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Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 43 · 11 months ago

Real Feels, 90s One-Hit Wonders, and Bad Acting Gigs with Brad Gage

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

As an actor, host, emcee, and podcaster, Brad Gage has met a ton of interesting people — and he’s certainly one himself. He’s appeared in movies and TV shows like Timeless and Jane the Virgin and has hosted content for Hulu, Mercedes-Benz, American’s Funniest Home Videos, and more. Throughout it all, he's found a passion for having in-depth conversations and getting to know people.

That’s what Brad’s podcast Real Feels is all about. He asks guests to be vulnerable about masculinity and gender issues as they dive into who they are now and where they're hoping to go.

Other highlights include a terrible acting gig Brad once had, the power of restorative justice, and some of the best 90s one-hit wonders.

Welcome the good people pool things, epodcast, featuring conversations with entrepreuneurs writers, musicians andother creatives. I'm your host Jowe held and today's guest is Brad Gauge.who was a host writer and MC? His hosting credits include content for ABCHulu, full screen, Mercedes and Social Club TV. He also hosted the podcast,explain things to me, which was one of itunes best of two thousand and fifteenpodcast, and he was named one of the new faces of two thousand and nineteenin the just forlast comedy festival, currently Brad host the webseries realfeels which focues on masculinity and self improvement and have in thoseconversations that we certainly need to be having. And you know what thispondcast is one of those conversations, because it is covering just abouteverything under the sun, we're talking about Brad's career as a host as apodcaster as an actor, his worst acting Gig, we nerid out over drums because we'veboth played drums. We both love, drums, they're, fantastic, we're talking s.One wonders we're going to have a link to ONS playlist. That Brad has we'retalking, beetles songs, we've got so much good stuff in here. Youlldefinitely want to stick around for the entire episode, which I hope you'renormally doing anyway. Let's let'slet's not leave halfway through this isn'tlike titanic, or it's a three hour show where you need an intermission inbetween you like to get in touch with good people, cool things you can do so.A couple different ways feel free to send an email joey at good people, coolthingscom or reach out on facebook, twitter or instagram at GPCT, poncastand hey. You know what it's getting cold outside. It's Wy, not head over tothe good people, cool things shop, which you can find right on the sit.There's hoodies to keep. You warm there's hats to keep that head of yoursall coozied up all nestled with the heat, it's wonderful and, of course,there's Tshirts, wal, art, Mugs, a whole bunch of other stuff pouryourself some hot cocoa curl up and let's listen to this conversation withBrad I'd love for you to give everyone listening to your elevator pitch. But Ialso want to hear the elevator that we're on while you're doing it, my elevator bitch, for what, for you asa personallevator pitch yeah and we're talking how many floors we talkingabout here- let's say: Eighteen, eighteen, FOURC, okay, yeah, so I'm Brad Gauge and dean. Okay! So that's the first floor.I am a host, a writer and working on being a real advocate for a type of Ting new masculinity and I'm doing a lot of research anddoing some writings on it and making videos Ting, and so I'm going to skipall the rest of the dings. But I will tell you because I know that's going toget annoying to listen the rest of the way after floor. Fouris a silent elevator. I am a guy who has for a long time, probably done toomany things professionally to really hone in on on things in a focused way and make big headway.I've I've done a lot of acting I've done. A lot of live comedy was a musician for a little bit. I'vebeen n some bands, so many different things, and now I'm finally, at thespot, where I can really make a difference, do the bigwork, as I call it ind that big work is communicating and and working with mento open up and be vulnerable about our masculinity nd that can range from just talking about our emotions, notkeeping them in to really creating a more empathetic worldfor relationships with women, and so I'm just learning how to do thatexactly how t how to communicate in a way that is not shaming of men. That isnot. You know, attacking men, it's more working incollaborative sense with men. The same way that I hope a men in general canwork in a collaborative sense with women in general moving forward, and I think-and I think now is a great time for that type of work- absolutely was there. First of all, youknow applaus to the commitment of the dings. I feel like most people justbypass that element to it. Well, how what what other noises do?PEOPLE DO? I mean it's elevators, it's rarely a noise, it's more! Just adescriptor of the type of elevator it...

