Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 97 · 8 months ago

97: Unique Album Concepts, Interesting People, and Travel Destinations with Mic Nickels

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We’re kicking off a new season of Good People, Cool Things with someone who’s traveled all across the world. One of the greatest elements of hip-hop is the storytelling, and a combination of seeing different cultures and meeting new people can lead to some fantastic results. 

Mic Nickels is a New York-based rapper who just dropped his new album Bars for Days. And not only is this new album full of music—including multiple Grammy-winning artists and a collaboration with Method Man of the Wu-Tang Clan—it also serves as an autobiography. 

Mic shares the process of creating both an album and book at the same time, some of the most interesting people he’s worked with, and offers a few must-see sights of the world.

Good people, cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things. New Year, new pod, lots of exciting stuff on the horizon. Here starting off the brand new your help. You had a fantastic year. Got Lots of hot chocolate, didn't catch covid like I did, and got to relax a little bit, because that's holidays are all about, is relaxing, charging, getting fresh. And now that we're in a new calendar year, everything is different. Right. Maybe not, but we're going to hope it as anyway. Today's guest is Mike Nichols, a rapper, musician, author, very interesting person who is talking all about his brand new book and album bars for days. It's full of music, an autobiography, Lots of interesting stories, and you can get it right now because it's out and it's available and it is delightful. Mike has lived a very interesting life. I mentioned he's traveled a ton of different places. We're talking all about that, all about his upbringing in the music industry, how all kinds of serendipitous things have seemed to happen to him and it's led to so many cool moments and we're chatting about it all. Mike. Of course, as we discovered during the podcast. I said of course, like we all know this, but we learned during the podcast, Mike is also a graduate of the University of Miami, go kines. So if you don't like the hurricanes, you're going to have to skip over like four minutes of this podcast, but otherwise you're going to love every minute of it. And if you're a canes fan, who, whoosh, let's go. If you'd like to get in touch with the show, you can reach out via facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast. And, as always, if you head on over to apple podcast, stitcher, pod chase or good pods, any of those wonderful podcast directories, and drop a five star review, I will be forever indebted to you. And now here's the conversation with Mike. For people who don't know who you are, can you give us your elevator pitch and can you also tell us the type of elevator that we're writing on? Hey, yeah, my name is Mike Nichols and I'm a MC in, a musician out of New York City. I record and I've been performing for years either a solo basis or with my band, and now I'm officially author. Just released my autobiography called bars for days, and yeah, I'm just generally positive person trying to try to push people forward. And you mentioned in bars for days it's both a book and an album, which is a pretty unique people can can download via a Qr code and and check out the autobiography as well. So what was the idea behind that? Yeah, man, you know, I just I just wanted to do something different. I think, you know, performing with my band for years, for a while seven the CD's after shows was like was like just given, you know, we'd sell ten, twenty CDs every show, you know, and towards the end of that run where I had a residency with my band, it just started gets some point where people will still be like man, I don't even have a CD player. So kind of like started with with that because I was thinking like man, what else, what else can I do, you know, to do something different? And then it's just done at me because I had been thinking about documenting my life. I just have just had a crazy life. I've met a lot of interesting people and done a lot of amazing things and I just wanted to document it and doing an actual documentary is like thousands of dollars, which I didn't have, and I decided to go back to school a few years ago at the University of Miami to finish my degree. You at to you exactly, and I was finishing online and I had a class called writing the autobiography and I was just excelling it all my writing classes and my professor was just super encouraging and she was like it, you should do it, you should just like turn this into a book, and I was like okay. So I started kind of, you know, working out my ideas and things like that, not realizing how much work it would be,...

