Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 89 · 7 months ago

89: Playing Piano and Fighting Monsters with Jeeyoon Kim

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Calling herself “a gateway drug to classical music,” Jeeyoon Kim has been playing piano for about 90% of her life. She’s certainly learned a few things along the way, from discipline and routine to overcoming nerves—fighting monsters inside of us—to the ways music can open up new adventures for people. 

When she’s not tickling the ivories, Jeeyoon also has her own YouTube channel and podcast, where she offers an inside look at making music and the art of creativity. On top of all that, Jeeyon is also the author of the new book, Whenever You’re Ready: How to Compose the Life of Your Dreams, which is structured like one of her musical performances. 

We’re covering it all in this episode. Grab a seat in the front—it’s going to be a great show.

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing. And here's your host, Joey held. Hello and welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is June Kim, an award winning classical pianist who has played piano she's forty one. She's played piano since she was four, and you don't need to be a math whiz, or I mean maybe you do, to know that that's thirty seven years of playing piano, almost her entire life, and she's played all across the globe. So we're talking all about her mindset when she is performing, whether it's Solo, getting her daily practicing in or on a stage in front of hundreds of thousands of people, however large these these venues are a lot of people watching, all eyes on her, and how she kind of fights off those internal monsters that we all have and puts on a great show. June also is a recent artist, with her book whenever you're ready, how to compose the life of your dreams, having come out just in August. It's a fantastic red structured like one of her performances. If you've never even seen her in concert, you can pick up a copy of the book and it's like you're experiencing it there, while also giving you a nice kick in the pants to get going on whatever your next creative endeavor is. Of course, because she's a musician, we're talking about our worst big because we always like here in that lots of good stuff in this episode, so keep on listening. I mean, you already pushed play, you might as well keep on listening. If you'd like to get in touch with good people cool things, you can reach out via facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast. You can also send an email joey at good people, cool thingscom let's kick it into the show and now let's have into the conversation with June. For people who don't know who you are, can you give us your elevator pitch and tell us the type of elevator that we're writing on? Hi, I'm concert pianist and Kim people refer me as gateway drug to classical music, and I I accomplished that. This saying by creating engaging concert experience. Being a podcast host. Try to create a concert that is connected to people taking breach down between creating a bridge actually between the audiences and and me as a performer and make beauty of a costco music. He's available to everyone and part of now I am also author and that's also my way of enticing people get to know me better and eventually they step closer to classical music love and we'll get into the book for sure. But I know you. You Credit your success to certain disciplines and practice as a mindsets that you kind of encapsulate every day. So can you share some of those so maybe the rest of us can see some success to yeah, I guess it is all about you know, a lot of people would say you're so talented and I actually left internally and if you only see how much I work and you know, as a perse give you a perspective. If I started when I started piano for you years old and I'm now forty one years old, that's thirty seven years of four or five hours each day nonstop, and that's that's how much discipline and perseverance required to, you know, be in the field and actually this becomes part of my life and it's not that I have so much more perseverance and motivation power, but I think for me it is more about creating a habit and build a system to where I want to go and forget the goal and actually focusing on the system. For example, if I I I know I need to practice in order to...