...is someone asked for extra floorsbecause they tend to ramble on and then gave a very sussint dancer. So I guesswe were on an express elevator there. Some had like glass opening, so you cansee everything going around you. Someone actually had an elevator intheir home, and so they just said they'd use that one at you know onestory or two stories. I guess between aters looking for in their home was itthe person who started comedy central no, but he he probably has like afirefighter's poll or something he's probably been into the cufy like that?Yes, yes, it was a a country musician andinitially had had it due to an injury and just to make iteasier for herself and her dog to get around. They both had various injuriesand they- and you know after recovering it's, like you, got an elevator in yourhouse- you'll probably still use it sometimes like. Why not? I do wonderabout that, though, because I'm sure it's much slower. Oh, it's got to be. I picture it. Likethe I mean, I know this isn't really an elevator, it's more of like amechanical dwheelchair device, but if you are an office fan, if you remember,the episode were Jack, black is like lusting. After an older woman,it's like a movie within the show and she's trying to like get away on thatslow, like motorized iwhat's, the technical Turpi, like awheelchair of the wheelchair star, areer yeah yeah. I imagine it's aboutthat. Speed like it's pretty slow but yeah, and the worst part of elevatorsis the awkward waiting. This is, I believe, I've told thisstory on a podcast before I don't remember if it was this one, but I wasin a work trip in Atlanta a couple of years ago, and you know it was like a Hilton Hotel,his standard center chain hotel, but like eight or nine floors, I I am onlike five or six like somewhere in the middle hit, the elevator I'm waitingfor a little bit and doors open up, it's crowded, I get in I'm standingtheir doors close and then I notice hey we're not moving, and I look and nobutton has been pressed and I' like reach over and hit the lobbybutton, and then someone in the back was like. Oh, that was a good idea andit like I had so many follow up. Questions of. Did this group all knoweach other and they all just got ont and no one pushed it? Is it like a lotof different strangers all got on? How long had they been waiting because Iassumed they weren't moving until I called the elevator and then it wouldgo down to my floor but like it was it blew my mind? It's like one of myfavorite elevator experiencees. I mean my guess would be that they were like a top floor andelevators do kind of automatically go places they're like set in their intheir coding to go to certain places. If you know, if nothing is pushed- and I think theyprobably were on the top floor- all got on and started moving, but it is kind of funny that yeah, what do you like, where you guys going they're just there for the ride? Theydon't have a destinith and they're just hanging out and for that many people,because here's the thing when you walk into a crowded, elevator and you're theperson right next to the panel. You always look at the panel m and and thenyou know oh well, maybe somebody didn't push the thing and then you're kind ofthe you know the captain of the panel there's no captain, there's no captain.No and then I hopped an I said I am thecaptain now and I pushed it and what Ow Bark Dod obds doing. I wonder how fee's he was in. He was. He showed up inblade runner, and then I haven't seen him since haven't heard too much abouthim. It's a good homework assignment forafter this find out, maybe he's a listener who knows yeah. Hopefully,hopefully, if you are hello now you were talking about your showreal fiels and said that now is a good time for it to be made.was there a certain like one specific thing were like okay? I got to dosomething about this, or is it just like the way the culture and climate inthe world has been? Obviously, in a pandemic year, there's high stresslevels everywhere and there's a lot of a lot of stuff going on so was it justkind of like a culmination of all of that? Or can you like point to aspecific moment where you were like? That's it? I got TA start a show aboutthis. Well, I think you know the show has evolved a bit when I started it. Iwanted to. I wanted to have...

