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Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 82 · 2 months ago

Building Culture and Growing Companies with Martin Rooney

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Do you ever meet someone and walk away feeling motivated, like you can accomplish anything in the world? After listening to today’s guest, you just might be ready to run through a brick wall (though you don’t actually have to do that).

Martin Rooney is the founder of Training for Warriors, turning a modest idea into a massive business. He’s continued growing both his business and his network, navigating a successful speaking career among everything else he’s doing. I’ve met a lot of people in my life, and few are as fired up as Martin is about what they do. And lucky for us, he’s sharing some of the mistakes he’s made along the way and what he’s learned from them.  

Martin is also the author of a dozen books, most recently Coach to Coach: An Empowering Story About How to Be a Great Leader and High Ten: An Inspiring Story About Building Great Team Culture. The books are great stories but also drop plenty of knowledge around leadership and building strong cultures within organizations, whether you’re a company of two or two million.

Good people cool things as a podcastfuture and conversations with centropristes musicians and othercreatives get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing and here'syour host Joey held welcome to good people cool things. Today's guest isMartin Rooney, who has done so many cool things in his life. He is thefounder of the training for lawyer system. He has worked with athletes allacross the world. He's spoken all across the world. In thirty, fivedifferent countries he's written more than a dozen books, his latest coach tocoach and his brand new one high ten and inspiring story about buildinggreat team culture are fantastic and really great for anyone, whether you'rein sports, whether you run a business, any kind of leadership position allabout building culture, we're talking about the culture killers, we'retalking about some of the corner stones for having that great culture. We'realso talking about Martin's, worst speaking, gig how he might fare in thefour hundred meter hurdles. If you caught the Olympics last month, hadjust crazy record breaking all going on throughout it. We're also talking aboutour favorite sports moments, because Martin has again had so many good onesand if you're not motivated by the end, this episode, I don't know what to tellyou, because we're getting lots of good insights here and I feel like going offand accomplishing a lot of stuff as soon as this recording ends, which wecan pretty much do right about now. If you like to get in touch with the showcan reach out Joe, we act good people, cool things, com or reach out onfacebook, twitter or Instagram at GP, CT, podcast and also always head onover to good people, cool thingo and support the show via the store, there'slots of new merch on there lots of goodies, and you know what maybe we'llhave to have one after this episode, because I feel like there's so manygood takeaways from this but I'll. Let you hear all of those for yourself inthis conversation with Martin. Well, Hey! My name is Martin Rooney and I amon a mission to make a world of better coaches. Now, where did that start? Mymom was a physical education teacher. In my first coach I had a coach when Iwas in seventh grade find me then, when I was at the darkest times in my lifeand- and he told me, I would look perfect for something and thatsomething was track. Seven years later, I'm in college on acollege starship for track and field, and it changed my life. But then, in aweird twist of fate, I made the US bom sled team and then got an opportunityyears later: coach top professional teams in the NFL, the military UFCchamps when I saw along the way was the world was in great mead for coaches,and I made it my mission to to kind of dissect what does it mean to be a greatcoach? How do we help more people and I've been presenting on that around theworld that my organization, training for Warriors- is a global fitnessorganization, changing the lives of people every day? And now I guess you could call you know thevehicle I'm using or the elevator now is actually books, I've written twelve,but the last two one called coach, the coach and the other high ten of justbeen released in the last year and coaches business owners, parents aroundthe world are going nuts for it and it's helping me with that mission,fantastic we're going to get into all of that. But I've got to ask since wejust had the Olympics on. I always love watching the track and field events.What was your favorite event wow that you know? Well, here's what I would say: I'm also attract and field coach. Ididn't mention that so I coach at the High School here and I've done that forthe last four years and that it was the middle school for the last three beforethat. So I'm a huge huge fan of track and field, but what I would say is andhere's a weird one- the four hundred meter hurdles, guys race and girls race.I don't know if people are aware, if you're not a track and field fan, butthe world record fell in both of those...

