Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 52 · 1 year ago

52: Exploring New York City and Classic Photography with Ray Simone

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ray Simone is a photographer and lifelong New Yorker, and he learned pretty early on the power of being curious and exploring your surroundings. In the 1970s and 80s, Ray often found himself at flea markets, garage sales, street fairs, and more all across New York City, buying all the negatives he could find.

Now, he's painstakingly digitizing these photos, retouching them pixel by pixel. The end result is a modern look at some classic images from the past 100 years (and sometimes even further back!).

You can also support the show by checking out the new Good People, Cool Things merch store. All February long, everything is 20 percent off (discount applied at checkout). Go get you something cool, and thanks for listening!

Good people. Cool things is concast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey Hell. Hello and welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is photographer and Lifelong New Yorker race am own, who, when he was just ten years old, found a photograph that really changed his outlook on photography, taking photos and finding the negatives of these photos, which he restores, and Y'all, his work is just so impressive. He retouches these photos pixel by Pixel and has captured just so many good moments of New York. Here. He's got Frank Sinatra, he's got famous athletes, he's got pretty much any street you can think of, thousands upon thousands of photographs. Ray has done some fantastic work on them. Some of these glass plate negatives date as far back as the S, a hundred thirty plus years, and he now win's an amazing archive of original photos of Old New York. These beautiful black and white photos not available anywhere else. Definitely go check them out at photo gallery NYC. We're talking all about race process. Some of the strangest deals and finds that he has come across some of the weird sights he sees in New York, because, hey, that city is full of charm and silliness and, of course, history, nostalgia, all that good stuff. So we're having a great conversation and, if you want to do a great thing, we're celebrating one year of good people, cool things. So head on over to the merch shop at good people, cool thingscom shot. Pick up some gear, a Mug. I mean, it's twenty five degrees in Austin today, so I know my Mug is keeping me super warm and cozy as I poor hot cocoa and coffee and perhaps the occasional bourbon into it, because that warms up the soul in its own...

...special way. So sit back, relax enjoy this conversation with Ra sumone. For people who don't know who you are not familiar with your work, can you give us a quick little elevator pitch? I really love the look of days past and I started collecting photographionals very young. So at the F right came a photographer, I really got into collecting original camera negatives, the one that were that was in the camera when the photograph was taken and then with those negatives. I enjoyed making really large, fine art prints of New York City, Hollywood, sports, music, anything that you know prior to the s S. I really enjoy doing so. You mentioned that you started collecting these, I when you were very young, very young, ten years old. You remember the first photo where you looked at and you're like yeah, the first photographic. But when I was ten it was of the bowery boys, the east side kids. I don't know if you know who they are, were but they were. They were a group of characters. They got their first start in the movie angels with Dirty Faces, with the James Cagney that's had. The became famous, but they progressed into doing short movies, basically New York City scenes from the s in the forties, kind of like, you know, like a Laurel and hardy, like, you know, like a look, you know, those short those short films they did, they did. They did a couple of full length films, mostly shorts, like a grown up little rascals. Okay, okay, nice, Nice. Yeah, and what was it about that photo that kind of flip the switch for you? Well, I was into the bowery boys because I'm from New York City. The bowery boys, the Bowery, which is part of New York City, Manhattan, not to you know, like two miles from my house. One of the characters actually lived in my father's building around the corner,...

...but I didn't find that out until later. So actually that was a pretty pretty interesting revelation. Wow, well, my God, one of the bowery boys living in my house. But yeah, so then I then it was all it's mostly happen in Costello, chaplain, Laurel and hardy, those those three stooges. I was really electing more and more of those, those characters. So how, and I don't know if you know this down to the tea, but if you had to estimate how many photos you have in your collection, thousands, thousands, thousand, thousands, thousands of photographs, thousands of negatives, tends of maybe negatives. Now, maybe you know ten thousand or more. Wow. Wow. And you've you pretty much scoured all over, all over the country, all over the city, yes, all over the city, most, you know, mostly in the city. There was a time before New York City got gentrified. You know, when, even if you're not from New York. If you're, even if you were in an outsider in the s or the S, you would still think of even the s in the s would think of New York City as this this metropolis, which it was is, but you would never think of it as a community. People generally speaking wouldn't think of it as a community. But up until HMM, mid S, there was small like within the center of Manhattan there was the little communities in within the city. Everyone knew we one another. You know, you're the went to the church or the synagogual you know the local stories and Bodegas with people lived and you know. You know people think of it today is as a tourist you know, as a tourist destination, but you know, to us it was home. You know, every every part of the city was a home. There was an area in the city which would be sixth day evenue, between fourteen street and thirty four street. Don't know if you're familiar with Manhattan, and there was so many parking lots that were used for for business parking, not really for tourism.

