Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 138 · 2 months ago

138: How to Make Work More Fun with Dr. Bob Nelson and Mario Tamayo

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

If you've read anything online lately, you've probably heard about the trend of "quiet quitting." People get sick of their current company and role and either outright leave or decide to stay and do just the bare minimum to get by. 

One of the common reasons people get discouraged by their jobs is that they're not having any fun. And, spoiler alert: unhappy employees don't usually do good work. So, how can you introduce more fun into the workplace? 

That's what Dr. Bob Nelson and Mario Tamayo are sharing in their book Work Made Fun Gets Done: Easy Ways to Boost Energy, Morale, and Results. They've dissected more than 400 low or no-cost ways to make the office fun, whether you're in person or hanging out virtually. And these are things REAL companies are doing, so you'll get good ideas that will actually work. 

Special thanks to Why Play Works for supportin g this episode. Hosts Lucy Taylor, founder of Make Work Play and Tzuki Stewart, co-founder of Playfilled, explore how we can harness the power of play to boost resilience, improve well-being and foster collaboration, connection and creativity in the way we work. Listen at whyplayworks.com

Good People, Cool Things as a Concast feature in conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians, and other creatives get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing. And here's your host, Joey Held. Welcome to Good People, Cool Things. Today's guests are Dr Bob Nelson and Mario Tomato, the authors of Work Made Fun Gets Done. Easy Ways to boost energy, morale, and results. And if you are a manager or an employee you do some kind of work, this book is for you because it's filled with real ways things that companies are actually doing to make work more fun. And it's not in lieu of getting work done, it's in tandem to That's what the title of book is, Work Made Fun Gets Done. If people are having fun, they're going to do a better job at work. They're gonna be happier, it's gonna be less likely to leave. And those are all good things for a company because it's kind of hard to run a business when no one while to work there, and then in effect, no one does work there because they're all leaving. So there's so many good examples in this episode, and then there's hundreds more in the book, So you definitely want to listen and be taken some notes maybe while you're doing it too non and be like, hey, that's a good one that I'm gonna try. That one sounds scary, that one sounds perfect for me. Lots of good ideas all throughout this episode. And if you want even more good ideas, head over to Good People, Cool Things dot com. Sign up for the mailing list. You'll get tips, resources, tools, not at a crazy pace either. We're not throwing three thousand emails that you would day like so many email lists do way more, way, more laid back than that, because that's more fun, not having your email inbox clogged up. Very fun, very enjoyable. Just like this conversation with Dr Bob Nelson and Mario Tomao. To start, for people who maybe don't know who you are, can you give us your name, an elevator pitch, and the type of elevator that we're heading on. It's a notice elevator. Dr Bob Nelson, what about you? Bob um considered the leading expert in employee recognition and engagement worldwide. Yes he is. He's been doing it for how many years? Yeah, and he's got a book out on that called thousand and one ways to reward your employees. And how many millions copies have you sold? With anting two million? Wow? Wow? Do you think the lever will be a point where you lose count? This account of what of how many? How many printings you've done? Sixty four is a lot? Yeah. Now that's why it's seared in my memory. Yeah, what makes it all the more powerful. It's not a regular business book that you read from cover to cover. It's more of a reference book. So it's amazing how many people have bought a reference book. They use it. Yeah, well, not unlike the one we did. Mario, that's that's true. And my name is Mario Tomao, and I am a human performance and organizational consultant. And Bob and I have known each other for what thirty three years Bob thirty four years? At one time we worked together. Bob was my boss when we worked with the Ken Blanchard Companies. Is probably most well known by the One Minute Manager Book and situational leadership. But since both Bob and I left there, we've applied our own trade. We worked together quite a bit. And you've got to tell him that we met at Walt Disney World. How about that which is we were destined to write a book on fund the happiest place on Earth, and it is both there in California, in Tokyo, Paris. Where else are they? China? Anaheim? What are we talking? Haunted Mansion,...