...and then when covid hit, I actually just had like a year off at home and I just took advantage and every day, like three, four or five hours a day, I would just sit and write until I wrote the whole story. I'm just super excited about it, you know. So and that, along with the music, is just a UNI experience because the book kind of takes you to the point in my life where I write and record this album. So you kind of get to see like everything that leads up to that moment and actually met in the studio. In the book I'm in the studio working on these tracks and what's going on in my head while I'm recording. So it's a really cool interactive experience to get to know me while you get to know this music. I love seeing Miami. grats. I also went to Miami. So always all really fellow Kane's doing big things. Yeah, that's what's up, kings up in here. That's whoosh, whoosh plan right now. Actually, the basketball team that early thirty am starts. That's rough. I know, I do not, I'm so I'm just heart. I'm just learning about the football team, honestly, just that was painful. For now. So, yeah, we got the new coach, so that's going to be excited, I know. Yeah, there's hope on the horizon, as I think, as there seems to be every three years. And then I was actually set. The first time I was there was actually the last time we won the championship. I was there during that. Oh Nice, and that was good timing. Yeah, and then things went to hell for a while after this. Yes, I got there basically right after the all the good stuff happened. So I'm Ye, had a had a lot of history it to look back on, but nothing really yeah, right now. You mentioned you've met a lot of interesting people along the way. Do you have someone who's the most interesting man this? So many. I mean I while I was while I was in Miami, I worked at a comedy club and actually became the bar manager, and through that experience I just met so many people. I met Oj Simpson the more a few times and we were like on a first name basis because my boss was like his his friend. He was so proud to be OJ's friend, which I thought was dark and weird, but yeah, it was. And also, like I was just driving. So part of my job was I was the radio liaison for the club, so I used to pick up these guys and drive them to do radio remotes all afternoon. And I mean during that experience I was hanging out with Tracy Morgan, which I talked about in the book. Was a really, really interesting time. Dave Chappelle and Dane cooked and this all these amazing, amazing comedians. Tommy Chong, I'm from teachings tongue, was interesting. Oh, Charlie Murphy is a funny story that's in there. And then later, you know, I've always like to get by for a long time. I just I just bartsended to get by while I was working on my musical craft and I got to New York and I picked up a job randomly at a jazz club, smoke jazz club, which ended up being this famous, world famous jazz club that's super tiny, like comically tiny, and through that I got to meet like some of the just the greatest jazz musicians in the world and spend time with them, like Jimmy Cobb, who was the drummer from kind of blue on. I was Davis Wrecker, and Harold Mayburn, who was just a famous pianist who actually just passed away a couple years ago. So yeah, just and then of course that just being an MC like I've just met so many really amazing underground himse's and spend a lot of time with them and just, you know, comprehensively my life, I just I just tend to kind of like bounce into people that are just really interesting. Like I didn't talk about it by even like Kevin Hart when he was coming up and stuff like that, and we were like about the same age, so we would let me him and I used to like go to this club and try and pick up chicks and no one knew who we were. No one who Kevin Hartwa. It's like that. So it was. It's been a good time. It's been a good run. You know, I'm looking forward to more. Definitely lots of interesting. I think that's something...

