Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 8 · 1 year ago

How to Use Storytelling for Business Success with Tamika Bickham

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Tamika Bickham is an award-winning TV journalist with a knack for storytelling. She and I share the belief that everyone’s got a story to tell, and that the most impactful stories can help change lives for the better. No matter what kind of work you do, you can take her tips and experience and learn how to use storytelling for business success by creating the kind of content that will truly benefit your audience.

Tamika’s passion for storytelling led to the creation of TB Media Group, a story-driven content marketing agency focused on cultivating stories, creating engaging content, and connecting with audiences in authentic ways.

Welcome to good people, cool things, the podcast featuring conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives.I'm your host, Joey held, and today's guest is to make a Bickham, founder of TV Media Group. To make as a fellow Miami Hurricane,it's all about the you, and has a delightful story of accidentally launching herown business. It's still going strong and to Mika has learned plenty along theway, which she kindly shares throughout this episode. We chat about how shestarted TV media group, the most surprising parts of running a company and mystorytelling is essential in any profession. What's dive on it? Coming from thatstorytelling and turtle locome backgrounds, and I feel like we always need to feedthat created side exactly exactly, or else we go crazy exactly. So Imean, I don't know if you find it the same, like coming froma journalism background. Well, I guess I should ask you. I mean, I'm over here at the one asking the questions now, but you're runningthe centerview. I mean this is what this is what I do right like. But how do you find it now, coming from, you know, moreof a traditional I at least that's how we were trained. Great TraditionalTurtles and background. I feel like so many of us end up in thedigital social space. How are you liking it? I think overall I'm likingit. There's definitely some elements that I think are lacking in the digital likeI think you have to generally, well, it depends. For some of theclients I work with it's like, you know, they're very social focus, where it's like hey, you kind of have to tell this message inlike fifteen seconds, and in those cases I'm like, well, sometimes itmakes more sense like dive deeper into a story and you know, you mighthave to sacrifice like as much detail as you'd want to put in there justto have a quicker, more like eye catching thing. But I think there'sthere's definitely some cool opportunities, just as far as like the different platforms thatare out there. I mean, don't even get me start on Tick Tock. That's its own thing, but like just with like the level of likesocial listening and all that, like ancilary data that you can use, Ithink can be super interesting and how you shape a story right. Totally agree. Yeah, no, I mean I think it's just a natural progression becausethe way that we tell stories and like the platforms that we have to tellthem on, has changed since we they've been in school and, you know, we were learning the art form of storytelling. So it's just changing sofast and we have to adopted. You know, at the end of theday, we are all of us have businesses or even just as individual weall are extensions of the media in some capacity. So we all, Ithink, have to think about how we are creating content. So I thinkthat that's fun. Absolutely. Is that a good segue into into TV media? Did you see how I set that up there? Yes, it isperfect and I think that's a good segue. Excellent. So give me the elevatorpitch. Imagine that we haven't spoken in years, not based on atrue story, and you're catching up on on life and what you've done.How did the TV Media Group get started? What was the impetus for it?Tell me everything. Oh good, yeah, how we got started.I mean, this was definitely never part of the plan, I tell youthat, but that's okay. I feel...