...um Splash Mountain where we're where with their airport. We founded at the airport that we were both there for the same meeting and that we've been rooming together together for five days. Joey, you're laughing a little bit too much right now for my comfort. Well, you said that like there was a sense of dread of I learned very quickly that Dr Bob Nelson is a guy that works and works and works. He probably averaged two to three hours of sleep at night. But it's on it's on these podcasts. Yeah, podcast here now. But we we met there, we started a great relationship, work together. We've done trips together with our wives and in uh, you know, a lot of social activities. And the something is we're having a lot of fun doing even the work that we do. There's always been a lot of fun. Yes, And I don't I don't know if you dropped the title of this book, but it's called work made fun gets done. Easy ways to boost energy, morale and results. So I guess it was born at Walt Disney World, Like you're saying, but where did this this specific idea to do this book come from? I guess I was toying with it for maybe a couple of years where I got Mario on the project to help me wrap it up. Yeah, before we got serious about having fun at about telling people that having fun at work because it really makes a difference, we knew, we knew there was a need for it, and that times have changed. It used to be very clear that you were paid to work, and you did that in the office, and you had fun on the weekend at home and never the two shall meet. But something's changed about work and now a lot of people are working from home, and I don't know anyone that that doesn't do work from home or on vacation for that matter. And so we just decided, you get you've got to make fun part of your work you do, and so we we want to do a guide for how to how to do that, How to do it in your own work, how to do it if you're working with just a few people, how to do it if you're a leader, How to do it for the organization with things you can do to make it a more fun place to work. And we've had a couple of well known business entities that have pretty much followed us into this. We had um uh. Fortune company comes out with a Best Companies to Work For list every year and Bob, you know what what was that percentage that they found? Well, they when we looked at their data of employees that worked at Best Companies work For in America said that it was a fun place to work. Whereas for those companies that applied for the ward but didn't receive it, only their employees said it was a fun place. So that was that single variable at the largest differential in their study between great companies and also ran. So we've always felt there was something there, but we've got able to quantify some of the justification for why you need to take fund seriously. And then the Deloitte consulting firm said that be based in part on that research that Dr Bob just mentioned that fun is a competitive advantage for serious companies today. In fact, they called the decades of the twenties the era of workplace fun uh, And they said, if you're going to be serious about having a high performing company, then you better get serious about having fun at work. And they had they had someone on their staff that did a doctoral dissertation that we we cite in the in the book as well. So we start with a bounding of the topic and then we had a...

...very clear filter, and then we looked for examples that fit it, starting with our own examples, and then I did an email to my my database which is fifty people, um and I got examples from around the world from that, and then we also looked at secondary sources in publications, magazines, and books for examples that fit what we're looking for. And what we ended up finding is we found over four hundred low and no cost ways real companies, real organizations are employing today to have fun at work. And the book is segmented for the individual person, it's segmented for teams, for managers, and then things you can do for the entire organization. So obviously don't give away all four hundred of this, but I'm curious for each of you, do you have a favorite, let's call it a favorite method of fun from the mine is one that actually Bob and I did when we worked together at the Blanchard Companies. We surprised our t our product development team and we said, you know, when you when we meet this deadline here, we're gonna do something special. And it just so happened that when right after the deadline they there was the launch a debut of the first Jurassic movie, Jurassic Park Movie. So we put a sign on our door and we had thirty three people working in the department at that time, and we said out to a paleontolog workshop. So we called it the the Fun Afternoon. We had popcorn, peanuts in the whole bit and we all went and watched the movie and everybody had a blast, and it was It was a ton of fun. People talked about it for for weeks and months afterwards. How about you, Bob, what what's your favorite one? That's mine too? You know. One of the one of the big learnings in doing this project is that that was really surprised by was that what people feel is fun almost varies from person to person. I thought it would be kind of everyone say the same thing. You asked me, what's fun, I'd say, well, it's when you're laughing, you're having fun. What could be easier but if you asked my wife the same thing, she goes, well, if I come home from working, I got a lot done. It was a fun day, really, And everyone has a different thing that that that makes work fun and different things that they do and try, and that's what that's what values from having you know a lot of different perspectives, and that's the value of the book because you can you can see what else someone else did. They had fun and will probably work for you as well. So one that comes to mind to me is a Laura Donnelly out of Los Angeles. She said, when she is doing a work and wants to have it be fun and more meaningful. She puts on Yo Yo mas h two thousand and fifteen concert that he did three hours h the five concertos he did that he played three hours from memory with like a three minute break. And she said, when that music is on, you feel like God's going through his hands, you know, And if you listen to whatever you're working on, he gives you the same feeling. And I got off the phone. I tried it. Wow, She's right, And and so that was a fun a fun trick to you want to if you've got a down day, and you want to put a boost in your step and feel that what you're doing is has more importance. Play your yoma in the background, and it didn't cost her anything extra. Yes, free on the internet. I might need to try that. I've got I've been feeling a little sluggish this way, like I'd like that.