They really wasn't all that much in those time. At that time and people left. Business people you know, the stolls closed, everybody went home. Parking lass were empty. So on weekends, mostly Saturday and Sunday, local people's took all this stuff. They jump from their palm whatever they were looking to sell. It's because they they didn't have garage sales, you know, they didn't have a garage and then have you know. So they would bring him to these empty parking lots along the aven. You just sell old their all their wears, whatever they want to get rid of. So my studio was right in the center of that. So I would walk from one parking lot to the next, ones to the next one to the next one, coming through stuff, and then I found my first negative mid to late S. I said, wow, I've always collected, always cloking photographs and never clicked it negative before, but now I'm a photographer, so now I'm I'm looking at it in a photographer's point to view, as a as opposed to a photograph collective, and I just bought one and then I just kept buying and I kept buying and it's just come through and then it became, and I want to say an addiction, but you know, compulsion. It is. Would I just kept buying more and more and I just sat on them for years. It's like, wow, look at this, you know, look at this is this is a great shot of New York City back in, you know, nineteen fifty, nineteen, forty nine, two thousand, nineteen and ten. Wow, that's amazing, you know. And and then, yeah, that's how that, that's how that's sickness started, sickness that's committed a scrap fit. But let's is, this is too much. I got tonned all over the place. And as you're looking at these and thumbing through, is there a certain thing that you're looking for, or is it just kind of like hey, this is cool, it catches your eye. Well, yes, you know, first I want to make sure that it's something that's workable, right, something that's that's printable, something that's either overly overexposed or overly under exposed. The shortanswering you want to look at the subject matter first, right, you know, why? What is it? What...

...is this of? So I love I mean I'm like I say, I'm born and raised in Manhattan, New York City. So I was always primarily looking for New York City scenes because I just love the city so much. Then I'm I could see from my background. I'm really into Hollywood, the old the old slapstick, old Hollywood silver screen, you know, you know, prior to the method, actors of the S and S S, so ones of like, you know, Jimmy Stewart, James Cagney and this you old slapstick chaplain, Maurel and hardy. So those characters really into collecting and looking for but primarily it was New York City scenes. Fantastic. and has there ever been? I mean I as seem you're going to beyond these empty parking lots, I things like flea markets and maybe your Ross right. Yeah, I'll say if if I'm driving the car and my I got to stop here, I got a I even if it's for a minute. And the thing is, as far as negatives to concern to was something that I think that has been overlooked as far as in the collector's standpoint. I mean everybody's looking for, you know, the the Frobridge, a AG, let's say, just for arguments sake. Nobody's people just overlooked negatives for for ages. You know the I've gotten, I've bought I think I paid a dollar one time for a photo album of these cars from like nineteen ten. I'm like wow, I bought this photo album for a dollar and these photographs that were printed in one nineteen fifteen. I mean they're practically steam engine cars and I think people, you know, maybe, maybe, would have jumped on that. But, but, but overlook the box that you know, a lot of times you fund a box with just, you know, old photographs in it, but then you look on the bottom and the negatives are in there. Then they're in usually many times they're in sleeves. Like wow. Then I look at hold it up to the light and say wow, what about...

I can make a print out of this. You know, the old camera negatives are a lot larger than thirty five million meters. You're probably familiar with. Thirty five millimeters is basically a little bit bigger than a postage stamp. You know, prior to generally speaking, the s there are a lot larger. Two and a quarter or two, two and a half inches by two and a half inches, two and a quarter by two quarter. She's full by five inches, eight by ten negatives. I mean these are really big. Five by seven, full by six. The numbers they change depending upon who the manufacture of the camera and the and the film was. But I'm bringing that up because the larger than negative, the higher quality the print you going to make. So if you could find a really good quality gate by ten negative, I mean you can make something as sharp as you're going to get. You could printed roots for Time Square, you know, thirty five millimeter you maybe, and make get it make up poster size, you know, maybe a little bit smaller, but more or less as far as being tight and sharp and clear. And you know hd the everybody likes the word hd now, but you know, but if you get it a five by seven negative, I could, I can make something h d huge, the size of a house. And so I guess that segues into another question. You mentioned how some I'm sometimes it's over exposed or under exposed, and just generally how much retouching goes into what you're creating so much, especially the person who handle them. I mean, you know, you know you would like, you would have loved for the person to have, you know, taken the photograph, put it to the developer, they bring it into you know, wax sleeve. They weren't using plastic back then. They would paper sleeves or Waxleeve and you would you hoped that they, you know, just kept it there. Unfortunately, a lot of times it's scratched, it's dusty, it's torn, it's bent, it's so you know if it's cared for, if it was kept in a you know, you know low humidity, you...