...that's cool about the music industry in general is that you do get those opportunities to meet really cool people and like yeah, maybe it's before they end up being huge celebrities or maybe it's just a random person you might never see again, but they you know, the night just sticks with you because of its diner. Actually it's always so cool. Sure you don't got to be famous to be special. There tons of I mean is I've met so many. Music just attracts like the interesting breed of people in general, especially in a city like New York. Lots of lots of characters. Absolutely New York and being a jazz club, I mean Jazz. Jazz fans are neurotic and quirky just because, I think when you listen to that frequency and that rhythm at that intensity for so long it has to do something to your brain. So they're they're like very quirky, like OCD type of people, but really also very smart, really smart people. Yeah, so it's never a dull moment when you're in a room with his music, that's sure. Absolutely. And, of course, having played so many different shows and been to all these different venues and all that, I always like to ask this. What's the worst gang you've played? I mean that's I'm definitely you have your share. I mean I've had gigs where, like the PA doesn't work. I we did this show in Brooklyn. I don't want to shout out the club because it's just I know the owner and he's cool. When he had us over and the room was great, the it was a nice crowd and and then the sound was just the worst I've ever experienced. Like Mede, the microphone was in and out constantly. They were constantly, they're costly trying to, you know, fix the sound right in the middle and there's feedback and and you know, when you're a musician, when you're on stage, you just need to like power through it and pretend it's not happening, but like inside you're like seething because you're like you just want to go out and I do a nice show and present something nice to your fans, spending money to come out and time. You know. So that was that was that was one of them. And that happens here and there. I mean you just you just get that and you get venues that just aren't prepared for, especially like a band like my band, is nine pieces all together. Were weren't full force, and there's just clubs that just aren't prepared for at all. You know. Yeah, it's always interesting to really just to see like a club or, you know, arena, not arena, I'm not playing arenas, but like just like setups and yeah, how you can kind of tell if like the sound person is maybe in over their head. Yeah, and I think, I think when something goes wrong, like how they handle it. That's partially where you can tell to if they're kind of like, you know, calm collected, they're like okay, this has happened before and they've solved it, like that's all right, but if they're just like, I don't know what's wrong, then it's fun and that that's exactly what was happening at said Gig. They had no idea. I was literally while my trump and player would be like doing the solo, I would literally like jump out and like try to mess with the board and then run back on stage to do my part or whatever. You know. So, which is the last thing the front man should be doing is going to try to help with the sound in the middle of a little bit set right. It just looks terrible, but it was what it what everyone was understanding and you know, we had a good time regardless. But and it flungs. You don't look too panicked. Everyone's just like, oh, it's like a quirky thing he's doing. It's part of the part of the a yeah, yeah, exactly, sure. Now you have you've been talking about this man. I don't know if we've said the name though, nickel and dime ops I, which a nine piece band. There's trumpets in it, so it's kind of like a a hip hop jazz fusion sort of, I amalgamation of different sounds of that fancy vocabod I'm throwing any I loved it. That's it. That's that. That's at university Miami right there. That's what we're doing. Yes, and I so how did how did that get started and how? Is it kind of like another creative outlet for you? Yeah, so Nicol and diame ops started.

Like I said, I picked up this job randomly at a jazz club, which is so weird because I was like, I don't want to work at Aven you, I just want to work at a club and make lots of money. You know, that was my plan and this this kind of like tricky craigslist drew me up to the upper west side, all the way from Brooklyn, and I ended up getting there I just needed a job so bad and they were the only ones that wanted to hire me. So I just I just took this job, but a jazz club, and for a while I didn't tell anyone that I was in musicians. I didn't want anyone to think like I was there with alterior motives to like take advantage of being around the musicians, because I wasn't. I literally just want to have craigslist. But through time, as I became friends with people and as I started releasing some of my first solo projects, it started becoming people started becoming aware what I was doing and they were like man, your stuff is really good, like we should make a band and I was kind of resistant to it at first because I had a group that was kind of like a band when I was down in Miami called the links, and I love of the links whatever. was just like a lot of like personalities and stuff and I was just ready to kind of move past that and just kind of like work by myself. And it's just kind of kept coming to my face and when I found out my son was about to be born, I was about to be a dad, I was just feel like I really needed to like do this hell Mary, to like keep my career alive as a musician, you know, and I was like I just I just called a bunch of guys that I had met at had befriended and I was like hey, would you guys want to just do like like this experimental album with me, and they were like yeah, cool, and we went into smoke. The owner of smoke, ballstach, came in. He's he's a producer and engineer as well, so he helped me Mike everything up and I went in there with these musicians that had the same format, seven piece band, and I had all these ideas in my head that I had been recording in my mic and we just started jamming. Goes out and, as I have I'll get like four bar or eight bar loops that I heard that I liked them, like okay, we're cool, and I went home with that and I turned that into an album, which was eventually called tragedy and comedy, and I asked the owners of smoke. I said, Hey, would you mind if we do the album release party late night on a Thursday? I know you guys don't ever have hip hop. They die like if someone would wrap it the open mic, they would take them up stage. That's how serious they were about like straight ahead be Bob, and they let me do it, you know, on the strength of our relationship, and it was a just a big success. We packed the house. It was packed like four am like here. The club hadn't been that vibrant in years, honestly, and I kind of just went on with it thinking like day that that was cool. You know, what do we do next? And about two weeks later the owners called me. They were both on speaker phone and they were just like hey, man, would you want to do this every week? And I was like really, like I just never thought it was even a possibility and I just, you know, I went with it and that that eventually became how nickel and dime mops kind of formed, because my musical director and friends frombone player, David Gibson, he made all the charts and he helped me put the band together. And you know, when you're playing every week and you're the first couple six months or so we were kind of like shuffling through players, trying to find who was right fit and really working on our sound, and from that it just became this thing where we just kind of like, as we harnessed this this collective she that we had as a music as a musical group, we just were like, all right, let's record more, all right, let's go play other places as and we ended up playing at the blue note and we ended up play at Joe's pub, we ended up playing getting flown to Athens, Greece, in two thousand and seventeen to do this huge fest Simbol on the main stage. And you know, we got to do all these things on the strength of just this kind of idea that just time to came together because the universe and demanded it. It was not it...

