch that's been really fun. But and then so possibly broadened that line like two mouse pads or um baby clothes or something like that. But other than that I'm just still working on my youtube channel, trying to grow that and then hopefully the cookbook is that's that's what's in mind right now. Fantastic now with the YouTube channel. I think that's I mean youtube has been a thing for I believe it gets its driver's license this year. I think it started in two thousand six, if I of my day it's correctly, and I remember telling someone back when I was more involved on Youtube, that I had started my channel in two thousand seven, and this was, I don't know, maybe twelve they're like, oh, so you're a pro at this right, and I was like no, I just started a channel to like favorite videos. I hadn't made anything yet, because they were just like well, then whatever. So, but Youtube was like obviously, I mean this is true of anything that's been around for sixteen years. It's evolved over time. Now it's it's become a platform for people to connect with really anyone in a in an you know, in a certain interest or category or anything like that. And Food in particular is such a like a cultural thing and like a you know, it has special meanings, Um, for all different kinds of people. So what have you found has has worked well with your Youtube Channel and is there's something that you thought maybe was going to work pretty well and ended up not doing so well? Gosh, it has been a it's this a very uphill um battle. For me. It is because I I do instagram and have a pretty big following there and I feel like I kind of had it figured out and kind of new and and was posting and interacting and it was growing, and so it kind of felt like I knew what I was doing. Went over to youtube and it's just totally different beasts and, Um, I film all my own shows and do the cooking and the lighting and that. So it's how to figure all that out, the technical aspects of it. So please do not go and watch my first shows. I mean it's painful. Um. That's one of the hard parts about it. Is like, even looking back five videos I'm like, oh, cringe, um. But now I kind of feel like I've gotten the technical aspect figured out, which is so important because it's going to set you apart if you have good lighting and good sound and, you know, good video quality. That is huge. Beyond that, thumbnails I didn't realize the importance of thumbnails. You know, for your click through rates and what has worked. I would say I still don't know exactly what works yet. Um, I think what I've what I've learned here's like an insider tip, I...

...guess, is that you ideally you make your video around ten minutes, which sounds insanely long, but what's surprising is if people are going to watch your video, they generally watch about whether your video was one minute or five, five minutes or ten minutes. So if they're watching of a ten minute video, that's a lot more watch time. Then Youtube likes that so all as as sort of uncomfortable as it is to make a ten minute video, Um, it actually does work and it you can increase your watch time and therefore get closer and monetizational things. So there's a lot of like technical kind of things you have to know to not probably don't have to but are are helpful to know. But so I basically I don't feel like I really figured it out yet. Um, the other thing that's interesting about youtube to me is that it having the longer format. This is where people go when they want to learn a specific skill, like chocolate chip cookies in one bowl. You know, they are googling for that specific thing often. And so, UM, which is it's different than your marketing, your approach to youtube. So it's what I'm saying is it's just it's different. I'm still learning, but I really enjoy it because I really do feel like I can teach and have a lot of detail and really explain for someone that really wants to learn, and that's that's who I'm trying to reach there. Yeah, and I think that, at least in my youtube experience, because you kind of touched on this, like there's very different uses of Youtube. Are Looking up how to do something. I think this is my my kind of like classic example of this. I have a Chevy Malibu which has all kinds of weird quirks to it, and one of the things is the way you reset the oil filter to tell you like how much oil you have left. It's kind of weird. It's like a you know, it should be pretty easy, but it's kind of a process and I remember I after getting an oil change one time, they hadn't reset it so it was still saying I had like nine percent oil life or whatever. So I was like, okay, how do I fix this so that I can and it's it's not complicated, it's just like not what you would expect. But going onto youtube, I had to go through like three or four videos until I finally found one that just told you how to do it. It didn't have like a six minute prelude of like, you know, I grew up with cars like my granddaughter's named Chevy, like I don't need that, I just want the answer. And all of the comments on that video were along the lines of thank you having the tutor like how to do it. And I think to your point of like Youtube has I kind of like it's algorithm promotes the longer videos now, but I...

...think there's there's still value in like the content still needs to be there, like you're sure? Sure? You can't just drag it out to differ. Don't do that. No, no, no, yeah, you've got. Yes, it was something I've also learned. No, you've got to have every every minute has to be valuable in there are people are going to stick around. Um, you know, I wouldn't either. You wouldn't neither. So, yeah, I I'm totally with you. You've got to make really, really valuable content. Um, just a little more in depth. If, if it, if it lends itself to that valuable content and actually answer the question, which is perhaps the most frustrating. It's a fully unch of video and it's just like, I feel like less informed than what I started right. I know my husband watched when to fix our vacuum cleaner and it was it was twenty five minutes long and but somewhere in the in the middle there he did answer the questions, but I was passionate about me La Vacuum. So it's it's interesting. You know, it takes all kinds out there. All Right, Marie, you're almost off the hook, but we always like to wrap up with the top three and I'm kind of curious about this because we had on a previous episode I interviewed an author who had written a semi fictionalized book of living next door to the Beatles in the sixties. So he gave his top three Beatles songs. So I'm curious to see how how the two of yours stack up, because you'd like to do your top three Beatles songs. I will um and my husband's in a band and so and loves the Beatles, so we play a lot of Beatles around my house. Um, he's way more the Song Guy Than I am. But I do have my top three. Um, my number one is let it be, and quick story behind that. That it is my number one is because I had a version of my daughter singing that with her friend Annie playing a Ukulele, recorded on my iphone and I played that song to my mom in hospice last year and held her hand and she was really unable to talk or do anything, but could she could hear my daughter singing let it be, and it was a moment that I will never forget. So let it be. Uh, here comes the Sun. Every time I hear it I just feel hope and just excitement. So here comes the son. And the other one is we can work it out. Just feels appropriate right now in the world and I I just love to hear that. You know we can work it out, no need for the fighting and fussing. I love it. Here comes the sun is definitely a top three for mine as well. I mean all of those are great choices. So it's hard. It's hard. It's hard to pay. Yeah, there's definitely. It's definitely a few where I was like, okay, this would never make my top list. But well, let me ask you real quick. The the day in the life. Are you a fan? It's all right, no, I'm not. I'm...

...not. It's not the one that people get annoyed when I say I don't like it as hey, jude, I think that song goes on for way too long. I am with you. I don't like it either. My husband loves it, one of his favorites, but I'm with you and it's a nice sentiment. But yes, John Lenna, not the the beacon of good person. I guess we don't have to go down that road. It's fine, it's a fine song, whatever. Yeah, well, excellent. Well, if people want to check out a copy of the book or they want to I know, the cookie recipe you kind of touched on is on your website. So where can people go to find you? My website, Marie Saba dot com, or you can find me on instagram at Marie Saba, and then the book is on Amazon, it's on my website, wherever books are sold. And Yeah, that's the best way to reach me and I look forward to hearing from you all and thanks so much for having me. Absolutely. Thank you for coming on. Go Out, listen to some Beatles songs, Cook something great and of course we have to end with a Corny joke, as we always do, and it's double topical. I always trying to make a topical over the episode, but also I just went to Las Vegas for the first time, so spending a lot of time, you know, with neon lights all over the place. Why couldn't the sesame see you leave the casino? I don't know why, because it was on a roll. Very Nice, very nice. Thank you. Good people. Cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you were a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. You can send me a message, Joey, at good people, cool things dot com. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people, cool things and check out all the old episodes via good people, cool things dot com. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day. H.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (141)