Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 30 · 1 year ago

30: Keys to Making More Money in Less Time with Caelan Huntress

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Have you ever reached the end of the day and felt overwhelmed? Maybe you didn't get a project done, or spent so much time on busy tasks you had to skip a workout.

Caelan Huntress is a marketing coach for entrepreneurs and he helps business owners earn more money in less time. That frees up more attention and energy for you to focus on other areas, whether it’s in your business or personal life.

Welcome the good people cool things to podcast featuring conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. I'm your host, Joey held, and today's guest is Kalyn Huntress, a digital nomad and marketing coach for entrepreneurs and call it has a pretty simple tagline. He helps business owners earn more money in less time, and he does this by setting up systems that sell their offers automatically. We're diving into all kinds of marketing goodness in this episode, from how you can find what your customers are buying instead of trying to sell what you're selling, lead magnets that will help you discover that audience, ways you can hone your brand message and so so much more. This is a legit masterclass in forty five minutes. I mean, that's fantastic good stuff all around. But before we get to that, if you'd like to get in touch with the show, can do so in a couple different ways. Send an email to joey at good people cool thingscom or get up the show on facebook or twitter. GPCT podcast on both platforms, and you can also support the show via the shop online shop good people cool thingscom. Shop and we are still in August. This is the last podcast in August, so that means it's your last chance to get on this gray eight birthday deal for the Merch just to use the code birthday, all one word, as it is always spelled. We're celebrating my birthday, even though it's already happened. It's in the past, but we're still celebrating it today. It's great, magical. Do that and you'll get twenty percent off your entire order. justent our birthday when you check out. So if you want to go do that now. I suggest pausing this because you're going to want to listen to everything that Kalin has to say, and let's hop into that conversation now. Let's pretend we bump into each other on an elevator and I'm on the fifth floor. You might be going further up, but while me and twenty seconds. You know, it's funny that you started this with an elevator pitch because on medium this morning I just wrote an article on the on elevator pitches and got that published today. But that's that's my name is Kalyn I. I run a digital marketing agency called stellar platforms, where I help on entrepreneurs make more money in less time by setting up smart marketing systems. I'm a digital nomad. I've been traveling around the world for the last ten years with my young family and supporting us with a business I run from my laptop. Fantastic, which I imagine is a pretty pretty good thing to have handy now that we're all working from home. Well, you know, it's funny when when quarantine happened, I didn't notice that many changes. I work from home, my kids are homeschooled, so, you know, just pretty much meant that we we couldn't go outside and we had to have groceries delivered. So it worked out for US...

...fine. Yeah, that doesn't sound like too big of an adjustment. Have you found that that's maybe not the case with some of the clients that you're working with? Did they have kind of more of a sort of mindset shift? I guess that they had to take on? Oh for sure. Yeah, a lot of the clients that I worked with last year were professional speakers and for a while my niche that I focus on was authors, coaches and speakers, and and I spoke at the National Speakers Association conference last year and made a whole lot of great connections and and started doing a lot of really cool work with speakers, helping them convert their ideas into sellable products. And then, when, you know, when the pandemic hit, everybody who used to travel and go and get on stages for a living had to pivot their businesses and figure out something different to do. And so I did the same and I pivoted and I started working with with corporate clients who used to teach facetoface workshops and now they had to suddenly teach virtual webinars, and so I've been doing a lot of train the trainer work and helping people learn about the about the tech and about the facilitation required to lead good virtual meetings. Awesome. And what have you learned? Because I feel like I routinely I am getting on a zoom call or a skype, Google hangouts, whatever the case, and there's some struggles, whether it's on my end or someone else that see like I would think by now we'd have gotten us to it, but I mean we I was telling you before we start a recording like zoom just wasn't loading for me. So what help us out? What can we do? Well, zoom is a good zoom experience is really a combination of three different areas. There's the tech, there's the conversation and there's the agenda. And if you master all three of those areas then you can have a good zoom meeting. But a big mistake in any one of those areas can lead to some significant difficulty. And so for the tech, you know, a lot of it is just getting familiar with it and trying it and getting in the habit of using the technology. And after somebody launches a breakout room two or three times they've got it, but that first time is really intimidating. And so having a safe space where you can get together with with people for a dry run, you know, or you know what we would call in the theaters a tech rehearsal, where you just try the tech and you push the buttons and you make the mistakes to see it in a safe area, and then once you get practiced in it, then it becomes easy. I like that. And you mentioned the theater. So do you have a background in theater then? Have you? What's that? What's the best show you've done? Oh, Geez, well, I've been in probably twenty different Shakespeare shows. I was a I was an actor for ten years before I started having kids and you know, kids are are they require a different lifestyle than...