But there, you know, it starts very simply with your own work. So you can't sit around and and and wait for someone else to make your work fun. You gotta, you know, get in the game yourself. And so we would we looked for things that people did to change their attitude and and make things that were difficult go quicker. And so there's one technique of putting a timer on for twenty minutes when you've got something to work on that you're dreading, and see how fast you get it done, you know, get it over with and to play a game with it. You can also, you know, of course, reward yourself when you finish a task that was difficult. That could be a walk around the block, or could be you know, shopping online or calling a friend that peanut butter and banana sandwich. Mr Elvis, Yes, you know what one of the neat things about this is what we found was is that most of these big programs that organizations have going for fun, they started from one individual or a couple of people having an idea, starting in their own department, and then it grew and the fact that that somebody took ownership of it and they could come to work and they were being paid to have this have fun happened. It was amazing. So people go from individuals starting it to a couple of people. Then they have committees and then there nowadays you have organizations that have vice presidents of fun. Can you believe that you believe part of your culture? In fact, I haven't. I don't think ever told you story. But I took my my daughter around look at the colleges a while back and when when we looked at was m I t and they have a whole thing on fun and pranks and they have a they have a police cards on top of a building that some students at once and then they have a have a prank day and they have a competition on doing it's just crazy, but it's but it's fun. They also had a remember I loved it. They had a you can get a certificate im pirating at M I T T praty, pirating, sword fighting, pistol shooting, and I can't remember what the third one was, yeah, something, but but it was it was you had to put some work in to get it. But certificate and pirating that's fun, you know. And yeah, that's the thing. People, you're only limited by your somebody's imagination, and somebody's always coming up with something different. And again, what they come up most of the time doesn't cost anything more times than not, or or if it is, it's a nominal budget to celebrate at UM. The president of Belmont Colleges, for example, he went on a sabbatical for a year to just visit high performing companies. When he came back, the first thing he said is every place I visited was having fun. We have to have more fun here. And so he he created a fun committee stapted with volunteers and gave him a directive. I don't know initially even had any budget, but let me know if you need any money, but what do you want to do. And they brainstormed and came up and we want to do this. And now they've got someone that could if morale'slow, we can have them do something or to celebrate success, you certainly have to do do something to recognize and have fun around that, which is part of my my belief and the power of recognition. If you don't recognize what you did well it is, it could be hard to repeat it. And what does get recognized recognized does get repeated. So there's anything you want from another person, your girlfriend, spouse, a customer, treat him the way you know, recognize the things that you like, and they'll do more of...