...like a lot of us end upbecoming accidental business owners and sometimes that more fun. You know, actually Iwas working in local TV news for about four to five years, so I'mnot very long, still pretty early in my career and I was, youknow, back here in south Florida as to the local preview reporter. DecidedI wanted to get out of the business. Love storytelling, you know, loveconnecting with audiences, but I just couldn't take constantly reporting on negative newsand I wanted to do something a little more positive and feeling like I justhad more of an impact in a positive way in the community. So fromthere I went in to nonprofit Ur but in two thousand and fourteen, twothousand and fifteen, you're starting to now hear these buzz words like brand journalismand content marketing. At social media's kind of blowing up and brands are takinga more notice and how they should use it in their marketing strategies. SoI went to go work for the local symphony, the new World Symphony,and pretty much went in house, as there in house journalists, so creatingvideo content for them and blog content for the website, social media content,email newsletters. So it was my business is kind of born out of that. I was working one day for the new world company I was add anevent shooting and shooting video and I met my first client and they came upto me to say hey, these a video, and it was actually someonefrom the Communications Department at a local city in Broward County and they needed avideo for a project that they were doing. So I said sure, why not, I can do that. So I literally went onto some business workand created my LLC and created a business account and I said right here,I'll do it. I'm mom a business now and I only created my businessbecause that client asked me to do a video for them. Little did Iknow four years later I would be here doing this full time. So backthen it was just I say back then like that's a long time ago,dece me, that's it. That's a decade ago. That are I meanthat's last decade at least. That's Oh right, right, December two thousandand fifteen is what I incorporated. But yeah, at that time I wasstill working full time and I even went on to take another job and littleby little I got other clients and but I would usually only work with aclient at a time not to overwhelm myself. I did some freelance on camera workbut primarily was doing full service video production focused on storytelling, you know, in a journalistic way, which is my background, for nonprofit and forlocal government. So passed forward to what was it now, two thousand andeighteen, I was working for the city of Mere Martin Browert County, handlingall their marketing and communications, still working on the side with clients, andthey ended up eliminating my position. So yeah, that came as kind ofa surprize. I had a little bit of a headset up, but Iwas kind of at this point of like, okay, you know, I haven'ta somewhat established client. Makes four or five clients at that time thatI was working with definitely not enough to pay the bills. So do Igo ahead and do this? Do I take another job? And I actuallyhad a couple other job interviews and neither...

...none of them came through, andI just felt like it was kind of the universe showing me which direction Ishould go in. So that's really how full time TV media group wasn't evena year and a half ago at this point. So yeah, I meanI just again we started video production. I knew I have a love forstorytelling. Helping my client do a better job of telling their stories communicate theirstories. But at that point it started to once I went full time withit, started to work into just content creation storytelling in general. So thatincludes video content but also, you know, copywriting, blogging for clients and socialmedia content, so the digital marketing aspect of things and in addition tothe video production side of things. So that's really what we do now andhave grown a lot in the last year and a half or so and havinga lot of fun doing it. That's good. That's a that's better thangrowing and having a miserable time. It's smashing your teeth every day's moment.That's inevitable. But I've definitely learned to embrace the process and enjoy like thestock more. It's all part of it. It's not part of the journey andI think sometimes you're so anxious to get to the other side and theside where it's like everything's great to have all these clients and making all thismoney, we're getting amazing results, that we're doing such off and work.But you know, there's always going to be hard times and struggles along thejourney and I think we don't take the time to really just kind of bein that and enjoyed that part of it too, because there's a moment whenyou overcome the struggles and you get better, smarter and learn more. So I'mhaving fun going through that learning and growing process because over the last couplemonths I had a period where I I don't know what happened, but inlike two months it sprippled my client. I mean it was of the itwas crazy. I was I wasn't sure how I was going to handle itall, but it was all they were all good problems to have. Sothat was when I was like, okay, I need to really focus on growinga team, coming up with more structure here, structuring the business sothat we have a process the streamline things and I have support to do this, because I do know that I want to scale and grow. So that'skind of the stage that I've been at and that's really a fun place tobe, you know, when you're growing the business side and growing a teamand finding awesome people you can work with and rely on who are better atdoing these things than you are and you can learn from as well. SoI love that I'm having fun with that and focusing more on business development andjust, you know, kind of focusing on the direction I want to takethe company in. So awesome and I think that's a part of running abusiness that can often get overlooked. Like a lot of times people will havean idea or sometimes have someone come up to them and be like Hey,do this for me and then you're like boom, business as in your case. But can you talk a little more about the business development side of thingsand sort of what processes and resources and tools that you found most helpful asyou're scaling up Your Business? Uh, yeah, you know, I definitely. I just I started tapping into different things online. You know, thereare certain things, as I'm sure you know, in a marketing field,when you're working with clients and timelines,...

