Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 116 · 3 months ago

116: How to Make Someone's Day with Howard H. Prager

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Does it seem like the world is in particularly brutal shape right now? We’ve got violence happening across the country, politicians deciding how people should use their bodies, inflation and rising grocery prices, and oh yes, let’s not forget there’s still a pandemic going on. 

Sometimes, it feels like we’re living the “this is fine” dog on fire cartoon in real life. But it doesn’t have to be all doom and gloom. We just need to be extra diligent about picking each other up. For Howard H. Prager, he’s made it a point to make someone’s day — each and every day. 

Thankfully, Howard has compiled some fantastic stories of people making each other’s day and offers plenty of tips so you can go do the same in your neck of the woods. We’re also chatting about the Cubs World Series victory from 2016, playing tuba, and our favorite Lindt chocolates.

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people cool things. Today's guest is Howard H Praeger, author of the book make someone's Day, becoming a memorable leader in work and life. Howard is also a public speaker, a columnist, a tube of player. We're getting into a lot of different things here, but the core element is there are so many ways you can make someone's day and what a fantastic feeling it is, both for the Makeee, the person whose day is being made, and then for you too. It's so cool to hear someone say that you've made their day, and we're diving into all the different types of ways that you can do it. It's fantastic and if you're not smiling and feeling great by the end of this episode, I don't know it's you, because there's a lot of good stuff here. If you'd like to get in touch with good people cool things, you can reach out via facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast. Can also support the show leave a five star review over on Apple podcast. It just searched for good people, cool things and there it is and it's magic. It's fantastic, just like this conversation with Howard. To start, for people who maybe aren't familiar with you, can you give us your name and your elevator pitch, but can you also tell us the type of elevator that we're writing on? Oh, I like that. Ye, well, I'm going to vet them elevators. I'm telling this. So my name is Howard h Praeger and I use the middle initial and part and tribute to my dad and in part because there's actually another Howard praeger out there and I was trying to differentiate myself from him. So who I am is someone who's an author, a speaker, an executive coach, a leadership called consultant, a teacher and an acessor. I do a lot of things. I enjoy it. I enjoy all my volunteering and all the various types of work and projects that I do. So I've really spent a career working primarily with adults and doing adult executive education. The other Howard praeger that's out there. Have you studied him? Do you know the INS and outs of what he does. Well, he also has had a number of careers. He was a real turn one point. Then then he just started and sold a company having to do with biometrics. Oh well, yeah, well, he's in Denver. Way To go. That's that's funny that there's a realtor. I angle. This isn't exactly the same, but there's another person who apparently has my phone number, because I will get texts sometimes for this person who was also in real estate. I will not name him, but his first name is Alan and the only the way I found out about this was at a pet smart. I was checking out, I was buying dog food and his name...

...popped up as well on the like, you know, frequent pet perks, I'm membership thing, and I said, I don't know who that is. Can you delete that person? They were like no, we cannot, like he suck in the system forever. So I've got to clarify every time I got a pet smart that no, I am not Alan. Oh, that's true. So I feel your pain there. Well, we're not here to talk about other hot weare to talk about you. And you have a new book. I make someone's Day, which is just a fantastic, I think overall, just mindset to have for people. So clearly you've done a lot. You've made a lot of people's days. When were you like, okay, I need to get this into a book. So I'll tell you the story that really drove back, because it is you're so right, Joean, and later on I'll like to share with you like my first make someone's Day moments that I realized in my life. So, but this is when the idea really dawned on me and said, oh my gosh, what have I been doing all my life? I need to write this up. So I was at the train station commuting downtown and early one morning and someone came up with to me with a clipboard, a young woman who said would you mind signing this petition? I said sure, what's IT for? She said we're trying to get someone on the ballot for election. I said, all right, I'm happy to sign, and so I'm signing it and I asked who it's for. She said mentioned the name. I said, well, at least I've heard of them, so that's good, and I gave it back to her. She took the clipboard and looked at me with the biggest of eyes and said, oh my Gosh, you made my day. Now, Joey, I signed the petition. That's all I did. It's not like I gave her money or donated or even said I was got to vote for him. I just signed the petition and those words you made my day came back to me and I could not get them out of my head all day long. The whole train ride down, I was thinking, there's something here, there's something powerful here, because not only did I make her day, but I she made my day when she said that. So I realized this is a powerful, powerful I don't go to call a tool, technique, method, whatever you want to call it. It is a powerful let's call it a method that we all need to use more and I'll bet many of us use it without even thinking about it. Yeah, I was thinking while you were saying that, that I had someone tell me I made their day like two days ago, and for that it was posting about them on an instagram story and being like hey, this person's real cool, and it was. Yeah, it was. So I'm like, I was flattered to read that. I was like I was just, you know, just sharing what you're doing out there. Which is I'm yes, yes, so it's that simple, it's that easy. And yet for some people, you know, and to know a model, they need to see examples, they need to...

