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Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 47 · 9 months ago

On the Right Path and The Best NBA Dunks with Brett Gunning, Stacy Padula, and Maddy Moore

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Author Stacy Padula teamed up with NBA Coach Brett Gunning on a children’s book series based on the principles of his nonprofit, On the Right Path. And because every kids’ book needs some great illustrations, they called in Maddy Moore to sink a few clutch shots with her designs. 

We’re chatting about the book writing process, the best quarantines, and some of Brett’s most memorable NBA moments, including a delightful story about Kevin McHale. 

Welcome Ha localy source weld, Don Te,good, wee cool thing, e e conversation with contevorai writers, musician,creative, I'm, your host Joey Helt, and we have a good people cool things.First, on here, three guests, all part of the on the right path: Book SeriesWe have NBA coach, break gunning, author, Stacy Pedula and illustratorMatdiemore, and all three of them are chanting about putting a bookseries together, which is a pretty impressive thing to do. Stacy and Brettand matty are all talking about the inspiration behind this book series.What it's like, collaborating in the midst of a pandemic and Brett sharessome of his favorite moments as an NBA coach and because I am a fellowbasketball geek we're also talking some of our favorite dunks ind NBA donecontest history, lots of good stuff here throughout. If you like to get intouch with good people, cool things you can reach out on facebook, twitter orinstagram at GPCT podcast, or send an email to joey at good people, CoolThingscom, always love her and from yeah, and you can also support the showvia the shop good people, cool thingscom shop, get yourself a niceHoodie, a nice hat, some nice, mugs or shirts. I literally drank out of my ifonly it were wine mug today. Sadly, it was not wine and said it was just sometea, but it could have been wine and that's the most important part isthinking positively, especially when we're all cooped up inside in themeantime, settle in for a fantastic episode with Brett, stacy and Madtie.I'd love to get the elevator pitch on the book series here, but first, whatkind of elevator are we riding in while you're? Why Ye're telling us about theBuk? Well, I've been fortunate over the LastTwenty Seyears in coaching to ride some all all different types of elevators and can't. I can't really say that too manystand out, but one that did was. I was fortunate to stay at a beautiful hotelout in San Diego at one point that Hotel de Coronado and they they you know it's an old oldfashioned, hotel and very historical, and they still kind of have theelevator shats from years and years ago, and I think at the time they even hadit was at the point where they would have a hotel worker. Wo LD wouldactually be like writing the elevator, with with the with the people with theguests, and I don't want to even say it's the termcranking the elevator but t a think. He was almost cranking it up to each floor.So that's the elevator were riding in right now, but the the youknow the elevator pitch. You know it's interesting. I was sitting on my couchone day months ago and I was reading a book to my son at the time who was three and itwas. It was a dinosaur book and he had asked me to read it to him, and so youknow I'm sitting there reading it to them and by the end I closed the bookand I said Wow. I said this was an amazing, simple book about a dim. YouKnow Itas a dinosaur book, but it here it is. You know. Ten pages later ittaught my son, a very simple basic principle, about being a good friend when you're at theplayground, and at that at that point you know, God had put in my spirit likeI want you to write a children series tying in just a simple life skills thatI've been able to witness up. You know first first hand through the game ofbasketball. So thus comes the idea of on the rightpath and it's tied into my nonprofit...