...was not really my idea of front it just it just kind of just made sense and we just went with the flow. You know, I like me that you would said with the album release that you were able to do it on the strength of your relationship, and I think that's a terrific lesson for really anyone. Not everyone who listens to this podcast is a musician, but any sort of like business idea or project or anything that you're working on, like people want to help out people that they like, and I think if you would gone in immediately and we're like yeah, I'm musician, like here I am, like I think the way you approach it is so smart. Of let's make a connection first, like outside of this, instead of just like what can you do for me? And then when the opportunity came, they were like hell, yeah, let's do it. Yeah, I mean I think that's it. If you just it's like that with anything life. Man, if you show up to you know, they call eager beaver, one of my friends calls it. If you just show up to like hungry, people push you away because if they're not ready, if they're not ready for you, they're just not. It's just like the like if you find someone you're attracted to. You can't just show up me like you're dating me. It's like no, like, Hey, I'm actually kind of smart and funny. You want to get to know me, right, you know, I mean so it's the same premise, I think. Right with anything, I agree. I also like, Hey, you're dating me is Oh, yeah, can't pulled it up. Got Les go do it. That opener. Yeah, I think I've actually seen that work in person, but I have someone, someone's done it at some point. Maybe. I don't know. Ah, you got me really rich and goodlooking. Yeah, now you've been kind of talking about how with the I with bars for days. How's it's an interactive experience with people and they get to they get to know you kind of behind the music as well, and I think that's just such an important thing for any musician, anyone trying to build up their brand, is to have that kind of interactivity. So, especially over the last two years when we've had pandemic life, what if what are some of the other ways that you found to connect with your fans? I just I mean social media is great, obviously, you know. Everyone knows that by this point. You know when it first came out and everyone just like Tia Tequila blew up from my space or whatever. It's like, Oh my God, what's happening any right, but now it's kind of calmed down. You kind of just realized that it's just a great way to find like minded individuals and to, you know, examplifier who you are through the way you post, in the way you talk, but also, you know, the way you interact with everybody. It's really specifically for me, like instagram has been really positive. I've found so many fans just by like seeing who people I look for fans that are fans of musicians or artist that are similar to me, you know, and I try to like reach out to him, and it's been really successful. There's a lot of people that are true fans now. They listen to my music, they buy my merchandise and books because we just make a connection, you know, and that's it. Just just going back to it, just being real with people. You know, you can't just be fake and try to like force the issue. You just gotta let it kind of flow natural and you know it's like that with anything like so, yeah, that's kind of amazing. Also, like, you know, when you're out doing shows, that's a that's a great way to interact with fans because they get so involved in the music. And then, you know, if I always like to hang after and have a couple beers with everyone and get to get to know everybody, you know. So that was that's having their residency was great for that too. I really got to know my fans on a deep level just because I would go and perform and there's like they're part of it. They would sing along and clap along and we go hang out afterwards. And you know, what's the beer of tries lately? I just kind of been an IPA man for the last several years and not generally too particular. I do like log go neatas if I can find it. It's in just a nice smooth IPA. I don't like I don't like running the middle beer too much. It just doesn't have much flavor and usually like too much water to water. It makes me feel a lot you drink butter Miller, I mean it's cool if that's what you're into, you know, but for...