...learn how to use it or how it's been been used. So that's where the book came about. I created a model that I call because a VIP model, because we all want to feel like VIPs right all the the VIP model came up with it, came up to the research behind it. I decide. I've been to change the stories that people don't want to read about me making someone stay. So I've got a lot of stories about examples. And what's amazing, Joey, is some of the stories I'll be sharing with you and our listeners today are stories that are not just one offs. I've heard them multiple times. For example, people have donated kidneys to strangers. We haven't. That's not just making someone stay, that's saving their lives. Remarkable. There there's several examples, as I've researched this, of people who have done just that and you wonder what, what's happening? Why is this working? But it is, and and what happens is, I told you, she made my day too. So I've said this is a boomerang effect. Why? So? I'm holding up a boomerang right now that I that I found, because it comes back to you. If you do it for someone, chances are they say you made by day or they at least presented at type of reaction. You feel good as well, just like you did in your story. That's that's the prop work. That makes me think maybe I should make this a video podcast. Love the love the boomerang being up there. Although I my family went to Australia when I guess I was thirteen, so as a kid, and I was like I've got to get a boomerang right got to do it. But there's a few types of boomerangs out there, which was this was unbeknownst to me that one of the the hunting ones do not come back to you, and that was the one I ended up buying, and I was so distressed to go to the park and I was like it's gonna come right back and just fell like a you know, like it was a baseball or something, and there was no one and so I was just like I've been, I feel like I've been lied to a most by Australia for for several years. But Oh my gosh, think the whole country down should jolly right. Let's do it where we're on a bitch at tick to Australia. There's a reason you're down under. It's because your boomerangs don't all come back. So please, Australia, help us find and get the right boomerang so they do come back to us, because that's what you're known for. Yes, thank you, thank you. They've got a reputation to pulled for sure. Now one of the the focuses within the book is specifically kind of kindness within the workplace, which I mean, I feel...

...like I say this every episode and anywhere you turn. Things of obviously, but different the past two years. They were were pre pandemic. We've got zoo. I mean I was on a zoom call today where I'm pretty sure every single person on it was in a different time zone. I which I was like, oh, that might be a record. That were like, I think five people on it just all, I'll spread out across the globe really and that, you know, it's harder to like drop by someone's desk and say, you know, a quick kind words or whatever the case might be. So what is kindness mean in the workplace, both, I guess, like just in general, but also specifically, since the pandemic has kind of shifted the way we work. Yeah, yeah, that's a great question and I'm going to share that in a couple of ways. So, first of all, kindness in the workplace means just just being recognized, being understood, that that you know, it's not just getting the job done, it's how you get the job done, it's how you get appreciated forgetting the job done. So, for example, I'm going to let me share with you a story here just about that, and it really talks about and speaks to how how people and how bosses can really do something for their employees that make a huge difference, and yet it doesn't take much to do so let me share with you the story of a best boss. So I'd like to talk to you about Sam's best boss was at a legal services firm and his second day on the job he made a random mistake when he turned to his work and he realized that almost immediately. But but you know, had already left after he turned in his work and thought all night long he just worried about Oh my gosh, I made the mistake. So he came in the next morning and first thing he did was he went to his boss's office. I Apologize, I'm sorry made this mistake. You know what the boss said to him? He said, that's not your fault. I believe that people only must get mistakes when their instructions aren't clear. So I think this is my fault, not yours. He had such loyalty to this loss because she did not let him take the blame, but she was trying to be supportive of him, and I think that's just such a wonderful way to go about things right. You know, so so often we worry and we fear and we're looking around our our shoulders and back and making sure that no one's not trying to stay a bus or sabotage or anything else, and like, oh my gosh, and here's a boss who says, no, it was my fault, not yours. That's great and that gets the type of loyalty, because...

