Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 37 · 2 years ago

37: Improving Physical Therapy and Athlete Training with Excy Founder Michele Mehl

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Excy founder Michele Mehl talks about the inspiration behind her product, how it's helped people recover during physical therapy, and shows off her gold medal.

Welcome the good people cool things, the podcast featuring conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. I'm your host, Joey held in. Today's guest is Michelle Mel the founder of the EXE total body exercise bike for home fitness and physical therapy. And this is a bike. I mean, I've never really seen anything like this and I am sure it's going to be a little mind blowing for you too, but it's a portable recumbent exercise bike that can help both for your fitness goals and any kind of physical therapy or getting back into shape. I have broken my foot my wrist before and I would have loved to have this while I was recovering from both of those injuries. And Michelle is just such a cool person with a lot of great business experience and experience working with athletes of all different kinds. She has a gold medal, as she's going to share, that she got from a client of hers, which is so cool, and she'll talk about her business goals, how she broke her leg while listening to thriller. It's a little more complicated than that, but I think that's a fun way to choose it and we've just got all the different kinds of good fitness tips and I know I personally felt super motivated to work out as soon as I listen to this episode, so I hope you do as well. If you'd like to get in touch with the show, you can and reach out joey at good people, cool thingscom or on facebook or on twitter or on the brand new instagram at GPCT podcast. On all of those you can also do you self a little shopping at the store. We're a nice t shirt while you're doing your workout, or have a Mug for water, or I guess you could put something else in there while you're working out, but waters probably the way to go, and you can visit that at good people, cool thingscom slash shop. And while you're doing that, let's hop on into our conversation with Michelle. Give me your elevator pitch, but also tell me the elevator that we're on while you're giving me this pitch. We're in a hospital elevator on the way to the ICEU to visit a friend who has an injury right and some limited mobility constraints, and we're going to talk about what it's going to take to get them back to their way of life. We do multiple things with exe, but we're coming out, we're up on there the we have a portable exercise bike, right, and that exercise bike works like large pieces of exercise equipment found in physical therapy clinics and gym's opper body or coometer exercise bikes would come an exercise bike, an upright bike, but it's all in one tiny little device. Okay, that fits anywhere, fits an overhead on an airplane. So as you're in the ICEU and you want to leave there with your health better intact, let's start you cycling in the hospital bed, okay, so that we can help with prevent preventing blood clots. Really focus on getting you moving. And I know that this person in the hospital is an athlete and wants to return to their sports some day, but it takes time, it's a process, and so we have created this device that works along the entire life cycle of somebody's fitness journey, whether they have a limited mobility that is due to an injury, a disability. It could be temporary, it can be permanent, but we view exercises medicine and so let's get you puddling in the bed and then we'll get you peddling at home and then we'll increase the intensity and work on getting back on the ski slopes, because we cover the whole range of that fitness experience. I know what caught my eye with with ECTC was that it's not really like a standard you know, like Pelletan, obviously getting a lot of buzz during the pandemic time and and being kind of more that recumbent style and like it seems a lot more portable, which is great. Was that always something that you had you would wanted, or did you...

