Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 69 · 1 year ago

69: Business Writing, Homeschool Hacks, and Gardening Tips with Linsey Knerl

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Linsey Knerl is a mom of six who has been homeschooling since 2004. Her interest in small business and entrepreneurship kicked off a freelance writing career that has led to stories in SO MANY publications, including Time, Shape, Better Homes & Gardens, Reader's Digest, Family Circle, All You, and Woman's World. 

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is Lindsay Neural, a writer, mother, Avid Gardener and author of the Book Homeschool Hacks. She's talking all about how she got into writing, starting blogging in the earlier days of blogs, really getting her foot in at the the ground floor there, and then how that segued into writing for major brands like American Express and mastercard, and she continues writing to this day. She also put a book together in a super quick amount of time to capitalize on all of the folks that are diving into home schooling now after the pandemic forced our hand with that. So we're talking all about that and Lindsay, of course, as an avid gardener, is giving us her best gardening tips. As someone who just started gardening less than a month or so ago, I very much appreciate any tips so that my plants aren't looking sadder than Sam Smith Song. If you like to get in touch with the show, you can reach out via facebook twitter or instagram. At GPCT PODCAST can also get in touch on good people, cool thingscom that's also where you'll find the merch shop. There's a few new items, both from the merch shop as well as the etsy only exclusives, where there's some some good merch for some shows that you have probably watched once or twice, perhaps been several times, who knows? But some fun, fun stuff inspired by that. So go check it out. Links in the show notes. All that good stuff. Once you get your cozy shorter Hoodie ready and you're all nestled up, hop into this conversation with Lindsay. For people who don't know who you are, can you give us your elevator pitch, but can you also tell us the elevator that we're riding on while you're giving us your pitch? Sure, so I'll tell you what elevator I'm not writing in, and then you can have all the other elevators. Okay, so in those swanky hotels where the walls are kind of like padded but little buttons. If you've seen those, it look like a plushy couch, gross like. I think of all the people that have been leaning up against those and touching them and and and they just I feel like elevators should be able to be wiped with the squeegee. I that tells you a lot of about my germ issues. So yeah, anny elevator, but that is what I'm writing in and I am, first and foremost, I guess, a mom. I've six kids and I'm a writer and I create content. Is My day job. Four different brands, a lot of SEO stuff and blogs and white papers and all that fun stuff. But I really just I love dark creepy stories and then I like the trailers of those dark creepy stories when they turned to movies, but then I'm too scared to watch the movies and that's pretty much me. That's I don't even know where to dive in. First there's I feel like the all of that needs to be unpacked, but I guess we can. We can start on the writing side of things. Will start less creepy and progressively as we we go along will get very scary towards them the later part of this podcast. But for your writing, you've been at it for creeping on your website since two thousand and six. How did you how did you get into it? Do you remember the first thing that you wrote? Yeah, so I have a blog that was Cubans and deals, right, and it was just me and my mom that read it and I would find like an online diaper cupon and I put it up there because, you know, I'm home and with my kids. My husband had a job that took him all...