...she's saying you're human. I totally understand this and that's what I mean by saying we can do this and we need to bring this more to the workforce. When people use this in the workforce they get more motivated, the increase their productivity because they really enjoy what they're doing and enjoy who they're working for. And in this era of time right now where people are leaving jobs. I've just spoke to someone an hour ago and she said sixty percent of our employees are leaving from the county government position. It's like, oh my gosh, they're the great migration where people are leaving jobs either because of a boss or because they don't feel appreciated. And certainly some are getting leaving for much higher salary. You can't do anything about much higher salary. Offer much higher salary, I say go you know that's can't. Can't compete with that. But as far as bosses go, as far as being cared about, as far as feeling like you're a vital part of the organization, that we can we can do something about and if you make someone stay, you can create that type of culture where that happens, where people feel appreciated. Are you finding that more businesses are starting to do this, or is there kind of a still a little bit of a gap where it's like a let's get going on it? Yeah, I think there's a gap. There's a gap joey. I mean I think the companies that do this and do this well, yeah, we know them right. There's a grocery's chain called wegman's in the east that's known for this. Southwest Airlines is known for being a great place to work, shoes company called Zapples. You know, there's like four or five places that everyone knows. Boy, these are awesome places, you know. Another one is W D forty. They've got an amazing culture and CEO There and and I love, love the quote that I have in the cover of my book. It's from fibritt CEO Perini, who was CEO of lint chocolate in Italy, and he said just by reading the title, I was inspired to make someone stay a few times that same day. It's people in places like that that make a difference. Very important. Follow up question. What is your favorite lynt chocolate? Oh my gosh, rule. So I like I like the dark chocolate. So they've got those little chocolate squares. So I think the green ones are like seventy percent chocolate. Nice, Nice, I thought you. I think I'm I don't normally prefer white chocolate, but with theirs I really like the white chocolate ones, which I am blanking on what color, because there's I always get the variety pack and right ID to yeah, it's like a party. Yeah, and I want to say it's the yellow ones. I think. Now Go, I think the gold...

...or no, yeah, what with the mint in it? Or just yes, Oh, oh, no, no, I I'm I don't think I've ever tried the way with the minute, but now I'd think I need to, because that sounds that fall. Yeah, it's going to be next on the list. Okay, it sounds fantastic and I think the seguentes nicely to. You mentioned the quote on the cover. I think the book cover itself, the the design of it, is very engaging and I always say this is a kind of a silly question to ask on an audio only podcast, but we've got links to the book so people can people can see the cover. But what was that process like, because it's a very engaging cover. There's several people on it building sort of a staircase of success. I'm just going to vaguely compet that, but I think it's I think it's very, you know, applicable to what the book is about. It's very eyecatching when you're seeing it in the midst of other titles or while you're scrolling across the screen where, whatever the case might be. So was that? Was that like what your initial kind of concept for it was, or did it sort of evolve over time? In evolved. Yeah, work with a graphic artist who just came up with some really cool designs. We had five to choose from, so I had to try to pare it down and then what we did was, I love the fact that my publisher, color books does this, is we had choose the time, choose the cover contest and people and they had a week to vote on which cover design they preferred, and this one one out for the reasons you said. Were you. Were you surprised by it, or was this also your favorite of the bunch? No, I was surprised that. Quite frankly, I was thinking, well, this is an inspirational leadership book, so maybe it needs to be a little more serious, right, and I'm thinking we have all the serious books we need. So when they when, when this one came out, my publishers said absolutely, that's that's the best one. I would have recommended it even if it didn't win. I said, all right, I'll trust you and let's let's go with it. Yeah, I think it's it's so fascinating. What I mean I'm not a designer by any stretch of the imagination, and a similar thing when I was picking my book cover, I was like, Oh, I think that one is like clearly the winner, and then put it similarly, like up to a vote, and just the mix of people that like, I think that one's the best time, like that one is my least favorite, but it's just like, you know, things are gonna attract people differently and I think the key is something that is going to make someone stop and and look, and I think this cover does that very well. Oh great, thank you. Nice to hear that. Yes, yes, and like it. Like you said, like the quote on there too, is just yeah, hopefully they it's not the only person that's having to it,...