...just kind of see that that was an area that's really not as well covered? So it I've always wanted it to be portable from the very beginning. I had very specific like I wanted it to be under fifteen pounds. That was really important to me. I wanted it to be small and initially I actually wanted it to fit in a backpack. And the whole idea of egee initially started right around the time I had turned forty. I was running around like a crazy person. I ran my business before and I was taking my son somewhere and then we finally kind of decompressed and I took him to Skate Park and we're sitting at here. I'm watching him at the Skate Park and I'm sitting down and I'm like look, and I sat all day at my desk and I looked on at my watch and I had twenty two hundred steps for the day and I was like, I had recently had pain in my chest, I had put on some weight from stress, and I was like, what happens if I just kind of turn this bench into an exercise bike, like right here on the sideline of my kids sport I could actually just peddle and and that's where the initial idea came and instead of cycling at that time, I started stepping on up on the bench and I felt a little bit ridiculous and embarrassed my kid, but whatever, I'm pretty good at and then I kind of sat on the idea for a long for a while, and then all the way through that first year of being forty, I gained more weight. I just had a stress, a lot of stress, and my business partner wasn't working with me anymore. She would went to go be mom and I put on more weight and again, I you know, I have a genetic disposition towards heart disease and and then I broke my leg during all of that and I started using a prototype that we had created. I couldn't peddle my legs, but I could peddle my arms. But so next thing you know, I'm like, Oh my God, this thing is amazing, like I can get my heart right, really high, right with just my upper body. And so it transitioned from being, you know, just like a recumbent exercise bike to being full body. But I wanted it to be portable because I wanted to be able to move to any room. I wanted it to be able to move to the sideline of my kids sports to, you know, anywhere that I need it while I travel. I take it with me when I travel all the time, you know. So that portability was always super important to me. Okay, a couple follow up questions from that one. How did you break your leg to did you have a prototype along the way that was like ridiculous or like almost funny, and like how the final products had like no elements of it, because I always feel like there's a good like like one good prototype where it's just like you look at all of them and you're like that's kind of yeah, I would like to have it. Hold on to do these out. Hold on. So show too. I actually keep this in the office. I keep every version in the office because we've been through multiple versions. So I had to your first question. I broke my leg roller skating at the skating ring and I'll never forget it because thriller was playing and and I wasn't trying to like shoot the duck, I was just skating and rollerblades not a good idea, and I fell and I twisted my leg and I broke it really bad, like really bad rod screws plates. I was in a boot for almost six months. It was horrible. I didn't heal it was it was pretty rough. But so the prototype, we were pretty far along. Let me see if you could see this. Oh Nice, yeah, I mean it is. It works to this day. I keep it in here for just kind of a reminder for how far we've come. But the original idea of the device in terms of friction based resistance, what we've patented is it's an it's allows the device to not scoot away from you. Now I should have the pretty one in here, but I don't, but it allows the device to not scoot away from you. I'm gonna drop that sea and it's very durable. I just dropped it on the floor and it allows the device to not scoot away from you while you're peddling. So there's all kinds of portable exercise equipment...

...on the market, but they all max out a very low resistance because it's scoots away from the rider. And as soon as we figure in my copart, my my cofounder, you know, who's a hardcore cyclist, aerospace engineer, amazing what he came up with in that first prototype, we actually ended up that was our patent. It was like the first thing that he sent to me is what we ended up pattenting. Is Cord everything that we do. So we had a really good patent out of the gate, I mean a really good prototype out of the gate. That's awesome. I liked that visual demonstrating we don't always get that. It's pretty Nice, Pretty Nice. Well, that's what's one fun thing about having a physical product, right, you get to like touch it and feel it. I mean we have a mobile coaching application as well and I just kind of like, look a look at it. It's so pretty, but you know, the hardware is kind of where the heart of the company is absolutely and I think that leads to a good sort of shift, I guess, in the entire home workout industry which covid has brought on, because I know I've been working out more at home because I still don't really trust going to a gym right now. Yeah, and what other ways have you seen that? Hey, we're in pandemic times now and all of a sudden home workouts. People are in need of them. Like have you seen and heard a lot of I don't know if horror stories is the right word, but just people needing that to keep up that physical activity I do, and so our core are like I have had Olympians, NFL like athletes, Mos, like people who do mogul skiing, you know, Paralympic athletes, really amazing athletes on our device and had them completely winded. I am not, you know, in super shape, but I'm in decent shape and I only use exee, you know, so I you can really get a vigorous work out with it. But in the pandemics specifically, it has been a little bit of that, like, Hey, I can't get to the gym. You know, I need some I need greater access to home and it's