...kind of the opposite of small talk, I'dWen, to have big talk and want to have conversations with people about what'sreally important to them and kind of shuck being an entertainer in La ther.Most so much of podcasting and conversations are about the industry or People's story with their careers andstuff like that, and I was really like I- I would love to just dive in andknow people in this moment and and so and I hosted so much and and and really felt more of a callingtowards an interviewed style show, and I was listening to a lot of oprahssuper soul conversations so that all tulminated to be starting the podcastbut where it's evolved to and where my kind of mission has evolved to in this.I believe you know walking into new era of masculinity in the way that werekind of conditioning young boys aroundmasculinity. I see that as a result of the me to movement and this kind of shaking loose ofe of the roots that have you know grownfor centuries, these beliefs of the structure of whatmen are supposed to be, and and it's really so it's yeah- it's a combinationof meet to and even Blm, just looking at systemic issues. The way that we areit's like people are finally seeing that stuff is bigger. Stuff is stuff,is conditioning, we are taught things in schools that were lies or that youknow service a certain area of the of the population or the power structure,and so I, when I was kind of seeking something bigger than myself somethingthe purpose in my life, more than just being an actor and honestly isstruggling actor. It was it made a lot of sense for me to diveinto this, knowing where I'm from in the Midwest kind of very, I would sayjust I'm a guy, a midwestern guy, who's,whois white and grew up in the S and was in a fraternity and I've beenexposed. I've lived a bunch of different places if the country- and Iknow men who who have not been exposed to strongwomen, strong female role models, and I havehad a lot of us strong female role models, and so I just kind of saw thisopportunity where there's a space where there aren't a lot of men talking artackling tougher issues, ingender relations, and so that's that's how I landed on this, and Ithink it's a good time now. I'm excited because I think that these conversations are going to bemuch more welcome in a post trump world. I would agree with that. Yes- and I dowant to get back to the show, but I have to quickly ask at someone else whoalso grew up in the s and in the Midwest. I would say, coincidentally enough, butthere's quite a few million people in there there's ma nothing of coincidence,but was having this discussion with someonerecently. Do you have a favorite one hit wonder from the S boy? I got a lot. I got a lot of them. I do hold on because I have. Iliterally have a playlist of all my favorite S, one hit wonders and I'm just goingto just going to take a peek at it. I would say- and I'm sure this isalways that thing where it's like you know they had other songs, but I reallythink there's there's a song called tomorrow by the Band Silver Chair. Ihaven't heard silverchairs name in a hot minute, yeah. Well as since,probably the S and then the other one would be in ajust just throw this one in there, just one thousand nine hundred and ninetynine at just got in there, but Tal Bachman's, she's, so high love it, which is an incredible song bythe son of an incredible musician, Randy, Bochman and Talbackman was like Canadian artists ofthe year. All this stuff never heard from him again too bad yeah still a Banger, though it's O. Oh,my God, I mean the music video was really cool. It was very whimsical. Itwas like a pre, the woman in it was kind of a premanicPixsi Dream Girl in the music CIDEO, for she so highsguys. Look that up! You'll you'l see exactly what I'm talking about, but anyways good question: Nice, Nice. Yes, I enjoy both of thoseselections. I'll give a nod to one ive recently heard again and was like yes,thes song is so good flagpoll Sita by...

Harvey Danger, which just more people probably know it as the I'm,not sick, but I'm not well Soh, yeah, okay, CAS IAS, like I don't I don'tknow yeah, but that, but I love that song. That was in probably at leastthreeteen movies from the S or early sands. Oh absolutely, that's! That'sthe barometer, I think, for for any kind of success for the s andtwosands as how many of those teen movies like if you're in every singleAmerican pie, you're, probably doing quite fine, even though those movieshave their fair share of problems. Yeah Baner, Saat, true! If you show up inmore than ones movie, you got Ta hit song. I think the cranberries probablyI'm mean I would guess the cranberry's dreams maybe takes the cake for that age, group, teen, NES movies orcoming of age. Ninetys movies. That's got to be the song yeah. Surely there's been some kind ofanalysis t? I think it actually has beeni think that wh en, when I believe her name was Shirley FunnyEnough R, when the lead singer of the crampere died, I think they somebodydid a video about how dreams was just everywhere when thatcame out in movies. Yeah also also a fantastic song. It's,although it's a good one. I mean Isa a few I still make mixes. I mean myplaylists and my S. playlist is probably my most beloved, I'm looking at it right now. There'sjust some there's some yeah bangers on here, magical. Okay, we could. We couldcertainly go down this road sher all day, but I do want Ti. Get back to yourfastball live Green Day, no dowans collective soul, sound garden last moreset seal all right. We might need to put a linkto this and in the shownot, so we'll follow up for that. For sure, anyway,got him out of there got onof this magical magical. Now you were talkingabout how post trump world these conversations and topics are hopefully better receivedand people are more illing to talk and listen, which I think it's also a keyelement to this of not just sat sei douting, I'm yesat's the number, that'sthe first part, but it is still you know a lot oftopics and areas where people maybe aren't as comfortable chatting about itas they would be say. Nes Music, I may be a little harder to like. I want touse the word Prie, but kind of pry stuff out of people. Sometimes so yourexperience is a host. I'm sure helps with that. But what makes for a goodinterview in having conversations that are worth getting out there? I think ifpeople feel seen and that they're not part of some other person's show, I think ifthe best interviews are when someone is comfortable enough toshare something that maybe they've never shared, but most of all, really peele back the layers, the masks,whatever you want to call it that they usually put on when they're on cameraor on mice or or just around people who they don't know that well and so thebest interviews are when it can. It can not only be comfortableand kind of casual to a certain degree, but I think what I like doing on theshow is digging in and and making people kind of, formulate these ideas about themselvesin the world around them that it is still from them, but there theyre, youknow those kind of Aha moments for yourself oe, like wow, I'm kind of I'mreally happy with the way I put together. That idea, I think those arereally fun. I think you know the interviews where people feel like they kind of made littleconnections and breakthroughs and and and connections with themselvesabsolutely and then on the flip side of it. Have you ever had whether, withthis show or any of your hosting past, you know past hosting experiences?Have you ever had someone get so upset that they left or is that justsomething we get to see on no yeah I've? Never! I am pretty good at not getting to thatpoint. I don't I'm not here for a Gotcha situation. I think, because that's usually what it ispeople people are just they're so uncomfortable and they feel honestly.They like I'Vei've, been in situations lunches with people or meetings withpeople where I've felt like leaving- and it's usually because I'm there'sbeen some rug pulled out from under me where someone is has either not lie, but as either haseither kind of done a little deceit or something things are not as they seemor or someone is being kind of...