...know, to how was stored. Also, developing is very important too. If sometimes you get people that developed the film themselves and then maybe they left it, you know, it goes through a process of three. If they did one too much or two less, you get deterioration in it. So you know it's all it's. There's a lot of factors that are that are put, a lot of factors that are in it and then you know, hopefully, if full of things everything is right. You know you can get an amazing photograph, you know, the old Hollywood ones. They're usually developed properly, they usually stored properly and you know, unless somebody dropped it in the street and got run over by a semi, you get to get something really to get out of it. It's can you kind of give us a look at at your process as you're retouching one of these or doesn't vary by by the photo. It varies, it very it varies. It varies by the photograph, you know. And then, of course, like just discussing, you know how it was cared for. So some require, you know, I have worked on some for forty hours, forty plus hours on one on one negative to make, you know, to make a print. There's a great image that I I I got from someone paid for it and get it. I paid for it, but the person must have thought wow, he really can't get much out of it. Was Frank's not just sitting at a piano with sheet music laying on the piano. But the thing was there was two men standing directly next to him and they're looking into the camera. You know, I'll let this go because look at these two guys, you know, standing there. You're not going to get much out of it, and I'm looking at it go. Everything is perfect. He's wearing his fedoor, he's sitting at a piano, this sheet music. It's gorgeous. I have to have this. So you know, I paid money for it, but I didn't pay as much that as it was worth. However, I...

...had a draw I couldn't I couldn't edit them out with just a crop because if I cropped at them, being that they were right beside him, if I crop them out, you would have lost all the sheet music, you would have lost two thirds of the piano. It would have been off balance of the photograph would not have been as rich as it being nice and wide with the piano when the sheet missing in front of it. So it took me forty hours to draw those two men beside him staring into the camera out. It was, you know, maybe for you could have been fifty hours. I you know, I lose track after a while, but it was at least forty. who was at least forty hours? And I've been told once. I've been told a thousand times it looks like an album cover, you know, it says beautifully. You know what it's the door just sitting there at the piano is beautiful. Yeah, so it's a long it could be a long process that, do you know? It's, you know, very rarely if somebody get to let something go that doesn't require a lot of work. You know, it's usually this. Usually a lot of work involved. Yeah, the end result that was so, so beautiful. I'll set I'll send that. I'll send it to you. The image. I'll send you that before and the after and you can see the the difference between the two. Have you shown the the end result, to the folks you buy these negatives from? I think there was only one guy. There's one interesting story. was almost like a drug deal. I'm telling you, like a drug deal. This to the way that it the way that it sounds, because so you know, you get you get put in this loop of other collectors. So you have like you're in the circuit of collectors. Like I have a friend of my the Michelin Man. He collects the Michelin Man. I don't collect the Michelin Man. If I have the Mischel a man will right by me. I wouldn't give him the mischelar man off. He collects anything and everything related to the Michelin man because it goes back to one Thousan nine h hundred. Fine, good, that's great. Everybody has with they're into. So anyhow. So if he has, if I know some of this heading that has something, Michiel, I'll call him a paid dude.