...races. So that means that's the fastesttime that has ever been run in the history of humanity and the two recordsthat they broke. The second place finiture in each one of those races,also shattered the world record by what is it considered an astronomical time?So when you shet shave off of a world record, maybe joey, it's like a point oone. Well, these guys broke those and girls broken by over half a second andwhy I think it was so amazing to me is: Can you imagine waking up the next day and you've broken theworld record by half a second and you didn't and you weren't, even the winner,and so those races had amazing stuff about it, and I got to go to the USOlympic trials in Oregon. So I was there and I watched Sydney butblackland break the world record there as well and then for her to decimate itagain. It's almost the two, the two of that Carston guys from Norway and herrecord. I mean those might be two of the greatest performances in thehistory of track and field regardless of event. So that would be my answer.How would you do on the the Foringer midder hurdles? I would not do so great, but you know wetalked offline, I'm wearing to know their name hat today, because mydaughter is going a note name for track and field as we leave in a day, and soI'm you know she's going to be a freshman and she actually does also runthe four hundred meter hurdle. So I can't tell you how I would do I wouldtell you I would tell you I can coach it and so she's going to a pretty biguniversity for that, so, but she's also a Heptathlete, which is why I love allthe events because she gets to do a little bit of everything. And yes, thatwas a little dad pride, but me right now. I would not do so yeah, I think I'm more in that boat. IfI were, if I were competent at track and field, I think I'd also be aHeptathlete, because it's fun you get to dabble in everything. Oh yeah well,and only that, but you know, but they call you the greatest athlete in theworld if you do good in it. Well, maybe maybe we'll be seeing thatin the coming years, then, your daughter will be greatest that athletein the world he finger fingers crossed, but what she had already achieved. You-and I were talking about that, especially in the face the pandemic andall the things that had happened. Man, I couldn't be just more happy for whatyou know she's about to experience and we're just really excited for her, butas a dad and her being my training partner, I'm also, I think it's goingto be bitter sweet when we get in that car and leave and she's not going backwith US yeah for sure you'll have to get some some facetime training in forsure, and speaking of doing things andaccomplishing things during the pandemic, you wrote two books, it hasn't. It's has it eve been a fullyear and a half and you've already got two books on your belt that are bothdoing fantastic. Tell us about them. How did you write them so quickly? Weit's funny, because I think people do that say that, like hey, so here's whatI want, how I would answer that is join that the two books came out that didn'tTan. I wrote a so. The first book coach to coach cameout two days after we went into the pandemic now, for anybody that'sproduced books, and these are with a very big publishing house called wily.You know the same authors that John Gordon or Patrick Lanciani, so the bookwas, I had done that it took me a year to write the book and then you gothrough all the process and then that's when it came out so that one there wasa very long process before that and remember, took me twenty years to learnall the stuff. That's in there before I wrote it and then, when that one cameout because, even though it was the pandemic, it exploded and people wereso into it. They needed it right. Like we needed leadership, then we wereHungary for coaches and inspiration, which is what the book is. It's a apowerable style. So it's a fictional story. It's not a textbook! It's not!If this, then that picture I like to usually say, if you're familiar withMitch, album and then maybe also a guy,...

...a business guy like Ken Blanchard, if aMichabo and Ken blancher book had a book baby, it would be coach to cookand- and you know, and people love that style their stories within the storyand they loved it. Now it did so well. The publisher challenged me and nowthat we were in the pandemic, they said hey and here's the great line right Y.They said Hey, you got anything else like do. I got anything else. I gottons, and I said now that we've taught somebody what it means to be a coachand had a coach, and what has really got revealed now is the businesses thatare really doing well or the families that are being strong during this. Theyhave the best cultures right, like they've, got a great culture, and sowhat I really do find out. What's what that meant to me and againtold the story, so I showed to this. One coach to coach will high ten isagain the same format story fictional story, but it's thirty years later, andit's all the stuff that that guy had learned about how to build a reallygreat team, but also a great business, and that one just came out a few weeksago and people are going nuts about it. It's already almost outselling coach tocoach already, just because people are hungry for the next book, but yeah thatone took me about a year to write and and also edit and design and everythingelse, and then now it's just come out so really, even though both books havecome out in a say year year and a half span, there's a three year span ofwriting them, but a twenty years span of accumulating the knowledge to beable to write it so yeah. So it's almost nobody saw thepain they just they just get to see the baby. That's always good, though, ifyou can hide the pain and just you know just show the good results of it now.Do you get to relax a little bit now that the second ones out or or thepublishers going to be back for a third one? Also for anybody listening, it'snot even about the third one yet which I do have a plan for that, because thisI was always a trilogy in my mind, Nice, but here's a little takeaway foranybody that ever wants to either write a book or have a book come out. Is ittakes like you just said it it's hard work, it's pain to right, one right! Ittakes discipline. That's all I mean every day, get you know getting to thekeyboard and put it together and just do enough work until you will havesomething. The key is not writing a book. There are hundreds of thousandsof books that are produced every year. The key is: Can you get enough peopleto hear about it? So, just like I'm doing right now we're talking about it.What I would do on my blogs, what I will do on my own podcast, when I willdo speaking or talking to anyone or presenting somewhere out there in theworld. The real work begins after it comes out because that's when you gotto get the marketing go in or get somebody to hear about it. So so it'skind of funny how you said he are you. Are you now laying back or relaxing? Nonow is when you I you put on the gas and the real work begins and becauseman, I really believe in both books, but no one will get to understand thatunless I'm screaming it from the rooftops, because there's a lot ofwhite noise in these days and and there's a lot of stuff to choose fromand and you got to, you got to either say something or do something in acertain way that somebody's going to trust in you to read your stuff and so yeah Ipicture for the next year, I'm going to be ceaseless again in my pursuit to getpeople to hear about it and then from there. That's what I hopefullymaybe start thinking about doing the next one. That's what I like to hear:Yeah, not resting on the laurels and a good reminder to I think, to any reallyany kind of creative project, and certainly a book is so much goes intothe marketing elements of it, and I always like to chat about the covers.As well because, as you know, there's lots of books out there, whether you're,looking through a book store you're going on mine, maybe you're just pagingthrough small little thumbnails on your phone, and I think your cover verysimple, but I catch it yeah. This is...