...a timeline, deadlines, revisions,reviews, you're dependent on the client delivering things and getting back to you ina timely manner and there's a lot of things that can really backlog your production. So I was running into a lot of that. So and it wasnegatively impacting just how much more business I could take on or our productivity asa team. So I really just kind of took the Google started looking forother people who have the desfil agencies definitely are at a place where I seemyself going and looking for people with resources. So I actually came across someone namedJason's plank. I don't know if you've heard of him, but hehas a really awesome podcast, awesome library resources on his website and it's allabout how to grow and scale your agency and putting you know, having clarityand you know your vision, vision and what direction you're going, but buildinga team and also having crosses in place to handle clients, develop the teamand all of that. And there were just certain key things that I startedto learn by listening to his podcast and also investing in some of his resourcesthat were a game changer for me and I've executed a lot of these thingsfrom the team perspective, one of them being hiring a project manager to reallyhandle kinds of day today, handle kind of managing the freelancer, handle clientmanagement, which were the things that were bogging me down and professing me fromworking on the business development side. And part of business is always keeping likethat sales pipeline fool and if you're just so focused on the work, andI still love the work, it's still do the work, for sure,but I can't have, you know, I can't spent all of my timedoing that because now I'm not keeping the pipeline full because inevitably, you know, cliently, clients, you know, come and go. So if you'renot constantly working on keeping that full and, you know, signing new clients,you're going to kind of have this up and down in revenue. Sothose are a lot of the things that I learned from him, just kindof tapping into other agency owners. As an agency it's kind of a differentin unique mottle. So I've just looked into that and that's been one ofthe main things. And then also working with a colleague of mine, unjustclarity. Yeah, I guess You Could Call It business coaching and I foundthat important be as an important thing to invest in in two thousand and twentyas far as where am I going, who do I want to market to, what type of clients do I want to work with? Because in thebeginning, right, you're just saying to everything, and I was getting involvedin, you know, when you're doing social and digital and video, you'refine. Need, I feel, or your clients need wet sides, andI was getting too wrapped up in all these other things that we're really notat the poor of who I am and what I like to do, whichis telling stories, working on messaging and creating content. So I was like, okay, let's get rid of all that. I'll have strategic partners Ican refer that work too, focus on what I like and now kind ofwhat segments or what industries do I really connect with personally and from a businessperspective, and focus on marketing to them. So that's kind of where I'm atnow. So you talked a little bit about how you love telling stories, which, naturally, as we both have journalism backgrounds, that's a keypart of really any good stories, being...

...able to kind of find that messageand what you want to tell, and we have been talking beforehand. Idon't know if I had hit re for it, so maybe this will showup on the podcast earlier. But how the changing media landscape and the focuson digital and social and how that has changed or impacted the way that youtell stories, and can you talk a little bit about both how that traditionaljournalism background still plays a part in the stories are telling, but maybe there'sa little bit more of a sort of digital slant to it now. Yeah, yeah, I mean you know what I love is like when I meetthose clients or potential clients who are like, I want to work with you becauseyou have a journalism background and that's who I'm looking to work with,because we still have to tell stories. Digital is different, whereas we don'thave as much time and it we have to keep thinks shorter and to thepoint. But at the end of the day, I heard somebody say once, and I wish I could remember who it is, but state and socialmedia is like networking at scale, which is so true. Like, ifyou think about it and you're going to a networking event to hopefully, youknow, meet some potential clives, you're not going to just say hi,my name is, to me to Bickam, my company's DB meeting groups. Doyou want us to do your social media for you? Like it doesn'twork like that. And so many people approached social media, digital marketing andstorytelling online that way. You have to build the relationship. You know you'reat a markie. I think about when you're at a networking at it andyou introduce yourself to somebody, you have some questions about them, you knowwho they are, where they're from, their family, what they do butthey like to do for fun. Okay, so then after that maybe we'll grabcoffee catch up. It's know each other a little bit more and itgoes from there. I mean, I think you have to approach social mediadigital marketing in a similar way as far as you're telling a story, butyou're building a connection, and so many people forget that when they're just sellingin fifteen second videos or, you know, in short pieces of coffee. Nowyou know that all have the purpose, but there's still have to be somethought behind. What is the story of who I am, what I'moffering, what makes those different and unique and why people would want to workwith us? At the end of the day, we're all humans, forall people, we all want authenticity and connections. So I mean, inorder to get that, we have to build trucks with the audience and wedo that by telling stories. So when I work with clients, I meanthe first thing we do, if we sit down and we just talk,I kind of interview them as a journalist like. That's what I bring frommy background, because if I just sit there, and I've done this before, I've asked the clients. So tell me, what's your story like?What can we work on? As furst, drafting a narrative for you? Andone of my very first clients told me our stories are these nine areasof service and I was like, okay, let's try that again. That's notyour story right. It's not like we're not here just to sell whatyou do, not to sell your products and services. We're here to sellyou as a person, because people buy people. So yeah, so,I mean just are my journalism background. I approach it that way. Interviewmy clients because most of the time they don't know their own stories and Ican pull out the information when I sit down and interview them. And thenyou know, and from the organic side of things, that we're creating blogsand social media content, we're taking that story and we're dressing the narratives andlooking at who their audiences and making sure we're tailoring that content to what thataudience wants to hear and we're not selling. So yes, I mean we definitelyhave to shift how we tell stories...