...me I just like a nice stout IPA usually, or something like that. Nice Yere I. You're on your own with that one. But I also drink the Celt most. Obviously, most time I drink tequila straight and just chased it with water. That's old Barkler, my wild boards, ender attendencies, you know. I mean you know what you're getting into with that. So at least that's that's good. Yeah, of course I do. That's why I'm making I think something else that's interesting is so back in the the days, you know, before even like all Instwo, messenger, shout out to aim and all that, hip hop was very much about just like the interactions you'd have with people, like a very like culture heavy background, and I think it's interesting to see how it's evolved into the information age, you know, like we're talking about social media. Were always on our phones, like we've gotten. Some people probably have chips at this point already and planed into their brains and all of that good stuff. So how how do you kind of keep the the sort of like culture and like relationship elements which are a big part of hiphop in this sort of like information age where it's very technology heavy? To yeah, I think I think there's just there's really like a divergence, as he vowed, in the hip hop world between and I think a lot of it is the information agent, the people that grew up in it that just, quite frankly, don't have much of an attention span, like the way that people like myself who grew up before computers and phones were available, you just kind of you kind of just absorbed things differently. So I think that there's a big core relation to why, like when you listen to s hiphop, there's this like heavy message with with depth to it, you know, and there's the music has all these like the samples are just layered in all these intricate ways. It's just a lot of depth to n s hip hop, which is why a lot of people call it Golden Age Hiphop, and a lot of the stuff that comes out in the mainstream today there's there's not much depth. You can literally just kind of take it at face value and and and if you missed two three lines, it's not going to make much of a difference if you if you interpreted that verse, you know, correctly. You know. I mean. Yeah, so for me, I think just because I'm just so heavily rooted myself in that error and also in the culture, like I grew up with hipop, which is kind of like the main premise of the book. Like, I was born in the late s and so was hiphop, and I mean when I was a little kid we would sneak to listen to it on college stations because I was the only place you can find rap music, you know, I mean, they wouldn't play it on the main radio stations and in we grew together. So like there's just different connection and it's what I represent just naturally innately who I am. So I feel like there's there's the divergence. So the people, you know, the people that generally have short attention spans and listen to them megoes and things like that, they're probably, I mean most of them, I quite honestly, might not be into the way I present my music, you know, I mean, and the way I present myself as an artist. But then there's a whole sect of people that just really do, and they don't have to be from an older error. There's plenty of young kids that just have, I think, deeper senses of perception and in and like a desire for substance. You know, there's there's plenty of young people that that that reach out to me, that that like that. You know, I mean, but there's a divergence. There's almost too there's almost two senses of the rap world right now, and that regard, you know I mean. So I think I'm answering your question the right away. I think it's just what I am, you know, I just am that culture. So the people that want it gravitate towards it. Absolutely. And you've got a new song that just dropped as well. When this episode airs. It might be out for like a month or so, but either way, still a new song. I Sky City, featuring a teen AF and I'm...