...over and I just I needed an outlet and also I like to shop. and that blog went nowhere. But I tried to several other blogs, a few of them. You know, this is way back and I don't know if anyone was reading them, but apparently they were, because I got asked to write for a couple other blogs with real viewership, wise, breadcom being one of them, like a personal finance where I could like kind of write about all the fruly Cupani things I was doing and get paid. And then I started like reading magazines about, you know, living rural life and homesteading and gardening and all these things that were starting to become very in vogue around you know the I guess two thousand and eight issues we had with the economy in the world, and I thought, man, I can write this like do I need to like? Who? Do I need to know? Or what do we need to do? And I just started pitching, like looking online, finding out where editors lived, you know, stocking them, writing things, but honestly just send the emails. And at the time that the Internet in the web and blogs were so new, people were like intrigued about the idea of having a blog, and so it kind of got me into the door. I started doing stuff for print and then doing some branded work for the blogs that I was writing for, and then pretty soon I started working with the brands directly, so like American Express and Master Card and some of these finance Ben tag startups. Just kind of a whole weird world. You know, everybody was getting into blogs and blogging and writing digital content and we had kind of started the the movement with our own little our own little blogs. I remember there was a search engine called ice rocket. Do you remember that? I do not know. Okay, it was like a search engine just for blogs, okay, and I remember like thinking if I can find it on a blog, then it's really like underground, right. So I search for things through this web search and find recipes no one knew about or clothing trends no one knew about or, you know, just like the start of APPs, and for a while it kind of just felt very exclusive and cool and it's how I got in without really any formal training. You know, I didn't finish college it. Didn't actually get my degree because I started parenting so young, but I just I wrote every day and I pitched and I pitched and if I saw something I thought hey, I want to do that, I'd try it, maybe at work, maybe it didn't, but kind of felt like there were no ceilings when blogs and all that were really young and getting started. I know, the vintage days of blogs. Before before we talk more about the art of pitching, because I think that is a fun topic to explore. What's the best deal that you've seen, or I should say, taken advantage of long time ago? Target, actually, this got me crazy. National Press, this this little truck caught me into Time magazine where they actually came out to my house, I'm not kidding, with a photographer from New York City and like spent all day taking photos of me and my family. It was a target acwere like and I can't remember it now. It was like if the number of on the price tag ended in seven or three. I can't remember what it was. That mente wasn't going to be marked down any further. So if you bought it that day, you weren't going to like miss out on it going, you know, lower another day. And I blogged about that. It got syndicated and like all these crazy big newspapers and I ended up buying so many bottles of shampoo that year from that thing that the next year I had a garage sale. Wow, just shampoo and conditioners. Is that a well attended garage sale?...

It was crazy. One family came and they just were like this is great and they bought just this huge family but all of the shampoo and conditioner that I had paid like twenty five cents a bottle for, and it was so weird. But yeah, it just kind of showed that you can you really can't do anything if you can sell a hundred bottles of shampoo to some random family in your front yard. So that's a lesson for all of us. It is, get lots of shampoo, try selling it and you'll accomplish whatever, whatever you want. That's how did you learn about that hack? A lot of just being bored and again having young children and just like not wanting them to cry and thinking we're going to go for riding a car, we're going to go for a riding a cart. You know, at the time I wasn't working full time and I just needed something to do, and so I would just walk up and down the aisles of target, you know, and say, wow, the price has changed since the last timerre in here. I wonder if this can get cheaper, and after a while you just kind of like developed, I guess, an eye for the trends. And then there are also some like online message boards at the time that were sharing their endtel and saying things like hey, guys, go check this out. We saw this mark down. This is like the last time they're going to mark down this three hundred dollar car seat to like fifty bucks, and a lot of people were like kind of getting started with like the Amazon, like the Amazon seller. That's how a lot of those people got started to in the groups that I was kind of running in online. So there's just a lot of us with time and access to shopping and was a weird little subculture. I kind of missed it, I know I was just reading something about an old message board and I was like, I remember what I was on those all the time and it was great. And now, I mean, I guess read it is kind of a message board, but it's also kind of a a cesspool and a dark pole of misinformation a lot of the times, which I guess message boards could be too, but it felt more pure. At least there are no updown votes. If I could recall like, I think it was just if you had something to say, you had to come up with a reply and the last thing people read was the last thing people wrote. You literally had to get in the last word. It was kind of fun. Well, go I'm sure we could go down forum rabbit holes, but we'll digress. But going back to your pitching ideas, I think that's something that many writers struggle with, like the idea of just like cold emailing someone so a how do you overcome that fear or is that just something that's like built into you and be what makes for a pitch that an editor is going to want to assign to you? So first yeah, at the beginning I thought I stood no chance. So it's kind of like when you think they're you have no chance, you can't be nervous about it because you don't think these things are ever actually going to happen. And then when I started getting some acceptances, I thought, okay, this is real now, and that kind of freaked me out a little. But getting over just understanding that if you're coming with some fresh ideas and a perspective that's unique, because really there are no new ideas under the sun right. It's just why are you uniquely qualified to tell the story? Maybe you have access to somebody you can interview, or maybe you went through something or you can add just like a really unique perspective to it. That's really all you can give. Even your writing, while it should be decent, doesn't have to be the most amazing thing in the world, because there are editors. It's that voice or that style or that perspective that you're really selling and once you can like get that idea out into the to the email or the pitch or whatever,...