definitely been more centered around people who are greatly impact acted by covid right. They have an underlying health condition there. It's not just about being scared, it's actually not safe for them to go, you know, and it's very state to state, obviously, and world wide. We're worldwide. But so when a lot of like we've seen a dramatic uptick in our sales and a lot of it has been hey, like, I broke my leg, what am I going to do? And they you do it the same with that I did and just hammer their arms. But we also have things where, like I have, we have a version for people who are bedridden, for example, where they can peddle in bed. And there are a lot of people who have had, you know, traumatic brain injury. They we had this one customer he was dropped in the hospital and ended up with a TBI and his you know, the pressure that he usually would have somebody come into the home and take care of him, or physical therapy service would come pick him up and then take him, you know, to a physical therapist or or we've seen where they service would come and take them to the gym and they can't do that anymore. So there's also just this there's a huge population where their homebound and they're kind of scared and they do. You know, a lot of people want. The one thing I will hide hope people walk away with after this coat for a covid is just how many people have heart disease right? How many people have type to diabetes? How many people have vascular conditions, respiratal right conditions? Then we just kind of don't talk about right, and so I feel lucky in so many ways that we kind of gravitated towards this niche. We can help anybody exercise, but for me would like, and Mike, what lights us up is that we can help people who don't really have access to exercise, like eliminate those barriers for them in wheelchair, right, you know. But a...

...lot of it does come count. Do you know? If you got like my husband is a type one diabetic, I don't want him at a gym right now, you know. So it comes down to that for us in terms of where our passion is, and it tends to be around age related injuries, disabilities and health conditions, which I have my own. I'm forty seven years old. I have you know, I have a genetic disposition towards heart disease. I have freaking Vertigo Right now, which is driving me crazy. It's insane. But you know, my leg is crooked and permanently crooked from work, from my injury. I have a history of blood clots from that injurid that I have to be careful on. So we're super careful, you know, and I so that's kind of, you know what, centering on those people who have health conditions, who are worried right, and they already do exercise right, they do, and they are the most inspiring people ever. They just need better access to it, and that's where we're focused on. One of the things that I noticed too, and some products will have this, of guided videos. Yeah, but something that you also offer is visual illustrations, which I feel like it's not as common. I'll get those sometimes if I'm going, like I was at the doctor a month or so ago and basically told them how like sometimes, yeah, I'll get kind of like vertigo, sort of dizziness feelings, and they gave me some illustrations to and some exercises to try at home and I thought that was tremendously helpful having those illustrations because I'd read the instructions I'm like, I don't really know what they're saying right here, and then I'd look on the page and there's pictures that like go through and I think, yeah, I think that's a a element that is both a good complimentary piece to the videos but also can stand alone on their own. There's sometimes I'm watching a video and I'm like I don't know how that person did that and for whatever reason, like a series of illustrations is like clearer to me for certain things. So was that again, was that always something that you wanted as like a visual component to the workouts, or was that something you kind of added based off feedback that you had gotten? So I always wanted a mobile coaching platform to go with it. So we launched the company on kickstarter and it's actually exactly five years ago, like next week and five years and we launched with a mobile coaching component. There's guided workouts, there's video workouts and and I think my own experience of going through physical therapy, anybody who's been through physical therapy, you get that hand out from the PT Right. They always give you a handout and you have to do the handout. Me Up, follow along and then you never can find the hand out and then you have to like pause and look at it. It's kind of a pain in the butt. So that illustration with drawings on what people can do didn't come until about two years ago. So you know and it. But it is like the people who do our videos. I do a lot of the videos and most of the videos, and then we have videos that we do with physical therapist who specifically break it down. And that intention out of the gate. Like it was very intentional about wanting the that to come from physical therapist, knowing that we were going to be working with people and a lot of medical fitness applications. So yes, always intentional in the mobile coaching application. Not so much on the on our drawings that make it very easy to follow. But I'd love, I love our drawings like and I was very speit like with her. I was like, I don't want it too skinny. I want I don't want her too muscular. I want her to have a realistic kind of bodies composition. So the people I'm tired of, like the fitness buff perfect abs, you know, and and I think a lot of people are. I think it's demotivating to a lot of people. Yeah, for sure. I think when you see a more realistic portrayal, it's almost comforting in a sense of like, okay, I can, I can make this happen more than Oh yeah, here's the shirtless guy with a somehow a twelve pack of ABS, which I don't yeah, know how that's possible. And then you know,...