...one pops. It was, you know hey. It wasmy idea to, and not only that, but see from the color schemes where you seehow they're almost in verse of one another, so they play off each othersame size, I'm olding there from but but yeah it was, and that idea too, isthat I wanted to what encapsulates this great culture. It's not just given ahigh five man, it's a high ten boom, it's those hands slapping and thenthat's when the Emoji idea came to me now. I remember that's a very smallcomponent within the story of the book, but it was just something that is notonly both provocative, but it's something that resonates with peopleand yeah. It's took me a lot. It took a long time, yeah guys for anybody.Listen if you're doing a book, it may take you longer to come up with a coveryou love than it does to write the book itself and it's such a intimate process. But at the same timeto somebody might send me up twenty designs and you actually love them all.But you got eventually. You know from the colors to the fonts to the dotdesigns to the look. It is really important, because if it wasn't, everya book could be covered in like a brown people bag and that's all we haven andif you notice out there, nobody does that. Maybe that's a good marketing plan thatfor for a new book series, just the Brown paper back with no no discernible,the only one that stands out yeah and I think to like. That's suchan interesting point of like you might like all twenty covers, and it's almosteasier, if you hate all the other ones and then there's a one that stands atso so making those decisions. I think it's very very vital. Well- and you canwhat I always do is then I show it to a ton of people and you know, what'scrazy. Everybody Has Different Tae Ye to like my child, with twenty covers totwenty people and each one of them like a different one, and it only it onlymakes it worse. So so yeah throughout the you know, because I've done a lotof other books, some of the other books that were much more fitness based andexercise based. Those- and I love those covers too, but those took and so muchwork to come up with and and if anybody wants to check him out or se wet thosecovers. Are you just type in mark roomy and books into Amazon and you'll? Seethem all, but but yeah like you cannot understate the process and then hey theediting too. So my books took as long to edit as they did to write and, andit's a painful, painful process that nobody sees when you finally have thatfinished product in your hand, there's a whole lot more work than justsomebody sitting at a keyboard and typing it out. Do you have a quirk inyour writing? I, as a writer myself, I certainly like editors. A hundredpercent are invaluable and I I'm very appreciative of everything they do andthey'll point out things that I had never realized before. So do you haveany thing like that in your writing for sure we well I'll, tell you a quirk andthen my style, so one court that I noticed that I was not that I am usingthe word. It's the word that that when you edit something, I start now, I'mgood enough to do a lot of it myself. But the word that I must have ithundreds of times and and especially when you're trying to produce a book alot of times, you've got to condense. It you want, you know you might have torove a thousand words or five thousand words, and I found just taking out theword that I saved the thousand words and it didn't change any of thestructure. So that was something I don't know where I learned it, but orwhy I put it in there. But that was something that I started to realizeholy cow it I just do it over and over again that it isn't it's not anecessary word, but then I would also say: Hey with my style, though thesebooks, they are now a reflection to me, I'm a story: Teller, for instance. Youknow we got on it. I'm telling about my...