...maintain as a constant pianist, and I actually in the fact that I love playing piano. So the practicing piano in them part every day, it's really important to me. Then I actually have to create it. I don't have to think about when I practice piano. So, for example, for me, after breakfast, that is my secred time that I get my morning practice in. That's the only time that I actually don't think about when I practice piano and I have to secure that the time for myself. And even if I don't feel like doing it, I still do and I really know that my feelings, even though I love piano, ups and down. So some days like I really if you don't feel like doing it, but I still do it because I believe that action speaks louder than words and I'm committed to this relationship with my piano and regardless of how I feel, I do it anyway. And I learned over the years that motivation is not about how you feel and then you do something. It is more about you do it, then you will get motivated. So I always call it as a butt power. And if you sit down and started to work on something and it actually there's some energy created within. And I think the first step, getting into the piano, is a hardest step. But if I create that as an easy, less friction as possible, make it as more automatic each each day, I was so much easier, and that's maybe some part of my perseverance and keep doing within the system. But every morning I write a journal. That writing part of it, you know, even writing a book. I really believe in a power of writing because being a concert pianist, I deal with this monster in my head all the time. That's that's the negative voice within you know, I have a self doubt or, you know, criticism. That actually there are professional critics that criticize my performance on newspaper after I play. So that doesn't really help for my monster inside of me. But I believe that everybody has that monster and I believe that that monster will never go away, but we can tame them. So over the years in my performance career that I have to actually find a way to tain this monster. Otherwise I always going to have this battle on stage and about those voices before, during or after. What I really found interesting is that those monster wake up only during those stressful or you know, in funt of people are during the concert. Normally, when I practice daily day, that it Moster doesn't speak to me as much, but as soon as I am about to go on a stage or performing, those monsters much louder in my head. So I had to learn the pattern of this monster and really write it down. What does it say, and really analyze is just coming from my childhood. It's just someone, something that I heard when I was young, or my friend or my teacher. Where is the root of this monster? And then after that, I write because we all have a jus angel side of us, which is you're doing grade, everything's fine, you know, all those positive side us, which I call it an angel, which is on my side. It well, and I have to write it one to five, one monster voice to five different and you'll positive voices. And I actually be defend myself with those angelic, positive voices. And if I say, like you know, I'm so nervous about upcoming concert, then I will write it. You know, you love playing piano. People gonna love it, don't you know? I want to share this beauty with world, or whatever that is. I really try to create a positive combat to that negative voice.

And every morning when I write it is a journalinge, it's I write a self affirmation sentences. Maybe it's a set, you know, strengthening my endel visualize the upcoming concert, whatever the important event coming up, in the detail, as ideal scenario as possible. And you know, like I write it like what could my today better? And that's not about, you know, do this task or that task, more about the attitude like, you know, kind of take it, take it, take it easy, be be be mindful, whatever the attitude that I want to have. And maybe at the evening I will write, you know, what are the things that have happened today? On May Zing thing happened. It's it's not a major thing, but maybe little things. I write it. What it what am I grateful for? And then at the end, maybe I write it what could my make my day even better? And often that I would write to you and today was beautiful, wasn't it? Other Times I would write you could exercise more today or whatever. So for me I have to create a self coach who is a compassionate, gentle warm yet a very positive giving up positive feedback for me to move forward in my life. And this writing routine that I have a daily basis is me creating another self and so whenever I need it, I can pick myself up. And being a performing artist, it's a it's a lonely journey, but I realized that everybody's journeys alonely, even if you have a partner, parent friends, you still have to create that self strength so that you know that whenever you needed that strength, that you know how to get tip into that strength that you already have. So my daily routine, you ask about the tools, that those journaling and visualization, to discipline my mind to be positive direction, so as creating in a system daily that so I can maintain the process, not not the goal or destination. I like that. I was trying to do the math in my head of if you're practicing five hours a day for thirty seven years, how many a total hours? I think it's around Seventyzero. But well, I'll check, check afterwards and see how close that is. But I very yeah, very, very impressive consistency and I like having the kind of, you know, competing voices and telling that monster voice like hey, you might poplem sometimes, but you're not going to overtake me. I like that. Yeah, yeah, I think the interestingly, those voice of voice about monster has a pattern. And when the PAT and changes, then I also have to like came where? Where are you coming from? And I kind of question, I kind of in a smile, like okay, let's talk about you now. What? Where's there coming from? Huh? And then I you know, tip into it and that, I think it's the self awareness. It's a lot to do with that. So that voice comes alone. That isn't it's not surprising. It's actually kind of expect it to have those negative voice and, you know, to find a ways to tame them and realizing that I I will always have that voice, but that's that's a part of the life. I always like asking musicians this because if you play enough shows, you'll eventually have a very bad one, and I think they're great to look back on. They're always horrible in the moment, of course, but I think they make for great stories afterwards. So I'd love to hear. What's your worst Gig? Interesting, you know, once one time in my master's...