...he didn't get those twelve packet ABS using whatever he's selling. Oh No, right, all kinds of other things that I'm I'm super adamant about only using X. I mean I mountain bike, I ski, I do all kinds of other things, but when terms of my exercise, I'm very focused on only using xe so that I can say, listen, you know, I've been doing this for five years, twenty minutes, five to six days a week. You know, do I have a perfect body? No, do I am. Am I trying to have perfect body? I'm not. I'm just trying to be healthy and be strong, and so I'm very, very purposeful in how I use XC for to show that, okay, we can do this, it's possible. Right. So yeah, I think people relate to it a little bit. Yeah, for sure, and I think that's speaking of for relating. I think we've got the holidays coming up. Somehow we're in queue four already just about, which is no bonkers. I and the holidays traditionally, who knows how it'll look this year, but traditionally are time we're working out seems to go a little bit to the wayside. I know I go to visit my family in Chicago. My parents are up there, so the idea of working out outside sounds terrifying because of the potential for frost bite. And of course, you know you're going to holiday parties. Again. That might look different this year, but you're probably still not eating as well as you normally. What throughout the course of the year. So what have you seen, both from a personal perspective and just from, you know, tips you've learned along the way of how to keep up with your fitness goals during what is normally a pretty chaotic time and might even be more chaotic this year. It is, you know. So I can there. I can answer that question a lot of ways and I'll start with this and right I remember, as we were entering two thousand and twenty. It was kind of like we're all looking at it like through these clear vision of two thousand and twenty, like vision our eyes, like there's all these references to per you know, kind of what we want. It's two thousand and twenty. What do you see happening? And I think right now is the time that we don't, you know, you in next June. We don't want to start talking about two thousand and twenty in hindsight right everybody's it's two thousand and twenty in hindsight and right now. If we don't take our care of ourselves in these last three months, and especially if we've let ourselves go since covid starting right, we're going to enter two thousand and twenty a lot less healthy and a lot more predisposed to disease right that we might already be carrying. So my biggest advice is like if you've put on the Covid nineteen weight right and I put on a little bit awake myself and I get it. It's just it's we're home and comfort food and all kind it's hard, but most of the time we'll put on five pounds during the you know, during the winter months and it's like we're not bears. We didn't we're not supposed to hibernate, right. So it's like start now, put and put that two thousand and twenty behind us in terms of our health, right, and like what can we do to at least maintain what we have or get healthier before the end of the year and then into two thousand and twenty one? And what I like to do I like to look at exercise like snacking on potato chips, is what I call it. And they've redone exercise guidelines, like you used to be, and I think the gym's had a lot to do with this. Like I love Jims, don't get me wrong, but it was like, okay, you have to go to the gym for forty five minutes to an hour, right to feel like you actually had a benefit. And nobody in their right mind wants to pay for gym membership or they're going to go ten minutes, right, or they're not going to want to go to the gym like four times a day to exercise for ten minutes. But the new exercise guidelines, they are very specific from the the Department of Human Health and services that it all adds up right. So two minutes here, five minutes there, ten minutes there. It all adds up. So like we can do that when we're at home and while we're you know, maybe we're working at home more, even when we're traveling. I just drove...