...always excited like I I have always been a huge music video fan, like I think it's always I if a song is a single and doesn't have a music video, I get so upset. I like even a lyric video I'll take, but I'm like like a real, yeah video with some some things going on. So of course, during the pandemic a little harder to shoot videos unless you're, you know, all separately like quarantining yourself, but you two are out and about and out in the city and all that. So what was what was that like to shoot the shoot a music video and kind of have like almost, almost a sense of normal seat to things. Yeah, it's funny you mentioned the the Pan Endemic, because my other video, that the single that came up before that rappers don't smile. We heavily considered, you know, covid in the implications of going out and shooting this video, and that's why I just me and my friend who was the director, actually just actually went out in shots and then we got all these rappers who sent in videos of them either like scowling or like scowling and then smiling, because that's the whole sense of concept of the song, is that rappers just don't smile in general, like it's just kind of a hip hop thing. So, like, we we took covid and into consideration in that regard when we shot that and it came out great. It was really cool just seeing everybody like in their own element in their homes or whatever, and then just me and my guy out in Brooklyn just shooting alone for safety purposes. Oh, when I shot sky city, that wasn't August and I don't know, I really feel like as this year progress, it's definitely not it's definitely far from over, but I think by that time the fact that a lot of people had gotten vaccinated. They're just there's just a different comfort level, you know, about being out in public. You know, I mean so, but once again, honestly, the only people that I really came in contact with were the cameraman who shot the video with me and then the people that helped me out in regards to doing the jump, the tandem jump, you know, the guy that was with me and everything like that. So it's pretty limited to WHO I was in contact with. I wasn't really concerned with that so much. Being vaccinated already, you know, and I really pretty sure I had it like right at the offset when it came out last year before. So I think I have the antibodies on top of the vaccine. So I wasn't only worried about it. I wouldn't go into a big crowd, you know. I wouldn't do a mosh pit, seemed sure, but going out and having a few people around me didn't. Didn't determined me very much. Nice. Nice, and are you already cooking up? Do you have other singles your planning to release with? Yeah, videos in the hopper already or or on on deck or things like that. Yeah, so we already shot the Phantom, which was going to come out mid January. We've been figured out the exact day. Yeah, we're going to let the kind of like the holidays settle and everyone kind of get bet like we can figure themselves, and then I'm going to drop the Phantom, which I shot in green point in this really old, like a hundred fifty year old church that had been shut down for like twenty years. I had just happened to know this like from my days at smoke. I know this real estate mobile. Heard her shot out to her hers, who owns this old church which has these frescos on the ceiling and pillars and like these huge pew. It's just huge rendesque church and he's turning it into a commerce, like a center of it's going to have like food and stuff like that and shops. So he's in the prices of renovating it and he just let me in there and just shoot. So the Phantom, I'm like the Phantom of the Outpak kind of. So I got like like a real nice mask and I got like a blazer around, but then I got like my baggy jeans and my Air Force One and I have and I'm like just like hip hop fan I'm running around this this church, which is is really cool. came out really good. It's already directed, I mean edited. It was directed by Jamalhall, great...