...and I imagine it's not that other people see it and they're like, oh, yeah, I should make someone's Day. That's that's that's the whole idea that if we can get more people thinking about this and trying to think each day, what can I do to make someone's Day? And I do think about that every day. It's like Oh my gosh, I've got to make sure that I make someone's day and sometimes you don't know right but right before I came on here, I got a linkedin comment from someone who said how much they appreciate the book and they're going to buy it for their colleagues because they think it's so good. So that like, oh my gosh, what I need thing for someone to say. That's fantastic. Yeah, and I imagine that's I mean, obviously that's a very good sort of marketing word of mouth element. As well of getting that, I like to ask about kind of marketing strategies and whatnot that you found. It works well and I think this is kind of a unique situation because of just the nature of the book itself. is almost like a marketing tool of someone, you know, spreading kindness and and making someone's Day and then they're just like, you know, like I'm gonna kind of it's almost like a pay it forward type of thing where it just kind of keeps going. It is absolutely you know, the difference is it comes back to you and you can keep doing it. Now there's can keep doing it to you. So I love that and I would love to see this take off in such a way. What I like it to be a best selling book, sure. What I'd like even more is of people to took it to heart and did it more often, and so whatever I can do to do that. So I'm thinking you're hearing it here. First I'm thinking you're doing something like the I spuck a challenge. I want to do the make someone stay challenge and social media. I'm thinking about doing some type of reward program for people who make someone stay, some type of a contest, thinking about all sorts of ways of how can I make this more exciting, relevant and important to people into organizations, because that's that's where where it needs to happen. I'll just have got several other examples, but let me take a non, non business example and I will go back to the business ones to can I talk to you about Abraham, who is a twelve year old boy who is diagnosed with a with a rare blood disease, and the only thing that he could do to to overcome it, to beat it, is he needed a bone marrow transplant. Well, this is not one of those sad stories about, oh my gosh, he couldn't find one. He did find one and I don't know how hard it was, but but it was a successful transplant and he went through chemotherapy treat and...

I think he can still may be going through that right now, because it was over the course of a year. But he was ill enough that the foundation, the make a wish foundation, said you qualify for a wish. What would you like? Now think about this. Here's very God mother coming down. You can get anything you want, right, and some kids. What do you think? Kids go for play stations and want to go to Disney year. I want to meet the Chicago cubs or you know any of those sorts of things. Do you know what Abraham wanted? He wanted to feed the homeless in his community. Wow, this is the first time make a wish. This isn't Jackson, Mississippi the first time, and Mississippi make a wish history that they had a request of someone who wanted to do something for others. So they had to work hard to figure out what we do and how do we do this, and they said, all right, we're going to give you, bring you food for eighty people once a month for a year and you can set it up and do it however you want. So he set it up and he decided that he wants it to go on beyond the make a wish timing. So he is also set up a foundation. He's now thirteen years old, and what's his biggest wish? Help others in need. Talk about a someone's Day moment. Right, yeah, I'm Shid. That's smart. When I was twelve or thirteen, now I'm thinking I was thirteen, I was yelling at Australia for boomerangs. Exactly right, I know. Yeah, Stro, you get your boomerangs right. That's a that's incredible. So these stories are you know, it's true. Experience is much like you. You experienced and you know. But the model helps and the stories help, but it really it's creating that culture of kindness, that understanding that we all can benefit when we help one another. That's the idea behind the book and that's the idea behind all these other things I'm looking to try to do with it. Love it. Will Kimmy posted on the social media challenge because I think that sounds great and thank anything to avoid the cold of an ice bucket. I'm right. Yeah, no, no, I know, I fucket. Showers needed, and this one. Now you're also a Tuba player. I am. This is crow. Okay, so my I was trying to think of some of the songs that I'm familiar with that heavily feature to be really the only one I could come up with is a real deep cut by the vandals, which is a punk rock band, who has a song called play that country too, but cowboy, and it's the tail of a classical Tuba player that somehow ends up in I believe it's a...