...eight hours this weekend. I pulled over three times and did jumping jacks on the side of the on the highway, because I have a here story of blood clots. It's not very smart for me to drive and not stop and do something, you know. So snacking on exercise, like two minutes here, ten minutes here's why we made our mobile coaching applications so interval based and short workout base, where you can get create your own workouts or you can do seven minutes and then, you know, what happens is one seven minute workout turns into a fourteen minute workout and then you're the next by the next time you're like hey, man, I did fourteen minutes today, I can do another seven tonight and at least I got twenty one minutes, and so it's like snacking on them throughout the day. Push ups, you know, squats, I mean ex see, we do so many different things. We have so many different exercises, you know. So obviously peddling x see, but arm circles, arm circles like, I don't know, do wear an Apple Watch? I do not know. I have not got got to get like. Sometimes I will, I will test myself and I'll go get the groceries and put my heart right on just to see what happens. Right. or I will stand and do arm circles and your heart rate will jump. What? But like actually quite a bit by doing arm circles. So squeeze and snack on exercise throughout the day and then maybe try to squeeze in one particular kind of workout, you know, in addition to everything you've already done for the day. So snap on exercise like their chips. If you eat one, you're not only just eat one, you can eat like two, three and then maybe the whole bag. I'd like that analogy a lot, especially as a chip aficionado. Maybe not as much as some other people I know, but it's definitely a relatable approach and totally agree. When we were still in the office, our company for a while was doing like on the hour exercise. As brings basically where we can get up and we'd we'd kind of set an activity for the day. So, yeah, maybe pushups, maybe squats, wall sits, and it was like really comforting. And I think you were saying how you know you're embarrassing your son during during his game. But like, I think once you get over that initial and it sounds like you, you're like whatever, I've done this before, it's fine. Yeah, but getting over that initial sort of like Oh, it's a little, you know, a little unorthodox to be doing exercising in the office. But so many people were jumping in then too, because they're all like hey, this is this is beneficial and and some people wouldn't and it was just like Hey, I'm going to do pushups next to you, like you're still working at your desk. That's fine. Both of us are accepting of what the other one's doing. And I personally very much enjoyed it because, yeah, I've been sitting down for the last hour. Like why not get up and get all exercise? Do we have to? I mean I did it for years. I did it for years and I you know, just sitting down hours upon hours upon hours and never moving. And the other thing that the research shows right. You could be a triathlete, you could run marathons, you could be in the best shape of your life, but if you sit at your desk all day, right, and you don't move, they don't cancel each other out. Right. It's like you still if you sit at your desk all day and it doesn't matter if you, you know, still get your minimum requirement for exercise to fight preventable disease. Sitting at your desk all day is still really bad for you, you know. So I agree. It's what even caphrases a your desk, like there's so many things that you can do and I like to really mindfully focus on what muscles or what I'm doing while I'm doing caphrasing, like, Oh, wait then I got to engage my core while I'm doing that. Oh, I'm like actually feeling that in my quads a little bit and like mindfully center on what you're moving and what you're helping. I think that helps to for sure, for sure, and I think that's a good reminder of really any exercises, like yeah, pay a little attention to what you're working on, what's going on, and yeah, you you really do focus that much more on on and I can only speak for me, but I know I've always seen better results when I do that. Yes, I think that's I think so horrific. Romo, I think so. I I tried to tell people to do that during a warm up, like when we're peddling our arms right with xe, it's like feeling what's going on with your rotator cuff if you're coming backwards,...