...you got to think of it as you're doing them a favor. Right, if they can accept your pitch and you can work together, you've just added something of value that they wouldn't have come across probably on their own, because there's only one you and you can only tell the story your way, and it's kind of fluffy and emotional and whatever, but it is true. I mean, you know, art is just that way, right. We can all paint the same picture of a vase or a fruit bowl and it's going to be a little bit different. And writings a lot like that. So if they connect with your pitch and your unique I guess whatever you bring to the story and they like it, you've just saved them trying to find somebody that they're looking for. I mean you're actually doing a lot of the work by pitching, and I think we forget that as writer sometimes like we're inconveniencing them, but we're pitching. We're like bringing ideas to the table and that has a lot of value to even if they don't hire you right away. Yeah, I love having ideas brought to me. So I definitely I empathize with with that and I think to like, it's easy to think like a rejection on one thing is a rejection for all time and it's like no, it's that one. What I do. Not all of my ideas are great, but I'm gonna I'm going to tell you about them and you can shoot them down if you want, but I'll be back with for that is right. That's how you do it. And and unless they explicitly tell you you're we're not a good fit, that's permission to keep pitching. And I've most things I've pitched I never got on the first pitch or the second or the third. You know, it was Oh, nice try, but we're kind of looking for it. You know, sometimes with that feedback gives you direction. You don't know what they're looking for sometimes until they tell you what they're not looking for, which is very valuable data. Yeah, and sometimes they might. I mean I've probably responded at emails more like tersely than I would otherwise if I'm in a rush or having a bad day or something like. I mean I went to the doctor earlier today. If I came back with really negative news and tried to respond to emails, I probably like I don't want to hear any of this. No, like just nose across the board, thankfully. Well, actually, I don't know. I haven't read the doctor's notes yet. Maybe that can be later in the episode. We unveil potential health scares on air. No, no, no pressure. That sounds fun. We should invite someone else to join them on that. Just call up a doctor real quick. You're not my doctor and this is probably a wild eye health violation, but let's read some medical, medical notes on here now. How fully, hopefully, all good. It was all, you know, regular check at not going in for like anything in particular. So I'm confident everything will be good. And I was trying to find a nice segue into that, but I don't think. I don't think there is. But I want to talk about your book, which is a I assume almost like entirely was brought about because of covid could you kind of talk about that wild whirlwind? Yeah, so it was conceived in its idea eight years ago and I brought it to like actually, there was like this big contest, like bring it to an agency and we're going to look at all these like I had to fly to the conference. It was this big thing and I made it into the top five for proposals and, you know, I had chapters written and it was all formed and then they were just like yeah, you know what, we don't think there are very many homeschoolers and they certainly don't want to buy books when you could just use the Internet. I hear that a lot from one books get shot down. It's like yeah, no, people want to use the Internet, but yet there's so many people you just want to say, have you tried Google? Because I feel like even that is very much, you know, a hindrance to some people. So they said no and I did the thing where you cry and you're like,...