...daughter, I'm telling you about I'mtelling stories. I just told those the hurdle stories and I try to get peopleto kind of live it and I'm telling the stories writ in the books, and so whatI came up with was I wanted to write stories where thecharacters tell stories so their stories within the stories and that'swhat the books are and people love them, because I believe people's brainsresonate with stories, and so ultimately, that's my style of thebooks, but definitely quirk wise or not even for just maybe grammatically inefficient wouldbe the way to say it that I sometimes I'm using too many words, and maybe even I tried to be toodescriptive and what I found to is once you removed the VAT. You can alsoremove a lot of adjectives. You know like he don't likethe one. Really you don't have to say in the book like Hey, he thought it wasreally fun, take the really out and he thought it was fun and I really gotinto the to the writing process and it was kind of an identity crisis. Right,like I'm a speaker, I'm a presenter, I'm a coach of a business owner. Inever really introduced myself as a writer or an author, and it was funnythat I said Wow. This is my twelfth book. Maybe I should start thinkinglike a like, maybe maybe it's okay to say, Hey. I know how to do it a littlebit and I really don't in writing or reading a lot about writing and whichmay seem boring to some. But if that's your craft right like if you're,probably a computer programmer, you got to read a lot about that and I don'tknow it helped me out a lot to really see how other people do it absolutelyabsolutely and as far I think the segues nicely to another question. Ihad him jumping a little bit around for my my notes here, but you talked howyou're also a speaker very unsurprising. After chatting with you, even for justa few minutes, I can already, I feel more energetic, I'm like ready to takeon the world, and I always like hearing this, whether it's a musician I likehearing about their worst show for speakers. Have you ever had a terriblespeaking gig. Absolutely I mean, let's put it thisway: Everybody listen to Hey until the pandemic. It got to the point joy thatI was presenting pretty much every weekend somewhere in the world, so I'vepresented in thirty five different countries. I used to be in front ofmore than ten thousand people a year minimum. I I presented for Richard Branson'scompany in Wembley Stadium. I've had you know: I've had some Red Games, theArmy Rangers maybe seals a lot of professional sports teams, but it allstarted that I can really say my professionalcareer. I started I didn't get paid and it was every Monday and Wednesday night.I gave a free speech in our business. It was called the Pres Speed School inNew Jersey right outside New York City, where I would give this free speech. Weadvertised it in the newspaper who wants to come here about the future ofsports performance or how to train your kids and it started off, and I mighthave two people show you know, and for this hour and a half talk and then itwould be for people and I would learn things and how not to make mistakes,and- and I would video myself and I would see not only was it a bad gig. Iwas lousy right and and then just like with the quirk exceptremoving the bats. I was a lot of ums at you know. You know that kind ofstuff and slowly you chip those away. Slowly. You really refined yourmaterial just like an artist just like a speaker and then those rooms start tohave twenty people. Forty people sixty people and then some of those roomswould have somebody in there. That would say hey. I need to come talk tomy business or hey. I want you to come speak to this organization, and thathas led me speech after speech you after year and it took me to thebiggest stages, but maybe the the biggest lesson within there is whetheryou're, a writer or your speaker or musician everybody's got that storyright. You got to pay your dues, I...

...remember O, hey here's a cool one youmight like. I hung out with billy idol. I hung out with Billy Idel and his bookhad just come out and I'm grilling him and he played the worst shows. I meanhe would show stuff. He was playing an play in these little one room gigs, Imean the Beatles Day right, like the Hamboro years, like they were playing,these horrible shows, but that's where they got great and it's the people thatthey do pay their dues, but they always keep the love for what they're doingyou're going to refine it and do it, but without a doubt yeah it didn'tstart with. Oh, I just had lots of skill and now I'm on big stages. Now ittook a took a really really long time, because that story, I'm telling youthose those speeches, those were one thousand nine hundred and ninety ninewhen that started so we're at twenty two years. Right and I'll tell you thisfor anybody listening. If you do something pretty consistent for twentytwo years, you goin probably be pretty good at it right most people justaren't that consistent. You know period yeah every week weekend is veryconsisted and it was very stressful. You know I can imagine it yeah when itwhen this got removed, it and hey. You know we're talking a hundred fifty dayson the road a year. We're talking be careful what you wish for you know itwas millions and miles on planes and and a lot of time away from my familyto and the pandemic. It gave me an opportunity to focus on the writingmore than the speaking and now. I definitely know that even if the worldopens up again, I will not go back to the same kind of hectic life that I had,but I don't regret it at all either because I got to see the world and meetso many interesting people, but speaking same musically, here's a coolfun fact. I went to the same high school as John, Bon Jovi, so he's ahe's a little older than me, but dude he's been on tour and the Seiwa. Thirty was thirtystraight years, and I cannot imagine it, but it's just got to show they lovewhat they do and they were doing what they loved and but you do somethinglong enough and hard enough. Great things will happen. Yeah! That's I wentto a show last night, actually is the first one. I've attended post pandemicand you could just tell like every every artist that came up on therewould make some comment. Like you know, this is like one of our early shows back to and youcould just see like the energy emanating from them with how excitedTis, yeah they're reminded how much they loved it right like it's easy toprobably be to say. Oh, this is a grind. This stinks, but then take it away fromthem and it might just be the reminder again, man, I love music or I loveperforming or love being up on stage and rocking you know and yeah. So I think some great stuff is ahead for humanity when the world goes back because all those all that energyand all the things that people learned about what they really love, thatpassion is going to shine through now. You said you've traveled and spoken atthirty five countries, so I assume you're, probably a master packer atthis point very good at packing. What's something that you have to bring withyou on a trip wow well here, it's kind of interesting, obviously, hey thefirst stuff toilet trees. Don't forget them! You know, because I haveforgotten them before and that's how you learn that one is no fun but but aninteresting one would be it's almost like my backpack, because because whatI'm saying is hey socks, underwear, your clothes or your toilet trees,that's kind of like my bag, but the bag. I always worried about, was kind of thebackback. Do I have a head set? Do I have adapters? So a very big thing is:When you go to other countries, they don't have the same plugs that we haveand they don't use the same type of electricity. So you've got to haveadaptors that can work in many different places in the world and I'll.Tell you what you learn that the hard way when you don't have one, becausewhen you go to that country they don't have any of those because they're allthat country right so so, for instance,...