...for the digital space. But youknow, we had mentioned earlier, we're all in a way that an extensionof the media. I think we're in the past people pitched media in orderto get their story out there, but we all have to create content nowbecause we have our own media channels. You know, we have a website, we have social media, we have a youtube or a podcast or,you know, video content that we're putting out there. It's so I ortantyou know how to tell a story and build a connection, and so that's, I think, where our journalism backgrounds really come in and are an addedbenefit, because really so many people are not good at doing it, orat the very least they're not good at doing it for them fellows, absolutely, and I really enjoy the getting that connection piece and I'm glad you mentionedthat several times. I've found personally for my freelancing career, that a lotof the folks that end up being clients are people I just met, likeyou know, and happenstance and just have we have that natural curiosity to wantto learn about other people and learn about their stories. And I remember meetingsomeone at a South by southwest event here in Austin. Whole city shuts down, it's delightful, traffic is miserable, but I was at I was walkingby. This was a little east of downtown but you know, kind oftakes over that whole area, so there's lots of things just going on,and I was walking by like a converted House that had become sort of likean event space and a company was just putting on this sort of like youknow breakfast with like live music kind of thing, and I was like,Oh, this looks fun, I'll just pop in here and ended up chatting, like just walking up to a table that had an open spot to standand just started chatting with the people there, and one of them, a yearand a half later, reached out to me and was like Hey,you know, I work for this company and we're looking for some content forour new site that we're starting and I remembered you had said that you're awriter and you know, are you interested? And I was like yes, likewhat a great you know, what great memory I'm actually and that wouldn'thappen if you don't build that connection. Yeah, yeah, you have to, you have to have that connection and that curiosity and I think I thinkhaving the journalism background certainly serves as well, and that regard absolutely. I meanwe should all think about how we'd storytelling on a daily basis, right. I mean, and it's like I always say, your story or yourmessage should be the heart of your marketing strategy. Everybody always thinks tactics andokay, I need to postpone social media or I need a video or Ineed to get my website up, but haven't even thought about their content,how they have or, you know, the message that they're going to puton these channels, like what is their why? And it really has tostart from there and that sees all those other channels. So I tend tofind that people work in reverse and and don't start with the story, themessage first. So it's so important. I mean even in just one tooone, you know, even if you just take the digital bide away orvideo or you know, anything that you're doing online and you're just talking aboutmeeting a person, networking with the person or doing a presentation in front ofa group. You know, how do you get them interested? You tella story about yourself. You know, you people, you know, youask them their story. So it's just that natural human curiosity and connection thatwe all, I think we all crave. So Yeah, love it, loveit and I want to get back to TV media group, because yousaid you kind of accidentally stumbled upon this...