...unnecessarily cruel, or something likethat. So I don't I've never had that situation and even when people are awary about the interview afterwards, which doeshappen where people go. I think I said too much about this and I'm worried about the way. This came up,at least for me, and it's you know it's. You know not journalistically thebest way to go about it, but I do give people to benefit that down and go heylike. I think it was fine, but if you want to listen to it here you go and and if you have really have a problemwith it I'll cut that out- and I think ninety nine percent of the time and allof the shows or interviews I've done, people always end up going. You knowwhat I'm Goin ta just stick with what I said in the moment, because it's you know you want to people should wantto stick to their word. If they know they're on camera on the Mike It's good to, they should know what they're doing youknow yeah. I think that's a common issue.I've certainly run into that a few times to where, after the fact peopleare like actually can I not say that, and I was like, but you did like ifit's you know if it's something like an NDA and you like accidentally blurtedsomething out like that, I can understand, and that did happen onetime and I was like you should probably have that buttoned up a little moreright, but I think for the most part, you should have an idea of what you canand cannot say, and you know maybe it's nerves that pop in with there. But Ithink if it's not you know anything likeincriminating, then yeah leave it in it's more authentic and it's and it's Iunderstand it's tricky. Sometimes I've had you know higher profile, people onshows and stuff like that, and they they get worried about phrasing, whichis natural. I mean especially now we're ina we're. In a time where you can, you can say one thing wrong and really getin deep shit and and that sort of justice has its placeand and is taking. You know picking up the slack for a criminal justice system n a systemicsystem of justice. That is not, you know, helping the little guys inGals, and so so I get that I get I get being wary of things, and, but also what's important, is to beable to look at maybe a mistake in wording or phrasing and apologize forthings like that wholeheartedly, and this is actually a part of you know down the road. One of my biggoals is promoting this idea of restorative justice, which applies tovictims of sexual salt, as well as saying the wrong thing or sayingsomething: Racist O or something not empathetic or punching down andrestorative justice. It's this idea that, especially in the criminal justiceworld, where it's being applied, you know more directly through different types of psychologistand therapists and case worke and stuff, like that. It's it's! This idea ofjustice, where thereis a collaboration between the victim and the perpetrator,to find a sentence or some sort of of a you know, end gamefor the relationship that serves both parties and and it's you know it's notnecessarily like the victim saying you know M, I'm the judge and jury, and Ithink you should go go to jail for thirty years. For what you did to me,it's more about! Okay, Youyou! Did this thing to me: yourhuman being human beings can change. Human beings have the right to growth. I canempathize with that. Let's look at what is fair to both ofus and find a middle ground, and it's alot more. It's seen as much more satisfying kind of resolution for victims and, ofcourse, for perpetrators, but really for victims, because it's there's morecontrol, especially in circumstances that the original crime, or you know,trespassor whatever it was. The original thing you know did notgive the victim as much control, and so it's a almost you know, handing morecontrol to someone who kind of deserves it in that circumstance. So that'sthat's. The idea of restorative justice and it's, if we'regoing to we're going to you're, going to be hearing it, we're all going to behearing it a lot. I think in the next ten years as this alternative, as as the criminaljustice system does shift in the wake...