...say you're not going to go to the seveneleven by Your House and get an adapter for an American plug, because we don'tneed those here and- and so I would say that and then definitely I got to havebooks, I'm a avid avid reader and that's something may be important tosay too. If you want to be a great writer, better, be a great reader.First, I have read thousands of books in my library, I'm a maniac when itcomes to it. I crushed three this week. I just put him on my shelf in the waythat I do that this morning, before this podcast and I don't know- I M Alifelong waterer and I cannot imagine say being on a ten or fifteen hourflight and I don't have anything to read. I would lose my mind so usuallymy my bag is packed away more books than I need, but but you'd be surprisedhow much you could read saying in a twenty or thirty hour round trip trip,depending where you're going in the world yeah. I am always surprised bywhat I can t read as well. I'm like Oh yeah. I can maybe get like a couplechapters in and then it's a full. You know four hundred eightpages later and you planned and I'm like. Oh perfect. This is great. We andit's funny, hey the books I mentioned today, highten and coach. The coach.You can finish him in in a round trip travel thing, because some of so manypeople have told me that they're that they love reading the planes it's likewow. I started it man. I was halfway done when we landed-and I was I didn't- I didn't even want to land yet and then on the way back, Icrushed it and it was also by design so yeah. I want everybody to know. Theseare not arduous reads. These are entertaining but you're also learningbut you're going to get this sense of accomplishment as you smash through itbecause they're easy to understand and fun versus you know, I could neverwrite some textbook. That would be, you know, just a slog to get through yeah.I think that's a less entertaining greed anyway. So I'm glad glad youdidn't get that rat, but you touch ththis a little bit about theimportance of culture and one of the questions that I always like to ask asa question you wish. You were asked more frequently, and you said what arethe secrets to building a great team culture so Martin? What are the secrets?Well Hey here if I could break it down and just like I mentioned hey beforeyou have to write a book, especially in particular on a topic. Then you betterhave done your research on that topic right. So, if you want to consideryourself a world expert, I can't say that there's a number of books, but butI guess what I would say is here to be safe. If you've read like twenty fiveto fifty books on the topic, you're- probably going to be pretty noted.Here's the thing, though one or two books, maybe not you're, scratching thesurface, but there's still probably so much hoer to explore and whether it wasin coaching which I have hundreds of books on my shelves and then evenculture. Probably the same thing but same is true for finance or biographyor fitness, and before I was ever going to write about any of these topics, I had to really believe Diet and it hadexhausted so much information on it reading, butthen also going and meeting many experts in the field that are doing itand here's why. I said that, after all my notes and everything that I had gonethrough on everything that I had read, then what I do is I look for the commondenominators. I say: okay, now, all of them and the different ways thatthey're saying it. What do they agree on? You know what are the things thateverybody talks about and that's when I had my big break through right, so herethe secrets ready first secret can't have culture if it's just you, so whatdoes that mean? There's got to be at least one other person. So if you got afriend chip, there's a culture between you, if you got ten people in YourBusiness, there's a culture there. If you got thirty on your team, there's aculture there if you've got if you've got twenty thousand out of university,there's a culture there. So it is, there's an interaction or a connectionbetween those people. That is what culture is, and people can feel it,whether they call it a chemistry. So that's the first component now. What isthat feeling? What is that component?...