You know this, this mischiling. This guy's got the stuff that I'm now you know you mutually. You know all about it. But then then there's other people do the same thing for me. Hey, Ray, you know, I found a guy has a these negatives. And then, you know, so this one guy contexts me and he's so you have a I have a negative of a trolley from glass negative. FEDD. He could, he couldn't date it, but I could. Would you be interested in it? So I said yes, you send me a photo. Oh yeah, right, so I sent him the money, he mailed me the negative and then I looked at it. Gold Man, this is amazing. Again, another forty, fifty hours of work. For some reason, I say I couldn't let it go. I called the guy back. I says, Dude, you have any do with it? Would you find this? You have anymore, because I have a box up thirty five. A box up thirty five. When you tell me that? Because yeah, it goes. Meet me along island them in a parking lot, he goes, and I'll meet you in this parking lot. And I'm like, all right, where it was? And it was at in a Roseville field. I drive my car at the Rose of field, but I told him right, was parked. They pulled up behind me. I hadn't put up my trunk. He opens up his drunk. I gave him his money, he took the box and right, what are we doing here? My buying a kilo or something. But no, it was it was a box that he had bought a house and in the closet was this box of negatives, glass plate negatives from one thousand nine hundred and nine hundred and fifteen of the of the trolley conductors on their trolleys in Manhattan. And they're beautiful. But you know, you who would if you know, if you were half a block away looking through with through a telescope, you hold my God, these guys are doing a drug deal. But whose negatives? Go figure. So yeah, so you know, you get, you get, you get into a circuit of people. I had a woman just called me of the day. I have I have some negatives. I BAKE IMP you're interested in buying. So I have to call her back. M I bought an acoustic guitar in a parking lot one time to a very similar story, and it was like one pm in the afternoon and there were other people there, but I still felt like so shaky is it? There's there's a good there's a machine gun in that guitar. Case...

...and I'm yeah, now I'm carrying contraband as I'm going back to back. Yeah, crazy. And also I hear stories of this sometimes of you know, you bought a house or like you're running a place your watch like and stumbling upon something like this, and I'm just thinking all I had were empty closets. I think maybe I heard case. I own this I own this building and my father's around the corner and I've get I get invited Tom you know, because people know that I'm a collector. You know you want to look through my house and stuff. I found a lot of stuff over the years. I found in this building. I found a revolver in the and my fireplace from the revolvers from wolves, a bulldog, I think it was. I think it's eighteen ninety. I think it was ninety five. Either the parking lot or finding a revolver in the fireplace. Is that the most obscure spot? You've found something in your collection in my garden. You know you did, because you know I'm right. Basically a couple of bucks from Manhattan. Yeah, you know, you find coins and stuff in the dirt. You know, people's People's homes and people's my the NAGHBOR next door. I went to his attic. was really help yourself, and this is right next door. He was going to tear that. He was tearing the house down. You help yourself. Look around. I went into the attic and I still have it, and I opened up the the insulation in his attic from the from the yeah, and then I found comic books and I found a superman comic book and I'm like, Oh dude, please be number one somewhere in here. I went through the hope place. I found three comic books. There was a superman from the s. Who Was it was all reggedy. It was I was like, Oh man, but this is how people find these things that we would just referring to it. Sometimes there's the guy who finds this superman number one. It's worth the million and a half, two million dollars. But no, mine we're roll reggedy and Brittles, and the minute I picked it up it was kind of like flaky. So it happens. It's that they're still out there. These things is still out...

...there. I think I might need to go look at my attic after this. I think might be and yeah, seriously, the one guy, the one guy. It was I think it was in the Midwest. He bought a house and he broke a wool down, because I meant to holly would, and the person that he put the House from was a movie theater owner and he used the movie posters as is insulation. So the whole house behind the wolves was all movie posters in the insulation worth millions of dollars. Wow, just sitting and who you know, who will be posted? You know, in the s and the s would be worth that much kind of money, but they are now. Oh, it's always amazing what is worth money. And then you I remember having a book of beanie babies and they practing, yeah, predicting like thousands of dollars, like even the worst ones would still be worth hundred rdvows. I'm like, if only because my sister and I, guess to a lesser extent me, but more so my sister, collected so many of those and we, I mean we still have huge tubs of them. But and then not even worth that much anymore. No, no, not even probably not even worth the the containers that they're in. Probably. Yeah, this is sad thing because my nephew did the same thing. They just say they lost. They looked. They was all hyped up, you know, like the cabbage patch dolls or will how they will hyped up and people jumped on the hype. And samely that I just don't have the value anymore. Still Still Nice to look through every once in absolutely reminis fighters. Right. Yeah, good times, good times. And so we were talking before we were recording about cities that are on your list to visit. Are there any kind of photographs or types of photographs or other collectibles besides superman number one that are kind of on your like Oh, this would be so good list. I have a wonderful photo of Chicago. To live in Chicago freeer and a half during the time of life in the military, and...