...of Defun, the police and and everythinglike that. So it's a very cool idea. I think I don'tknow what you think about that yeah. I feel like I've heard rare instances ofsomething like that, and it's I'm trying to think now. If this isever like, I know I've seen it like in TV shows, is kind of like a you know.We don't want to put someone away, for you, know fairly minor crime and the grand schemeof things, and maybe they'll come to some kind of agreement. I'm I know I'mlike positive. I've seen it in he simpsons episode, commediic effect and Yeah. I think it's a. It is a veryinteresting alternative to yeah some of these, like real harshpenalties that come down for people that you know, probably probably don'tdeserve them in a lot of cases and it's an area that I'm excited to learn more about and kind ofsee how girs, like you were saying in the next ten years, and you know it's certainly like. I think,if two thousand and twenty is taught us anything it's to like expect anythingand just when you think you've hit the bottom or the wall or whatever you wantto call it. ters, yeah, thrs, there's more there's more to come, and it's notall terrible like it's just you kind of got to look at things indifferent ways, and I think that's a great example of this and it kind ofties nicely into something else that I wanted to chat about, which was yourprevious podcast explain things to me: whichyeah, I think the title is PrettySelfexplanatory, so my question is: What's the your favorite thing that youhad explained to you? That's a great question. I mean explain things to me: If peopledon't know it's, I no longer do that podcast, but it was bringing in experts and havingthem explain their jobs and, and it was a lot of what they did and then kind of debunking myths about that job. So I mean a lot of people's favorite is the firstepisode and it was a Mortitian and honestly I mean it a lot of the things that were spokenabout in a lot of these episodes just changed my view and did make me a miniexpert. You know, and that was what was cool about it because we kind of got tonow. I know a bunch about you know size, mology and the big one. You knowthe big earthquake that's going to hit the west coast and I know a lot moreabout about mushrooms or you know how lawyers or I mean another favorite. Was it justalways it's just kind of funny like it sticks in my head, like there was a, wehad a blood spatter analyst and I was just like. Oh so it's not splatter. Theword is spatter that just stuck in my head, but the mortition was greatbecause this ide of death as something that is Iky or we got to stay away fromit and we're scared of it and and and the way that we deal with death. Beingthis separate thing from life, is you know bullshit? We have toembrace it and it just really stuck with me. She had this idea that isillegal, but she you know we asked her. Why Katlan dode was her name. We asked her how she wanted to beburied or what she wanted to be done with her body, and she said Skyburial, which is when you put your body out inthe woods and you let the animals and birds feast on you and then you just disintegrate over. You know the years you decon boast. I guess that wasn'twhat I was thinking when I said my woe. I was expecting like getting shot intothe sky, or so that's also that's also a well. That is that's what I thoughtit was initially too, because it's like yes, skyberry, like you, would chewyour ashes into the sky. You know it'd be like it would get on everybody like like in the Biglbovski or something,but no apparently it's allowing the birds of the sky to be your burial sounds imal to me. It's like it's likeplaning ourself with the tree, those tree pond things, and I think we should be able to decide legally. If we want that to be done, Imean it's, I think probaby people are worried about sanitation or whatever disease orsomething, but I think that should be an option. If you want it to bepersonally yeah yeah. Did you ever from any of the people that you talked with? Did youever feel so passionate that you're like? Maybe this could be a career movedown the line or W at? Did it never get to that? No I mean I was. I have always beenvery, very tunnel visioned about being anenterainment...