...the theatrical lifestyle, which is a lot of late nights, a lot of parties. And since I decided to pivot to raising my kids, I got out of the theater, but I actually went I was an acrobat in the circus for a while and I went to a clown school and and so when I look at my work as a marketer, I always come to it from a theatrical perspective and I see things as a performance. How could I make this performance in such a way that it's going to have the greatest impact on the audience? Yeah, I think that's a wonderful way to approach it and I will get back to marketing, since I think that's where the the bulk of my audience at least we'll get value out of this. But I do need to ask as a Shakespearean performer, have you ever seen the Reduced Shakespeare Company? The Reduced Shakespeare companies, that the one that does a show in like five minutes? They do well. They do all the Shakespeare Act like every play in it's about an hour and a half, but they do kind of go through all. I believe it's all the tragedies. They do in about five minutes where they just really speed through them. And I first learned about this on a family vacation to London and my mom was like hey, I got us tickets to this thing and being, I don't know, I was like fifteen or sixteen maybe at the time, I was just like that sounds stupid, I don't want to do this, but I went to it and it was hilarious. It was just it's three guys that just do the entire works of Shakespeare and I'm always so I'm always trying to spread the word of them. I guess I don't think I've mentioned them in a maybe a year and a half, but just tearing your background trigger that for definitely not the checking them out. That sounds Super Fun. And what I like so much about Shakespeare is that it's built for humor and you can make jokes out of it because it follows a very set of stock patterns. You know it cut Shakespeare was based on Commedia Dell Arte, which was a fifteen century form of Italian theater where these visa. Performing troops would travel around into different regions where everybody spoke a different dialect. The audience was not going to have a common language and comedia developed as a way to communicate physically with people, no matter what language that they spoke. So when Pentalone came on stage, based on his stance you knew, oh, that's the old miser, he's going to be a grump. And and Shakespeare took a lot of his you know, it was it was a hundred years later when Shakespeare started making his plays and he used a lot of those same fundamentals. But what made Shakespeare so amazing is he spoke to two different classes of people. There were the nobles, which would for the first time where it was socially acceptable to to watch the theater, and so they had very highbrow plot lines and and intricate court intrigue. But there was also jokes for the groundlings, for people who just wanted to see the sword fights and the dogs and the the the blood and guts. And Shakespeare was a master of being able to talk to different levels.

And so I'm going deep into this because I want to make a point about marketing. The people who are really good at marketing. Also know how to talk to different levels and they can tell the same story and the different chapters in that story will resonate with different segments of their audience. I'd like that. And I don't know if I knew this, but I assume that's where the groundlings theater got its name from. Oh yeah, it's from. Okay, nice, learn to look at that. Your educating me on multiple levels there. I love this. Well, you paid two pence to go up on the the balcony and one pence to go and stand. You know, the the upper class would sit for the three to four hour shows, but it was the ground lanes that would stand in a mob down at the bottom because they paid for cheaper seats. Sounds not too dissimilar from a concert experience. I guess where you can, you can get your general floor. See, it's which there was a time where I enjoyed that and I said maybe in the right such setting I can still get down with that, but I don't know. The older I get, the less appealing. bended like a more impornative it. Yeah, like I'd like the seat with the backrest. That's fine, I could get so. You mentioned how having kids kind of brought on a career shift? was at the main impetus for that? Or had you always kind of had that sort of marketing interest and background and that was just kind of like a nice like Oh, this has happened and now I can hop into this. Oh, I got into marketing through sales when I when I was having kids, my wife said, you knew, you need to get a day job if we're going to have any sort of family life. And and my kids are the most important part of my life. I run my business and I do my work so that I can support my family. My wife's to stay at home mom and she takes care of the kids during the day what so that I can run the business and earn the income. And and when I first made the shift out of being, you know, primarily being a performance artist into being a worker, I went into sales because it was the easiest way for me to monetize my charisma. And so I and I'd spent, you know, lots of time waiting tables and and putting myself through college with sales jobs, and so it was a natural transition for me. And after a few years of working in sales, I found that sales is continuous because you're always convincing another person one on one. But I saw these people in marketing where they were looking at the entire conversion from stranger to customer and instead of trying to convince one person in front of them to make a purchase, they were convincing a large segment of people to make a purchase, and that really appealed to me, and so over time my career started shifting from sales into marketing. But I find that having a sales background is in den undeniably useful as a marketer because I can bring...