...organization, which is guiding youthbasketball players on the right path to reaching their maximum potentialthrough free teaching, education and mentorship. Sowe we dove into this project with stacy and Maddie, and we can't bemore excited to get our first book completed herevery soon. That's super cool and spot on with I'm always amazed. Every time Iread a children's book, I was like. I don't remember that many good lessonswhen I was reading books. So maybe I was just reading the wrong ones growingup, but I feel like they've, really really stepped up the game over thepast decade or so yeah you're right, I mean yeah back inthe day of rein, curious, George and books like that yeah there's way moreteaching going on nowadays and Stacy and Mattie you're also withus on this elevator, so Brett Givin a nic overview of the book. How about howabout you to? How did you end up getting in touch together to working onthis series? I guess, ironically, could link it to San Digo as well so earlier,and let's see, I think it was my gosh. Itwas the spring of two thousand and nineteen. I Hade gone up to Californiaand I ended up meeting up with a producer outthere, who is a friend of Mine, David Gunning, and he actually happens to beBrett's, nephew and Duvid want tos talk about turning one of them, one of mybooks that I already written into a movie so Davi and I started workingtogether and we're currently working on turning my entire book series into a TVshow, but because I was in contact with David when Brett had the idea for thisbook series David Put me and Brett and touch that we could dive into thistogether. So when I was out in California actuallySTU in San Diego, so it's kind of funny that Brik picked that elevator of allof them, but it's pretty cool. So yes, so David connected us and then Breton,I dovinto it, and I you know, as the publisher and the author, I needed to find a really talentedillustrator. So that was when I set out to do interviews- and just you know, put it out there on abunch of different sites and I'm so blessed to get Matie manes application,because I just loved her put folio and everything before I even met with her,and then she was just the one. You know therewas a couple other illustrators, I remember showing you know their work toBrent and stuff, but me and Brett Werwere, both just entralled withMaddie's work, and we just couldn't be happier with the way things are going.That was very flattering. It must be nice to hear Madtie. U Yeah Stacy nightconnected just after I graduated university andwith this crazy crazy year we've been having I graduated with a degree in afield in which I couldn't pursue. Given the pandemic, I studied archaeology forfour years at pen and I've done excavations untraveled a lot and that'sjust something that wasn't viable for the fall and even going into the nextyear. So I kind of had to stop and look at myself in the mirror and say youknow what skills do I have? What do I love to do and what can I do from thesafety of my own home and it's funny, because I always told myself drawing is something of a hobby of mineand I never wanted to turn it into work, and I always kind of wanted to keep itas this thing that was my escape from you know, schoolwork or you know whatever, but then I'm sittinghere with this my tablet in my hand and just knowing how much I love doing this,and I thought to my you know why not give it a shot. Why not make this myjob, so I also went out to a bunch ofapplication sites and I've sorted through piles and piles of applications.I interviewed for a huge amount of job...

I was not remotely qualified for and then I stumbled on Stacy'sadvertisement about this project and immediately it wrung about with me,because I come from a family of international coaches and the breats mission just really spoke tome growing up around coaches and then stacy and I connected, and we reallyhit it off and yeah the rest of his history and we've just really kind ofmelted. Well, together, it's always nice when you have that moment whereyou're like yes, this is this is the one. This is it and that's awesome thaty'all found each other like that, we'll get back to the design element becauseI think that's a very crucial part of really any book, but especially forChildren's book but Brett. I have to ask because there's twelve books in theseries- and I saw that there's you've gottwelve basketball, skill pillars and twelve lifeskill pillars. Are we seeingone of each in each of these books or are all twelve in every one of thebucks here? Yeah so it'll be one light skill in each in each book and Ye we won't, we won't, we won'tdive into we won't. We won't dive into thebasketball skills per se with this that this will be more the lifeskill component and we even tiein a Bible, a Bible verse as well. So thisis solely you know. The nonprofit tries to tie in like twelve, like itskills with twelve basketball skills, and I've always been passionate about that. As far as youknow, a lot of times players may hear you know of you know being unselfish right andeverybody kind of knows what the word unselfish means, but do they know whatthat means within the game of basketball, so that that's kind of tiedin more with the with the non profit. This book series will solely betouching on the life skills and it'll, be one one life skill with each book. That's where I feellike trying to cram twelve into a single book might be a little ambitious,so I think how you've laid it out make sense. Do each of you have a favoritelifeskile out of the twelve h man, there's there's a lot of good ones. Youknow, I think, probably one that stands out to me is you know, is the word whether it's coachable or teachableright and let's go with teachable for now. You know when you're, when you're, when you'reat a younger age. I think I don't think people realize a lot of times that the one kind of person that we chooseto listen to the least is, is the one that's actually trying to help us themost, and what I'm saying is is a lot of times whether it's a teacher atschool or one of your coaches. You know it there's been a little bit ofdevelopment in society where it's like. If a coach gets on you or if a teacher,you know correct you it's you know. Well, that's what that's what they do.That's you know, that's what that's? What coaches do they yell at us? Youknow it's like, but as you get older, you realize that people that that teach or people that coach it'sfor the most part, that their passion is purely and simply trying to helpother people. You know, and so I think, if we can at it at a young age, get kids to you know just to realize itand the reality is your kids only know what they see or what they're taughtright. Whe You come into the world with no knowledge of anything. So you, theonly thing you know, is what you see or what you're taught. So we can teach ata very young age that your teachers or your coaches,...

