Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 72 · 1 year ago

72: Mental Health and the Healing Power of Music with Kimberly Dawn

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Perhaps the most obvious statement ever: the past year and a half has been rough. Between a global pandemic, social unrest, political chaos, and the fact that a lot of us handled it all on our own, there’s been plenty of chances for life to take its toll on our well-being. 

This week’s guest, Kimberly Dawn, is a big advocate of mental health. Kimberly just dropped her new single “The Bottle,” has a strong message about the importance of checking in with yourself, courage, and connection to community. Kimberly participated in the “You Are Not Alone” campaign with the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

We're talking all about her songwriting process, the power of storytelling, her tips for connecting with your community, and what it's like being a mother of four children.

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is musician Kimberly Dawn, who has a new album coming out canyon road next week. You can go ahead and preorder it right now on official Kimberly Dawncom and we are talking all about the making of that album, her newest single, the bottle, and how it really shines a light on mental illness and the importance of checking in on yourself, on your community and admitting that, hey, sometimes we have bad days and that's totally okay. We can get through it as long as we have each other and we have a strong foundation for ourselves, and even just admitting that, yes, those bad days happen totally fine. We're also talking about Kimberly's worst gig that she ever played and again, the power of being able to improvise and be flexible as a musician to get through those types of bad shows, the writing process, quarantine hobbies and we're talking about being a mother of for and all of the great stuff that Kimberly is doing with that as well. If you like to get in touch with the show, you can reach out on facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast. We can know. We shoot me an email as well. Joey at good people, cool thingscom always love hearing from you and if you're feeling real festive, why not head over to the good people, cool things merch shop, which is on the website. If you're listening on the website right now, you can just head over a shop and stop this episode, but you can open up a second tab and then everything will keep going. Get yourself a Hoodie, a hat, a t shirt. There's lots of fantastic goodies there for you, and then cozy ONA and listen to this episode with Kimberly. For people who don't know who kimberally done is. Can you give us your elevator pitch and then can you also tell us the type of elevator that we're on? Yes, so I am a country music artist and I was born, I'm raised up in Alberta, Canada. I live in Los Angeles. I'm kind of back and forth from Los Angeles to Nashville Right now, but I'm a country music artist. Do you remember the first song you heard where you're like yes, I need to I need to get into this industry. You know what, I grew up singing in church when as a little girl, and so I always loved music in general and I listened to so many different genres because my mom was, by the way, in Elvis fanatic, and so it was like I grew up listening to Elvis Presley and Paul Anka and the supremes. I mean there were so many different genres of music that I, you know, listen to, but I would say when I heard Garth Brooks for the first time, I was like, Whoa, what is this, because country music wasn't something that I necessarily listen to or loved. I was like, okay,...

...you know, I listened. You know, I listened to all genres, but I wouldn't say country music was one of the genres I listened to. And then all of a sudden this guy named Garth Brooks comes out and he's singing a song and I'm like friends and low places, and it was like Woo, who is this guy? You know, and that's kind of where and that was like that s country and I fell in love with that s country sound and then what I think Chania Twain came out. I Love Trisha your wood. I loved REBA. I mean I started like listening to it. So it was like all these other elements of that country world and these musicians, artists that I now was listening to and I was like Whoa, I love this. I have recently heard friends in low places. I was just driving by a bar and I had the windows down and I could just hear it emanating and like people singing along. I imagine they had their arms around each other. I'm sure that's what you do. That sound comes on, that's that song is just a staple song for everyone. So it's great. But yeah, it really is. And so had you. Were you already playing music at that point, or was that just kind of when you started getting more into it and then you're like wait, let me try and kind I mean listen. I was probably in I was young, I was maybe in middle school, like elementary school. You know, I was, I was I'm when I was like listening to that. So it was just kind of one of those moments where I really remember like really loving it and as I got older well, first of all, I moved out to Los Angeles when I was eighteen. So it was like I came out to La I knew that I wanted to be in the industry in some way, shape or form. So I was kind of I was doing the acting thing. I was still singing, but I was doing more like vocal training and doing all that. And then so music was always still the fore friend of being a part of my life, but I kind of was focusing more on acting than singing at that time. And then fast forward and that my husband, we got married, I had all these babies and all of a sudden, after my fourth child, I was like wait, you know, I was somebody before I was married. You know, I had all these hopes and dreams too, and not that I didn't want to be a mom. Being a mom was something I always wanted, but I just knew that I needed to also find myself again, because now it was like, yes, I'm a mom and I'm a wife and I'm doing all this other stuff, but I was somebody else before all of this and I needed to find myself. And so I started just kind of searching out, you know, what I wanted for me and I started piano lessons at like thirty. I took them when I was a little girl, probably like six seven years old, and Um I said, you know what I want to I want to start taking piano lessons again. So I started taking piano lessons and just jumping back into the music that way, and then I started writing. And it's so funny...