...what's going on with your shoulders in the back? How are you sitting up right? And if we're sitting on the couch and we're pedaling X, see, you know what happens if you sit up versus lie down. And then you know foot fitness. I'm a huge fan of foot fitness and we, you know, we don't take care of our feet really well. So we actually encourage people to pedal barefoot or with their socks, and it's like hey, take a moment and curly your toes and like feel the joint muscle and you know motion is lotion for the joint. Like feel the joint moving and then all of a sudden, maybe you didn't work up a big sweat, but all of a sudden you have morm ability in your me that you've ever had. It's crazy. So, you know, just moving, like moving is everything, and exercises every you know, for greater health. But I mean, I could go on it on for this stuff. Sorry. Yeah, someone who has broken his foot. I cannot stress enough. Yes, get, get that mobility, whatever you care. It's wonderful. Yeah, you like, you know, use it or lose it. It's real, and especially like you get forty and then, you know, fifty and then so it like it just becomes harder. So we have to take care of ourselves, you know. It's like, don't put it off. If you're in your s and th s, it's like, no, game on, let's go right. It's like it's like investing in a retirement account or something like that. Like you start it now and you'll you'll have a much better benefit all those years down the line. Now, moving from the exercise to more of the business side of things, you're about to celebrate five years. Congratulations since the kickstarted. Young Guy Legends. Thank you. What's surprised you the most about running a business? About running a business you knew, I think the so my I had a business before this that I ran for for fourteen years and I've worked with startups my entire career, so I'm pretty well versed and kind of the aspects of running a company. But the things I think that has surprised me is when I actually had is the emotional roll coaster of it. I consider myself to be somewhat of a pretty strong per son, you know, not rattled the easily, and also not like, not somebody who's on an emotional roller coaster, pretty pretty stable, and I was certain like when I went full time in on xe, I ran extee for two years, working two jobs and then to pay for it and boot struck the company and then I went in full time and all in and I had never had, I have a head, never not had a paycheck, like from the moment I graduated from college, I had a paycheck, and so that freaked me out way more than I thought it was going to freak me out. I mean, I'm telling you, I had anxiety, I felt like I had panic attacks, I couldn't sleep and you know, my husband's nice and all, I love them, but like, I don't like to be. I just I was super uncomfortable with being really dependent on him financially and I wasn't expecting that and so then it was like, oh, I need to make more money, you know, like it was just stressful. So I think that was the biggest surprise to me. That kind of caught me off guard. I see. Yeah, I would imagine that's definitely a big change. Early on of like wait a minute, and did you go and check your your bank account, like when you were supposed to get paid? I feel like I would do that still, like I'd log out of be like Oh, Oh, wait, oh no, it's not there. I think I think I checked my bank account more frequently, like, Oh my God, hello, was this skidding right? I mean that, and just like all of a sudden not feeling like I could go by myself something, or I could you know if we're going to go out for dinner or I was just much more I felt like we were early in our marriage again, like, you know, where we didn't have a lot of money and we had to really talk about everything. And you know, we've been kind of privileged in that way. My husband and I have both made a good living, and so all of a sudden it was like I just jumped back...

...to being right out of college and just really really thinking about finances a lot and it was a purposeful decision to bootstop the company. So I was kind of expecting that, but not to the extent that I felt like I lost a little bit of independence, financial independence, where I'm like, Oh, I want to get my hair done. Oh God, like, how much does that cost? I can I really go get my hair done, or little things like I needed some new clothes and my clothes are horrible, like I need some new clothes and I just and I felt this tremendous sense of guilt and so and responsibility. Yeah, so that was that was probably I think that was probably the biggest thing that caught me by surprise. None of the business stuff, like I love that part. That's fun part, right, but the other side of stuff were as a little shocking to me. I think that's a I think that's a reasonable fear, for sure. Yeah, yeah, no, a question that I always like to ask, and maybe I like it because it's it's really no work for me, but a question that you wish you were asked more frequently, and for you it was what motivates you to be such an advocate for fitness and health, and I feel like you've touched a little bit on on it. But is there any sort of other really any other reasons why you're so passionate about this? You know, it's a really good question and I you know, can I cuss on your program of course, like I really want it. In the beginning, I don't know if it's appropriate, but I almost thought of our tagline is being fuck fitness, okay, because and then that wasn't appropriate, because it was like, it's not the fitness piece that motivates me, it is the stories of the people who need access, who can't have it, who don't have it. And for me I thought it was time. I thought I just didn't have time. I had time. I would sit on my butt in the evening, like thirty every night consistently. We watch exercise. I mean we'd Watch TV as a family. That's when I use XY. Now I have time, that time. I don't have a lot of other time, but I have that time. It's