...their sole purpose, is to help you andbring the best out in you and create great habits, and things likethat. I think if, if we, if Thi, if this book series can do just that andjust allow kids to understand that being coachable or being teachable is,is an amazing lifeskill to have and it's something that Ould could benefityou in so many amazing ways. I think you know. I would pick that one as faras standing out the most I wan about being humble, you know humility, Ithink that's really really crucial, because that's one thing, I think it's true across manydisciplines that if you go in with humble attitude, you're going tosucceed more you're going to absorb the lessons of others better andactually be that coachable person you're going to also want others torise with you. So you're going to be a good friend and you're going to be. You know grateful and thankful, and you know Ireally think pride can hurt somebody a lot, whether it's inathletics or just in any fields or any even just life situation. So for me Ithink that's the one that really stams out as a court principle that couldchange people's lives yeah. I also think resiliency is one of the pillarsthat especially this year, I think, can kindof speak to everyone and really kind of resonated with me that we all have hadto be so adaptable and so flexible, and so you know willing to change for thebetter and, I think of any age group. As Stacy said, whether it's sports orjust you know, general life, I think we could all do with building our ownresiliency and being flexible facing challenges like we've all facedthis year. Spun on with that, this is certainlybeen a year of RESILIENCA for a lot of people, and I think that ties in nicelywith- I would imagine, in a quote unquote typical year, that your process of working together wouldprobably look a little different than it has this here. So can you kind oftake us through what has it been like to work with other people and putting abook together during a pandemic stacy? We can set with you for this one yeah.I mean it's amazing what you can do with a laptop in the Internet, becauseI n that's what so much of this has been dont. It's amazing. I mean thankGod for the technology. We have yeah, it's been interesting, you know doingeverything remotely, but I think it's worked really well. It would be awesomeif we could meet up in brainstorm in person and everything, but I don't. Ireally don't think it's been too difficult. You know to do it thisway. I mean it's awesome because when we'rein three very different parts of the country and we're still just able tomeet and work together, so I think with writing was publishing andeven my other industrywitis education, Private Education for tutoring andcollege counseling. I've been able to kind of continue with that withoutreally skipping a beat so feel very blessed, because it's not the case formost other professions. Yeah, definitely do you have a Gototool that you found most helpful or is it just kind of emails hoppen on Zoom?That kind of thing I mean facetime has been a blessing for sure. That's what Iuse probably more than anything, even my gosh, even just to see familymembers at this point Sou for yeah, so I mean facetime in Google, docks whereI mean I know even for for our book, Maddie sed a Google dock for us withall the illustrations, all the text and everything and it's just we can all beon there. At the same time, we can leave notes for each other. I mean it'sjust been a great tool and that's...

