Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 6 · 1 year ago

Making Big Decisions, UFOs, and Hearing Dead People with Alyea Sandovar

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Alyea Sandovar, Game Researcher and Digital Producer at TintHue, joins the podcast to chat about her process for making big decisions, which has led her down many paths and through many careers as she’s discovered what she’s most passionate about.

She’s also a huge UFO fan, so of course we’ve included some fun links below. And Alyea dives into her unique ability to communicate with dead people, or at least disembodied voices. How could you not tune in?

Welcome to good people, cool things, the podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives.I'm your host, Joey held, and today's guest is Alia Sandovar,game researcher and digital producer at Tint you. Alia cycled through a series of professions, doing a lot of things that she thought she might enjoy but ultimatelywasn't feeling, and the mindset she took to get to a profession where sheloves what she's doing today. She also is obsessed with ufos and loves doingresearch, and so we got plenty of links in the show notes all aroundthat of some of her favorite videos and channeling her inner Haley Joel Osment,she can kind of hear dead people. Wait now he says C dead people, isn't it? Well, sorry for spoiling the sixth sense for Ali'all, but let's dive on it. Wow, all right, elevator pet pitch aboutwho I am. This is I've never really thought about this. Imean, of course there's elevator pitches for what you do, but about whoyou are, that's really quite interesting. All Right, okay, my nameis Alia Sandovar. I'm originally from Columbia, South America, and I have livedin many different places, including Costa Rica and several places in the US, and now I live in Amsterdam in the Netherlands, and I think I'ma person who is seeking to be sovereign and free in all ways. Soin work, in life, yeah, in friendships, in love, Ithink. Yeah, I think that's who I am. Excellent, perfect elevatorpitch. Where's your favorite place that you've lived? Is Anstagram number one.It's pretty close. I also lived in San Francisco, so that was really, really great. I loved the bay area, I loved what it offeredand, yeah, I love the mix of people there. Before I beforeI lived in other places, but the bay area was the first place thatI lived in where I felt like people would have these like weird combinations ofof personality, traits and hobbies. So you don't see, or I didn'tsee up to that time, anywhere else. So, for example, you couldhave this like really, like, I really intense personality who's doing likesome sort of you know, market research or something intens maybe like the VPof marketing or something like this. What...

...you would expect would be like inwhat I would say like the boys club or something like this, and thenyou talk to this personality and maybe make assumptions about who this person was,and then you'd find out that there were like maybe also like a zen masterat the monastery. So I really like that about San Francisco. You didn'tknow, like you can tell by just looking at someone and talking to someonewho they really were. There it was sort of like permissible to have likeall these different facets of yourself and and it was the first place I feltlike more at home because it's like, okay, these like differences within oneperson can coexist, and it's not always like that that you have like maybethings that are opposite to one another, things that you don't expect people tohave within themselves. To yeah, to to have that. So I thoughtwas really cool. Plus there's the whole startup. Seeing that was pretty interestingwhen I was there, really educational awesome. Yeah, I have never lived inSan Francisco but have visited many times. My sister lived out there for alittle bit and it I completely agree. It's just such a interesting mix ofpeople with lots of lots of hidden talents. Yeah, it's it reallyis really crazy, and it can also get a little bit tiring after awhile, because if you are sort of like this normal achieving person at atable, it can really like I remember going out to dinner and and thenyou'd have these conversations with people about what they were doing and and everyone waslike, you know, extra, extra, whatever was that they were doing theirsuper driven, super the best at whatever they were doing. And andmaybe you talk to someone at a dinner table, I'm like Oh, sowhat do you do? Is Like, Oh, I'm taking time off,and I'm like great, so where what are you taking time off from?And and they'd be like yeah, well, you know, I sold my startup a few years back to Google and then after that I ended upworking with Google as their vp of Blah, blah, blah, Blah Blah.So after that I decide to take a break, and then then Ihelped build an orphanage in Rwanda and now I'm just sort of figuring out whatI want to do with my life and I'm like, yeah, I justwent to public school and and yeah, so it was it was stories likethis all the time, and and in every area. So whether it wassocial enterprise or the startup world or like you know, or research or whereeveryone was just level ten. So which is really great for being driven,but but it also played a little little who made you feel a little selfconscious. At least I feel selfconscious. So yeah, yeah, I know it'sthe advice is always to be like hey,...