How is it interact or what are thoseexchanges? Those are done through behaviors right, it's how the peopleact to each other or with other people that aren't within that culture. Soit's behaviors right. That was the next thing and then the third one was wellwhat influences behaviors and it's what it's, how those people think? It'stheir thoughts, it's what they believe, and so, as I was playing with those wordsright people, people actions what they think I came up with what's in the book,and I call it the three bees right and it's the nut shell of Culture, becauseI love to define something down to so so simple and then expand out andthat's good book and the three Bs are instead of people. I called it yourbeings right, it's your beings who that are they your human beings. Instead of your actions, it was yourbehaviors right instead of your thoughts, it was your beliefs, and sothe three bees are again beans, behavior's beliefs and here's how itworks. Culture is nothing more than thebehaviors that are carried out by your beings because of what they believeright like that is what it is. So in your own home. That's what it is inyour on your own team. That's what it is in your business, that's what it isand and then what I do throughout the story is expand all that, but teachingand lessons and make it super super engaging. But ultimately, that's thesecret. So if you want to change your culture right like so, if you say man,my family is not going great or my business isn't grown great, you gotta,assess and then either change or reprogram one of those three bees andif you do it and all three of them are aligned and working, how you want it,man things are going to be awesome and that man guys that may have seemed veryelementary and simple and here's the thing. A master of something doesn'tmake that something something more complex to scare you. They make it veryeasy, so you can understand it, but why I'm saying that is that little rent? Ijust had took me about twenty years now and I was able to do it in a couple ofminutes and that's what I believe we should all be striving for in master.Thank you for spending the twenty years on it. So we can. We can learn it injust a couple: Men Yeah! Well, that's the that's! What the books are right,like the books, guys, the books, you get them on Amazon for twenty bucks,but they saved you twenty years and what I call that as an inexpensivelesson, you can either learn the hard way like I did, make a lot of humongousmistakes and blow it or you can read these books and immediately jump aheadand that's what books are. That's what courses are and conversations and theand the best in the world take advantage of those where the peoplethat usually spend most of their time complaining, don't, and so that wouldbe my challenge for everybody that if you want to be a better leader or youwant to create a better culture, man then get the two books, and I promiseI'll make this guarantee. I promise you're going to love them or you canwrite me and I'll. Send you your money back, because I have not there go onAmazon. There are over five hundred five star reviews right now. Nobodydoesn't love it. So I've got enough proof now with those out for a year anda half that I'm so confident that it's helping people that I want you to getexcellent work, all around love the money back guarantee and yeah. I was. Iwas reading some of the Ross before we hopped on and just like those you, I think you cantell when there is maybe, like you know, a fake reviewer like you can tell itlike a friend of the e O or anything like that. Yeah I go on there too, andI don't know where they're coming from and and I'll tell you hey here'ssomething, that's important for anybody out there that's going to put their artout there, whether it is in music or book or Business or whatever it's scary right. You put it out therein the minute. It's out, you know, you said: Hey is the work done it's like nonow now's, when I get scary like what...

...does everybody think right, like youput this out there, do they like it, do they hate it and man? That's a scary time and you haveto have a thick skin, because what I will say is not everybody is going tolove what you do right, but and and and actually yeah. I don't know if you wantto try to make something that everybody loves. It you'll probably driveyourself crazy, but if you've done something really good that enoughpeople appreciate, you know you did a good job and it's almost amazing howmany reviews you know like right now, high tenn is new, so those are startingto trickle in now. But you know the coach, the coach book it's over fourhundred and fifty reviews by itself and that's more than all my other bookscome bind. So it just shows people are going crazy for it and there and if youlook they're from all over the world, they go show you the country they'recome of fun too, so it's really really humbling, and but it makes you feel good when youreally put your heart and soul into something and people like it so, but Iwrote it from a standpoint that I wanted to help people and I think whenpeople read it, they know that and like and if somebody's trying to help you,how can you think it's you don't like it right like so it's yeah, it's been ait's been a real lesson with that too, because I wrote it from that heart. Youknow where mindset and it's reflecting back on that now with what people thinkI think you touched on this a little bit with you talking about how peoplecould complain their way out of something and out of doing something,and one of the elements that you talk aboutis eliminating the five culture killers. So you don't have to give all five away,because we want people to read the book, but can you touch on one or two of themand what people should look out for yeah? Well, Hey I'll touch on yeah likehere will be an easy one to touch on and it's a big break through, and it'sa big thing that people are quoting me from the book that I didn't know it wasa big break through for me, but it's seeming to be very powerful for all thereaders, and here it is yared ego above all, is the killer of culture. And whatdo I mean by that when it's, when you make it about youwhen it Ma when you make it everything is about you and it's your ego isdriving everything. Then you can't be part of a team and you are not acontributor and you're not excited when someone else does something and you'realways comparing yourself to everybody else, which is also a killer too. So inour day and age of social media, and you know kind of look at me. Look at me.Look at me. You know that's the opposite of being on a team right, and so as the book walks through throughthe stories. This is one of the major breakthroughs that happens for peopleand I'll. Tell you ask yourself right like I'll say this, I was not alwaysthe best team mate. When I was growing up, I wasn't. I was usually probablymaking the cultures worse, but I had to learn by those mistakes, especially asI became a leader, but a leader, hey and everybody can take this where theywant, but the pandemic also showed us that the world was starving forleadership, and you know what, when the leadership became all about ego, youwatch the leadership self destruct and, and everybody can take that where youwant, but man leadership is not about look at me and I I I leadership isabout. How can I help you and we we we, and so that would be my answer to thatone, and hopefully everybody has some ranters, but also they guys watch itwhen you are in the leadership position that,if your ego is holding your back it's time to put that in check, I lovegetting rid of the IIIS and focus in on Wewe waste. It's very French. I saidthat out lads love it now. I also want to talk aboutyour training for lawyer system, which has grown exponentially over over theyear. So can you kind of take us back...