...exactly whate. I use with my studentsas well, so we're fortunate to have that do yourfacetime sessions also devolve at some point into playingaround with all the Emoji ther, because I feel like all of myfacetimes Du at some point. You know that did happen. Actually tone of my students where it was like. I hadn't done the updates. Why I didn't eknow that you could, at and all of a sudden his face turned into like thisgiant cow with like Hart Eyes, and I like, what's going on, like you're,suddenly account an he's like. Oh, I just dod the update and yeah that wasthat was entertaining but te, no, that's no sout the norm and Manni from the illustration side ofthings. What is your process like you have like? Are you given someinstruction around what I'm, what to go for, or is it just kind of you have thetext and take it from there? Yeah every project is different and Ikind of have to Wat. There's always that kind of really awkward process offiguring. Everyone's working style out for the first few pages and we reallykind of have to read the room and see what works and what doesn't for thisparticular project. Google docks has worked really well so, for example, aprocess would be. I would submit to Breton Stacy, maybethree very, very rough sketches on the Google dock and they can go in at theirleisure make notes at you know. I really like this. I really like this.Let's add this and then just really and then up and then I would upload a newersketch and then colored sketch and then through every process. I would havetheir feedback in real time yeah, which has been as stacy said. Myprocess has been completely seamless. This is how I normally work, which iswhy I pursue this career getin the pandemic, but yeah we've all worked well with theGoogle dock. We've all been really communicative, and really it's been a cent really nice. Nice.That's always always good to hear, rather than a pulling teoth story whichit doesn't sound like you have. You all have a problem with that. So that'sawesome and another element that I think isinteresting is the marketing side of things because again prepandemic there are events youcould go to conferences to attend where that's a very natural bring the bookwith you talk about it, interact with people, get them excited about it, butthat's not really a thing. We're doing. You know virtual conferences, all overthe place, a lot of things just getting canceled or postponed. So have youfound any kind of unorthodox marketing tools as you're promoting the seriesmean, I have actually two different PR teams nowworking for the publishing company kind of like keeping me in the loop onwhat's been working. What's not one of one of them Omonica shementioned doing some. You know virtual conferences and stuff that we couldplug into Kenot. You know speaking things likethat. There's been, you know some magazinearticles newspape are of those things like that, but it is. I mean that faceto face contact like the idea of setting up a book signing or a bookreading. You know at the local barns and noble imean right now. None of thatstuff's happening so is it is different, but thankfully I dohave you know two different teams of people kind of working on that tofigure out how we can take advantage of the situation and what works but notwaste time on what isn't working. So that is a bit of a challenge right now. I wonder this just triggered something,but when I first moved to Austin and again this might not work super well incold cities. Right now, but tha I met someone who was a cab driverwho just had all these great stories...

...with people, and he had learned from afriend of a thing called barstoal poetry where essentially there'd be astack of Napkins and you'd, come over and write a title and then put them ina bowl, and someone else would take the title and write a poem underneath andthen he'd read some of his favorites throughout the night, and I I always thought that was veryentertaining and I feel like you could kind of work. An outdoor book readingsort of thing like that you know, get some hute lamps, but spread people outnicely just get a nice PA system to do the Readi like you can make that makethat work. If there's not crazy amounts of snow everyway, yes yea, maybe Texas would be the place forthat. Maybe we'll come down to see you Brett Y head over to San Diego ride, theelevator I its perfect yeah. I know it is I mean it is interesting, just the adjustments you know becauseof the Pandemig, an always not you know just not knowing if there's going to beanother major walk down and what's coming certainly a year of uncertainty, but Imean thankfully working from home. I think is given mea little bit more time in my day, because I'm not commuting anywhere andthat he time I've been able to invest in a lot of creative projects andincluding this one and really just the publishing company and building that upinto something that I honestly never imagined. It would become that it'sbecoming and I honestly think that the pandemic has given creative peoplemore time to work on their project. So there's probably I'm getting more booksubmissions from other authors them I would have expected- and I thinkthere's get a lot of people writing books this past year. So it's interesting. I do think everyone.I know who is a creative person, whether it's you know with makinghomemade masks at home or you know jarring and writing songs whatever it is everyone'ssort of been able to do that a little bit more this year because of cobidabsolutely. I know I finally finished my book short stories, so I am one ofthose many people that have been like you know what I'm takingthe sexratime and I'm doing some stuff with it and, of course that opens up aninteresting question and Mattie. Let's start with you for this one, but haveyou picked up any quarantine hobbies o see this isn't a great quarantine hobbybut hone of my absolute favorite things in the world to do other than drawingis to travel. So I'm sitting here on my computer whenI'm not doing commissions for clients, you know planning the next big getawayand these crazy extravagant trips that I'm never going to be able before to goon, but dreams are free. So I spend hours running itineraries on mycomputer. What's the most extravagant you've planned, I think the Maldeinesthatthat's one of the only places that's open right now and obviously Iwould not fly to the Maldis at the moment, but that's one of those placeswhere you've got ta fly into a major airport and take a charter plane, it'sa whole process, but maybe one day it does look gorgeous. I that's quiteunstandable study and it's like an all beach itinerary.So right, it's very outnolos Brett. How about you have you picked upany hobbies during the quarantine? Oh Man, I would just say I'm pretty muchbeen on on the my life's, been on the run, the last twenty six years and thee the quarantine life of being at home. I learned just how women are Wat wired, much differently than menand are way tougher than men, because meaning mothers and mothers inparticular, meaning when we get to just you, know, wake up in the morning a-and you know we get to say, hey we're...