...that was actually important concert in my most Mester's degree, there was a degree recital. I was very big ambitious about my repertoire, which was very technical, and I was actually got an audition for Dr Program, recurse program, so that I have to show off what I could be capable of, and that those that's why the repertoire was very hard when I was in that in that concert, just one moment I was going well and one moment, like you know, just like a movie, everything stops, there's no sound, you can hear your breathing note of a sudden, like who am I? Where am I? And at the moment, like you know, I could feel like my body temperature rise to elicit ten gree degrees and thinking, oh, what's going on? What is next thing I supposed to do? And it's just basically blank. And in that moment I was feeling like, Oh wow, how how could I? How could I go, you know, and it felt like forever, but at the end it wasn't forever and I somehow finished that concert. But that concert was so much war going on in my head that you know it. The Monster was definitely winning over end all at them, at that concert, and all I wanted to do is somehow wrap up that concert and cry, you know, going home and cry, you know. And so after that I realized I needed to something about this. I can't have this world war three, whatever the word World War, in my head and and keep could performing because this is too stressful. And that's where but then what was interesting was that when I list watch the video after maybe six months and later most of the closing my eyes and watch that video that recorded that particular concert and that mishap or whatever, the mistake that I thought it was going to be Detester, was not that bad as much as I thought it was. And in fact there were a lot of people came up to me that like how in how beautiful that concert was or, you know, gave them some something to connect to and they enjoyed it. They they get some strength and they connected to the music and they really share with me and many beautiful things. Then I realized that it is not about perfection of the notes. My perception of success of concert completely changed from since then. That is not about how perfect or what kind of mistakes or Digester is actually it. I its only as I'm core to the message that I'm trying to give and connect to the music. That perfection is the fantasy and I can never aim for that perfect note, perfect but I have to put my mind into the right place. So now have ever since that concert, working on this Mike Again, the monster and all those mind battles that going on, that there's there. If there is a Digester of concert, is then where I have a so much mental battle within me, but actual people's perspective, that's the probably is a beautiful concert as well. So it is I can always pinpoint. My goal of each concert is that I walk out and as if this is a last concert. If this is a last concert, what to worry? You know, I would never really worry about this note and that note, but I really want to express what I can give and connect with people and share this joy and beauty again. You know, being a concert pianist it's beautiful and wonderful because even if I make a mistake, nobody dies. I'm not a doctor, you know. Maybe I fix...

...a soul, but it's nothing like digesters. So it really gives me a comfort. Or I'm just a messenger of beauty and I have to just coming, come from the right place of a mind, and then there's a no failure. That's a good mindset for a lot of careers. I. Doctor, surgeon? Yeah, probably, maybe, maybe, like a Bungee jump instructor, I making a mistake. I'm other people might notice it, but I think in most cases we're our own worst critic. So if we, you know, in a song, if we think like a man, I really mess that up, people on the outside probably aren't going to notice. Like maybe maybe they for a second like Oh that, you know, that notesided maybe a little off, but like Oh, I'm already back into this sounding good again. And and likewise, even just if you're you know, if you're walking somewhere and you think like Oh, you know, I just like tripped and everyone saw. No, chances are no one did. Like people aren't paying that close attention to other people, I would say. So, yeah, I think it's also that mindset of you know, I'm just sharing my love with this piano and music and it then love is overflowing from me and the Arrow is pointing to the to the out not arrows from outside to me. So I shouldn't care how actually people going to think about my performance. It's actually relevant. I just have to focusing on my relationship and and just me express seeing not how people going to like me or how they're going to judge me, how they're gonna actually react of how I do it. It. I I hope they like it, but I fact they don't. It doesn't really affect who I am as a pianist. So so that that really helps that I stronger relationship I have with this particular music. It's it's matters to most in and people get the gift of music as a byproduct, and I know so. That's why I'm focusing on my stronger relationship with the music. And then, you know, there's again, there's no failure. And outside of your music, you mentioned that you also are now an author with your book. Whenever you're ready, how to compose the life of your dreams. Was a book something that you always wanted to do? Or what I mean, after thirty seven years of playing, where you like, I want to share this with people. How did that come about? I think I always wanted to write a book. Again. You know, my my language, main primary language, is Korean. So I always love the intimate relationship you can built with author and you know that that relationship always fascinating. You can actually go in someone's inside of their thinking process and actually be have a dialog internally. So I want it to maybe somehow and thought about it, but you know, at the same time I had again a lot of monsters acting up and saying, you know, how is you going to do it? And and I have to overcome my own fear and self doubt in thinking that. You know, I really wanted to share my grin room of a stage and you know, through the performance I can really connect with people through music, but with through the book, I can give them toward guide to my process and inside of my thoughts. And at the end is a create dipper connection with audience that who already, you know, appreciate music, maybe perhaps never heard of me. So there was my window to the world to connect and I think also I wanted to. I realized what I prepare in behind the scene, in Micrin Room, which is all a lot...