...because I look back at that time when I started writing, I was introduced to producer and he put me with different writers and I started writing. I was always writing when I was a little girl. I would write poems, I'd write stories, I was I love to tell stories, and it all kind of came to fold. It kind of that three hundred and sixty or whatever you call it. I'm probably saying it wrong. It's like, oh my gosh, I used to do this when I was younger. So like just all kind of came to life again for me and I do want to explore that because I think the songwriting process is always very, yeah, interesting to chat about. But I have to ask, since you were out in La for acting, obviously a big part of acting, especially when you're just getting started, are the auditions. Did you ever have a super strange audition that you had to go out for? Oh Gosh, I'm sure I did, because because even back in those days it was like some you know, you could get some people asking you to do weird things, you know, and obviously before the me to movement and all that, you know, a lot of stuff was come out. Thankfully, I will tell you I didn't have like a bad experience like that, but at the acting world kind of it was like I wanted to be in it and then it was like, uh, I love music more. It's so it's kind of it was and I'm glad that I was so passionate about music and I was able to just kind of realize acting isn't what I wanted to do. But yeah, I mean in La you're driving all over the place, two auditions everywhere. Now it's different because I have a daughter who does acting. A lot of it's now self tape, so you just selftape at home and send it in. Yeah, I guess. I guess my question was less strange experience and we're just like stranger unique product that you were you were marketing, because I think it's always so fascinating. I mean, I'll I do not do acting, but as a writer podcaster, like I'll get pitched things where I'm just like I would have never even thought that would be a product, and yet like here I am being like that's a pretty good idea, I want one of these. So I think it's always, always interesting just to kind of go down those roads and see, like what's out there that people are trying to sell. You know what, I haven't. I didn't have any of those experiences where there's I mean I just remember sometimes it was like a dennist office and they want you to promote their Dennis Room. Like okay, you'd all that kind of stuff. You know. Well, you do have very nice taste. Thank you. Had A good Orthodonis, perfect for this audio. Yes, exactly, call that out. Yes, so, going back to the songwriting process, because you said you've been writing since you were little. Loved Stories, but I think is a very important part of songwriting. Yes, you can slap a few rhyming lines together, but to bring it all together with a story, I think is a lot more impressive and I think leads to more impactful song. So do you kind of have a seedling in your eye, in your head when you start writing a song or is it...

...just kind of you just you going with no expectations, you just let the words take you. No, I usually have an idea. So, like I have notebooks all over my house. I have them in my cars, you know, like in the car I'll be on the side of you know, on the side I'll literally find like little notebooks that I've been writing ideas, and I have notes in my phone. Literally, in the middle of the night I can wake up. Last week this happened to me so much. I kept waking up in the middle of the night and I had these ideas and my husband's like, what's going on? It's like three thirty in the morning. I'm like, I have a song idea. I have to write it down because I learned early on those ideas go away if I don't write them down, I forget it in the morning. So I have to like write it down. So I keep note books or my phone by the bed and, you know, throwing my ideas and so usually when I go into like a writing session, I love to co write. I love to write with other people, just because I've learned that when more than one person, you guys, have these different ideas and you literally can feed off of each other. But a lot of times, most of the time, I'll walk into a session with an idea of like hey, I was kind of feeling like this. You know, what are you thinking? Sometimes we write to that. Sometimes, like a totally different idea comes up and I'm like wait, Loui, what about this? You know, and that happens to are those not outbursts, but those revelations in the middle of the night? Are Those always lyrics? Are Are they riff sometimes too, or like a beat? We're like weight, I need to capture that. Sometimes it's all of that. So sometimes it's just like like an idea and I'm hearing like some lines for a song and I'm like, Oh, I got to write that down. Okay, so I'll write it down and sometimes it's actually like I'm hearing melodically how I want it to be, and so melodically sometimes. And then it's like I'm singing into my phone kind of what I what I'm hearing so that I don't forget it. Nice. Yeah, I feel like I I'll get the the melodic stuff that just POPs in my head. I'm like, Oh, that could be a cool song, like little idea to think of it, it's always at an inconvenient time. It's always like out on a run, middle of the night, in the shower, something like that, and I'm just like why, why can't you just come to me when I'm like write songs? To do you write songs? Yeah, I play a guitar, I love it in a band and I just have yeah, same, same sort of thing. Like I've been writing stories since I was, I don't know, five or six, probably is when you could trace it back. And so, yeah, I think it's too kind of bring that into music. I think a super for fun, although I would say most of my expertise lies and just writing stories and like reporting on stories. So but I love it, certainly not as much. Yeah, that's how it starts. Yeah, and it's been, I mean again like obviously during the pandemic, a lot more time to sit and do things like that instead of having gone out. So I think that segues nicely to your song...