...going to work today or hey I'm going ona five five day trip to La and Phoenix and I'll be home in fiveday, and you know that now mothers get stuck at home and it'stwenty for seven. So my quarantine has been a revelation ofreality for just the amazing hard work that you know my wife and obviously mothersin general. You know just new when, when a lot of times we get to runaround the country and chase our passions, and things like that, so mydays are up with the kitties cooking breakfast to school lines. To pick uplines to, I don't know, then all of a sudden theday's over. So I can't really say I picked up a hobbyother than probably learned a little bit about the more the real world that wives and mothers live in every day. Always good things to know for sure stacy how about you are just just doingall o the creative things yeah. I don't Yeah Ie had a lot of lotof creative projects. I guess one of the things that I've been doing now is I decidedto open up another company, so I recently just in the pastmonth, openedup an online shop. Actually, a manny has a hand in this too, and it's to help raise money for animalrescues. So I have two long haired Dochs, ands Brileyan baxtor and that'sactually who the publishing company is named after as Brylean baxtorpublications, but I just opened up the Briley and faxter shop, which fiftypercent of the proceeds from every item go to a different animal rescue everymonth and Baxter was a rescue, so he's kind of of the inspiration behind that.But what I did was I built up the dogs following over the last few years oninstagrams that they have. You know over five thusand pollowrs, and youknow I've made amazing friends all around the world who are dog loversthrough instagram and from there I've met a lot of people. H areinvolved with rescues, so we've been able to team up with a couple differentones: the tiny to on whals foundation. For this month they help dogs thatsuffer from Ivdd, which a lot of dachsins do because of their longspines. They help them. You know financially, whether it's they need aDogyo wheelchair or they need surgery. So that's who were donating theproseads to this month next month. I think it's going to be a rescue. That'sout of New York still working out the details for that, but the shop basically was Maddie's artwork as the huge partof it. So she drew a bunch of different illustrations of Brilin Baxter dressedup for graduation for Christmas. For Easter I mean every holiday you canthink of, and then I put those images on items that ranged from tw shirts andsweatshirts to masks to mugs, to journals to phone cases, to basicallyeverything that dog lovers can buy for a good cause. So that's kind of been my project. My New Hobby lately is justbuilding up the store. Now I think, there's over like a hundred and eightydifferent items available, they're reasonably priced and it's on Etsy. It's called two cutdelydochins, which is what their instagram name also is, and it's the brily ofBaxter shop. So yeah, that's probably my latest Hobiday next month, it'll,probably be something different, but this month, as a fellow I have two dogs as onethere, each half Dochen or at least partial. I don't know what the twentythree and me Yeah Equivlin is but yeah Chihuaha, docks and mix and a JackRussell terrier in Dochson Mix, which...