...those things. Yeah. In fact, there's a there's an organization in Colorado. It's a consulting firm, and they don't have just one value for fun sky Team. Sky Team, Well, how many do they have, Bob? They had four different values for fun, have eight values and four more different types of fun. So they're serious about it, very in trench, and it's entrenched in each of their relationships with their their customers. I personally think that, you know, life's too short not to be working with people that are fun to work with. So I just said, as a guide with who I tend to deal with, you know, whatever possible. Yeah, I agree with that. I remember one time I was working my sister lives out in l a and I was working from her house because I was out visiting her, and I was on a call and I got off and and she's like, I don't have fun on phone calls like that, And I was like, I know, and you I think that's at the time she was looking for another job. So I was like, that's probably a good indication why you're you're out looking for something else, because not having fun, you come home miserable. If you're miserable at work, you come home miserable, and then you make everyone at home miserable. You know, you complain about in fact of employees or or employees spend their time at home complaining about their boss. Does that Does that change anything? Does that help anything? Probably not inventing making that person miserable and then that that that them complained And now we're both in it. Great And Joey, what do you like to do for fun at work? I mean, I think when you were talking about the Jurassic Park movie night, we actually did something similar with Back to the Future a few years back, which I capacitor. I realized as we're watching that I had never were seen the beginning of Back to the Future, Like every time it was on TV. It was always like fifteen minutes in exactly. So I was like, the last like two thirds of this was very familiar, but the first part I was kind of like, I think I kind of missed some of the the initial setup of this movie. Well. Well, well, if you're enjoying this episode and it's sparking some ideas on how you can make your experience of work more fun, you might want to check out Why play Works host Lucy Taylor, founder of Make Work Play, and Szuki Stewart, co founder of Playfield. Here the stories of trailblazers, from play practitioners to academics to organizations who are radically reshaping work as play. Lucy and Zuki investigate how we can harness the power of play to boost resilience, improve well being, and foster collaboration, connection and creativity and the way we work. Each episode serves up some playful practices you can take away inject into your own work. Listen to Series one at why play works dot com or wherever you're listening to podcast. Chances are, wherever you're listening to this podcast right now, you can also listen to Why play Works. So when this episode is done. Look up why play works, listen to it and enjoy all of the great stories that you're gonna hear and actions you can take to make your own work more fun, because hey, work made fun, it gets done. Bob, you've written a book that you've sold two million copies of. Oh that's not just one. He's written thirty other books. So I I know, what, what did you learn from those books that you applied to this book or was this such a sort of a different idea from what you've done in the past that it was kind of like almost starting from scratch. Well, someone once told me that every author is writing the same book over and over, and I think there's some shooth to that. So this, of course is a slightly different topic, but it's a piece of the fabric on how do you what do you do to have an environment where keep or motivated, they enjoy the work they're doing, um,...

...who they're doing it for, who they're serving as a customer. All my books have all kind of pointed to different pieces of that. So the book before this one was called A thousand and one Ways to Engage Employees, and I guess, I guess I have a format I've done books and other formats. But the one I most do is to get a clear a clear topic, have a research foundation, and then look for examples, kind of cut to the chase and and so I'll find um, I'll find uh, I'll sort to a story and I'll find zero in on the piece that in this case is where someone had made something fun or in recognition, where someone gave and a reward or or a form of recognition, and what that looked like. And it's all over the map. So there is you know that that's been that. Books now has one ways of of There's just so many ways that you can you can thank people just in h I mean we've named a few just that we've done at random, but things that you can do to make people feel special and surprisingly like the fun topic, the most motivating ones tend to be things that don't cost any money. So a personal thank you fromone's manager, someone who they hold they hold the high esteem, or a job they did well as a top the top one, or being asked your opinion m at at work or ideas for improving things. N two percent of employees and my research say that they'd like to be asked for how we can do things better around here? What kind of kind of a common sense thing? And then if they have a good idea, here's here's a blame fresh you know, let them pursue it. Let them what's a great idea? Why don't you try that? Tell us what you find out. You know, who's gonna have more energy for the idea than the person that came up with it. Listen to how we can help you with your idea. Now they've got ownership, you know. One of them said, God, if you want to thank me, can I serve on that ad hoc committee? You know? Other people say, hey, that's extra work. But the other is, no, I want to get ahead. I want some visibility. And that's that's exactly what they got. Yeah, that there's actually it's like eight percent of people want to be recognized by being given more responsibility. So you've got to know people you're dealing with and know what does it for him? And and it changes over our our life and over our career, you know. Um but um so said. They want to be asked for the opinions. So they want to be involved in decisions, especially those that affect them. How hard is that to ask we're gonna talk about this. This this decision I gotta make and I'm I'm the manager. I gotta make the decision. But I know would be a better decision if I have your input. You guys are closer to the job you're doing, So what do you think? And then just the process of doing that makes people feel validated and and acknowledge shows respect and trust and I I feel better about working there, working for you. And then and then, uh, whatever you come up with this could be implemented easier because they were part of the decision. You know, it's all kind of common sense. But more than more often than not, managers don't do this type of stuff that they tend to. You know, you get a job as a manager, you're promoted for something else, you know, you did technically or sales or I T or whatever, and now you've got to use skills skill set that you you haven't had to. And most managers initially kind of flail because they are too busy trying to be the person in charge and telling people what we're gonna doing and who catching people doing things wrong and being the smartest person in the room. And that's not gonna get you anywhere but resentment, and you got to back off that instead. Work is Peter dirtor defines is getting the job done through others. And so that means you've got to be there to help them. And then if they make a mistake, say another another simple technique that doesn't...