...the bottle, which has a really nice message behind it of having a community and kind of like the the courage to speak out if maybe your mental health isn't a hundred percent right now. Obviously this last year was bananas for all of us and it still is, still is impacting people like we're certainly not in the clear, despite what that bar playing friends in low places and plenty of other places around here may may lead us to believe. So mental health has always been something that's important to you, but can you talk specifically for the bottle, that kind of creation process and the message that you hope people get out of it? Yeah, I mean, so when when I wrote the bottle, I wrote it with a songwriter by the name of Jeff Cohen and it was the first time he and I actually had met and I kind of had an idea of what I wanted to write about and we just kind of sat down and and the word just kind of flowed. I mean the song. We wrote the song. I don't even know if it took us an hour to write it. It was one of those magic moments, because you don't get that all the time and you know that it's I mean when that happens, and it's happened a few times with me, but it's like when a song just kind of like is born and it just kind of comes out. It's it's a very it's therapeutic. First of all, it was very therapeutic for me. But I just this was actually a song too, that it's reminiscent to my life, my story, you know, and talks about alcohol and struggle with it. And when I was going to release a song as a single, I originally wasn't going to release it. I put it on the album and and so it was going to be on the album, but with everything that's happened in this past year, I felt like this song really could resonate with people because everybody is going through something. It doesn't matter. You know, we've all gone through something this past year and I think, you know, this song really dives into mental health and being able to, you know, ask for help and know that it's okay to ask for help and it's okay to know you're not okay today. You're going to have days where you're just not okay and but you're not alone. And so I really hope that this song, when people hear it, and even so like the music video I have with it. I partnered with NAMI and and they're the National Alliance for mental illness and the great thing with them is that, you know, there's a number of people can call. They have people that are standing by to help and I think a lot of people, especially during the pandemic, felt very alone. I mean we're in our houses, we're not going out, we weren't seeing people and you feel very isolated, especially if you were living alone and you were, you know, not in a house with other people, or, I think the elderly. I look...

...at a lot of the elderly and they felt so lone. They can see anybody. So I just for me, and this is partly why I did with music as well as like I want to help people. I want to I want to help. I want to whether it's a song that lifts you up during the day because you're having a hard day and it's one of my songs like Nashville, that gets you singing and get you in a good mood, or song like the bottle, where someone is able to be like wow, you know what, I am struggling right now. I'm depressed, I'm whatever, whatever it may be, and know that they're not alone, that we all have gone through it and even for me, daily it's still, you know, I still deal with my mental health daily. It's very easy for me to go down a tunnel, go down that rabbit hole and feeling depressed and sad and there's so many things that can pull me down there. It's like I daily work on trying to to stay happy and positive, but I also understand there's going to be days where I'm not having a great day and it's okay to say, you know what, I'm actually feeling very sad today, I'm having a hard day and it's okay. Yeah, I like to think of it as like the Anti instagram effect of real life is not always behind a filter and, you know, very shiny and well, I guess pictures aren't really shiny, but you know what I mean, like very bright and no, but they but instagram, and I have said this so much to instagram social media in general, can paint a picture like oh, their life is so perfect. Nobody's life is perfect. I mean your life can be great and you're happy and but everybody is going to deal with something in their life that's gonna, you know, make them stop in their tracks and be like wow, like knock the wind out of you. I mean everybody's gonna nobody goes through life without without struggles. So I think it's important to and I try to portray that, to be honest with you, even on my social media, like, even though my life might look like, oh, it's so great, you know, I have my struggles and I actually talked about it. You know, I openly went on and did an instagram live and I hadn't done one and probably I don't know, five six months, and I talked about the bottle and the meaning behind the bottle when I wrote it and what it was about, and so many people were kind of taken back because it's not something I've talked about. I haven't talked about you know, that I struggled with alcohol. I just people know I don't drink, but I've never really discussed it or really talked about it. I've said like yeah, you know, I don't drink. I choose not to. Is just not something that I, you know, want to do. And it really I think people were able to kind of feel like they knew me a little better and realize, oh, okay, she's struggled, she's had her struggles. Yeah, and I think that's something else interesting that the pandemic did, because it did kind of create that feeling of isolation, like you were saying, especially if you were living alone. But then to see...