...apparently is called a Jockson Righ,which I did not know and feel ridiculous. Every time I say it, so Ijust try to go with the full bread names, but yes, theyare, wonderful dogs,and that sounds like such a fantastic cose, and I am going to look at theshop right after this, because I want to see all this illustration. YeahMadyou did a great job. I mean I have friends now all over the world likeordering stuff, like they're posting pictures of things from like Finland,the Netherlands, British Colombia, I mean those illustrations, you did, Imean they're all over the place now ont Sirt wit, your Gat Super Super Cool. Ilove doing up anting fantastic, fantastic now. Onething I always like to ask on this: PODCAST is a question you wish. Youwere asked more frequently and stacy. You provided the prompt for this one n, that your faith is a big link between youand Brent. So how is faith central to both your life and your work? My faithes central to, I would say every part of my life, but it really became Li cu, say anavigating factor when I was this suniorver senior incollege and I sort of rededicated myself to my faith after kind ofwalking away from it for a few years and realizing that there was so muchmissing when I wasn't walking and stup with my creator. So once I turned backto my Christian roots and really started just walking forward,God really started to showing me a lot more about myself and the gifts that hehad given me and that he had a very specific path for my life, which I didnot need to know in advance. But what I need to do is just trust him with itand trust him to open all the right doors and shut all the wrong doors, asI continued to give him give my will over to him so aftercollege I actually was working in architecture industry. That's what Ihave gone to school for was architectural engineering and intergesline, and I just felt like something with missing. It was weird because I had always loveddesign projects. I mean I really I literally had started drawing houseslike in two or four plans of houses from I don't know when I was like tenyears old onward and it certainly was a fun hobby. For me, it was just when Igot into the field. There was a lack of personal connection. I felt just kindof empty just sitting behind the computer working on o these big officeplans from microsofts. You know new long, island, office and stuff, likethat. I think I wanted to be anteracting with people a lot more thanI was so I started praying if i God to just show me I was like. I know youcreated me to do something. I just know this. Isn't it and you need to show meI'll, do anything I'll go on the mission field I'll go back to schoollike whatever it is? You know please show me, and at that time my Stepdadwas really sick with painferout of cancer, and he had only been giventhree to six months to live, but he had already. You know lived past a year andwewere dealing with all that at home, so I opted to take medical leave ofabsence to help my mom take care of my Stepdad, and in that time you knowreally seek out God and pray about what he had for me and what his plan was formy career and that is ultimately through a long series of evemsits. Whatled me to the field of education and, what's so amazing about that, isworking as a tutor and a college counselor I work every day with teensand that what my books are about. My other two book series gripped andMongomer Lake Hi there for teenagers and they basically educate kis aboutthe perils of prescription, Drung,...

...afuse and other issue social issues like bullying andpeer pressure. It's done in a fiction way and hopefully an entertaining me,but it really just want kids to know that that is not what leas to fulfil it.So the fact that I get to work every day with teams and even take a bunch ofthem on as interns for my book series. It's just amazing how God work that,together with me being able to work daily with my intended audience for thebooks that I actually started. Writing when I was a teenager, so you know I would say that I've comefrom. You know the architecture, industry and then gone onto educationand literature, but it has been all because of my faith and the direction that God hasso clearly given me through divine appointments and just things that youwould call chance happenings, but they're so coincidential, you know theycan't possibly be a coincidence and it's really just been an amazing avenueand I'm so fulfilled. I mean I still remember what it felt like to go towork in Boston, everyday, the architect firm and how empty and felt and thennow it's like. I wake up every day and I can't believe I get need to do what Ido, because I just love it so much and I just feel like I'm doing exactly whatI was created to do and that security of knowing that and the fulfilment thatcomes with that is just unmatched. So yeah that's a long wingin answer, but Itrye to sum it up this. It's it's really my whole life. Honestly, that'sa powerful feeling for sure brant. Do you have anything to add man thatthat'd be hard? That's Gona be hard at time. Folbutyou know, Ati can umuain ajust in the way that stacy and I cross paths it had God's fingerprintsall over it. My nephew David had had given to me a couple of stacy'sbooks. This was years ago a couple years ago, and I am part of a great church here inHouston, Lakewood Church, which is Joeostin's church and they obviouslyhave a great youth and young adult group as well, and my Bo friend of mineis the leader of the youth and young adults at Lakewood. His name is NickNelson. So my nephew gives me these books from from a friend of his who happensto be stacy. I wind up taking the books to my friend at Lakewood and you know just said: Hey. You know keep these in mind if you guys erelooking for some books for the for the youth and young adults and so fastforward a couple years later, which happened to be a couple months ago,when I had that, in my spirit about doing this series, I had remembered that David knewsomebody that wrote Christian based Youth Youth Book. So the moment it was in my spirit to dothis. I was like man, I got a call. I got a call David and get see if it would be okay if he couldconnect us well, David wound up calling me the day before and I was at a dinner and I said, Hey Dave, can Icall you, can I call you back so here it is: God had already had the alreadyorchestraed before I was even going to reach out to stacy. It was already.This thing was already all orchestrated. So when you, when you get to that pointof understanding, you know, there's the gibl verse about how God knows the endfrom the beginning and he wired us from the womb. You know I've been passionateabout basketball. My whole life- and I think, when you can, you can get tothat place of peace to say: okay, he's wired, he has wired each one of us withthese unique passions right,...