...awful, a lot of this mindset and how to awaken the creativity, how to cultivate connection, how to take care of my body, how to prepare physically, emotionally, mentally, it's so much similar to preparing a life stage. So I wanted to create this like life tool kit that it worked for me, and and also demistifying the talent code. They think that I have a special talent and that's why I'm doing this, and so they you know, the title is really comes from the thirty seconds before I go on and stays. There's always stage guy holding that door asking my Q. Whenever you're ready. You know, at that very moment again, I have to create so much courage and strength within and make a decision to walk. And I think a lot of people who has, you know, starting out new hobby or new career or speaking engagement or writing a book or whatever hobby, that you picking up that first step. You know, making that decision to go for it. It's the hardest step and at that very moment we need to create a lot of strength and I wanted to create those tools like a friend, just like we are having a coffee and talking about life, you know, the no judgmental voice attached, and so when I talk about you know I had a struggle with similar things, but for me that worked. You know, this tool work so that people look at these tools that are that I use as something accessible and tangible and so so they can be motivate and inspire, so that this book is between their stage and and then say store, so whenever they're ready they can pick up maybe one or two tools and maybe maybe apply to their life. Your stage hands are much more polite than the ones I've dealt with and my band. I feel like the last show we played, when I the the band before us was done, the person running the show kind of ran up and she's like you've got to get on stage like five minutes ago, and I was like, I'm sorry, they were still playing. She's like we're way behind, like you gotta go, and I we're like okay, okay, yeah, I guess it, because I am doing mostly Solo. You know, it's there's a lot of people behind the stage and you know still there have to wait for me to like are you ready? Whenever you're ready. You know, that kind of thing. It's not like a group of people. So I always have that movement that I nod to that person and smiling yes, you know, do you ever? Are you ever in such a playful mood that you'll do like a fake out, like you'll start going then you're like, actually, hold on, let me wait a minute and then I'll go. No, I'm sure people would be very pleased, but yeah, I I never really done it. I think that moment is a kind of secret moment for me to so that I coin to that Zen or zone that I needed to be to be optimal performance. And you know, and I always come out to the stay smiling and, you know, being happy to see everybody. And one other thing I always like talking about with books are the covers, because especially, I mean it doesn't matter if you're physically in a bookstore or looking online. You despite the saying don't judge book by its cover, a lot of people were judging books by covers and that's often the first introduction to the book that we're seeing, and I think yours very nicely reflects the feel of the book. It's very colorful. You've got piano keys at the bottom of it. I assume incorporating piano in some way was always part of the process, but...

...was this kind of the cover you initially envisioned, or how did you reach this side, this point of what you ended up with? I guess you know as a magician. It's as artist this visual element is so important and in fact, before even write a first word of this book, I already concerned about how discover is gonna be in and thinking I go to you and you got to write a book, before thinking about the cover. But I really, I really wanted this book to be contemporary and Beautiful, light, inviting, and you know, all of those elements. Arts, art, you know somehow, and so I but at the same time I'm not to be your artist, so I have no idea. You know, I have all the visions for the image, of the feeling, but I wasn't, I could not create it. So when I work with the visual artist, with this graphic designer, to creating a cover, I actually chose every time that past two years when I've work, whenever I go to bookstore, I took a take a picture, like I really like the cover, something about the color, you know. But then my my taste of the covers all over the place, because the every cover has its own reasoning why it works for them, but maybe it's not for me. So but at the same time it I noticed of some patterns that, Oh, I like that in because it was a strong connection to the title or so. Then you know the graphic designer had a little bit more solid idea with what I would like, and from there he created five different drafts completely different direction, and this, this are particular color, was one of those five and for me was pretty clear, but it was still there wasn't a piano keys anything like that, but it was a similar direction for the cover right now, and from there we're talking about I think, would that be really like a tacky to have a piano keys? You know, we didn't want it to be too obvious, like piano black and white keys and everything. So somehow maybe keys is somewhere in the bottom, you know, but then it's not black and white, maybe colorful, you know, and also that color mixer of almost like mosaic, kind of like ready. It's also has a like little swallow trolley kind of things, almost look like a travel clef, and I really like that too. And at the end, at the end of the final product is a card cover. So then you know we did make a decision. When you open the book there's a yellow inside and I also incorporate those live drawings of the artist whose name is moons of shine. When he draw me performing at the live performance and I that was kind of like make a divider of each movements that I have. I have a by movements, so each movement there is a drawing, live drawing, and I wanted to put the Qr code for the intimission part of the you know, in the inside, which can direct people to come to my podcast and actually listen to my own performance of it. So every little elements of the cover. I thought about it million times in at the end, when I look at this cover, I was like, I don't know how it gotten this point, but I'm just completely more happy, beyond happy, and if I have to create again, I don't know I can beat this particular vergs. And so for me, I mean it's this is a big because it's my baby. I actually lost objective activity. So I don't know how people, other people would think, but for me it's like, oh, everything's just perfect, of everything about it. It's just just exactly how I mbisioned and better gets always just so amazing, like how much goes into it. I think it's very easy to think like hey, you know, this is a simple kind of decision. I made really quickly, but I mean I'm also writing a book,...