...cost anything, that's a big, big morale boost is to make a mistake. You can catching doing catching with the mistake and prove that you're smarter than them and embarrass them in front of the peers, or you could, you know, take a breath and say, I'm not sure I would have done the same way. What did you learn from that? In fact, that sounds awfully familiar, Bob, that sounds we have an example of that, Mario earlier when we were working together. Yeah, a couple of months after I started working for Blanchard, Bob was my boss, and I printed up we in product development, we created a leadership assessment. And in this assessment about six pages long. And this was back in the days when uh spell check was just coming out and some people were using it and other people weren't. Well, I was one of those stupid people. They didn't use it when I could have, and wouldn't you know. But the word manager showed up as manger. Actually, you might have been using it because I think that's the major is a real word too. Oh that's right, that's what exactly what happened. And so the spell check didn't come up with it because manger is a real word. And I did not do the human eye check. I just relied on that and it cost us ten thousand dollars. You know, I printed the darn things throughout the assessment. Yes, so Bob, instead of saying tis tis tis you're fired, he says, Mario, you know what, think of it as I just we just spent ten thousand dollars on your training, and I bet you'll never make that mistake again. And we laughed at it. You know, it was fun. He laughed at it. And he says, this is how we learned, And uh, I didn't. I never made that mistake again. I made other mistakes, but I didn't make that one again. By the way, one question we get a lot Joey is people look at the book and they go, God, that is great. How how do you best use this? And so what we tell managers? And Bob learned this when he did a thousand and one ways. He says, just bring the book to your next staff meeting and pass it around to each of your your staff members and have them select the things in the book that they valued most like initial them in the column you know, this is what I would want to do if if you know, I want to be recognized like this, or this is what I want to do when we want to have fun. And guess what you get at the end of the meeting. You get a book that is customized for the things that your people really want to do. And then as things happen, you pick up the book and say, here's what we're gonna do, and it's full proof. You're always doing something that people want to do. Again, makes it makes it easier to implement, easier to follow through on, because there's a lot of people that will just say, hey, I know what that person wants, I know what they want, and they go do it and it falls flat and it's you know, it's we'll always you know, one of our one of our principles that we have in the book is find out what your people really value and makes you you're providing them with that. That's where it starts. Yeah, yeah, we say safe and make sure it's safe and fun for everyone. That's the one one key rule. You can't you can't have fun bybe you know, having jokes at someone's expense. That's that's like funny for like two seconds and then they're upset and then they're about to quit. So you gotta do it if you make jokes about anyone, making it about yourself, you know, and be the person that's that's uh big enough to laugh itself. Like I know, no crazy physical endeavors either. I just rewatched. Okay, maybe not, maybe not.