I do like Chicago. I do like New Orleans. But but if I was to look better negative of New York City, I could pretty I could nearly identify exactly where that is and when that is. I probably couldn't do that within the other anywhere else. So and and and and my love and Lore for the city. So all there are the cities. Yes, but do I have the knowledge? You know of you know State Street, you know of Bourbon Street, although I know the streets and it maybe those two streets I could probably identify, but one of the side streets I probably couldn't. But New York City I could pretty much pinpoint you know when and where that is and I just you know and I you know. I walk through it every day. It's you know, it's the it's been the backdrop of my life. has there ever been a photo or a negative you've gotten that you spent thirty, forty, fifty hours trying to attach and then just couldn't get it to look how you wanted to? I've been on one of I of Babe Ruth and Lou garic on the field in their alter ego uniforms. Is that the Yankee uniform? So one is the babe of Gracious, lose something or other and babe something or other. It's not the Yankee uniform. And I've been working on that photograph and I've been working on and it's a beautiful you know, I food was completely redone. It would be as as Nice as if anything you could to get. But it is so deteriorated I had to step away. I just I I had to step away. I'll send it. I'll send you that I'll set. If I kind of getting opportunity, I'll send it to you to see. You know, it's a beautiful shot, but it's just so much work. It is, it was, it was, it wasn't cared for, the negative, wasn't loved.

And you mentioned stepping away. Do you have, because I think this is especially now with all of us working from home, remote work being a common thing, of kind of stepping away from work, taking breaks from work? Do you have a good either quarantine hobby or like a way where you can kind of disconnect from your work? And I wore head every day I do between five and ten miles in the city. That's, you know, my left of the city. I do between five and ten miles every day in the city. So I usually leave my house in the afternoon and I'm gone for two hours. I choose one of the bridges. They were basically four bridges that take you over into Manhattan. Is the Brooklyn, the Manhattan, the Willomsburg in the fifty nine treet bridge. So, you know, I don't know. I don't necessarily flip a coin because there are four bridges, but I choose one and I'll walk over that one and then I'll work my way to, you know, to one of the subways and then, you know, head back home. So I'll go up to Harlem or I'll go down to the financial district, or I'll go to the west side or world maybe you'll go upper east side. So, like I said, that's why I said to you just a couple of minutes ago, if I look at a photograph, I could pretty much is entify more or less you know where that image is, and then you know, by looking at it, I could pretty much dating by the lamp posts or by the cars, or they'll be some landmark. They'll be able to figure out more or less you know what your that is a also by the film. That film helps you identified as well. If I said it was a glass negative, a glass plate negative. You know, people pretty much stopped using them. M You know, one thousand nine hundred and twenty five, nineteen thirty, you know, they went to gelatin. But although people still use them in the S, in the for S, but generally speaking, you know, you get an idea when it was. Do you bring your camera with you on these walks? Are Lest I do? I always camera my walks every day. Yeah, and I'm shooting, you know, people on the street or something that's interesting, something bizarre. That is New York City. Is always something. There's always something in the going on in the city that you could photo.

Or what's your most recent that's how that's some in moment. Oh, a girl sitting at a table with a man with a horsehead on him. How's that for you as that was good. That's pretty good. It's very good. I actually just got one of those. My friend, a bunch of friends did a virtual secret Santa and he got up, he found a horsehead somewhere and send it to me. I wasn't even his secret Sayanna, but he sent it to me because it was like, I think you'd enjoy this, and I'm just like, well, I guess I own a horse head now and got to wear it once for a themed party of be your favorite netflix character. Hmmm. And so I had been recently been watching Bow Jack Horsemen, or re watching I should say, and I was like, you know what, it's not my favorite show, but it's definitely up there. It's a very good show. And what am I going to get to put this horse head on? So just put the put the horse head on, got his blue shirt and a little blazer and passable. You just got to carry around whiskey too, because that's his his Ms. so I just carry about all whiskey with a horse said and that help. I wasn't out in public with it, but I imagine it's probably a similar sign. And it wasn't Halloween, so it was just like a couple of weeks ago. So yeah, it was still that. It was January, mid January. It's pretty gread. I agree, though. I think that's a pretty uniquely New York thing of just kind of like you'll see something that anywhere else you'd be like that's really kind of weird and out of place, but here it's just like, well, that's just another day. Just yeah, exactly, exactly, and again, this mighte segue nicely. You Know New York like the back of your hand. Absolutely. I always like to have a top three in my episodes and I'd love to hear just your top three spots in New York to go to, if you can narrow it down. I could. I had a doubt and and and, oddly enough, that pretty much parks. Central Park is one of the most beautiful I have traveled the world. Central Park is probably the one of the most beautiful places on earth. I...