...and are now in the growth mode. So I'd love to know what's the surprising part about running a business?Everything, I mean, it's just one big learning process. I don't knowif I could say one, one surprising thing. I mean, there's definitelya lot, probably. I mean, everybody talks about this, but Ithink you really don't realize until you're in it, as far as judge howquickly time to escapes you, like how much you have to struggle so manydifferent things and you don't realize all the other things that you need to doin the beginning, right, like you get your first client. They're like, Hey, create a video for me, and you're like, okay, awesome. So you know, you shoot the video, your grip, youedit a video. Happy Client. Yeah, okay. But now you're scaling,right, and you have fines when you have a team, so youneed lawyers and you need contracts and your you need to invoice make sure youget paid and you need to pay people and you need to have all ofthis documents has and then you're accounting and many the market your business. Likethere's just so many sides to having a business to manage and to keep upwith. So that's probably the most overwhelming thing. Until you can start toget some things in place to help support you on that, weather's administrative supportor project management support, then you can kind of have your sanity back,because I know for a while I did not have my sanity. Yeah,it's a lot to juggle. I mean you're always on. That's probably anotherthing. You don't really realize it, and I feel like people always saythat right, if you never can turn the business off. I think thattakes some personal discipline and training in order to you know, just I meanwe all need some free time, we all need some time to relax ourminds a little bit, but not realizing how all consuming having a business canbe was probably another surprising thing. But I think as time goes on,you you learn how to how to balance that and take a day off.So check the email maybe per a day. Yeah, so I would just saythat it's time management and juggling pretty much being everything. And Yeah,so, I mean it's overwhelming for sure, but I think kind of tapping intoany resources, whether you have a mentor or you know, there's somebodythat you can find, whether it's on my courses or you know how Ifound another former agency owner who specifically teaches other agency owners how to grow abusiness and scale a business. I mean, once you can invest in those kindsof resources, I think it's so worth it. So you're not playinga guessing game right like in the beginning you're like, okay, I thinkthis is the right way to handle this problem, but you're not sure becauseif you're a first time business owner, these are all things you haven't encounteredbefore. So I found that, after kind of guesting on a few thingsand something to get right things to get wrong, it's much more helpful tojust go ahead and pay for the answers. And I'm sure there's been many eveningswhere you're in bed and you're like all right, time to go tosleep and then something POPs into your head like wait, a mids did Ido this? Yeah, Oh my good to yeah, I mean so manyevenings right like I'm just like I'm gonna just work through the night or I'mjust going to sleep here on the couch...

...or on the floor for two hoursas I have to be back up again to get all of this done.I mean it's definitely it's definitely a hustle and a grind, but it's themost rewarding thing that I've done. Well, that is wonderful to hear. It'sall worth it, all worth it in the end. Pick it outanyone who's thinking about it or is like I'm at that point, I wantto quit. Pick it up. Yes, you will reach the top of themountain and it's wonderful exactly. I think as long as you say trueto who you are too, you know, as long as you say true todoing things that you truly love, like you have always think back towhy you started and what it is you really get joy out of and youlove to do. So I think if you stay true to that, becauseI think we all go through that right like you may start. For me, I started doing a video and I love that. I love video storytelling. That's probably my favorite thing to do in my business. But then youhave clients to ask you for something else and something else and you get furtherand further away from why you started and really what she love, and maybethat's where some of that anxiousness or, you know, on happiness can comefrom. So I think always kind of saying true to what you're really goodat, which you know really well, and what you're passionate about, willkeep you on course. I love it. We're going to turn that into amotivational poster and then dish out to Bos like can hang it up onthe wall. Excellent, im you're expectually writing some of this down. Wecan quote for my social exactly. Yes, well, we'll, we can transcribethis, turn them into very nice quote graphics. Fair, and Ithink that that again we're all about the SEGUAYS here. I think that's Segueis very nicely into the top three, since we both love telling stories,I would like to hear, and you can, I guess, do eitherpast clients or from the early journalist days, of your top three stories that you'vegotten to tell. Okay, I love this question because this is Imean, this is this is the fun part, this is why we dowhat we do. Um. But that's definitely a hard question, stoll right, because there's I mean there's so many stories sometimes in news and I peoplewouldn't realize you do three four stories today. So sometimes I don't remember a lotof them, but the ones that I do that really stand out.One of the first ones it was the story I did in Montgomery Alabama,which was my first TV market. It was called living in poverty. Itwas actually a sweet piece and so my news director, I think, Ithink he brought that story to me. Yeah, there was like a articlein the paper that said one and three children in Alabama live in poverty,which is a staggering number. So we wanted to do a profile on itand I was like the only way that this story will work is if wecan actually show a family or a child or children who live in poverty.So that was that was a bit of a challenge to get that, obviously, because that's a very personal and difficult thing to share with a very publicaudience. But we ended up finding a family and my strategy there was actuallyI just hung out at a soup kitchen for a few days and I justtalk to people again, like Bray, like just building that connection, buildingthat trust so so that they would trust me enough to want to go oncamera. So I ended up finding a family. It was a single momwith three children, so a family of for living on about eleven or twelvethousand dollars a year. where, I...