...director, and Oh yeah, that was going to come out next and I'm trying to coordinate with method man to see if I can get up with him in January to see if we can do a shoot for this song that we did, which is obviously really exciting for me because, you know, he's just one of my heroes. So I'm just so honored that he he respected my craft enough to be on this album. Yeah, that'll be fantastic to get that, that video going. I I'm sure, I'm sure he'll do it. That's cool. He did, because happen. Yeah, it sounds like it's going to happen. We've been we've been trying to cordate. We were actually going to do in November, but then he got picked he picked up like some some acting gigs that he had to go tend to. So you know, it's like all right, man, well, if you're getting paid like, you know, millions of dollars, I guess that's that's a fine excuse. Yeah, and that Segue is nicely into another question. I always like to ask, which is a question you wish she were asked more frequently, and for you it's what do you see your future being? Like? Yeah, man, Um, that's a good question. Um. So I definitely really enjoyed writing, so I would like to write some more books. I always thought like I would get into like scriptwriting, because I took some of that while I was at the you and I did pretty well with that. I might do that too, but I definitely want to write. You know, this album is is not as nonfiction. It's about me, obviously, but getting I wrote it like it's fiction. So I really feel like I can get I'm trying to. have been trying to think of concepts I want to get into, like some kind of like just just topic, Scifi, almost like grave newer world, one thousand nine hundred and eighty four, but something different, like my own concept. So I've been trying to like think about that. You know, I'm it's just because, I mean in general, I am kind of like a futurist, like you know, I'm a entrepreneur as well. Me and my friends from the you, we started a company which kind of got derailed by covid but we're still trying to get it off the ground where we've actually liked design houses that like sustain their own energy and reduce water and just really stuff like this world needs right now as so, so they have their own greenhouses and stuff like that, where you can, you can grow your own hydrochronic vegetables right in your greenhouse, go right from your kitchen and go get them and cook. So I'm just constantly thinking about the future. I think about humanity a lot. I just want to I just want to have an effect and like just help make changes for the positive, you know. So those are that's why I'm kind of drawn towards things like that. Love it, love it all right. Well, Mike, you're almost off the hook. Care but we always like to wrap up with a top three, and you've mentioned a couple of spots that you've been to in your world travels. But what are your top three places you visited? Yeah, well, first off, I don't feel like I'm on the hook at all because I'm enjoying the competition. We can talk as long as you like. Oh, I've been to a lot of really, really amazing places and obviously one of the most amazing is is just I visited the Giza Pyramids in Egypt, which is just mind blowing, and I talked about that going there, and while we were there there they were going through Ramadan. So it was like a really interesting time to be there because like they were cranky by day but happy by night because they're hungry o day, but and then they would like sing and rejoice. So there's like a scene where like we come around the Great Pyramid of Kufu and I actually stopped because I noticed like a piece of rock that looked like it had broken off the pyramid and I wanted to take a rock, a piece with me. That was one of my ghosts, and I was looking and I was like comparing it to the actual, like the actual giant stones, and at pretty sure it is, because it's supposed to be limestone and they didn't have limestone there. But anyways, I as I go forward, my friends like stopped in their tracks and they're just looking. You can just see Chiro below you. I don't know if you ever really seen it, but like the pyramids kind of like overlook Cairo, like the actual city, and the entire city is...

...just like was all we're all seen and you can hear like like literally thousands, maybe millions, of people all like singing at once and like the sun and the breeze and at the Pyramids. It was really amazing. We just did a lot of stuff like that, and that's another thing that I've been working on with my buds is is a as a travel show which we call temple hunters, where we're going to kind of like search out these old, ancient different sites and see how they correlate to like I don't know if you're familiar with the miss. Everyone knows Atlantis, but then there's another one called called Moo or the Maria, which was from supposed to be like around where Hawaii is, and there's all these like legends all around the world that correlate to that. So another place we went to in that regard was Peru. You know, going to match you Pechu the morning of the spring equinods, and we just we did a hike and for like four days and we showed up at sunrise and it was really intense. And then finally, my dad, well, I really never really knew well, but I just feel related to the culture. Is from Cuba and in two thousand and six I actually went to Cuba and that's one of my other favorite places. I loved I loved Havana. I mean it's just such an interesting place because it's so there's a lot of poverty because of the embark between the embargo in this oppressive government and there's no money in and the people were just so happy and it's just such a beautiful thing. It's just like, no matter how hard their lives are, they're not going to let it get them down and they they sing in the streets and make music in the streets and they whenever they would find out that I was cube and they would just take me in and old ladies would cook for me. It was just it was just a beautiful experience. So Egypt, Peru, Cuba definitely top three. I have to say honorable mentions Japan, Tokyo was amazing, realise, Guatemala, Amsterdam, it's all so many amazing places I've been. So see the world, please, if you're listening, if I can give you any advice, just see the world, get out of your get out of your bubble and it's just going to change your perspective on life. Yeah, I agree wholehearted I've actually been to Peru out of that list of yours, but several on my list in terms of places of visit, and I wholeheartedly a great Du that Inca trail. If you're going to Montre Pechu instead of taking the train, it's an extra four days and a lot, a lot more hiking at high altitudes. But Oh it's so it's so gorgeous. It was just amazing, man it did you go on the side, when you're on the those steps on the side of the of the mountain? Yes, where the yeah, my boy, like I talked about in the book. I don't know if you got that part, but he like he like lost it. We were out there because just like threezero feet in the air everywhere that's listening and there's no guard rails. You literally have the Montent on one side you and then you have three thousand feet down under this hot you. So if you screw up, your kind of screwed and my boy like lost it. Were like come on, man, we had to like we had a like motivate them, but he made it. He made it Nice, Nice, yeah, that's so it is. I remember I did a Dominican Republic volunteer trip back in college and there were a couple places where we, you know, would be like an adventure thing we're doing, and you'd get to a body of water and literally the only way to continue forward was to jump off of the hillside, which was, I don't know it at most maybe like thirty or forty feet, so not like not an insignificant height, but not, you know, not three thous feet. Are Crazy like that. And there would be a couple times where people would just like freeze up and they were like, nope, I can't jump in there, and we're like well, we're all in the water. Like the option is you can walk like an hour and a half back the other way or you're just or just, you know, deal, deal with it. And it was always interesting because it would like rotate. It wasn't like the same people being being afraid, like there'd be someone who...