...saloon and everyone there is like, note, you can't leave, you got to play a country version of or like it, like player Tu but like in a country style. And so he does and impresses them and you know it's trying to leave and they're like note, you're too good, you got to stick around and come back, and it's very ridiculous. It cracks me up. I have played at for other people and they're kind of like what is this, but I think it's it's very well done. So my question for you is, do you have a favorite song, either to play on the Tuba or that that heavily features the Tuba? Wow, that's great. Well, first of all, I've never heard of that. So I'm gonna I'm going to have to hear this recording right after you speak yet please let me know to thank you. I will absolutely so favorite tuber recording. Well, well, so you're talking in Tuba player, right. You're also talking to a jazz musician. So I've got favorite Tuba players. The Chicago Symphony for years has had outstanding some of the Best Tuba players in the world. Arnold Jacobs was the one who I grew up with and took some lessons with. Right now it's Gene Peck Corney, who's been there for I don't know, it's two thousand and twenty five years and has done just remarkable job as an amazing tube of player. And he has a favorite Tuba player to WHO's a Jazz Tuba Player, and I love Jazz. So Jazz Tuba players are near and jured to my heart. There was one who just passed away last year by the name of Howard Johnson. Wasn't like a guy neared tower right, it's Gott keep it, got it, but he was. I you wouldn't know him, but you'd have seen them on Saturday night live. who was in the Senat live band for years? Okay, so I might have, might have spotted him during a monolog or two. Yeah, I look forward to your feedback. On the side, it's a pretty ridiculous song, but it's very unlike a lot of things I've heard. So I was like give it, give a shit out. So He's gonna that's great. But I love playing Tuba and any any chance I get, I've played like five times in the past week. Couple rehearsals and I played with basketball band and northwestern. I played a Marty Ground Gig. And what was the fifth thing I played? I played the another concert. So you know, whatever it takes, I'll play up a Tuba player. We can't be fussy. It's a good it's a good motto for life. Well, people players may heat me for saying that, y'all, it's true. We can't be fussy. We're all gonna play classical. We're going to have very few opportunities and we're going to play more music that gives us a little bit more. But you...

...know, you've got a string base, an electric bass, which you know. They think it's all about the base and I say it's all about the Tuba. I mean I remember in elementary school we're picking our instruments that we wanted to play. I was like, Trumpet's going to be my first choice, saxophone is going to be my second choice. Couldn't play either of them a lick and ended up choosing clarinet because a couple of my friends did. I also couldn't play the clarinet when I first started. So I'd like to think that if I gave a brass instrument a try again now that perhaps I could do it, but that might be a little too optimistic. I'll stick with found a nice niche with guitar now. I'll stick with that. Okay, all right. Well, you ever want a tubless and give me a call. I will. Well, I'll have to see if I can find a Tuba. But I mean Austin's a big music scene, so surely, surely they exist out there? Absolutely, it's got exist in Austin. Now, one other thing, talking about making people's Day, we obviously both have Chicago ties. The cubs winning the world series in two thousand and sixteen. Do you remember where you were, what you were doing, how you celebrated? I was here, my father in law was here and and my wife and I and we just went crazy and it was after midnight Chicago time, I believe, because there was that like twenty minute rain delay. Is One too extra innings and Oh my God, and you know, wondering what are they going to do? Got To pull this off because they were ahead and they lost the lead and stuff. When I can't remember who was. Was it rolled as Chapman who gave up the lead? But whatever it was, it's like we can't lose this game, we've got to win it, and sure enough it was. It was your for you. Yeah, it was so many weird things in that game too. I the one. I remembered that. Yes, I was just like, Oh, this would happen. I was the wild pitch that resulted in two runs. I guess it's more of a pass ball kind of well, PA, I don't know. It was a hybrid of the but I was just like one of the odds that two people score just from like a bad pit right, right, I know, but yes, it was. It was you for it. I was in a I was down here in Austin, but in a Chicago themed bar. But then during the rain delay they were reporting, like I this is going to take a super long time, and so I was kind of like you know it was Sunday night. I know I have worked. How much. Should I just go back home and then, you know, watch it, watch it there. And I made that decision and did it and then, of course the game started like right when I got in my car. So I was listening on the radio when my cubs went ahead and I was like, thankfully, we're in the Internet age, so I was able to watch what happened immediately and I was recording it at home, so I just got on and like rewound it. But yeah, it was it was just, yeah, I was just like going, I'm like yelling out my car window. I'm sure people were like what is that man doing, but it...