...believe at that time in maybe twothousand and eleven. The poverty line, I think, was something like twentytwozero a year, so Barbo of the poverty line. And she opened upfor doors and shared everything with us, from how they have run out offood at the end of the month how she, if they need milk oreggs, has to walk six miles to a door to get it. Becauseshe didn't have a car, she paid one of her friends in town todrive her to the grocery store wants the month to get the food that theyneeded for the month. She had a daughter who was a senior in highschool and she this one month that we kind of, you know, showcasedher life. She showed us how she saved twenty dollars for her cap andgown that she needed to purchase for graduation and money for a prom dressed froma consignment store and very inexpensive dress. You know, some of the thingsthat we all take for granted, but just showing how they made it workas they still strive to have somewhat of a normal life and, you know, even just living with gratitude even being in that situation. But it wasvery eye opening and it was a beautiful story and it was really rewarded becausewhen that story aired, several people, I mean I don't even know howmany, ended up calling the station. There were people that knew her whoended up going to her house. They gave them clothes and food. Somepeople gave them money. I think I remember member actually, which blew meAways, that Auburn University at Montgomery actually called an offered a scholarship to herdaughter, who was a senior in high school, to attend school. Sothere was just I mean that's just shows the power of storytelling and that waseye opening for me and I think it was, you know, a positiveexperience for the family who told their story. So that was really rewarding. Thatwould definitely tap my list. Let's see. Second Story I would sayis a story that I did. was actually a series at channel ten atW PLZ in south Florida, where I was a reporter from two thousand andtwelve, two thousand and fourteen. So I don't know if you've ever workedthat dreadful overnight shift or morning shift. I gabble. That wasn't it.If you dabbled. You don't dabble lot usually those who do, I givethem all the credit. But I work what three am, so like noonor zero pm whenever we got off and I found myself in a situation whereit was super unhappy. I had gained a lot of weight. I justwasn't looking or feeling my best, as I wasn't eating right, I wasn'tsleeping right, I wasn't exercising. So I set myself this crazy goal tocompete in a bodybuilding competition for the first time ever and I was going tolose like forty, forty five pounds in order to get on stage, andI had about eighteen weeks of training. So about halfway through I was losingweight feeling that I was like okay, I'm going to meet the deadline theshow that I wanted to do, which was another nine weeks from months.So I went to my news director. I just said, Hey, I'mdoing this thing, which means I'm going to get on stage in a bikini. Just want to make sure that's okay with you, so you know,keeps some pictures pop up somewhere. There's no surpises. He's like, Oh, yeah, that's great, let's do a story on it, and itended up turning into a nine week series...