...those same selling techniques to the marketing material that I create. Awesome and I do want to get more into that. But quickly, touching on something that you mentioned, how your wife is looking after the kids while you're working. I think a lot of people are kind of having to balance that now with everyone being at home. What have you found to be successful, because I think, at least I know I've experienced this of like people think, Hey, I can just pop in real quick and like chat with you and I'm like, I'm literally in the middle of a call right now, like please, please stop. But have you found with you know, several more years than just a few months, like a lot of folks have had several years of doing this. Effective ways to kind of keep that work life balance without going to insane one direction or the other. Oh Yeah, yeah, I make a clear division between deep work and shallow work. And deep work is is the creative, cognitively demanding, difficult task that you that where you really known for. This is this is the the hard stuff, this is why you do what you do. That's your deep work. But shallow work is not your priorities, it's other people's priorities. And so if you think about you know a professor who's an academic and teaches classes and writes books. They alternate deep work with shallow work, and part of being a professor is not just teaching classes but also doing really difficult intellectual thinking and producing large papers and books on your topic. But a professor always has open office hours when you can come in and interrupt them and knock on the door and say hey, I've got a question for you, and they're they post their hours so that you know during these hours I can go in and interrupt them. But if you try and interrupt a professor outside of those hours, they're not going to be available, and so what I do with my family is I have a separate working space. Right now I'm in my home studio and when I'm in here, if my kids wander in and ask me a question, I say I don't know, go ask your mouth and I just Tut because she's she's on point for for when I'm working, but if she has to have an appointment or she needs to go somewhere during the day, then I bring my laptop out to the dining room table and I do shallow work. I check emails, I deal with other people's priorities and if my kids interrupt me at the dinner table, I drop what I'm doing and help them with whatever they need. They need, they need a food, they need some food, they need to settle an argument over an IPAD, they need to get a splinter out of their foot, whatever it is. I'm available for those interruptions during my shallow worktime and by being clear and generous with when my shallow work can be in interrupted, I earn the right to preserve my deep work time, and that's how we manage it. I'd love that distinction and I also feel like you've you've liked been keeping an eye on me or something, because...

I had a splinter this weekend for the first time in I don't even remember the last one, but I was just like look, how did I do this? And it never remember. It's just like not all of us sudden. Now now there's a splinter here. So I can I feel the feel the paint of your kids. Going back to, I believe this was actually just in your elevator pitch of how you're helping people make more money. You're helping them be more effective so that they can make more money without working themselves ragged. Yeah, and that's something that a lot of people would want to do, but it's not always it's not always something that they do achieve. And have you found the there's like a certain sort of blueprint to follow for that, or is it varying based on industry, type of product or service or anything like that? Well, the biggest variable, Jose, it is do I tell you, Joe, Joseph, Joey One, mix it up every time. Yeah, okay, George, okay, Joe. The biggest variable that I find is is in is in the customer and how they like to consume content and a lot of the foundational work that I do with my clients is helping them figure out what's the right lead magnet. What could I offer for free to people who don't know me at all so that they would be willing to give me an email address or schedule a call or whatever that top of funnel action is. And when you find that top of funnel asset, you know, like I've got a personal branding checklist, for example. It's twenty four actionable steps you can take to improve your personal brand, and I offer this for free to people because I know that the people who are interested in that are the ones who are going to be interested in my other services. And so by setting up a smart marketing system, I say, okay, this is the lead magnet which is going to attract the types of leads that I want to convert into customers. Now I just have to go out into the into the crowd, and offer this lead magnet and the right people will come to me. And figuring out what that lead magnet is and crafting the journey from stranger to customer. Once you figure that out, you can stop doing all of the Spaghetti against the wall stuff where you just trying thing after thing in the hope that it works. A lot of entrepreneurs, since we have to wear so many hats, there's so many different things we could be doing that we try to do them all. But I find that most entrepreneurs really find success when they identify the simple, clear actions that their best customers take at the beginning of their customer journey and then they make it easy for people to take those actions. Awesome. I think that ties in very nicely to a question I always like to ask. Is something that you wish you were asked more frequently, and you said, how do I figure out what people are buying instead of how do I sell what I'm selling to...