...to the beginning of that and what's what's next for twenty, the resto two thousand and twenty one beyond well, it's. I think it's a veryinteresting story where I was a ORGIAC physical therapist.First for a while. I sometimes forget that about myself, but I wasn't Iwasn't fulfilled as much as I could be. I loved where I work. The culture wasgreat and it cant be there. That's how powerful culture is, but I knew I wasdestined for something bigger. I had an energy. I had a way that I connectedwith people. I wanted to be around sport again, but everybody told methat's what you don't want to do. There's no future in that you can't doit, but I didn't listen right and I started going. I guess you could sayagainst the grain and I started just attending course. This is in the mid eThou nine, a d y somethin, I'm attending courses, I'm trying to findany book or anything. I can get my hands on to learn how to be a bettercoach, learn more about fitness and on an airplane, to a of course, inTyler Texas, which you like, Oh yeah, I meet this guy and his name is billparisy and he was starting. This fledgeling company called price speedschool and by the end of that trip I knew I had to go to work with him andover the next decade and a half we built it from a essentially a vandriving around seeing if anybody wanted to be faster to a hundred locationfranchise affecting millions of kids around the world, and during that Istarted working with. Not only high level football and all these others,pro sports, but also fighters, and no one else had ever done that before Iwas one of the original students of a guy name, Hanzo Gracie of the famousGracie family, and they took a liking to me and they said Hey. We want you todo this with us and we want you to help us and that was kind of the birth oftraining for warriors. So I started training these world class mixedmartial artists. No one had ever done it. I didn't know what I was doing atfirst, but I was honing. What now I understand was the the genesis of thesystem. People started becoming very aware of what I was doing and theyasked me to come teach courses and they and and then I started writing articlesand those articles turned into a self published book that went so big. I gota call from a big publishing house in New York City called Harper, HarperCollins and they said Hey. Do you want to do this for real? We want to do areal one of peace, and I put out the first book called Training for Warriors.It's gone on to sell over. You know a hundred, fifty thousand copies and sixlanguages around the world, and but here was what was interesting joeyit wasn't fighters buying the book, it was regular, people see it, everybodywant to be a fighter, but they wanted to train like one. They wanted to getthe results that the lean bodies and what I had stumbled upon was. Youdidn't have to be a fighter to do this stuff. It was, it was for anybody andthey would lose fat, build muscle and that led to courses and the courses ledto people said. I want to run this program. I want to help or people withit. Now you talked about the growth at our Zeneth. We were at three hundredlocations in over thirty countries around the world, but for everybodythat's aware- and this is shown vulnerability when the pandemic hit most gyms wereclosed around the world and many of those in many countries or states inthe US were closed for three months and then six months and then nine monthsand then over a year and for everybody listening, it's very hard to keep yourbusiness afloat when you're not allowed to be open and you still owe money tolandlords and unfortunately that's that has challenged our you know thebusiness greatly. We've had so many that have not just survive what thrive,but a lot of what I worked so hard for was really challenged and undone overthe last couple. You know almost two years now and but still we are stillthriving, a strong. There are thousands of people per day doing training forwarriors around the world. I in in...

...places, and also you know online or with my books andwith my blogs on training foursome. But what I would say is, I am stilluncertain, of the future, because now, with this Delta variant, you know,we've got facilities in Australia, they just locked that they just locked downthere now they're going into their first lock down. You know some of ourplaces in Europe and Belgium and Denver they still haven't opened back up yetso I don't know and I'm very unsure what the future holds for, how we're going to continue to navigatethis. But I know one thing that it's not going away and- and you know Idon't know- if we'll ever say, meaning training for words is not going away,but I would also say that I don't know if Ovid will be something that goesaway or not we're going to have to learn how to live with it and maybewhat the new normal is and that stuff that we are still navigating, but theultimate lesson of it all and why I feel most proficient in writing a book aboutculture is, it has been the culture of my organization that has kept us goingand, and it was those relationships with all the warriors that used theprogram that when so many other businesses went away, we didn't and itall stems back to having a great culture and man. Maybe that's thegreatest lesson. I've had through the entire panted yeah. I think it's been highlighted somuch more than every for culture is always been important, but this lastyear and a half has really really just like put it to the forefront and Martinyour Omas off the hook. Here we always like to end with the topthree and you, and I were champing before we'reboth big sports fans, so we're going to alienate the people that don't likesports a listeners enjoy sports. Let's hear your top three sports moments. OhWow, I thought you were going to say sports teams. I was all ready to gowell you're! Not I give you- and this is pretty interesting because many times people will say it would beeasy for me to de fall. Hey when I was a speed guy with the New York giantsand they won the Super Bowl. I was working with a guy named Frank Edgar.He won the UFC title, but here's here's a sports moment. Actually, I could saynumber one number, two number three. I was working with a they all bob highschool right, which I think is this most amazing time for everybody andmany times the last time people do do sports in their lives, and I workedwith this high school football team called Wayne Hills in New Jersey. For adecade we had the second longest winning streak in state history. Thatwas a point on Ole one, a D, fifty five in a row, and- and it's funny that Isay we because that's how much I felt part of it right. I was only a coachwithin the organization, the the head, coaches and everything else. It's ashout out to everybody not just like. I did it, but there were two moments right. It wastwo state championships which you play on the floor at giant stadium. Theseare high school kids and the first one. They call it the second miracle at themeadow lands and we were losing with barely any time onthe clock and the other team had just scored and they were kicking back offto us and I thought man it's over and they kick it off, but it they at leastkick it to our best player and he's running. I'm like okay, something couldhappen, but four guys jump on his back, but this kid using all strength andnothing left. He pitches the ball to this kid who was really young on ourteam, but the kid runs all the way around the back and then runs likeeighty yards for a touchdown of we win with. Like no come on the clock that Idon't. I think I will never forget it. It's a I couldn't sleep for a weekafter that, but then with the same team the next year and I have a youtubevideo of this- it's called the power of a coach where I give the pregame speechthere was this weird altercation weeks before, and the governor of New Jerseystepped in and removed half our starting lineup, which they should havenever done, and I'm thinking there's no...