...whether for Maddie, it's what herpassion is or for Stacy with her pet they're, all different right. We don'thave WEA, we all don't have the same unique passion, but when you're able torecognize like okay, what is this unique passion that he put inside of meand when I come to peace with what that is?What can I now do to use that passion to be of service to other people or tohelp other people, and in turn, can I lead? Can I wind up leaving others to God through the passion that he putinside of me, and then I think that's what we're trying to do here with thisseries Nd. It's been amazing, working with both stacy and Maddie, but I thinkthat the whole purpose here is, you know: can we impact lives? You know forthe Kingdom, and can we lead others to God through this book series? And Ithink that's you know. That's. What's most importantfor me with this project, I'll only add that I think the storyline for on theright path is just it's simple. It's beautiful! It's poignant in a way thatwill speak to families of every faith. Bret's mission, to write the story andStacy's words which bring it to life, are deeply rooted in their love oftheir faith and a love of God, and I think that's a wonderful thing and, asI always do on the show ending with the top three, because everyone loves agood list and Brett you've got more than a quarter century of coachingexperience. So can you distil this down to your top three coaching moments?That's! That's! That's tough! I will say this. My dream is always to get tothe NBA. As a coach I get to the NBA twelveyears ago and my first year with the Houston Rockets we get to this western conferencesemifinals and we're playing against the Kobe Bryant lead, Los AngelesLakers. We took them to a game. Seven. We wound up losing eventually in thegame: Seven and the Lakers wound UPP, going on and beating the Celtics to winthe championship. So I think that stands out in numberone. Just as far as the kid you know growing up outside of PhillyPhiladelphia, and you know rooting for the sixters as a kid and having the opportunity to get to theNBA and to fill my dream, and here it is you're playing the Laker so thatthat stends out of number one number, two again growing up in thePhiladelphia area that the the heated rivalry was with stacy's, now Boston, Celtics and on oneof the great players on that team was a guy, my name of Kevin mckalll. So itwas Larry Bird Kevmcal and Robert Parish. They were the the original bigthree at the time, and so here it is, I'm a kid again growingup in Philly, I'm watching the sixers play against the Celtics andKevin mckall was this dominant player and if somebody would have said youknow twenty five years from now you're going to be coaching you're going to beon a coaching staff. With that guy I mean you can't even make that STUFP up.So I think the second moment would just be all the great coaches that I've workedwith, but in partticular a guy that I grew up watching as a hated Boston,self te Guy n. Now I'm on his staff, Coaching Coaching Him coaching with him and I think the third one you know acouple of years ago. I was fortunate to be a part of a a great Houston rocket team. We wonsixty five games, which wis the most e in the franchises history and we hadthe opportunity of coaching in the All Star game. I was an assistant. The headcoach was Mike Dan, Tony and again for just a a regular, simple kid fromoutside of Philadelphia to be...