...the day before had jumped what appeared to be a higher and like more dangerous cliff and then this one, for whatever reason, there's like one rock nearby where they're like Nope, I'm gonna hit that rock and I love that stuff. We did that and belieze, we jump be in the same thing. My one of my buddies was like a Kung Fu instructor and like tough is dude like you could ever want to have with you. You know, out in the street, completely froze on. This is probably like the same thing, about thirty feet high by this waterfall, and I was like you guys aren't going watch out, Cannibal. But Yeah, those are fun times maybe, and that's that's kind of the whole point of the book. You know, man, it's like I really think that you need to step outside of your comfort zone to really have like optimal experiences in life. I mean, you can totally have a fine, fulfilling life. I'm not saying you can't, like if you just stay home and and you work Nin nine and twenty five and you never leave the town you grew up and that's that's cool. It may if you have a great family in your happy that's cool. I'm not saying knocking it, but what I'm saying is at some point, I just highly encourage just do something that you're you've never done before, go somewhere you you're not comfortable, and I guarantee you the experiences that you're going to get out of that are going to stay with you for a lifetime and they're just they're just really special moments. You know you, I know you get it as a traveler as well. You know. Yeah, a hundred percent. So everyone, get out and travel and in the meantime, while you're while you're book in or you know it's it's you probably not booking something for tomorrow. So while you're in that sort of waiting period, check out everything that Mike Nichols is doing. Where can we find you? The website, of course, is spot me a Nickelcom, like, can I borrow a nickels? Spot me a nickel. There you can find every thing. Also, all my own all my solcios are just at Mike Nichols, which is mic and I S K lsts. You can find me an instagram mostly, and the book bars for days is on Amazon. So just Mike Nichols bars for days. You can do a search. You'll find it. Thank you. I really appreciate it. Get in touch with me if you do get it. If you listen to music, hit me up let me know what you think. But I really love hearing all the feedback. I appreciate it. Fantastical, Mike. Thank you so much for hopping on the PODCAST. Love chatting with the fellow Kay. Yes, sir, there's a nice surprise. Really Nice to meet you. Man Likewise, and of course we've got to wrap up with a Corny joke and we'll keep it musical themed. Why did the pianist keep banging his head against the piano? Why he was playing by are get afterwards. Today people, I would tell my kids that later. Y's please do, please spread the bad Jackson. Good people cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you're a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here at the show. You can send me a message Joey at good people cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people cool things and check out all the old episodes via good people cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

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