...okay, my heart is broken. I put it in the in the drawer and I did other things. I went on to like have more kids and grow my business and, you know, move and do all the stuff. And then, you know, I was like looking for a book to write. I just had a fiction book fall through. The publisher went out of business, like right as it was supposed to be brought to the market place. Couldn't find anyone else to buy it and I thought maybe I should go back to like nonfiction, because that's the world I live in. And then the pandemic was like bringing all my friends to me asking the same questions over and over and over. It was like I just wanted to copy paste my answers and like all the message boards and I thought, but I've already done these answers and it's in this book that I wrote and I think now is the time. So brought it to an agent like that weekend, was like yes, we'll sign you on. He got it sold pretty quickly to Tiller, which is a subsidiary of Simon and Schuster. So, you know, like the box I would have gone for. Yeah, and it just was like but we got to get this in the world fast, because parents needed this yesterday, and traditional publishing is not like self publishing, where you just mean everything has to go in its own time. And even with that, like very okay, we got to go to this editor in this editor and it went so fast. It went so fast and it went to the world in April and just in time for parents to like say, we don't want to even think about school, it's summer Um, and so we're kind of hoping to like let people know it's there so that when they are ready to think about school again in the fall, they're not scrambling. I guess is the goal. So yes, also, let me Google that for you. Have you ever used that with people? I have. It's so passive. Agree it's it really is, but it's so good, very on brand, isn't it? I also think in my excitement I might not have even said the title of this book. But homeschool hacks. Yes, get get out there and, like, I mean I would think that's valuable just for like dealing with other people at home, even if you're not necessarily teaching, like not being on each other's nerves all the time. Right. So one thing, you know, we covered a lot of ground with like how much video game time is too much video game time? How do I protect my kids from seeing crazy things on the internet, and so like anything that could come up in a school day is definitely, you know, something we tried to talk about. But also remote schoolers that are still in the public school system but are at home and you, as a parent, are trying to figure out how do we work that in the word schedule. You know all of that. The interviews I did with parents who have been in and out of public school private school kind of done a little of everything, you know, you pick up things here and there, little tips. So we tried to get as many of those as we could into the book. Yes, and there's also some one your blog as well, which also has lots of great I was I was creeping through it before and I was like, Oh, this is so like there's so many helpful things there's reviews of stuff. I am may be going to hit you up after this. I might have something for you to review later, but it'll be a great, great stuff. But has that has that always like is that one of the blogs you've had for a while where you're like this is obviously stuff that people need, so I want to share it, or how has that evolved over time? Yeah, so the name. You know, back when we were picking out names, we weren't thinking about Seo. So has a really weird name. It's all Punki and Lila Punkin. It was like, I don't know, French and Danish mixed together. I didn't want to mispronounced. I was like so I would say it, but I can see this struggle in your face, like do I say it or what you introduce it? That's you're the...

...guest. But yeah, over the years we've just it's been, you know, gardening and recipes and and you know, I'm going back now and trying to like take some of that early content where you're just kind of like the small picture with the phone that you took back and you know it's dark and we're trying to like retake some of these photos and kind of update them and bring them to life so people don't feel like they're like, I don't know, it's kind of got a creepy vibe when you look at all those really old photos from blog post a pixel kind of you. Yeah, freshen those up, but yeah, it's ore. We've done a lot of reviews, just hundreds and hundreds of from toys to books to a lot of homeschool curriculum APPs, you know, anything that a family might use. We've done a lot of those and you know, I am not holly homemaker. My pinterest pins are an abomination. But the stuff that brings them most traffic blows my mind because it's like us, let's talk about this. What is it? What is it? I have this how to fry chicken gizzards tender is like the SEO. I did a post on chicken gizzards, like how to cook them, and it gets so much traffic, and not from the United States as much as other countries. Yeah, that's someone. That's just the gift that keeps on giving. This time of year. I don't know what it is about, you know, June and gizzards, but Google says this is like the time to shine. So Nice that is. That is one that gets a lot of traffic. We did one and like how to do paper machee with the kids. That one tends to get a lot of traffic. And then I always get a lot of traffic for products that don't exist anymore that people are trying to find, and then I have to update those with sorry, I know you're here looking for this thing and I wish it existed to and you know, rest in