...more people? And I think that's a very good distinction to make and can kind of be hard to do. So do you primarily get that from finding that lead magnet that works, or are there other ways that people or other areas people should be exploring that maybe they're not? Well, to find out what people are buying, the best place you can go is to your competition, because your competition leaves a trail. They're iterating just like you are. They're trying to figure things out as they go and they've had some things work and some things not work, but the things they stick with are the things that are resonating, that are getting them traction, that are getting them results, and so I never recommend going out and copying your competition. Just like on a trail, you don't where somebody else's shoes, but you follow the same path. And so if you can identify a path that the competition has taken, if you can take notes on the way that they're talking to their audience, then you can learn quickly and easily about how you can talk to them too well, and I think that's very helpful as well, especially when you're getting started. You might not entirely know how to really best describe what you're doing, and I've certainly seen this an action where I'm on a website and I am exiting out and I'm like, I'm not entirely sure what what this company does. Like it sounds cool, but I'm not, like, I don't really know how I'd apply this, and I think really that's a good kind of intro activity to do, is to is to look at that and see what your competitors are doing. I think that's that's so spawn on. Yeah, I've got a three month coaching program that I take people to and through, and that's one of the first steps is I give them a workbook to research their competition, find out the language that they're using, write down all the offers and lead magnets that they have, and it's not to copy and paste, it's to get it all in one place so that you can analyze four or five competitors and get all their content in one document and then look at it and say, what's the theme? What are all of these people doing right that I can learn from? And once you figure that out, then it becomes a lot easier to access the same audience. So you've been doing this for a decade now. What is something that's surprised you about running your own business? What surprised me the most was that online courses are not the ticket to Margarita's and Hula Girls, that lots of people online say that, yeah, that's what everyone's telling me. I just got to do a course. Yeah right, and that's it's easy advice to give and and it's appealing. Oh, I just have to get in front of a camera and talk for a while and then I can kick back and watch the money roll in I had I work with some really successful clients and online courses in two thousand and fifteen, two thousand and sixteen, around then, we...

...were doing a lot of online summits and we would invite in best selling authors to be interviewed on these ten days summits and then sell their package of courses at the end. And we made bundles of money on it. And then in two thousand and sixteen the clients started drawing and so I went around and started asking some of my colleagues who did the sort of thing I do. You know what's going on? Are you seeing this too? And the students started tuning out. Turned out that less than three percent of customers were even bought, were even finishing the online courses. And so for when I came to New Zealand, I got out of the entrepreneur game and I got a job for a little while because I had to get a work visa, and so I worked for the subsidiary of the world's largest credentialing provider and they sell online courses to to governments and and corporate businesses. And what I was so surprised to find, Joe, was that the same challenges that entrepreneurs were facing. We're being faced in a peripheral way with these big corporate clients. People weren't finishing courses, even though that these compliance courses employees were legally obligated to finish. They were on a clock, so they were being paid to take this course and they didn't like it. They weren't completely they weren't even logging in, and so I started doing some research to figure out why and I interviewed a lot of people about their online learning habits and it turns out that what people get in a live classroom that makes the classroom so valuable they don't get in an online course. They don't get access to the teacher, they don't get feedback on their personal situation, they don't get a cohort of peers working through it with them, and so this illuminated to me that the whole online course boom was a bubble that popped pretty early on. But when you still have all these douchebag marketers out there saying, by my online course on how to make online courses and it's seven figure city, but that's not happening in the market. And so anytime I have a client come to me and they say, you know, I really just want to launch an online course and have that be my business. I have to I have to break it to them that the people who are making money and online courses they either have a list of Fiftyzero people or they have a certification that enables the student to do something that they couldn't do before. If you have one of those two things, then yeah, make an online course. If you're just starting out and you're trying to start an online business and online course is not the way to go, but you know it is a way to go is a group coaching program you and if you launch a group coaching program and the course is the offline curriculum that people are studying in between sessions, those are selling. If you put if you put a sales page up with three tiers on it...