...and the cover had also five, you know, five options, and I'm like I like four of the like what I was kind of like now for them. I was like, I can get on bored with these. And then I you know, I crowd source because I like hearing other people's opinions too, and just like I was fully expecting like one or two to kind of stand out, but it was such a mix. People were like, I really like this one, ever like that one, and it was just so fascinating to see. And then some I started being like, okay, I know this person a little bit, like I think they'll probably pick this one, and then they'd pick another one. Throw a curveball at Man said it's wild. Yeah, and I had learned that I shouldn't ask too many people about the decision. Like even for the actually title, I have a five different options and in fact, whenever you're ready, what's in the top one? And I think the cover as well, there's a five options in that. The one I'm heaving now. It wasn't the top one of the people voted the most and then I was like, you know, I can see why they like it. But then at the end I went for what I felt like, you know, but it was interesting to ask and I didn't want to like, I don't know, do offend anyone either, you know, like because they're everybody, I feel like they have ownership of Theo what they choose. So which was interesting, like Oh, you got to choose this because this is like look at this. You know, all those reasoning and I listen to it, but at the end I made a distance based on my my feeling. Yeah, I think that's the way to go. Like it's good to crowd source the information, but ultimately, if you're not happy with it, then it's right. Right, Mac them said right now. You also have a youtube channel, and I feel like I say this every episode, but video is becoming a must have really on whatever platform you're on. Obviously Youtube's always been big on video. They were the the original kind of video. Well, no, I'm not going to give them original content, but they're definitely the most popular video platform, and then you see channels like Instagram, ticktock, obviously prioritizing video. So it's certainly a skill that people either should start learning or perhaps can can hone it a little better, and so it's kind of a two part question. But how do you come up with content for your channel and what's your video setup like? Oh, you know, when I first started this Youtube Journey, I again, you know, as a concert pianist. I wish I can just practice and perform, but the reality is that I have to be a marketing person, I have to be my own agent. I actually spend so much energy and time to publicize what I do and you know, I was actually agonized it at some point. But at the same time I become like a multi talented person who does everything of everything and know how to do everything and actually become a stronger musician because I have all these tools. Now how I can market myself, you know, whenever, whatever the platform that would be, and video was very daunting, I think, as you mentioned, you know, talking in front of the camera. It's something about it and you know like you have to be like talking to invisible audience, but still be yourself and very vulnerable, I have to say, and still it is. I still never easy and I have it's spend so much time learning how to edit the video takes forever and stupid caption takes it like, you know, hours and hours, and so I think for me, I'm hesitant to say Youtuber, but I'm I don't mind calling myself youtuber either. And this time...