peace, because all the good products just eventually go away. Yeah, that is very sad, like a Dunkaroo's page or something, although those came back, so maybe maybe people can hold out hope that they've got it. But yes, I think as the owner of several different websites, I am always floored what what is the most traffic. As you know, I have my crisp bounce pass newsletter that I also publish online. The just basically taking the emails and putting them on website. So if people aren't subscribed, that's a fun little way. And for that one, the Post that's about basketball duo names is as the number one thing. I'm like, okay, would have guessed that out of you know, if you give me like forty chances to guess which of my post is the most traffic. Would not have guessed that one. And then for my food website, Bok Choy and smoothies is apparently I did a Bok Choy and pair smoothie. recipates very good. I was kind of surprised. I was like, I have a lot of Bock Choy. Actually, my garden right now is Boch Choy intense. So I'm, you know, waiting for the like the roots to kind of get a little more, you know, meaty, but sometimes I'll just snip the leaves when they're young, and that is some of my kids are kind of like, oh, bock joy again, because I throw it into everything. But if we could turn it into a drink, yes, we could do some things. Yes, I'll will be in touch. I'll drop the Wakay, I'll drop the link of the show notes as well for anyone else that has ample box choy or pairs and and want to get rid of it, because both and both of them are in the smoothie. That also segues nicely because I have started gardening this year for the first time ever, and all I have, because the yard is going to be undergoing some renovation, so I didn't want to get too involve. So I have our tomato plants and basil plants and the like. This is like within...

...the last month started, so still very new and fresh. Did make one round of Basil pest out. It was phenomenal. It's so much better than getting out out of a can. Would highly recommend. But you're much more advanced and garden and gardening and you've done it several years more than I have. So for someone that's just getting started, what's your top gardening tip and do you have a plant that you like recommend that maybe is a little under the radar, or is Boch Choy? It no, Um so cash a gardening tip. It's funny. Just grow things you're going to like, first of all, because it always amazes me that people will grow these things because they're pretty or they look like they're easy to grow or the plants were cheap, and then they're like, I don't even like vegetables or I don't even like and I guess if you want like a really difficult hobby that requires a lot of time and money and you know stress, you could garden just to garden, but you know there are some yummy things that you can find that are, you know, sweeter versions of cucumbers or, you know, sweeter versions of tomatoes, like they're just these varieties of things that don't even taste like what you get in the grocery store. So you know, if you can try some like farmers market produce or something from like a grower directly, you can get a taste or what the actual food is and you won't be surprised. People like crack me up when they try their home grown food and they're like this is not what I expected and they don't like it. So try it before you go out and invest in it. I guess is my really weird beginner to like it. But one thing that I found, like we have this favorite squash. It's called Patti Pan. I don't know if you've heard of it, I don't think. Also scalop. It's so it looks like a little ufo kind of and it's a little white, kind of cream colored squash and if you pick it really young, you can slice it up like a Zucchini or a yellow summer squash, and if you let it get kind of hard then it's more difficult to deal with. But they just they grow and they grow and they produce and they produce and they're just kind of like this, I guess, under the radar thing that I didn't know about till we accidentally planted some one year. And Yeah, little squashes, little things you can like slice up and put Mr Fry, and maybe people haven't had before. I'm always encouraging people just to try. If you really don't know if you like something, try it in person and then, you know, try growing some different things. Lovely. Yeah, I'm looking forward to branching out a little bit, but that's a great tip with the farmers markets, as farmers markets are so wonderful to go to anyway and then to try, although I think the last one I was at, the other thing I actually tried was a cookie and I said this is probably not not the best choice, while I'm here, it is a good cookie. So well done, well done. I don't remember the name of it. I'm sorry, I'll find out. Well, we'll drop it in the show notes. It's a promise I like to make an episodes and then usually I do, but sometimes, sometimes not so much. Now kicking it back to writing, because that's how you and I met, is through Asta and we were on a panel together where I was kind of thrown in at the last minute. You were moderating it. I think I blacked out for some of it, but I think everything was okay. It was about kind of side hustles besides writing that that some of US had, and a lot of folks up there were podcasters. I had done some voice over work and clearly still putting my voice to good use here with with multiple podcasts and the occasional voiceover spotify ad work, which is ways always entertaining to do a little read for like a credit card or something. It's fun times. But for people that are getting,...