...just focus on yourself, don't compareyourself to other people, but in environments like that can be hard sometimes. Yeah, yeah, it's true, especially when it's like that and everyone'slike that and like what? Of course that advice is really powerful. Youhad to focus on yourself. So it's not so much that your you feeldown on yourself all the time, but you're like, who are these peoplelike? Like so, anyway, then I moved here to Amsterdam, wheneveryone was the opposite. Is Much more lead back and people don't actually sharetheir achievements here, which is really interesting. You find out later from talking topeople what they've done and what they haven't done, and and it's sortof you know, it's it's kind of refreshing that the people don't like arenot constantly pushing and saying Oh, on this and that and that. Iknow there's not this kind of self marketing. You know, self marketing, Idon't know, way of being. You know, they just kind ofare. You currently are in gaming now, but you said that you've had,you kind of bounced through a lot of different professions to get to thatpoint. Do you have a super stranger outside the box one that you you'vedabbled in before realizing it's not for you? I can't say it was super outsideof the box, but I got my one of my master's degrees asin clinical psychology and and so I was a therapist for a couple years.I didn't get to be licensed because after a few thousand hours of doing therapyI realized I did not want to be a therapist. So probably should havefigured that out before my degree. But yeah, I figured it out onmy way there and a little bit after. Yeah, and I thought it wouldbe really great to help people. I really loved studying psychology and howpeople were and like how their minds work, understanding the systems in which we liveand and how much we influence and effect one another, you know,from little children all the way up to you know, our social structures,and I really wanted to understand that. I wanted to understand how the humanbeing was and and that school provided that, which was fantastic. I was reallyhappy with my education, but the practice of it was a completely differentthing and I felt yeah, I wanted to help people and it just turnsout it takes for people who change, it takes a lot and a lotof time and I didn't get that that it's not easy. It's not reallyeasy to change, even with support, and that can be for me personally. I have other friends who are therapists who really enjoyant still continued good,but for me personally, it was really exhausting to go into a session weekafter week after week and seeing that the...

...issues that people came to see mefor the very first session were still present a year or a year and ahalf later, and that felt very discouraging to me. Yeah, it's Iobviously have not really any experience with therapy. I do not have any master's degreehanging up on my wall, but I am my very early side hustledays I worked for a transcription company. Yeah, and some of what Iwould transcribe were therapy sessions and, you know, no names or anything like. They were all just a series of numbers to identify which ones they were. But I would kind of like I'd get some of the same people sometimes, so I'd felt like I was like progressing along with them or would like, you get it invested in some of the stories. And Yeah, I'msure there were. There were gaps in between two, so I wasn't gettinglike back to back, but I'd hear like something like a call back thatI transcribe before and I was just like Oh, nice, I was wonderinghow that turned out. So it's it's definitely yeah, it's definitely interesting.Yeah, and did you see progress between the transcriptions? I'm curious. HumI would say probably not. I think the the one I had the most, without being too identifying, was was a woman probably in her s like, and I only did like three or four for her. So I don'tthink that's enough to really see that much. But I did enjoy doing her transcriptions, probably maybe the most. I don't know, but she she wouldtake a lot of long pauses in between saying stuff. Yeah, so thatwas like less had. I enjoyed that because sometimes it could be hard tokeep up with. Thank you, I can just imagine. Yeah, thoseconversations are really did yeah, interesting. So, yeah, and so well, now I use my psychology degree in other ways with people and interactions andthings like this. But but yeah, I don't and I really appreciate that. Degree was really great. I learned a lot and we also had togo to therapy as part of our degree. That was really also as a weightof like it helps you, as a practitioner, know what trips youup so that when you're with a client it doesn't show up with your clientand and it also it's also a way to see how other people do therapy, but you can learn from them. So that was really, really interesting. I like that part also. So what trips you up? So Idon't ask it, or I do if I'm feeling real, real torment.Oh my gosh, so many things. Where's to you in the whole list? Well, let's see. Well,...