...would, you know, I would put it up. I would put it up against any place as far as beauty. You know, the Conservatives really take fabulous care of the city of the park. It is absolutely it is a it is a gem. So, without a question of the debt, it's Central Park is pretty much at or near the very, very top Washington Square Park because, you know, you could get the woman with the horsehead, you know, sitting you know, sitting there with a horsehead. So and next where I spent a lot of my misspent youth, in the Morhington script park and anywhere between the East village in the West village. You know, I live in the East village for quite some time and they and the I don't want to say glory days. I'll call them the gory days of you know, you know the hardcore punk, you know the days of you know, the Ramons and Blondie and you know back in the leak seven, these early s which were the gory days. So yeah, the golry days of the East village and then the the the nice end of the West village. So yeah, so he's West village, East Washington Square, Central Park, very nice, very nice. I still central park it during the winter. Is Still on my list of places I'd love to see. Every time I've been in New York it's been either spring or summer. So absolutely need to get out. You could be there. Is there isn't a day or a time rain, snow, sunshine, heat, humidity, cold, any time it's it's a beautiful it's a wonderful place. Yeah, I will co sign, even even for Non New York or not native New Yorkers like me. Cosign, I think. Yeah, I think all of those are our fantastic you could be in we could be this. You know, this a little sweet spot. Maybe it's by the BILVIDEER CASTLE WAY. You won't hear a siren. You know you won't hear you know. You know you'll hear me, let me hear people, but you won't hear any of the craziness is going on in the on the perimeter. Well right, thank you so much for taking the time to hop on and chat's my pleasure at be I'm...

...already happy to do it if people want to want to check out your work. We've touched on a few of the photos, but there are so many thousand ones. So my website is photo gallery and White Secom and I'm still uploading. You know, you kind of to something specifically looking for. I still have thousands here that I have not get worked on, but I to work on them every day, as well as my instagram, which is nyc dot cleft, sick shots and tastic. And yes, I highly recommend checking both of those out to everyone listening, because they are, they are really impressive. Thank you so much. I as as someone that likes you know, I admire photography. For sure. I have never claimed to be good at it, but I think it's just a lot. So, as you know, then it was when I when I was starting. You know, you were you were in just a photographer, you were a technician. Now you could just you know, photographs. There's a delete, reduced delete, you know, but back then there was no there was no delete. But Oh, that's so. I always loved like the Bar Mitzva's and weddings where they'd put the disposable cameras like you'd get so many good gems in there. Absolutely have no idea, would you? Somebody's going to pick up and find yeah, for sure. Yeah, we always had a bit where we'd go around. You know, I'm sure we're not the only people to do this. I imagine this is a common trope, but at especially at the Bar Mitzva, is just growing up and going. I mean I never had a our mits, but because I'm not Jewish, but I most of my friends were. So we'd go to a lot of them. There'd always be some running gag of us, you know, posing like really really, just like ridiculous poses. We're not usually wearing suits and ties, and so we're like, you know, like pulling ourselves up by the neck tie and all that nonsense, and I I'm glad, I think that I've never seen the end result of this, but I'm happy that other people have. For sure, I like to look at those photographs one day. Maybe I could get my hands on the negatives. Yes, let's I'll reach out to all my friends.

I'll see what they've got. Hopefully, hopefully, some pristine gems still in there, sweet good deal. Will any future projects that you want to be a teasing or just I'll be like, I'm still where. I'm still every every day is a every day is another another day of working on an image. So you never know its going to come up tomorrow. Oh well, what I'll find tomorrow? That's true. Yeah, you can. You can plan out your week and then stumble into something amazing. Absolutely always a good time. Well right, thank you so much again. Thank you so very much. I really appreciate you. I enjoyed meeting you. Likewise, likewise, and of course we got to wrap up with the Corny joke. I even made it photography themed. I actually started out as a photographer, but I had to give it up because I just kept losing focus. Good after the day, people, very good joke. Good people, cool things. Is Produced in Austin, Texas you does this episode. Go ahead and hit that subscribe button, whether you're on apple podcast, spotify, stitcher, pod chase or any other podcast APP. I want to keep delivering great content to you. You want to keep hearing it, tap that subscribe button. We'll see you next time.

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