I would say, like any level of involvement as a writer, like whether you're just, you know, starting your writing journey you've been writing for years and years, like I find it so valuable and it's just been a fun little, like fun way for us to meet, and I've met other people through it, and give us your like hey, you should join a Sja, a pitch. You know, the Asja's is a good is a good one for especially if you're, you know, doing non fiction, any kind of like journalism work. There they're opened up their ranks to branded journalism. But you know, there if you're a fiction writer, because I think there's a lot of people that feel like they have a fiction story and you can usually find organizations that are like in your niche. So mystery writers, horror writers. It's funny because there's a lot of times you might think the book you want to write is a true story and then you realize, Oh, I don't want to deal with the legal of like trying to tell someone's story, so I'm going to make it a little fictional. You know, maybe they're in space or they have superpowers or whatever you want to do. So, like there's that blend of I think you can really learn no from any writer group ideas for how to take that project that you have in you that you're you're not really sure what is this fiction? As a self published I want to try get an agent. Sometimes you just don't even know when you wake up in the morning who you want to be that day, and writing does not help that, because now it just gives you more outlets and expressive opportunities and it can feel like I don't even know where to go. So writer groups are super important for kind of grounding you. If you listen to the people that are actually making it work. I think you can say, okay, this is someone who's making it, this is someone who's satisfied with their path. Here's some things that you know they've said don't work, and you can take it and leave it. But ultimately you'll start to see some themes with with the old timers that are have been doing it for a while, and you'll get a feeling of, you know, is their advice trust or that you're not, which is what's great about those organizations. Yeah, absolutely, and it's I think that's a key distinction to is make sure that the person is trustworthy, for lack of a better word, before you just dive in and give them all your money or give someone else your money that they're they're recommending. But yeah, I think that's it is helpful to have those those other folks to bounce ideas off of you, just you saying like Hey, do you want to make this a true story or not? Just made me think of I would love to do a memoir of when I host a Karaoke on Los Angeles, because I have many ridiculous stories from that and I feel like there's ways to kind of like fictionalize it up enough that it's not gonna be Libelis or anything. And there are a couple of like celebrity encounters that I maybe have to either skip on or figure some way out, and and not bad ones, like they're enjoyable one. So it's not like I'm putting this person in a terrible light, but even so they might not want to be featured in my book. So it's a yeah, it's nice to not know you're not alone in those worlds. But we're going to go to horror now, so I hope you're ready, Girl. Okay, this is this is prompted by a coworker of mine actually recently was with like visuals for it. So she was saying, I can do murders and she was like stabbing. She's like, or I can do demons, but she are she can do monsters. I'm sorry, but she can't do demons, like things that you can't see. That's like too scary for her. So are you around, like what's the most scary part of horror movies, or is it just anything remotely horror? You're like, I'll watch the trailer, but that's it. So it's funny because it's change as I've gotten older.