I think one one of the thingsthat that trips me up in in life is that I am, I feelthat I'm constantly in a state of confusion with people, and I'm not sureif that's the way my brain works or what happens, but but I oh, I used to think that it, that this state of confusing was sortof like my fault, like I was doing something something wrong and sort of, sort of what I realized is that I think a lot of people havea mismatch between what they say and how did, how they behave, andthen how they feel or what they actually think. And and then I itwas like it was like I could feel or sense how people felt, butthen the reaction or the behavior of the words were coming out of their mouthwhere are not what they actually feel or where where I sort of feel orsee. And so I used to just feel like, oh, there's somethingwrong with me, I don't understand people, what's happening, and and through thethis work I came to understand, actually know, there's nothing wrong withme per see. I mean it's one of the things that trips me upthat I'm constantly but I feel so confused right now. But why that personsaid that, because to me it's clear that it's blah, Blah Blah.So I'm not sure that answers your question, but that's something that trips me up. I think that makes sense. Yeah, a lot of times peopleare not super forthcoming, especially in newer situations, like if you are firstmeeting someone like I'm sure there's plenty that people are going to keep hidden,which is probably for the best. I don't know if I'd want to knoweveryone's full, you know, full medical history and all that good stuff.No, I. Yeah, yeah, no, I totally agree that.The definitely like it's not so much about not being yeah, there's no reason. There are things that should be kept sort of like sacred for yourself,you know, you don't need to be telling everyone your business. But Ithink maybe that's why it's a little bit easier for me here in the Netherlands, because people will just tell you what they think right away. There's nothere's no like confusion, there's most of the time no filter and and itcan feel a little bit harsh if you're not used to being in that environment. But for me it feels really refreshing because I don't have to guess ifwhat someone's telling me is what they want me to know, what they reallyknow or or feel. They just tell it ow it is. And andif they don't want you to know something,...

...they just don't say something. Nicesimp I like it. Yeah, so, yeah, and so youbounced around all these different professions, get master's degrees left and right. YourWall is like an art wall, just of degrees. It's magical. Yeah, maybe, and you said that only recently you've kind of returned to playinggames, which is something that you love. So how did you get back intogaming? Yeah, actually it was a little bit ironically, had abit to do with my clinical psychology study. I started noticing, no, wheneverI do, because part of my job was to do home visits.So actually go to the clients home and either with them, that the besttimes, in the best sessions that I had with them were the ones inwhich I wasn't doing quote unquote therapy, but ones in which we were doingactivities together, playing with their or them and their children are showing them.So you play, or perhaps we were cooking together. And of course thattherapy occurred in that sort of time. But we but it wasn't okay,let's sit across from each other and then you just share what's happening, butrather like two people sort of hanging out, I hope, held the therapeutic space, but they and they obviously they were sharing information, but in theprocess of an activity. And not only did I have fun, but they, they also had a lot of fun and and I really enjoyed those sessions. So when I realized I didn't want to be a therapist anymore. Isort of had this intuition to go into games. I saw some sort oflike startup weekend or something where they were doing like startup weekend on video gamesand and I hadn't thought about the video games. I had played some whenI was a kid and also in college, and I gosh, I wonder ifthat's something that I that I can do. And and of course,I mean there's lots of people make video games, but for some reason theydidn't dawn on me like that could be an actually could actually be a career. And what could I do now, you know, after having a couplemasters to grace, like they really want to go back to school or dosomething else. So, yeah, so, so I saw this thing and thenI just was inspired, you know, I just had this intuition, thisfeeling like it was the right thing to do, and I then wentinto a PhD that allowed me to then study and work with game designers andand that's how I made the transition and I really enjoyed it and from thatpoint forward I started then becoming more involved.