...so many, in particular, musicians that were either hosting these virtual concerts or doing things like that, like going on instagram live or having kind of those intimate conversations, I think really helped sort of bridge the gap of not being able to go see shows, but almost like you got to know your fans and fans got to know their favorite musicians even better because of that, which is super cool. Yeah, and that's why I think even, like I always said, you know, music is healing. Music heals people. It's you know, whatever you're going through, it, I feel like music so healing. So being able to even though I wasn't able to do a lot of live shows, I wasn't at all last year, you know, being able to go on instagram and actually, you know, do an instagram live and do a virtual show or virtual show on facebook. What however, it was done. You know, I was grateful I got to do that because I saw how it helped people. It just made people feel like, oh my gosh, music brings people alive. It's just something about it right. Yes, yes, a hundred percent. And there it is also very impressive just to see with a song when people interpret it in different ways of like, Oh, yeah, I think it's like that. I think it's like that, and then to hear from the Creator like this is what I was feeling when I wrote it. But like, you can certainly have your own interpretation on it, and I think that's something that is really hard for a lot of other art forms to pull off right. And that's what I actually even love about the bottle, because different people told me how it resonates with them, like what they get from the song. And it isn't necessarily a struggle with an addiction. It could be that they lost somebody and they're so they're listening to the words and the words definitely talk about loss and struggling, you know. So I love it that other people are getting a different meaning from it and and how it resonates with them and I I appreciate that so much. Yeah, absolutely. I I know you had talked about quarantine and being alone, but I think what was also exciting during quarantine was how many hobbies popped up from it. So did you start any fun quarantine hobbies? Trying to think. Did I start any fun quarantine? Well, I don't know if this is a hobby, but puzzles we were doing so many puzzles and that was really fun. I mean, you know, sitting down and just hours of like sitting down and making puzzles. And, by the way, they're not easy. The ones that we were ordering were like hard, like fivezero pieces and like tiny, and I'm like really, but it's so satisfying when you're finished with that puzzle. Okay, let me ask you a puzzle related question, because I have encountered this within the household. How long after you complete a puzzle, do you keep it intact? Okay, so we have a hard time actually dismembering these puzzles. So we have one that we started. It's probably been eight months since it's still we have not destroyed that puzzle, but it took forever to do it. So it's like we...

...still have it. It's like it's probably it's big. It's a big puzzle. It was one of those what was it? We got on Amazon and it it literally was like all these different TV shows that used to be on. It goes everywhere, back from like the S to s s and then some of the s. So there was a lot of you know, but yeah, we still haven't taken down. It's been it's been up from my eight nine months. Is it? Is it at a place where you like? Is it on a table? That is, it's on a common table. It's sitting right there. And then. So actually, our little puppy she got I don't know how she got a hold of it, but she did, and she ripped a little bit of a piece off and we're like wait, what happened to the piece of the puzzle, you know. So we're very protective of the puzzle. Fran Nice, Fran Nice. Okay, so that makes me feel a little better because there's been similar situations here. But I also am not as good at puzzles, so I I will let let the other folks handle it. Yeah, I will. I will just admire from afar and try not to spill a drink on it, my water when it's guess that not based on a true story or anything's a risk with with the table being out there. That's right. That's right. So that, I would say. That's the gist of my hobby that I probably started doing, you know, because I was writing a lot too. I was doing a ton of zoom rights, so that was keeping me very busy. Over the pandemic, how do these zoom rights work, because I feel like I've heard a few different ways that people have done this. So how do yours work? So I will tell you. In the beginning doing zoom rights, it was like okay it I felt like the creativity was still there, but then after I had to tell you about five six months, it was like it was hard because it's there's an energy you get when you're in the room with people in your writing and your it's just it's an energy. You're not getting that energy from a computer. It's just different, you know. But I mean, listen, we were at some great songs. There were some great songs with different artists and writers throughout the pandemic and I'm excited about recording some of those songs too. But it's just a different you know, I'm happy to be able to be in person again and actually be writing in person with people. Yes, it is very nice to see people and be because you're right, it is that that type of energy and I think that translates to live shows as well. With, hopefully you're getting back out and two thousand and twenty one get to do some live shows. Yeah, I just actually had one on memorial weekend, which is Great. It was fun too, and this time it was like a my full band, so being able to have like a full band and, you know, great show and it was fun. They had fun. For most of them, was the first show, like like a live show like that with everybody since the pandemic. So it was really fun and you could feel that energy in the crowd and people were so excited. That's awesome. That's awesome. Yeah, I'm...