...and the first tier is a passive online course and the other two tiers are that come with coaching sessions, people are buying those higher tiers because they want access to the teacher, people want feedback on their situation. What they don't want is more videos to watch and more of it busy work to do. So that was the biggest surprise that I've had in running an online business. Yeah, I think that's a very good distinction. is having a set of videos to watch, because it all sounds great. It's like, Oh, I'm going to teach a step by step how to do email marketing, how to, you know, start a blog, how to successfully dunk a basketball which I have not seen that one yet, but it's I'm probably beyond hope anyway for that. But it's just more to do. But when you have when you have a group, I think the two things you hit on right there. You have someone giving you feedback and you have a group of peers that you can network with. You can see how they're doing, you can bounce ideas off them and that's super helpful and when I've been in groups like that I've gotten so much more out of it than a course that promised everything I wanted and maybe even has everything I wanted in it, but it's just like not, not conducive to learning for me and I a lot of other people as well. Yeah, because it's all up to you how often you show up. If you show up, there's no attendance requirement. With an online course you have to manufacture that sort of accountability to yourself. But if you're meeting with your group on Tuesday at Zero Am, you've got to have your work done by then and it gives you that kick in the pants to actually get the work done. And I think that's kind of a tie in to any kind of like homework out as well. Like you see a fitness class or something, it's like Hey, you've got other people around you are now it's more virtually, but hey, they're calling me out like hey, Joey's doing a great job with this handstand. Again, I'm doing very hypotheticals here. I would not be doing a handstand probably at all, let alone well. But yeah, when you have those those people around you, it's just like you're saying, you're showing up and you'll put in the work. Yeah, and that's a differentiator between an online course and Netflix. If you have a passive online course where you're not giving a community and you're not giving access to the teacher, then your student has a choice. Am I going to watch your video or am I going to watch Netflix? Am I going to watch youtube? Am I going to watch this highly produced production that had fifty people working on it, or am I going to watch what you did with your Webcam, but if you add in this special sauce, you get people seeing you, interacting with you, asking you questions about how you are applying the material. Netflix can't do that, youtube can't do that, but a group can. And so anytime anybody wants to to use an online course as part of their their business model, I always recommend having some sort of...

...group accountability function where there's actual interaction, because that's what people pay for. Information is free. Nobody has the problem nowadays that they can't figure out how to do something because there's so much information in the world right now. But what people do crave is authentic connection with other people and being seen for what they're going through right now, and especially now with with all of us having the social distance and not getting to see a lot of people. I totally agree with that and I think it's a something else you said that I was like yes, spot, I'm in most of what you've been saying. I'm saying that, but I think maybe I'll come back to me at some point. But yes, agree, agree all around. You've mentioned your ad digital nomad. Now, so where all have you been? Well, I left the states about ten years ago and I'd like to say it's because, you know, we were independently wealthy and we could just travel wherever we wanted, but that wasn't it. We we we were left destitute by trying to attain the American dream, and so we laughed with two kids and my wife was pregnant at the time and we went to Costa Rica and my third child was born in Costa Rica and he's a citizen and we're all permanent residence. But you know, Costa Rica wants to eat you. It's got bugs and spiders, snakes, and when you've got three little kids that's really stressful. And so we lived there for for a while and we were all we traveled around a bit. We were looking at some different countries to land in and a friend of mine had moved to New Zealand way back when and he said, look, if you're looking at different countries, you've got to come to New Zealand at least get on the ground here and see what it's like, because I think it would really fit you. And he was totally right. There are no natural predators here. We can walk out into the Wilderness and there's nothing that's going to eat us. So we really like it here. Awesome. Yeah, I having been to both Costa Rica and New Zealand, I feel like I was less physically attacked by the nature in New Zealand. For sure. I do. Sorry, go ahead and guy. Yeah, there's an interesting way that people move in Costa Rica because there's so many poisonous things. You could if you touch a tree, it could have a frog that is that has poisonous skin. You know the and so when people move they move very slowly and intentionally around things and try not to touch anything, whereas in New Zealand they don't care, are they just they call like they go tramping in the Bush, just stomp on things to go out there. I remember in and Costa Rica we did a like a scenic jungle tour or something like that, and the guide found a frog and he put it on my arm and then he said hold on weight and he left, came back with a second frog and put it next to me and he said happy hour, and I was like like this is real cute, but like are these okay...