I worked at the game developers conferenceas one of like their advocates, ambassador of people that volunteer. Nowthey get paid for four years and then, you know, I got involved withother organizations and with research organizations and, yeah, and then my life justtook a completely different turn and I was so for I am so muchhappier using games and claification now for businesses and helping develop products and things likethis. It's so much more fun. So that's awesome. We'll get backto gaming towards said, but I did want to dive into a couple ofyear your self proclaimed quirks. Yeah, one of them being your obsession withthe UFOS. Yes, and have you many, many follow ups, orhave you seen ufo and you felt before? Or well, let me say thatin normal way. Have you seen a UFO before? Well, youknow, it's interesting, not that I remember. I had when I wasliving in Santa Barbara. was with some with some girlfriends once and I hadby this point, I think, I joined the move on organization in California, and so you could become a reporter or something, and I and wewere talking about children or something important in the world and then I saw thisthing flashing in the sky and and I said do you see that? Andthen they and it did this loop to loop thing, not not the kindof thing that you would see a plane do. It did a loop toloop thing and then in a flash, it was like a flash and itwas gone. And and then they looked at it and they managed catcheck becausethey were facing me and I was watching the sky until they turned around andthen they saw it and I was like, is that what I think it is? And they're like, I don't know, but it sure doesn't looklike some object that we would have. Now I was like, well,there we have and and that's probably the only time I've had any kind ofexperience with it. Most of my thoughts or experiences are on your phones.are watching videos and wanting to go to ufo conferences and things like this.So, yeah, so do you have a favorite video then that you youwould recommend for people that just want to learn a little more about UF hasmaybe don't have the extensive background that you do? Wow, oh my gosh, I'm so far in rabbit hole of this thing. Okay, so maybeI would just say people. There's so many people that that I follow,but like the first one that that POPs into my mind. The talks ofabout this and there's a movie called beyond majestic which talks about this tool,like just ufos, and like it a...

...little bit into conspiracy theories and thingslike this about why things are being hidden, etc. Etc. Etc. Byone of the main people within this like disclosure community is David Wilcock.So if you were to search for him on Google or youtube you could findsome of his stuff. Yeah, but they're like now I have to likewho are all the people? I just jump around different youtube like that.I also edge of wonder also covers some used ufo stuff that I that Ifollow. That's another youtube channel. But they also cover other types of stufflike con be able to cover like conspiracy stuff. Yeah, but I've beenobsessed with them since I was a kid. I used to like feel like Iwanted to leave the planet. I felt like, you know, thisplanet is crazy. I mean I grew up in Columbia in the middle oflike the Pablo Escobar time, so it was not a nice place. Imean my mom was super great and she kept us safe and we are inmain city, so but it was always really scary to grow up there atthe time. So I was always sort of like think, like designing spaceshipsand trying to figure out I actually want to be an astronaut when I wasa kid, to how, you know, just to figure out how we'd getout of the planet, because those I'll get into this like and itis so whack. What is happening? What's the fastest root out of here? So, yeah, and so I became that's when I became obsessed withufos and sci fi and all kinds of things, you know. You know, we had two TV's growing up and my family would be in one TV, like would be watching TV in one room, and then they would giveme the other ones that I can I could watch my sci fi shows,because no one could relate. Do you have a show that would be theideal like if we, if we were to go out into space, goto a new planet? Is there a show that really captured that super well? If you're like, if this is like this, yes, I'm onboard. Oh my gosh, a show that really captured how things would reallybe? MMM, no, I don't. I think all the shows about ufostend to make it tend to make ufos this like really horrible thing orlike they're somehow. Yeah, I mean I liked actually, recently, theshow I like the most. I don't know if they're still on seasons ornot, but the one I liked was the orbal oh. Yeah, yeah, I really like the orbit. I mean, of course, before thatyou can maybe look at, you know, they were all the difference projects andthings like this, but but I really like the Orbale. How thatwas really funny. It was very humorly, but this idea of like, yeah, going to different planets and connecting...