...where every week I was doing astory on my weight lost journey, but I would highlight different things like thisis how I do the Diet one week, or this is what my workout routineis like, or I did another story on the history of bodybuilding.So I turned it into something educational that I thought the viewers could take awaywith them and even one week I ended up turning the spotlight on the viewersand asking them to share their weight lost journey. So I actually featured someof them in the stories as well. So, as a result, Ihad people who were coming to train with me and work out at the gymwith my trainers, people who came to the competition in the end, whichI ends up placing in the top five, by the way. Nice, butthat was a really fun story because I think health and fitness have alwaysbeen part of my personal journey, so to share that journey for me waswas really fun and I think it also inspired our viewers so, you know, live their healthiest lives and worked out and get in shape and also realizethat, hey, there's not anything you can achieve if you don't put yourmind to it. So that was a lot of fun. And the third, let's be I'm going to have to pull full of client story for thisone. You know what? I'm going to actually go with my very firstclient, that one that came to me and said Hey, I need avideo on it. Said, okay, let me go creat my l sadI did that this story for the city of Sunrise, which is in BrowardCounty here in Florida, and they needed a story on a program that theywere doing for high school students. They called the Sunrise Leadership Academy, WhereHigh School student it's like a group of high chiming high school students or interestnessto the engagement. So each year they have kind of a different project thatthey're involved in. And that year, what was that? Two Thousand andfifteen, two thousand and sixteen time. They of project where they paired highschool students with senior citizens and had them teach senior citizens how to use theinternet or how to use, you know, their Gmail, facebook, all socialmedia, skuype and Youtube. It was so funny to see them experience. But it was such a cool project because, you know, you havekids who are sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, and then you have these results whoare in their S S who really don't know social media, but theywant to because they have grandchildren they want to keep in touch with, theywant to keep up with on facebook, they want to see them on skypeor on facetime. And the reason the city did this is because they sawthat there was a gap as far as their population. They had a lotof their population, I don't know the exact members, that we're senior citizensand then a lot who were younger, in that kind of high school age. So the way is that they were communicating to city residence needed to bedifferent, right. So like the older generation kind of wanted the flyers andthe paper and the younger generation want to find out any city news and updateson social media. So they wanted to find a way to bridge the gapsthrough a program and that's what they did with it. But not only werethere years it is and learning from the kids about hey, youtube. Imean they were getting one of the guys who was getting on a dating website. Some of them were applying for jobs, but you know, these adults wereteaching the kids about life and some of the challenges that come with lifeor getting old and their back through their getting or the right is, andalso just a desire to take connected to...

...their family as they grew up.So it was definitely a two way learning process and it was such a funproject to work on. So I would say those are my top three,all very different but all rewarding. Those, those all sound terrific in their ownways. And I'm just picturing the last one time. It sounds glorious. Oh my goodness, I will send it to hilarious. He's like some, yeah, I remember this one guy. He's like, I think I goton plenty of fish. He's like there was a lot of matches,like go on to be bad. Yes, truly an inspiration for all of us. Exactly. You'll still probably have the online dating figured it out beforeI do. That's amazing. Well to make it. This is just flownby, at least it has on my end. Maybe, yeah, maybeit was like pulling teeth on your end, but hopefully not. Hopefully it jodid as well that it has. I hopeful. Yes, yeah,I'll plan it. We've got motivational posters already on the way. I've contactedthe printer. They've they've told me that's they're on the way already, sowe're looking forward to that. In the meantime, if people want to learnmore about TV media group or find you online, how can they do it? Yeah, my lovebit is TV media group, Acom or you can findme connect with me on Linkedin to MEK a biocom or instagram to make aboom TV. So I would love to connect with you there. Lovely and, of course, astute listeners know that I always like to end every episodewith a joke, so we'll do one that I just heard this morning.It's a brand new, I mean it's probably really old joke, but it'snew to me and hopefully new to everyone listening as well. I used tobe obsessed with the Hooky pokey. Yeah, I used to be obsessed with theHooky poky. Then I turned myself around. Good after today, people.

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