...very excited to I have not been to a live show since twenty, I mean two thousand and nineteen, so I exc I've got a few few planned coming up and then our bed playing one in August. So I'm very excited. It's always exciting to get out there and be playing. I agree, and I also have to ask this because I always love hearing these stories, but what's the worst Gig that you've ever played with? The worst GIG? Oh Gosh, I mean, listen, I've played it some five bars, like literally in the pouring rain. I can think of one. It was like early in Hollywood and it was like on a November and it was like pouring, pouring rain and anyway, Long Story Short, my guitar said I had playing with me wasn't like an acoustic set. His guitar string broke in the middle of it. I mean it was like it was like everything you could imagine kind of went wrong. I mean, listen, it was pouring rain, so people like just trying to get in there were like drenched and I think I had probably ten friends that came, but let me tell you, that bar was so happy that I had ten friends that are because it was my ten friends that were in the bar. That was it the whole night. So anyway, but yeah, there's there's been. Obviously, actually, this last show that I had, five minutes before I went on, the sound engineer came over to me and said, I'm so sorry, but something happened. We lost all your settings. So everything from the sound check, we had literally an hour and a half sound check, was gone. That we winged it. Did it work out? Yeah, I think it did. I mean everyone said it sound good. I'm like, all right, I can't and I couldn't hear myself. I had my my my ears in and I literally come out to sing my first song and couldn't even hear myself. So I ripped out one of them and I was like okay, this is how it's going to go. We're just going to do this. So now we're worked out. I had fun. You know what, it's having fun. I learned that early on. If you have fun, the audience is going to have fun. You just got to have fun. Yes, have fun and don't act like things are going wrong exactly. You got to just kind of play it off exactly exactly. So I think that's a skill that is important for for really any performer, but especially musicians. It's just the ability to roll with things because, like you said, things are going to go wrong. Sometimes, maybe you have a real sunny day and then it just starts pouring right like ten minutes before. I know like well, all right, we're going to roll with it. Yeah, you just gotta Roll with it. Yes, take an Improv class or two if you need to, and then I love that. I love that. Now, something that I like to ask on the show is a question that you wish you were asked more frequently, and for yours it's why did you start singing?...

And I feel like you've touched on this a little bit, but but why? Why do you want to share music with people? You know what? So growing up music was really like got me through like my teenage years, through any difficult times, it was always music. So for me, and I would listen, I listen to lyrics. So I'm a lyrical girl. I definitely like listen to to lyrics and and and they just like it's empowering to me. So for me I was like, you know what, that's what I want to do. I was so honestly, when I write songs, I think about I think about that, like how will this resonate with someone? How will they feel when they hear this song? Listen, all my songs are not going to be rainbows and butterflies, you know, there's going to be heavy stuff, you know, but I hope that people, when they listen to it, it just it helps them. It make it in some way, shape or form. I really do. I just want to help. So that's the reason why I do music, because I think it's healing, like I said to you earlier. You know, I think music is so healing. I joke around to people. I tell them, listen, if we all just communicated in song, there would be no wars, life would be great, which is sing to each other. You know, I mean, I agree. I think I always, I always enjoy a good song conversation. I don't think a lot of people partake. But yes, we'll work on it. Will work on grinding them down. I love it. I love it. Yes, and we are missioned. So we're basically at the halfway point. I think when this episode goes live it will be basically yeah, it'll be like the week, first week of July. So perfect halfway through the year. What is coming up for you in the second half of two thousand and twenty one? Well, on July nine my first country album is being dropped. So it will be released on July nine and I'm very excited about that. So and for the first time I'm going to have a vinyl so I'm very excited about that too. I've never had anything on vinyl, so now I have an album on vinyl. I'll be heading out to Nashville actually that first week in July. I'm going to be there because the album's dropping, but also I'm recording some new music, so I'm excited about that too. Always working on new stuff, you know, always want to be doing that. And then, honestly, I'm hoping to you know, I'm taking a little vacation after the album drops. I need a little vacation, well deserved. Yeah, I'm going to do that, but then I'm really wanting to get out and be playing shows. You know, I'm hoping this year. I've definitely played a few this year already, but I want to get more shows in and be able to get out there. I want to, you know, meet my fans and meet people and just, you know, I'm really looking forward to that. I love people. So, you know it, this last year is hard for me. No, not being able to hug people was like so hard for me. I think the first time I got to hug a friend, like finally get to tug and I started crying because I was it was such a like wow, I need I need that physical touch, you know. Yeah,...