...with different cultures and things like this, it's really, really, really interesting and, yeah, and sort ofalong the lines of going to different places. Yeah, you also say that youcan hear dead people. That's right, let's dive into this. What doesthis mean? So I would I will. Yeah, so I willsay it's more like a sense, a sense of feeling sort of people aroundme. I call them dead people, but they're probably just means that people. I don't have a physical body and I've had this feeling since I wasa little kid, and so I sort of hear this these things, likein the example of I tell people with my intuition. Maybe it is,I don't know, but I sort of hear this these sort of voices thatsort of like guide me and telling tell me which way to go. Sometimes, especially when things are hard, I don't feel alone. I feel likeI have this like you know, band of like superheroes. They are constantlywatching over me and and sort of guiding me and giving me advice. Sohow does it work? It works differently each time. So one time whenI was in Europe by I missed my train and it was a mess.I was trying to visit my cousin and and I didn't know I was goingand I was heading the wrong direction and I needed to catch this one train, to was like the last train from that city in or to make itto my cousin. Otherwise I would have had to spend the night and andso I I was I was frantic. So I was going down the stairs. I didn't know where to go. You couldn't. I couldn't tell whereI needed to go, and I made a turn to the left and thensuddenly I felt my color being pulled really, really hard and and I heard theword no the other way, and so I was like okay, andthen I turned around and sure enough that in the other direction was was itpaint. I got in and then the doors closed and then I managed togo through. And so it's just one, one sort of instance. But ofcourse another instance was this feeling of when I saw the part of weekendfor for the video games and I looked at it as I could I reallydo it, and I kept here in my intuitions like yes, this isthe way you need to go. Go, go into games, go into games. I kept here and go into games. And another one might havebeen when I changed my last name,...

...because my original last name is notsandalar and and so I for every every day when I woke up for likethree months or something like this, I would I would hear the word Sandalor Sando or sand or sand or sand or sand or now, so quiteas that. Why am I hearing this thing? This is so weird.But every day for like the first couple minutes when I woke up, andthen finally one day I'm like, oh, that sounds sounds like the name,that sounds like like maybe like the last name, like a last night. Oh maybe that's the last name I could take on. And then andand I didn't hear it anymore after that. When I kind of heard that conclusionand and now it's a bit different. So like it, it started sortof small, with like small hints, and now it's like is like havinga friend in my head, so to speak, that sort of talksto me all the time and is telling me like well, and I asked, Oh, what's going on with this or why is this happening? Andand I sort of feel like guided. I. Yeah, I'm told differentthings and sometimes I feel like if I really concentrate and I can speak outwhat I hear. Yeah, so that's what it looks like. And Isay dead people because I'm not sure where it comes from. And but Iknow it's not me, because the words and the things that I hear areso much wiser than anything I could O. it's not like my subconscious. There'ssomething, although some people could call it that, but it was sowise and also so loving. I'm never judged by these words or restock thethings, you know, and it's always kind, even when I'm angry withpeople or frustrated or or have my own negative thinking about something. You know, these, the wisdom and the words are always always compassionate towards it,whether it's towards myself, and so it's really soothing to to hear it's like, you know, yeah, I don't know what you would call it,but now I like yeah, I don't know, dead, disembodied voice,just the soothing voice. This is voice. Yeah, I mean I think,I think some people might don't know, depending on where you yeah, becauseit's not like I my psychic and like I talk to people's grandmas orsomething among this. This is not is, this is not what happens to me. I don't know how to explain to other people that that. Ido feel like it's not I do feel like they're like beings or people orsomething like this. It's not something that's...