...was very exciting. Yeah, yeah, oh, that's great. I just texted pay use Hallelujah last night after the baseball lockout finally ended. Yes, very, very exciting. One of my eye I say half baked, but I'm probably halfway there already, is to visit all the Major League Baseball stadiums and obviously Wrigley one of the best, if not the best one, out there, and it's been it's been fun to see some of the other stadiums and interact with fan bases and all that. So what highly recommend for for any baseball FA's out there? That's great. You just have to keep going to the new ones as they open up. I know that's part of the part of the I don't know, not really an issue, just part of the challenge. I like. I went to school Miami and they, since I graduated, have opened up a new stadium that I believe has a pool, so I would have to have to go during the hot summers of Miami instead of just the pretty hot springs. Yeah, all right. Well, Howard, you're almost off the hook here, but we always like to wrap up with a top three, three ways you can make someone's Day. You know. I'm going to start with the number one thing everyone who's listening can do is soon, as as soon as we're finished, like, don't wait thank someone who's made your life. It could be a boss, it could be a spouse, it could be a parent, it could be a teacher, it could be a colleague, it can be an Anton Gout, could be from fifty years ago. There's no statute of limitations on saying thank you and all there is is great appreciation and for the acknowledgement. So do that as soon as you're done listening, think about whose day you want to make by thanking them for helping to make your life. They will appreciate it and you'll feel good for having to been able to say that. So that's the first thing, I would say, one of my top one. The second one is keep us song in your heart, and so, of course I keep a tube on my office, but you can keep a song in your heart. Young coming out a tube in the heart. That would be it's a little painfully little hea. You right, but keep us on in your heart because we need to feel the the joy of life, especially when there's so many things pulling us down. Let's keep up and keep positive, and I think music is such a way of lifting people up as well. So I would say that would be the number two thing and the the third thing is absolutely the mantra that you know to the mantra of being able to make someone's day whenever you can, to live your mantra that I'm gonna do what I can for others because I know it's going to come back to me somewhere along the line. And in the meantime it's going to come back to me...

...because I'm going to feel good when they tell me that I made their day. So make this a mantra. Find ways to be able to do it. It can be small ways, you know, I start in the book with the smallest of ways to make someone's Day a smile. That's all you need. In some cases it's just very much one size does not fit at all. It's independent, based on what a person may need at that time. But it's amazing how often a smile is something that we all need. So so do something to keep make someone's Day in your heart, on your mind and in your life. Thanks, Joey. Love it the top through waste, makes one day. It's so, so easy, so easy to do it. Now, if people want to learn more about you, pick up a copy of the book. Where can I got? Best Place to go is my website, Howard H Praguer, remember that middle initial Howard h Praeger PR agercom. And if they scuttled my website and they sign up for my newsletter, which I've got to get going again, they'll be able to get both a free chapter of the book and they'll be able to get some checklist that they can use to monitor their practice, and so we can all learn to get better making someone's Day. So I've got several forms there that you can download for free and you can use. So the website Howard Age praguercom. Just sign up and take advantage of those free resources and then share your stories with me as you find them. Joey, you shared yours today. If others who are listening would share your stories with me, we can all learn, we can all grow, we can all give back because even at the hardest of times, even at the most challenging of times and crises, and my Gosh we facing those today, there's always opportunities to make someone's Day, and I'll just leave with if you look at the Polish border right now, the things that they have done to welcome those fleeing Ukraine is just amazing, amazing. Everything from coats to baby strollers to food is all there for people's they're trying to flee and save their lives. So make someone's Day should just be a part of all of our lives and it's been a joy talking to you about that today. Likewise, Howard, thank you so much for hopping on the podcast. We're gonna wrap up and then we're gonna go make some some more people's Day. Great. And then, of course we've got to end with a Corny joke, as we always do it. I think actually it comes out very nicely and topical, since we're just talking about baseball. But why is a baseball stadium always called HMM? Why is a baseball Game Stadium always called Joey? It's full of fans and after time it will but I'm bum good people cool things is produced in Austin, Texas.

If you're a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. You can send me a message Joey at good people cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people cool things and check out all the old episodes via good people cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and I have a wonderful day.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (133)