still my time that I do it, you know, but it is the I can. I get thank you emails. This weekend on the sideline of my son's baseball game, I'm coordinating with a physical therapist who is using our device in a way that I had not thought of with a stroke patient. He sends me a text message on the sideline of my base, my kids baseball game. I almost start crying right. I have another lady who just this was just this weekend. She has horrible back pain, like really bad back issues, and she has a lot of things going with her core. She can't, she's not supposed to engage her core, and so she had originally bought a device that anytime somebody buys our bed bike are that we say is for hospital beds, I call them because I want to know what's going on and I ended up calling her asking her to give me a call and I walk her through everything and like you don't need the bed ridden version because you can get to the floor and there's so much more that you can do with our other version. You can offer body, lower body, all kinds of things that she can do, and I mean she sent me the nicest message, right. So it's helping people in that they really don't have access to other means and they are the most motivated and inspired people. And maybe they do have that, but the equipment that we match is thousands of dollars, thousands of dollars, and upper body or Gometer of good ones. Twenty five hundred bucks, right, a really good recumbent bike, one two hundred right, lying down on the floor and peddling with your legs. Nobody does that. We are the best to it in the world, you know. So we take thousands of dollars of exercise equipment, right, we put in one little tiny device and so it really helps people. So that, I mean, that's that's the only reason I'm doing this. It's too hard, like if it was all about people and how they look in their bathing suit, which is I'm not putting that down, because it's important to a lot of people, but that would not get me up every day. I just wouldn't. I don't think I'd...

...given like up at me everything. Yeah, I really like the aspect of calling them and just to just, yeah, to learn more about really their story and everything that's going on there, and I think that's something that a lot of companies can be doing. And Yeah, I'm trying to think of the last time I purchase something and got a call or even like a personalized sort of note of like hey, you know, I want to learn more about you and and your use with this product we have. I keep another thing. Where do I have it? Right here? You see if I have it. I just had it in my hand. My desk is a mess. I don't know if you can see it behind me. I put it somewhere. Oh, I'll heather here. I keep it on my desk like. So this is a metal, a gold medal, from one of our customers. She's a Paralympic, gold medalist in the warrior games for the military. She's partially paralyzed and she hurt her. She hurt her shoulder, she's partially paralyzed in one of her legs, she has an ex sy. She's been amazing, like we've become friends and she she gave us one of her gold medals. She wanted gold medal and she sent it to me with a handwritten note, like I mean, we have store. We have so many amazing stories like this that it's just like, of course this is what I'm doing, like why wouldn't I be doing this? It's insane, right who we get to help and impact and it changes everything when you can actually be able to do stuff like this weekend with this person with a stroke. They have not been able to pet do any form of exercise. Independently on their own for nine months since they had their stroke. He was crying while he's peddling our device like this. Is the fiscal therapist telling me this, because he could do it by himself? Right. It's just that's it. That's a long way around, but that is why we do this. That's who we'd want to help. I want to help busy moms and you know everything, but most of us have something going on right that we just don't talk about, and that's who we want to focus on. That's amazing. Those are such good stories, and you get a gold medal. That's super cool. I get a gold medal. I mean it's it's I need to put it in a case and actually put it on the wall, but it's here and some day will do this. Now I usually like to wrap up with a top three, and I feel like you are a great person to ask this, but what are your top three favorite fitness workouts? Well, I'm bias there because it's totally exee. I can go all right. First it's peddling, actually with my arms, because never in my entire life have I had toned arms and for the first time in my life I do, and I usually sit down on the floor and pedal my arms there. So that's my first one. The second one is I love standing on it and been peddling it at my desk or like with Ski Poles, and I hammer that one and then and then it goes back and forth between our lying down on the floor position. We have this new accessory that is simply a crazy workout for gluts, but also for core for people who struggle with lur lower back or the recumbent chair position. That's what I primarily do. I also have like a kettle bell underneath my sink and next but where I brush my teeth, and sometimes I will do that. I do push ups before I go to bed, like twenty push ups are usually sometimes I fall off the radar, but I try to do twenty push ups before I go to bit, even if a fad glass of wine, I always try to do twenty push ups before I go to bed. And during covid I've been walking a lot and I've really enjoyed that and it actually hurts my leg. That's crooked, but I still do it anyway because I like it. Another thing I do. I do have a Sara Gun and I think they change the name. I forget what they've changed the name. That's have your they're good. It's like a pulsating gun or you put your muscle and it kind of vibrates the muscle and I use that and we're aches and pains and try to free up the muscle. And then, I mean, I love put what Peloton is doing, I love what tonal's doing and mirror fitness. I am a...