You know, I would laugh like any good methodist kid at a slasher movie. You know, we would at our like Church youth group things. They were like showing some of these like hey, let's have a lock in and watch, you know, night real home street. We were laughing. I don't know if it's that the the graphics have gotten that much better where it's like confusing to watch things now, like you knew they were just not real. Yeah, for or if just by having children and becoming more aware of my own mortality and all that philosophical stuff, if, like I empathize too much with characters. I don't know, because I can watch some like just crazy out there, you know, Shaun of the dead type stuff, and if an actor's good or it's funny or the writings clover, you know, you know it's just for fun. But I do know that stuff, that there's just some stuff that's gotten the work, the visual work, is just amazing what some of these people can do, and I think that might be more of it. For me, I can't look at blood and real life. I get really squeamish, and so I think there's been a transition from what was kind of fun. We know this isn't real to Oh my goodness, this is kind of like slightly triggering because it looks so real. I think for me that's what it is. I don't get too spooked out by, you know, anything offscreen or supernatural. That's it's just I think really that Gore for me is kind of where I can't do it. Yeah, I think. I think I'm probably more in that realm as well. But yeah, if it is like shot of the dead and hot fuzz are the ones I was thinking of her I'm like this is like more over the top and there. I mean I guess hot fuzz isn't really supposed to be scary. It's more just it's just that same cast and and director. But yeah, those are the ones where I'm just like it's a little too realistic. I don't know if I like it so much, but I always, I always think with horror movies of do you remember the cartoon Doug from back in Yeah S, I think that was a nickelodeon mine, wasn't it? Yeah, nickelode I think I'm maybe moved to ABC for a couple years at the end, but largely Nickelodeon, but I just remember there's an episode where he's very afraid. There's a scary movie that's coming out. He's very afraid to watch it and like the whole class, I guess, goes to see it and it's also scared, like they're all covering their eyes and then Doug peeks through and you can see that the monster has a tag on the costume. so He's just like, Oh, this isn't scary at all. That's like I don't think most movies are like that nowadays, where you see that it's obviously fake and store bought. But I like they need to have her come like two versions, you know how like for movie trailers there's like the red band trailer and then there's a regular trailer. So they could do two versions of movies, one where we see the tag sticking out for those of us that can't handle I'm sure that would have like a lot of conflict with the true artists intent, but I feel like I'm going to sell it on a lot of stuff. I feel like they could. I mean there's so many youtube videos now where it's like, you know it's some song, but every time they say one word it's like a goat screaming or something like the tailor swift, I knew you were a trouble me, and like bringing that more into Youtub. I watched one the other day that was is the killers, Mr Brightside, but anytime they used a pronoun they sped it up, so it was just like super fast by the end, and I'm just I'm baffled at what people do with free time. So I feel like that could be something where it's like or maybe like they replace the monster with a puppy somehow and it's just like very calming for us, even if the puppies doing violent things. We don't say or it's very like a metaphor or very, I don't know, Meta. What did the kids say? You know? I don't know. God, yeah, you ask you, you have kids, you go ask them. I'll ask ask them a lot, ask them a lot. This is I have to know what's going on and if they're not showing me something on Ticktock, I have to go to them and go is...

...this something I should be worrying about? Is this a thing? And they're like no, mom, this is what parents think are thing, but it's not. So what's something that is a thing that you like. That's a really Oh, I don't know. You know, I think it's fun. My son is like very gen ZY. I find their memes to be so ridiculous and pointless and also just undercover brilliant. I don't know, there I could go down the rabbit like of like Gen Z memes and just how they're so sad and they have so such of very like bad outlook on life and I don't I can tell a lot of its sarcastic. But also how did these kids come up with this? Like I don't know, it kind of reminds you my generation being gen x and kind of having a chip on my shoulder, you know. But instead of like being angry about it, they're like I'm going to make memes and I think it's such a cool way to cope and it's just funny. I just there are some means that are so sad they're funny and I don't know, that's that's what I like right now. Yeah, and some of them are just so specific where I'm like this is sadly brilliant, but yes, I applaud it. Excellent work and segues kind of nicely. We're talking about how you watch trailers. You told me before we're recording that you have watched a lot of trailers for shows, I assume on Netflix, but perhaps other ones, where they like auto play the trailer for you, and you certainly do not have time to watch all of these shows. But based on the trailer alone, what are your top three shows that you, quote unquote, need to binge, but maybe just need to watch the trailer. Right. So we have HBO Max and that's where, like a lot of I feel like some of the cool shows are coming right now. I think the whole world shut off when it was the mayor of Eastown. Is that what it was? I think so. With yeah, so, like Hbo Max went down during the season finale and people were on twitter just it was a travesty. That's in my to watch. Obviously I have a lot of shows that I want to watch, but the kids I'll have to be asleep, which is another issue. There's always a kid wandering. So there's another idea there for like two versions of a show where if my kid comes in the room, because you know, there's shows that are just a little kind of deal with some things that aren't. It's not trash, but it's there some thematic elements that, like kids, don't need Anossar loorry about. So that's one. Are going to make me think. Because I said I had three. I will say don't need to see the trailer for the final season of Kim's convenience. Okay, that is a great show and I was very sad when I learned that was going off there. And then the trailer, I think it's coming soon for Loupin on Netflix. Yeah, the gentleman thief. I finally got around this past weekend to doing the first get in the first season under way. So now I cannot, you know, cannot wait for the second, lovely, and I'll probably take me three years just to watch those three shows. So I'll let you know. Have me back on and three years we can talk about how wit. Yes, we will get we'll get a TV recap. I will probably all be watching through I don't know, Google glass, if that's the living but yeah, I feel like there should be. I remember watching a Toyota commercial, maybe for a car that had like two versions or I don't know what the thing was, but you'd watch it on it was like a youtube video, but embedded in a certain way on their site that if you pushed,...