...coming just for me directly. Yeah, that's all I can say. I'm not sure. I wouldn't know howelse to explain it and because I don't have any words for it that couldit could explain this. And it's not something I talked about with people either, although I am talking about it more and more because I decided that Iwasn't going to hide that part of myself from people, which is why thispodcast was going to be Super Fun, because it's an important part of mylife. When when people ask me, well, you've made, you madeso many choices. You you change from this to this and this and this, but it'll also always had a direct shin, so to speak. Andthe direction I thought was was sort of like this intuition. But it's sortof like this. It's more like I'm connected to to to a wisdom orsomething that exists beyond me and and this wisdom sort of helps me and andtells me where to go and what to do. Most of the time Ilistened to it, although sometimes I haven't, and it's always worked for me inin the best and the best way, even if, at the time,like the same intuition told me to to move to California because I've beenstudying. I did my bachelor's at Florida State and then when I did mymasters, it was in California, and I and that change happened very quickly. Within six months, I moved California, crossed, you know, did thetypical get on my in my red beetle, pack everything you own andgo across and and yeah, and I knew was the right thing. Ithought, okay, I'm going to become a therapist. At the time andand yeah, and it was sort of like this guidance that told me,okay, go, go, steady, go through this and and I thought, you know, I could even look at an alcol at all. Whydidn't my intuition, where I did, this guidance like take me the wrongway? Or why didn't I become a therapist? But actually it felt likeit was. It was something that I need to do and needed to learnanother to understand the world and and to be, because I carry that withme even now when I do my work and and so it's a big,big part of where I am, even though it's not what I do.And had I thought about it just logically, I might have pushed through to tryto force myself to be gone with therapists when I didn't feel right anymore. So my intuition told me to do this change. And now it's notworking, but I just kept trusting it. Okay, it's not working anymore.So that means this part of then, I don't know why it's done,but I feel guided to go in a different direction now, so I'llgo there. And Yeah, I like...

...it. I like it. Andas promised, we will return to gaming for okay, three which wraps upevery episode and would love to just hear this. This can be video games, it can be bored games, it can be learning games, but yourtop three games of all time, my top three games of all time.Hmm, okay, let's see leg you know, Zelda. I really,really liked this game that was designed by someone who I interviewed, which iscalled girl go up, which is a really cool puzzle game and papers,please, Nice. Yeah, solid, less, I like it. Yeah, thanks. Have you played any of those games? Well, maybe thefirst one, but maybe not too I feel like I have played definitely Selda, yeah, and definitely not the last one. Okay, yeah, Yep, but I think for now those three. Yeah, something with more, alittle more depth or things. Yeah, it's always good. Yes, gonnahave yeah, a little. Well, the DIAMONDTO yeah, exactly. So, Gosh, I hope. I hope to all my chatting was good. I have no idea. I just went on. Like I said'll beup to the audience to decide. But if they want to, if theywant to learn more about you or, you know, chat ufos or anything, where can I find you? Sure, yeah, sure, so, I'mevery your my website. Name is Alia. Sandovarcom so you could seeme there. And then, of course I'm on linkedin under Aliyasanda bar andof course on twitter at Aliosandavar, and same thing on instagram at Alisanda bar. Pretty much the same across every platform. So yeah, that's good branding.Yeah, exactly. So, yeah, this has been fun, interesting awesome. I'm glad. I'm glad you weren't scared off. Should like wehave guests just running off. Really give up? No, no, that'sactually okay. Still waiting for one day. Just they just mid interview. They'rejust like no, that's I know. I've made it as when someone walksout on me. Yeah, exactly. You like you push the right buttons. Yes, yes, yes, well, I think so much.And of course we're going to end with...

...a bad joke, because that's justwhat I did. Yeah, how do you get a Pikachu on a bus? You pokemon good after thread people. That's really good.

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