...fan of whatever somebody's going to do. For me, it's about fitting exercise in with my every day life, my everyday routine. That doesn't ask me to fall too much outside of my routine, you know. So I think whatever works for people, but I still go back to the snack on exercise. Do Jumping, you know, not everybody can do jumping jacks like you know. Just find what works for you. Connect it back to your why, why you're trying to be healthy in the first place, and then that will be the motivator. Yeah, I like that a lot. There's maybe a little more than three, but I think those are all good, all good things. I don't I don't hold people too closely to if you's, I just I just ask at least three. If people are only coming up with too. I might come on, give me that right. Yeah, I just say whatever works for you, whatever works for you, for sure. For sure. Well, somehow we've reached the end of the episode already. That's just clue right by. If people want to learn more about exee or want to learn more about you, were getting touch. How can they? How can they reach you? So our website is probably the best way to find out more about us. At WWB EXECOM. We are on social media as well. We do I do a lot of youtube videos. So Youtube if you know you want to. Sometimes I say things that are off the cuff. It's all live. It's a little crazy on occasion, but youtube and then facebook is probably our most in channels with our most content. And then my emails. Just Michelle at xccom and it's Michelle with one L at xccom, and that's the easiest way to reach me as while you be an email. But check out the website too. Do you have a favorite off the cuff thing you said on Youtube or one more? You were like, I should have said that. Well, you know, I think for I, polly, have cursed more since covid I really try not to do that. Because we all we I just try not to be offensive in it anyway. You know, no, I don't. On occasion my son will come in. When he was little, now he's fifteen. When he was like ten or eleven, he would come and do videos with me, and now he won't. So I love those ones because now he's cool and he's fifteen and he thinks I'm a nerd. Right. So, yeah, I know, probably like when when I have guessed that I get to have on and we just go live and they haven't done it before and it's just real like that, right. It's authentic and it's my favorite way to do things. Yeah, I think that's that's like the beauty of having live. Yeah, live looks like that. It's like you're never entirely sure what to expect and yeah, yeah, it might go off the rails occasionally, but I think usually it's just a good time all around. Yeah, I think so too. Awesome. What Michelle. Thank you so much for taking the time to chat. This is great. I am literally going to go exercise after this, so good. You have inspired. I try the arm circle telling me. I yeah, they are ups. It's like absurd, how effective there it is. What it is. It is absurd how effective upper body cardio is. People don't know. They focus so much on their legs. Upper Body. Okay, and my talking about bicep curls and all that upper body conditioning. If people could walk away with one thing of trying to incorporate upper body conditioning anything by you know, is symmetric pools. It's, you know, good, and it with exy. I mean we can just you can get it up really high, you know, but just upper body conditioning is the secret. Even if you're tremendously overweight, you can move your arms. There's a I think it's a Tracy Anderson workout on youtube that's like yeah, it's just seven minutes or eight minutes long, super easy, and one of are, one of my co workers, shared it a few months ago and every once in a while I'll revisit it or someone else will and be like Hey, I did that arm work out again, like I hate myself, but also it was great. Yeah, no, it's a secret. It is a secret and everybody needs to know about it. Love it. We're spread in the word, spread in the word, spread in the word, spread the word and of course we'll always end with a corny joke and I wanted it to be fitness themed, but then I heard this other one...

...and I wanted to share it. It's more Halloween them, I guess. But okay, what do which is put in their hair? What scare spray? That's that's cute. That's cute.

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