...of error, I believe that we have to utilize all of the elements out there. Even if you don't do like like multiple videos a month or anything, I think having that outlet, your own TV channel, it's important. It's an as independent or any any business that you're in. So I have like I have every corner of my house film some way, like Oh, what if I use that corner? Is that was it gonna work? You know, I invested in different lighting system obviously doing around the piano a lot. But then get to the point that it takes so much time to set up and I just want to use maybe computer camera, even though I have like a thousand dollar equipment. I just just want to use zoom video and just self record or something, and I realized that content is more important than the equipment and how fancy you're editing is. So now I'm actually step out back of my excelator of food on Youtube because it my concert started to back up and I I having a little bit like it's a bit too much if I create every video every week. So I think about. I actually took this like fivezeroll youtube class, which was very helpful. Actually, what they taught taught me was storytelling and how to create a storytelling, which what's not only for Youtube, but also states how I talk or how what, whichever platform that I UN interact with people. It's how I'M gonna share who I am and it's how to I create the connection with people. And and I think it also comes from the mission why I'm doing youtube. You know, for me, when it when I discover the WHO is the audience of my channel. So for me was I'm a concert pianist who want to connect with people and share behind the scenes of pianist and share some of the tips of practice and maybe also show some teaching tools, which means piano teachers my watch my video. So I there. They recommend for me to create a three different specific person that in your head like you know, give even fake name. This James is fifty five years old, who has been playing piano as amateur for thirty years and still feel like there's something to be learned about piano playing. She he find out my video and what kind of videos that he liked to watch, and then there's three different kind of audience of my Youtube Channel. It that I create based on that and I try to create a video for those people and ultimately that that that is my audience, not the world, whole world. I'm very so that you have to create a specific audience, as a specific as possible and from there that I try to create a content that is relevant to my mission, so that I created in those audience that matches my mission. Yet this this James, who you know, that I created. It's also very multifacet person. So it's okay for me to venture out and maybe just one day I just talked about, you know, my my hobby. Maybe I'm so talked about my surfing, but that's that's kind of create a connection with that person too. So I think eighty percent of those very core elements of video, but twenty percent just to connect...

...with that particular person, maybe have a live streaming youtube video just talk about, you know, my day, or just talk with them and communicating them. So so I think about the content from there and I it's like writing a book or creating an album. There's always a writer's block, you know. I already always afraid, like what if I'm run out of idea, ideas to create a youtube, you know, and I that's that fear is still there and I think I'm just gonna relax into youtube world like if if I don't feel like it, I wouldn't, and if I my focus right now is really about part some kind of particular piece of music that I'm really focusing on my share of that. So I really trud to who I am and all that really is the content. For me, it is. Everybody has a different objective for for why they do the Youtube, but I think for me is again just like a book, another window for people to have to connect with me and have a glimpse of who I am so that, you know, they can learn one or two or, you know, come to a classical concert, not by me but some other shape of form. So I think this is kind of long marathon and in the past I try to create a one video each week, but you know, not all, not everybody, have that stamina or energy to be able to do that for like ten years or so. So when I think this youtube journey as like my lifelong window, then you know, if I don't feel like it, I don't, but I do have I create this content as consistent as possible in terms of a content that at reflects who I am as a pianist. All right, during your almost off the hook here, but we always got to wrap up with a top three. And, like you're saying, you've been playing piano for what is that? Ninety like ninety percent of your life? You've got lots. Yeah, it's of experience and have played at venues all over the world. So if you can, can you narrow down to your top three venues that you've ever played at? MMM, yeah, I think I will start with the smallest, which is in Chicago. There is monastery there. I actually didn't know this venue before and when I showed up there was a little monastery. Maybe ten to twenty months they're there's like a little upright piano that I was in my mind, oh my gosh, it's going to be digester. Why there's upright piano, and when I started to play give a concert in that particular space, I I would just it wasn't transport myself into different world, as if I'm in like, I don't know, like eighteen century or something, and everybody's feels like they're coming from Europe in some Mirran test. So, although the place was just so humble, not being really fancy about it, but I love that experience so much and I cherished that very experience in my heart and whenever I think about that concert keeps me a piece and and also gives a reason why I give a concert. That that's wrong connection that I had with that audience. That does those monks and those their smile there, their piece, their happiness to do that experience of share and music. So that's one of that three. The second one is there's concert hall called Conrad Presby Comes Performing Arts in Lahoya here.