...a group that does bungee jumping off bridges, okay, and they all said, yeah, that's what we want to do. So that that's what they did. How about that one woman who said, you know, when I make this goal, you know what I'd like, I'd like my boss to wash my car in front of everybody in the parking lot. And sure enough she made goal. She brought the hose and the boss took over from there and they had a blast. Yeah. Actually the boss was suggesting that for whoever makes this goal, I washed the car and they could have they could have just given them a car wash coupon. They're taking the car to a car wash, but they made a whole performance of it, and they didn't in the lot and in the parking lot and everyone was looking out the windows and and what's going on. You know, Well, someone's getting the car washed because they finished the project. About the boss who shaved his head, Yeah, yeah. And I worked with the company in Seattle where the salesman just saif we make this goal, we're up against it. If we make it, I'll shave my head. And that was, you know, it was part of the banter of making it happen. And and sure enough they did. And then the people that had the most progress against the goal, they got to cut the first locks, and he did in front the whole company. It has a lot of a lot of fun. They all loved. There's only one person who didn't like it at all. And that's when the guy went home and his wife's saw him. I don't know about that, but um or Or, giving an example from the book, um interviewed the CEO and he said, we'd like to do something a couple of times a year, uh a, with everybody. No, a fun, fun type of thing, and but whatever he did, it never seemed that much fun. People didn't seem like they really wanted to be there, and not everyone showed up, you know, and so he felt it wasn't working, and so he had another executive try the same results, and finally he decided he was, you know, he's coming at it wrong. Instead of kind of forcing his idea and everyone, he got a millennial to say, would you like would you be willing to do this? Absolutely? And the guy used social media tools to find out the best time and survey people and they came up with three ideas and the CEO could now veto one he didn't like. But they end up doing when they've never done before, and it was a blast. They actually did a one of these pirate shows where you could could serve turkey legs and watch a jousting and everyone loved it, and the kids loved it and everyone loved it. So sometimes it's not working for you, maybe you're pushing too hard, and try a different approach you. Another one is when they had bring your dog today or bring your pet to work day, and they got to be so popular that some companies got real serious about it and they put in fire hydrants in their brake area so that they could have their dog be there. They they had special foods for them, they had you know, treats the whole bed and people just love it. In fact, you know, during this pandemic, people says, I'm not going back to work and unless I can bring my my dog. That's actually been part of the resentment and going back to work because people don't want to leave their pet. And now leaving your pet is have an apartment, got a dog an apartment for eight hours, they can tear the place up. You know. It's it's a great simple thing to if you can allow people to bring their pets to work. So that's just one of the sections we have in the book. And again have so many different ideas about how to have pets at work and have fun with your pets. We've had it with the virtual We've got that. That's another chapter two, how to have fun on your virtual meetings. But we've had CEOs and high level execs having virtue their virtual meetings, having their pets sit on their lap and they all introduced their pets. They go around the you know, the monitor or high for...