...to be coaching in the All Star game andto be around just the great, the grates of the game that that was an incrediblemoment that I'll never forget. That is super cool. I have too quickfollowin questions. Nember one, have you told Kevin mckail that you dislikedhim growing up? Oh for sure, first of all, kemicels he's one of the greatestguys in the world. I mean just an amazing amazing guy, but the funnything is and stacy and Madyo'll think this isdisgusting, but he kept mckill was a. It was a. How do you say had a lot of hair on his body. Let'sput it that way and- and he was a guy that sweated a lot so my memory of himas a kid, but he would always whenever there was a stoppage of play, he wouldkind of yell to the Ballboy like hey tol me toll, so the guy would throw himha towel and he whipe his arm pits and he wipe all over. And then you liketire it back to the kid, and you would do this throughout the course of thegame and and back in the s. They would always wear that they were wearing theshort shorts. So it was like shortshore Terry Harry Body sweating all over andI'm like this guy's this guy's. What e you know he's out of his mind and thenagain here it is I'm sitting there coaching with them and he's an amazingguy, just a great great person, so yeah, I definitely told him and he didn'teven have to. He didn't even have to ask, because if you, if you grew up, ifyou're a Celtic you know lit, mean think about this, the sixers and theCeltic they theyre infamous Foro. There was a fight between Dr J, who was thegreat player from the sixers and Larry Bird. So there was a fight during agame: okay, where they fought each other. Well people most people fail torealize this. They fight took place in a preseason game. That's how muchthat's how much those teams hated each other. You know they were just so Idon't think Hev mckall was at all surprise that that I hated watching himgrowing up. I've seen footage of that fight before,but I didn't think I knew it was in a pretree season, game prebudy, but youknow mckill made he interesting point when you, when you play in the sameconference, you know you play it multiple times during the year, thenthey played in the playoffs year after year. You know so and then so by thetime you know that it got around the preseason. You know. You've now playedthis team. You know just like for with us. With the rockets we've playedgolden state what three four the last five years into seven game serieses,then you put you on that's on top of you playing on four times during theyou know. After five years, you've played the team thirty times so thatthat's, where the hatred just getsbuilt up. So fantastic yeah. It's t the more you seesomehone, it's kind of like it definitely festers a little bit thereand then my second question and Manin says you can feel free to hopen. If youhave a favorite as well, but you mentioned the Allstar game, always lovethe Dun contest. Do it during it? Do you have a favorite dunk from an MBADUN contest? You know whatit's very interesting tosay that so when I was in college, I graduated from I graduate from UNLV and the our bestplayer at that time was the guy by t e name of Jr rider, who also went by the name izaa rider,but when he was a when it was his last year at UNLV, he used to come intopractices every day and he would do this. He was from Oakland and he woulddo a donk. It was called the Eastbay funk dunk, something like that and it'syou go up. You jump op in the air and you put it through one leg: You bringit around, you dunk it and he was like a guys. Just so youall know, I'm GoinnaI'm going to win the Dune contest on this dunk next year and sure enough.The next year he won the dumb contest on this dunk. It was his final finaldunk and it was the Etbay funk dunk and we were w. We were like wow, this guyused to just he'd walk into practice or...

...he' walking after class hed have jeaneson, and he just I mean he was just a unbelievable athlete and and player aswell. But you know he would do it like. It was nothing and then here it is fastforward. A year later, you Wen the Dune contest on it. So that's probably theone that stands out the most an's, certainly the best name for adunk. I think Oh yeah, he's pay funk Stacher matdy. Do you have a top dunkfrom your memories to yeah? I wouldi would think not. I wasgoing to say how many, how many Dune contests have you watched an can't say.I have a favorite, no comment. I started a basketball and pop culturenewsletter. This quarantine as well, and I did an article on some of themost underrated dunks and just one that I think is so goofy wasdweint, Howard sticker dunk. I think a lot of people remember the SupermanDunk, but he did adunk the year before, where he it was kind of a normal dunk, but hereached up and put a sticker of his face at the top of the backboard andthen like got out of Taht measure to sow that it was like twelve and a halffeet off the ground, and it's just like this is so ridiculous, but so creative.So I had to had to apply it, I'm all for the silly factor in Duncontest. Well, we can get off the basketball,talk and Y'WL AR officially off the hook for this podcast interview. Thankyou so much for taking the time to chat and walk us through the whole back storbehind this book, how you all have been working together and looking forward toall of the releases down the line. If people want to order a copy or learnmore about the book about all of Y'all, where can they go well once the book is available forself there'll be a lot of announcements on the publishing website, which isjust www, riley, baxter, bookscom and I'm sure bright on your website for onthe right path. You'll probably have a link to it to right, yeah, that's andthat's on the right path that net perfect, perfect Mattie. Do you want togive a plug for your porfolio? If people are in need of an illustratorhorse, you can find me at Maddie, more Maddymoore, one word dot art all of mysocials are on there and my portfolio is there for anyone to view. You cansend me a message right from there fantastic, so we've got a com dotnetAnna Don art. I like it is the most pofulrd. Yes, no, I love it a love! Itwell fantastic. Thank you again for Hoppang on this was so much fun and a good people cool things first herewith three guess on one show, I think we nailed it well done all rhunk yetank. You thank you Sol, my absolutely and, of course, we'll end with a cornyjok. That's we always do. How do you organize a party in space?How you plan it a tea people, definitely repeating that one.

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