I think if you pushed are the our key on your keyboard, it would flip from like day to night. So it was showing like hey, there's versions of this car based on like the type of person you are. So like the day one you're, you know, the guys like picking up his son from school, and then the night one he's like stopping a heist or something like that, or maybe participating, and I don't know, it's been a while, but it was like it was interesting because they're basically going the same route and stuff, but it's like one of those videos where they do like the quick cuts. So he's like punching a bad guy, but then it cuts today and he's like handing lunch to his son and it's just like, I feel like if they could do that on a short little two minute video, surely extrapolating it to several seasons of a TV show as a piece of cake. Well, they used to do. I don't know if you've noticed. It used to do like with the movies. You had your R and then you had your unrated right. So, depending on like what was going on, you could maybe watch with your older teenagers or your kids come home from college. You Might Watch the R rated version if it's appropriate, but you're not generally going to sit down Christmas and watch the unrated with the kids. I mean just not my house anyway. Just be really awkward. But a lot of the shows that were maybe TV fourteen when they were on network, they're adding in the scenes that like maybe we're cut for time or content and and all watch shows that I swore we're okay, and it's not my memory, it's that you know, you're looking in now they're TVMA and we didn't even have TVMA for the longest time, especially not for network television. So it's you got to really watch because it maybe a whole season will be great and then they'll just have that one episode where it's like now what do we do? Do we not watch it with our kids? DO WE FAST FORWARD? Like I feel like this was just put in there to give me decisions to have to make it. I think that's yeah, I think that's exactly a wonderful well, hopefully no more surprise bombs like that, but we'll keep our fingers crossed for you. Thank you. It's a hard job, you know. But for now people want to learn more about you, maybe hire you to write some good stuff for them, or check out a copy of their book, of Your Book, not their book, it's your book. Where can they find you? I am at Lindsay Erlcom, my name, which is Great. No one else had that name, so the domain was available, and and on twitter at L NERL K Andy Rl. So I love twitter. If you're on there, I'll talk to you. I love it. Excellent. Yes, you are a very good twitter user. Would recommend solid follow. Twelve out of Ted. Thank you. Awesome. Let's thank you so much. This was glorious. I can't believe it's been an hour already. I feel like this sped by like an up two episodes of Kim's convenience. That's a half, marsh I right. Yeah, it's been it's been a while since I've seen it up. So, but I did enjoy I'll get back to it. It'll be on my list as well and we'll touch base in two thousand and twenty four to see how we enjoyed it. Sounds like a plan. Excellent. Of course we got to wrap up with a Corny joke, like we always do, and let's make it writing themed. What's the leading cause of death among new writers? What is it, Joey? Exposure good after today people iof as. That's great. Good people cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you're a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. As always, you can send me a message Joey at good people, cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people cool things. Can check out all the old episodes. Be a good people cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

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