They've been building this, this hall for to two years, I think, multimillion concert hall, and it's been construction for a long, long time. Everybody, she was like waiting for the moment they opening. Went before they open. They invited me, because I'm local for this concert hall, if I could test the test the sound in the hall while still there's something still in the construction stage. So there was acoustition from Japan, whose name is Toyota. The master acoustition came from Japan and testing the sound, how the panel of the wall, how we can adjust it, and then there's a piano in on the states. Everybody wearing a construction had and everything. You not many people. was like maybe twenty people, and I was was honored to be there too, to play piece on that piano for a first time. And before I play, Mr Toyota came up to me on stage and telling me like this is the first note it ever played in this hole, and I was like wow, it feels like big exhale, exhale, after holding the breath for a long time, two years of holding in, and then finally this hole is going to create a sound on piano by me. And when I first play the first note, it felt like, I mean, giving a birth or something. It was unreal experience and the concert hole is amazing and when I give play, that the concert for the construction workers or is a condition. The feeling of music is such a life organism that that it's a like a nature. It's a mountain water music. It's part of the nature and I really felt that and I really love it. And then the last one of the venue, and I have to say it's it's Connegie Hall. When I think about Kinnegie Hall as my dream place that to perform, I had no idea I actually did. Actually did not dream Knegie Hall as in my dream, but one of my friend went to Kinegie Hall one of the concert and gave me a postcard of Canegie Hall and from the pianist that perform in that evening. Asked her to write why not on the top of the postcard and then she just handed to me. Just put Connie hold concert postcard and sing on Malk and I was received that postcard and thinking like what you know, and then she didn't say anything and I put that on in front of my desk just no, because it's nice postcard, and I looking at one day and was thinking, actually, why not? Why not play Kinnige Y'all? And then I actually decided I want to play in Kinnegie Hall and I called Kinegie Hall next day and say Hey, I'm I'm June Kieman, concert pianist. I was just wondering how could I play there. And if the lady didn't laugh, luckily, and didn't say just practice, practice, practice, but told me, oh well, you need a right pretenctor, you need to submit this form, like thousand different forms, to to us and whatever that was. After I hang up, I feel like, you know, this is not a dream anymore. This is actually steps that I could follow and I have no connection in New York. And when I create a first album, which was a kickstarter crowdfunding album, ten more minutes is called, I I asked everybody to help this project and when...

...they donate a dollar for that project, felt like it's their baby too and really invested in this project so that ten more minutes. That particular concert was the one that I actually gave in the Conegie Hall and a lot of people flew from out of stage to be there and kind of Gie Hall and made it sold out concert. And when I went out to the stage to Canegie Hall, first thing I said to the audience is welcome to my dream. And in that concert I don't remember how I played. It felt like a dream, dream stage, and felt like a minute. It was an hour and a half concert, but it really felt literally a minute. And Canegie Hall doesn't allow anyone to video record, so I have no proof or documentation of that particular concert. But it was pure magic. The this pianos is the best I ever encounter. The whole people, they could a crowd and the every single of them in the space remembers that particular moment and still talks about it, and I still remember that. I could could go back to that moment and I would cherish it. Is like gift for my life and whenever I think about that moment, how could that happen? Who are they the to come all the way out of state to be there for sharing another piece of music by me playing. So that is very humbling experience for me and it's keeps me a lot of fuel and and also reasoning why I should keep going. That is so cool, so cool. Well, Gan, thank you so much for taking the time to chat. If people want to learn more about you, maybe hear some of your music, check out a copy of whenever you're ready, how to compose the life of your dreams. Where can they go? Yeah, I read my book also, so it is available and audible. You can buy this book, however, you purchase books Amazon Resident Noble, and if you want to get autographed copy, you can come to my website. You and Kimcom and get older from directly there. I think I am more easily available in public through social media, Youtube, my podcast, but I think that intimate relationship we can continue, just like reading a book will be sign up for my newsletter that I write every other to every other week and the reflections that I learned or sharing my gleans of my life through writing. In that way you don't miss any of the events. Maybe coming to Austin or some other CDs that you may not be on social media all the time but can directly connect with me through a newsletter, will be one of the direct connection that you can make. fantastical. Looking forward to you come into Austin. Hopefully not when it's a hundred degrees outside like it is. I know I would love to go. You know, come to Austin to perform. Well, of what we look forward to the day that happens June. Thank you so much for taking the time to come on the pocket. It is great. Thank you so much. I had a great time and of course we got to end with a Corny joke and I made it even piano thems. This is I try to I try to pair it with the topic of the episode, and this is it's not good, but it's Corny and that's all we need here. What do you call a laughing piano? What could what is it? A Yamahah people, good people, cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you're a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. You can send me a message Joey at good people, cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been...

...on good people cool things and check out all the old episodes via good people, cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (119)