...example, they have people fill out meat profile. So if you're dealing with people online, especially if a lot of people are working from home now, then they fell out a survey about their hobbies and do they have pets and where their pets names and that type of stuff to allow people to could know each other better. And now they've got also ways to thank each other should they want to, because they know them a little bit better. Um. Another thing that high It does is they assign um praise buddies kind of like secret Santa's, but they signed you know, employees to someone else on the team for the next month. Pay special attention to what Tom's doing and you see something good, call it out for the group. Very simple thing and kind of funding that someone's doing it for that person and else in the group, and you know, of course anyone can chime in, but it kind of guarantees that there's going to be a banter of catch and people doing things right. I gotta tell you we that reminds me one of one of the things we did in in our department meetings with Bob is we had very very highly participated meetings, to the point where sometimes people would step on each other and wouldn't let people finish talking. So Bob came up with this idea and he went home one weekend. He came back and he came back with this big coconut, and he said, here's here's what we're gonna do. If you're gonna talk in the meeting, you have to be holding the coconut. So that coconut was thrown around the meetings and the coconut. It got to be real fun. Of course till the time when somebody threw it and the other person wasn't looking. Oh man, that was having fun at somebody's expense. We also did stand up meetings. You want a short meeting, to do a stand up meeting or we we did. We we experimented with how to keep things fresh, and in fact that they got to be so good. We ended up having our meeting table redesign and built where it was like today now they have those adjustable high tables that people stand up. That's what we had for our meetings. We should have. We should have copywritten or trademark family. There you go, but a great virtual example. Because so many people have spend time on zoom calls now or go to meetings or whatever. Google meets that and get that, we get the question, well what can you what can you do and virtually to thank people. Well, one of my favorite ones is you can do a praise brage and that's where you you say, Hey, before we dig into the agenda, we just take a few minutes and go around our group. As I call your name, I like everyone else to say something they value about working with you. Positive. Let's start with Tony, Now, Mary, and what do you Ten minutes later you got around the group. Everyone has gotten personal feedback from people they work with. That's gonna make them feel great. It's gonna buy and it's gonna make the team more tightly operate together because they they've done that sharing. And I guarantee whatever someone has been called out for as being good at, they will become great at because they've been encouraged. So, Tom, you're a great summarizing where we are and what are the next steps. Now he's going to be super at it and make the means even better. And then what they did is they put that that agenda item as a standing agenda item for every meeting they start a meeting with praises? Yeah, who has any praising? And I've got one and got could top it, you know. And I've seen companies turn around just with that one technique where it was a really uh bitter place to work, and as working with the manufacturing plant in and Carry, North Carolina, and they their meetings were basically blame games...

...and you know, somebody, somebody left the number three turbuying on. It wasn't me, you know, And and all of a sudden they said, well, we're gonna try something different. We're gonna stop stop, We're gonna start with any praising and thank you for other people. And initially they you know, people were kind of quiet and there wasn't anyone and but they kept at it. The next meeting someone spoke up and wow, that's that's a great thing. And then someone else spoke up, and all of a sudden became part of how they worked together, that they're constantly acknowledging the things that are going right instead of complaining about the things that are going wrong, you know, And it became a fun, positive culture just from making that one change now that they that led to other changes as well, but that was the trigger for it. Fantastic, Well you've you've been dropping I feel like examples of this left and right, but we always like to wrap up with the top three and so maybe maybe will narrow this, will narrow this just a little bit of your top three ways to have fun at work from an individual level. So, one person, what are your top three ways for how they can have fun? Well, I think you know, one of the things that people usually have a lot of fun with because again some people don't like it um is having a dress day for some type of um special event. You know, it could be Cowboy Day. Hey, there's an idea, could be Elvis Day. I would talk like a Pirate day. People, you know, you just think about Halloween, think about Halloween UM events. People like doing that kind of stuff. So and then the thing is you asked them what do you want to do, and they usually come up with something really good and then they take ownership. Then before you know what, they want to do more and more and people are having a lot more fun at work and getting things done. Very important that we're not saying have fun at work in lieu of getting work done. We're saying have fun at work because that fun helps you get the work done where you feel good about it. The your boss and your department does, and the entire organization wins. It's a win win, Yeah, And just the simple thing of of thanking someone just much more common sense can you get. Most employees don't receive that where they work. They don't receive it from their boss. In fact, most people say a long time, I hear from my boss when i' made a mistake, and so I tried to avoid my boss at all. It's because it's common nature. If you get you're getting you know, dings every time you see someone, you start to avoid seeing them, maybe they'll think someone else instead, you know. But it can be turned around very simply by uh, I gotta I gotta tell you. I mean, I've worked with a lot of companies that worked with the I R S and talk about, you know, that's the negative culture. And they they had supervisors. They would listen on people's phone calls and until they heard them do something wrong, you know, they quote the wrong policy or they should direct it somewhere else, and they'd write them up and they go the next person and do the same thing. And I said, you know, it's it's great that you're having that uh that monitoring, but instead of just make one change, and you can change the whole culture. And that's you write them up on something they did well and then go the next person to do the same thing. And that's what they did, and it it actually, it actually worked a lot more positive, especially because if you got written up with something negative, if you've got a couple of those, it it meant a ding in your next rays. So there were some financial consequences and so telling people they did a good job and and how hard it would be to say, and if you if you do that, if you get five of those, and you're gonna get a little something extra in your next race. You know, it's a very very simple thing, but it's a very huge different approach. The other saying that that does is when you start to give more...