...to be like beyond me right now. And turns out they were fine. They weren't poisonous, but there was like a brief moment of Pandag where I'm like, I can't look like it. Would it be poor taste of like shake the soft real quick. That all worked out, so it's fine. It's fine. I'm glad you survived that interaction. Yes, it's tough, tough being on this tour is out there. I had a permaculturalist come by my house and Costa Rica once and and our kids were playing and they're having fun and we go out of the backyard and he says, oh Um, kids come around here. So I need to let you know this tree in the yard that you've been playing around this is a cashew tree and it's very dangerous. Don't touch it. You could go to the hospital and it turns out that to get a cashoe. The reason why cashews are one of the most expensive nuts is because they grow in these pods and they're highly toxic. If you break a leaf and you touch the liquid that comes out, it'll put you in the hospital with a with an abrasion type burn. And so these pods, the way that people produce cashows is they drop them in deep friars to fry off the POD and get the nut out. That's why you always see roasted cashews and we had all these pods like littering our backyard and that's just part of living in the jungle is that it's highly toxic. That's just I'm like my skins crawling just thinking of that, because I know I would, I would accidentally just step right into something like totally I just totally forget. One morning I'm like, Oh yeah, this is now I'm covered and things that aren't good to be covered in. It's a tough life. Tough life. Well, Killen, you're almost off the hook here. We always like to wrap up with the top three and for you you recommended the top three books that Solo preneurs should read. So what should we get on our bookshelves? Oh Man, the best book that I've read last year is called the thought leaders practice. It's by three business coaches in Australia, Matt Church, Peter Cook and Scott Stein, and this book knocked my socks off. It's it's a really practical method of packaging your intellectual property and delivering it commercially to the market in the way that they want to consume it. It's a fantastic book. I highly recommend it. That's the first book. The second book I'd recommend for Solo preneurs is called company of one by Paul Jarvis, and Paul is one of the elders on the Internet, meaning that he's been active online for, Gosh, I guess fifteen years now. He's got he's about our age. It's just he got into the game early enough because, you know, like like us, he's kind of a gee, and so he's figured out a lot of things and he's been working for himself for so long he's clarified a lot of those challenges and issues that face companies of one and and I really liked his book. It was a good read.

The the third one that I would probably recommend is deep work by CAL Newport. We talked a little bit about deep work and shallow work earlier in this conversation and and Cal Newport is a scientist by training and so he really looks at attention and productivity through a scientist's Lens and he has all these great case studies about the difference between deep work and shallow work. And I'll be honest, I was an avowed multitasker for years. I loved being a multitasker and I prided myself on it until I read his book two years ago and it changed the way I work and now I alternate between periods of deep work and shallow work and I'm much more focused on unit asking and I get more done. Also, I love it. I've got I've got three to read. I haven't read any of those, so gotta Got Adam to the list. I'd love it great. Read more books for the bookshelf. Yes, yes, I've been. That has been a nice like a side effect of I don't know, I was kind of feel like I'm starting to read more this year anyway, before I was stuck inside. But yes, I've been making an active effort to remork because, yeah, there's so much, so much good stuff out there, and it's just nice to like hold a book in your hands. It's really great. I can't do kindles and I can't read pdf online, but sitting and holding a book, you know, there's nothing like it. And I realized recently that I hadn't been reading nearly as much as I wanted to. I had a stack of books that I just wasn't getting to and so I asked, you know, using the the James Clear theory and from atomic habits. You know, how can I stack this habit somewhere else? I figured, okay, I'm going to I'm going to read a chapter after I ate lunch before I go back to work, and it causes a really nice break in my day where I sit and I rest and I digest and I get introspective and I learned something and I get into the you know, the second part of my day much more refreshed and I'm moving through books that a much faster clip since I've started that habit. So that was really helpful. It's a good reminder to to take time to eat lunch. It's so easy to just speed through it be like I gotta get back. It's like Nah, yeah, take the time, take the time, yeah, because we need that time. Yes, absolutely. I actually just finished a just you know, on books. I finished a great book last month called rest by, I think his name was, Alex Su Jung Kim. He's a he's a he's a business coach out of Silicon Valley and he coaches some of the the highest performing executives and and his whole thesis is that the better that we handle our rest, the better that we can work and I started implementing some of his techniques and it's been great, awesome, awesome. I like that. That's for for perfect perfect. I Love Them. People go above and beyond. Gotta get the extra an awesome will. Can't let this was fantastic. If people want to learn more about you, want to get in touch, want to learn how their their course idea can be...

...taken to new heights, how can they find you? Well, you can go to my personal website, Klen Hunterscom, but you have to know how to spell my name and it's kind of challenge. So we send people to my digital marketing agencies website, which is stellar platformscom. And if you go to Stellar Platformscom, I've got a whole bunch of free resources on there. You can get my personal branding checklist and I also teach monthly master classes and you can find information about that over on stellar platformscom. Fantastic. Okaylyn, thank you so much. I speaking of master classes, I feel like this episode was just one great well, I'm glad that it was helpful. Absolutely, and we will end with our corny joke. As is always, this was actually sent in to me, so I gotta I got to make sure I get it right. Why did the scarecrow win an award? Why? Because he was outstanding in his field. Afterwards, today, people.

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