...way we can win because we're missinghalf our team, but I still give this speech about believing and now we werelosing at half time, fourteen twelve, but we end up. We go on to win. Youknow fifteen fourteen, and it was so though, and after that game kids weregiving me such hugs. My math was bleeding from them hitting me in theface with their shoulder paths over and over, and but when I went to bedtonight that night with a fat lap again couldn't sleep and then I guess, beingselfish, but we talked about why I'm wearing this note name hat the third probablygreatest sports moment happened during the pandemic and my daughter who know her name wasalways her dream and I didn't know what was going to happen. But I alwayspromised her if we just kept working even when the tracks were closed and ifwe trained in the street or we did whatever it took and even when thecolleges said you couldn't they didn't, you couldn't recruit anymore or wedidn't know. If there was going to be any more sports. We just kept going,and I just always told her to believe and t one night when I thought man, maybe nothing wasgoing to work out. She screams and my wife runs upstairs and then my wifescreams to me and I run upstairs. I get up there and they're both crying and Ididn't know what happened. I thought all the dreams are over right and mydaughter takes her phone and she puts it in my face and it says: Hey tell allthe other schools are out. Welcome to the fighting Irish and noter dame andall our kids came up by a four daughters and we all had the greatestfamily hug. Maybe we've ever had. Everybody was crying and all three ofthose stories. No one will ever see the years and years and years of work thatwere put into all those kids and nobody's going to maybe really knowthose those were in Olympic medals. What which I've had athletes that haveone. But you know what those were the three maybe greatest moments for me. Now, that's such an awesome Iman,hopefully no fat lip for you, Yeah Yeah, a K it wasn't he nice nice was. Shewasn't. Work, show well no congrats to her and safe travelsince you you're, headed out tomorrow, even for sap bed, crazy, that's goingto be wild! Well, Martin. Thank you so much for hopping on the PODCAST. Ifpeople want to check out any of your books or learn more about you work, andI find it yeah so hey go to Amazon, it's the best place. They always havedeals going right now. Coach to coach is like five bucks off depending onwhen you listen to this, I'm not in control of that Amazon does thosethings but they'll create this counts for books. Sometimes that are doing sowell. They want more people to have it, but I would recommend hey. You canstart with either one, but you can't go wrong with both and you're going tolove the story. I promise you can find more about me if, on Instagram M V,Martin Rooney, you can go check that out of Oishi some cool stuff and you'llsee a lot of the things that we talked about today. I have a website calledcoaching greatness com, some great blogs on there, and if you want to seemore about training for warriors, you can go to training for Warriors Com andcheck that out too, but hey. Hopefully, if nothing else thor you take someaction on some of the stuff. We said today and, and I'm really hoping thateverybody stays safe during this, but also enjoyed what we had to say that,yes, absolutely thank you so much. I know I feel inspired. I I got butmentally going through, I'm a all right. Here's all the things I'm going to getdone after this call. Martin. Thank you so much my pleasure and, of course, wegot to end with a Corny joke, as we always do and topical we're talkingabout track and field, what do sprinters it before a race, what nothing they fasted good after itto that people. I like that one. I I'M gonna, have to p some kids that oneespecially like yes, after that, please use it. Please is it good people, cool things is produced inAustin Texas. If you were a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that followbutton that helps more people here, the show you can send me a message: Joeyhad good people cool things com. Thank...

...you to all of the guests who have beenon good people, cool things check on all the old episodes. He a good people,cool thing com has always thank you for listening and have a Wonderful Day.

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