I think I had the same reaction when I was just like Oh, so nice. It's so nice, right, and I actually want to. I'm going to be working on a Christmas album, so I haven't. I haven't. I've put out Christmas long before, but I want to do that again. So what is your favorite Christmas song, either traditional or outside the box? Well, okay, outside the box, I'm going to say last Christmas, Wm I've just love that song, I just do. But I also love, I love silent night. I just think there's something so beautiful about that song and I just it's one of my all time favorites. Good choices, good choices. I do randomly get last Christmas stuck in my head, like even throughout the year. It's one of those songs. It's so good. Why? I'm certainly knew how to how to write a catch. You taste sure did. Oh my goodness, that they ever. All right. Well, you're almost off the hook, but, as you mentioned at the top of the show, you're a mom of four children, which it's a lot of children and there's, you know, a lot going on. I know parents with one kid who are like it feels like I have for so I don't know if that exponentially multiplies we're having, for it feels like you have sixteen. Probably not, but I always like to wrap up with the top three and I thought you could give some advice, your top three tips for having four kids and keeping them all happy. Yeah, well, that's you know, that's challenging in itself, right, because every child is so different. So I have four different personalities and so trying you know, what works for one doesn't necessarily always work for the other. But one of the something that I've learned, it took me a while to get there, is that with kids they are all so different. You have to based on whatever they're going through. So all kids are going to go through angster whatever as teenagers. Okay, what works for one is not going to work for the other. So they advice that I'm going to give to one, it's not going to be the same. And I've learned that because it's like you think it worked for this one and then you try to work say the same thing to another one. They're looking at you like, what are you talking about? That doesn't even make you know. So you got to just each child is different and so you want to treat them, you know, according to you know, their little different personalities. I'd also say they all have their own different passions to so I've never wanted to ever push like what I do on my kids like, oh, mom, seeing. So you guys all need to take vocal lessons. You guys only need to sing and be a music. They all find their way on what they're passionate about. I did have them all take piano lessons when they were younger, and I just I think that's important. If you can have your kids learned some some kind of music, or at least introduce it to them, they'll decide if they...

...want it. And it's interesting because my kids all love music and they all can play the piano and but I'd say probably two of the at the four actually play it all the time, like they love to sit down and play, and it's just really nice to hear that. You want me to give you one more huh? Yeah, I know it's a this might be the biggest curveball of ball. Yeah, I know. But the other thing is is accept them for the way they are. Don't try to change them. You know, we can all you know, no kid likes to be judged, just like we as adults, right, we don't ever want to be judged. And when we feel judged, what happens? We you know, our walls go up. You know, just there's so many things that happen. So accept them for the way they are. You know, we don't always have to agree with their choices and what they do, but all we need to do is love them. So that's the other thing is just, no matter what we love them no matter what. That's our job. Absolutely, absolutely, top three, complete, kimberly, you're officially off the hook. Thank you so much for for Chatt and if people want to learn more about you, what you've been doing with the National Alliance on mental illness, and here your new music, your new album coming out next week. Yes, it's coming out. So what about the time this drops? Yes, next it. Where can I find you? You find me on all my socials. That official can really down, but you can even go to my website. Official can really Downcom you can pre order the album still, you know, get it on vinyl. Who Doesn't Love Vinyl? And with the vinyl you get a free down load any way to download the album. But and while also on spotify, apple music. So I'm all over the place. So follow me. Fantastic. Yes, go out and follow go, get the album and enjoy music that really for all moods, like you were saying, it is got you. You got your happy and cheerful and you got your you're gritty that we need sometimes, and so we all great stuff all around, and thank you so much for taking the time to chat. Thank you for having me. This is great. I appreciate it. And we got to end, as always, with a Corny joke, and I hope I don't think I've told this one before. I once once you get several episodes. Sometimes I forget if I've told this, but I think this is a new one. But what do you call a sleeping t rex? What do you call a sleeping tea rex? A Dino Snore? Good after Tay People? That's a good one. Good people, cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you were a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. As always, you can send me a message Joey at good people cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people cool...

...things and check out all the old episodes. Be a good people cool thingscom as always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

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