...positive feedback than negative feedback, it makes it easy to give that critical feedback because they're not cringing, hey, uh see me, come talk to me. Because in the old days, when you heard that, it was oh, But now if you're getting so much positive, it's like, okay, what is that? Yeah, I can do that, no problem. You've built a good will and there's a trust you've built. Uh not just Stephen Covey us to say that you know you can't, you can't make withdrawals and the human in the bank bank unless you made some deposits first, So you gotta and then then you do that and then people are eager to help you. And because you've you've you've helped them and you you've praised them and you they want to pay you back. And I found that to be very true. Um when when I've used that to ask favors from employees that you know, maybe working hours that they weren't scheduled, or or doing something that maybe wasn't officially their responsibility, but they were eager to help out because of the things I've done, they're so positive with them. One company is that is Petco. You've probably heard of them. Well, their headquarters is here and where Bob and I live in San Diego. Both You can walk in there and walk down the hallways and they have all their cubicles and they have criss crossing and all that, and you look in both sides of the hallways and you see all these pets. I mean, these people are motivated because they get the brand and not just dogs, lizards, snakes, birds, you you know, you mentioned it. They haven't it's actually proven to pet a dog or cat, it lowers your your stress level. Yea. So it's it's not just uh, it's that's just silly fun. It's it's uh, there's there a reality to it behind it, and you know, and it's it's like, you know, if you have dogs, you probably used to walk in them, and that's that's how you meet the whole neighborhood, right because and everyone that has a dog, you know who they are and where they live in what they do and and uh, it's the same same. It's true at work as well, coming to visit your your your pet and talk to him in the meantime and another friend, Yes, I know, I'm gonna get plenty of puppy scratches in right right after work. Here. So if people want to learn some of these other ways and pick up a copy of the book and learn learn more about how they can have fun at work, where can they find all Well, the book is at any place that sells books. Amazon, I actually have some off of my my website, m Barnes and Noble. Uh, you can get audio books any bookstore you didn't even get in the airports. My my online bookstores Nelson hyper motivation dot com. Um, it's good all all my books, I sell it at discounted prices thanking keeper's author. I like that. So yeah, that's the best discount you can get if you go to Dr Bob Nelson dot com. Well talk to Bob. Mario, thank you so much for taking the time to chat. This was I mean, like, like the name of the book suggests, this was a lot of fun. You know, it's just something cool to do. You take the book in and you never know where it's gonna take you. Plus if you get the book, you get to see a a special bonus. Mario and I and our our high school pictures and seven. I like the matching hairstyles there. Yes, I that afros and it was like the mod squad and room. What was that called about, Welcome Back Carter exactly. It's all the rage. Yeah. I think that's worth it for for the price alone, just to see let's see those photos and good all that other content. Yeah, and every organization that...

...we profile in there, they're listed in the back along with contact information actual that they're real doing right now. So that's around the world. You know, it's not just stuff that's made up or try this. You know, it's it has some of our that from us, but it's mainly really examples from real people, so it's already working somewhere. Probably work for you as well. Yeah, well fantastic, Well, thank you again, and of course we've got to wrap up with a corny joke, as we always do. I asked my friend if they minded if I did a little shadow boxing. They said, knock yourself out. That's good. That's good. That's good Good People, Cool Things that's produced in Austin, Texas. If you were a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button that helps more people here the show. You can send me a message Joey at Good People, Cool Things dot com. Thank you to all of the has to have been on Good People, Cool Things and check out all the old episodes via Good People, Cool Things dot com. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

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