...and so yeah at the time I was very seton acting, but I mean it. It's it's a lovely thingbecause t I think a lot of our listeners hadhelped out it. We had a lot of young listeners and we actually, we had oneperson on twice and that was Dr Rominy Dervisula who's, a therapistpsychologist who kind of specialized in narcissism, andwe had her on the show. And then we had her on again and she told us the secondtime around that her, whatever current assistant or graduatead sisters, some sort ofsomeone who worked for her had contacted her because they heard her onour podcast and so that's cool. But it didn't know it didn't really make merethink my path, but it definitely broughten myhorizons about how incredible and how many more things there are outside ofthe entertainment industry, because when you're in the entertainmentindustry, Youyou drink the cool age, you kind of think that you're the mostimportant thing and city in the world and that's not really true, yeah. It'samazing and that this show has taught me the same thing of like how manydifferent career paths there are out there and if you can dream of something,then it's I mean tens of thousands of people areprobably doing it already, but yeah there you can. You can always find aniche somewhere where you're kind of the unique creative one out of. Howevermany people there are, but just like, and even just like some of the sidehobbies that people have is always so fascinating to me and I'm sure inquarantine. Life people have picked up even more and I guess I'd beremissife. I didn't ask if you picked up any quarantine hobbies. I mean it's a pretty basic one, but itis something that e I have not really committed to my entire delt life and that's workingout like I finally didn't have an excuse and so up until you know the past monthwhen I was moving, I was working out for to five times aweek for the first time in my life since high school, and so that that wasthe new thing that and developing real fields, justkind of became the thrust of my days, but yeah it's not cool. It's not. Imean I have other things I like to do that are fun like playing drums. I know,are you a guitarist, yes and so yeah like playing music when I can and I'mgoing to set up my drum set in a new place here, which is going to befucking awesome but, and so that'll, be. You knowquarantings that over. So I think that'll be my my next quarantine thing is taking drums back up, but yeah.No, nothing not like. I mean I guess cooking a little bitmore, but I was already doing that so yeah. Nothing! No baking bread for mejust banking, my body, that's it yeah. I feel like the breadmaking was areal, a real hot item in March in April, and then it just fell off a cliff, but you know could I did. I didn't godown that rout either, but Kudos to everyone who did- and I think drums area terrific. Just like a stress relief look way morethan playing guitar is, but I mean any any kind of music is fantastic andhighly recommend anyone who's been thinking about it. Do It doit it's sofun so fun. I there's never been a better time to the really has is yeah and yeah. I actually grew up playing. Isay playing very loose. Air quotes here of playing drums. My Mom bought me asnare drum and then we just progressively like every Christmas orbirthday would add a piece to it and then recently she was like you're,not playing thess like they're, taking op space in the house, I'm going tosell them, I'm like allright. I guess that's fine, but I was I was kind of getting the itch afew weeks ago and I'm like how far did you get with the adding to your set?Did you get to like Woodblock Glockenspield Gong? I didn't. I didhave a cow bell, which was was a like. You know that had to be after seeingthe SNL bit of needs Mare, cowbol. I think that that really solidified it Iwas kind of on the fence and then I'm like now, Cabos too much fun. I have tohave that, but it was pretty sizeswell. Let's Se, if I definitely there was abass drum and two times, I don't think I got to afloor Tom, but I had riht symbol. I Ha to crash to times over the over thebase over the kick. You had O no floor. How many symbols we talking this andI'm sorry folks, when drummers get together this, how many symbols we talking here we had.We had the high hat, a ride and a crash.

I mean that's all you need and then animportant question. You got the Cow Bell: Where was a placement on that onemine was attached to the kick drum, so it was kind ofabove my right knee was mo where my cow bell was placed. That was, I believe, that's where minewas too. I can't remember if it was to the kicker. The the snare had like alittle claw thing that I was able to hang it on to to. I think I startedthat at first and then I was like no it's more secure over the kick because yeah, I think youneed it. You needed an easy, accessible place. You don't want to be likeringing all over, because I'm assuming you're probably hitting a cowbellseveral times in succession, if you're using it you're not going to just giveit like a one rewat smash so and and when you got it on the snare, then thenyou're almost making Youre hitting the snare at the same time, at relatively you're iin the cow bell. Ifit's mounted on the snare, you will create the snare type sound, which isnow what you want. You want to clean cow bell, sound, so that makes sense, but you youtrouble shot it and you figured it out, and you know that sounds great. I wish I could goback and you know jam to drummerstyle with you back back in the day welh howyoung we talking about. I think I was thirteen yeah when Istarted twelve or thirteen and and kind of just grew it throughout high schooland then, as we've discussed, we both went toschool at Miami. So I was out of the Midwest, and then I lived in La for acouple of years and now in Austin, so have not been a full time resident ofChicago in about, Oh goodness, fourteen fifteen years nowso the drums were just collecting dust, but I'd like to think at least myparents would would rock out on them a couple times a year, even though that'scertainly what's not the case. Yeah Ait Gro they just growled at it and thought about how much better it wouldbe with if it wasn't there, but our sweet people, I'm sure andwe're like well. They are Jos and maybe hell Wanam or something like that.That's that's very sweet of them, yeah theyheld on to them for much longer than was required, and I would have expectedso. I sold my original kit for gas money todrive to Los Angeles. That was a what', my kind of classic story. Did it get you there or did you have?Did you like Peter out along the way getgas money wise? I think it wasprobably enough. This is probably enough. That would have been extra devastating.I think, if you that's, that was all the money I had. I mean after going to school at Miami. I wouldn't be surprised. I'm veryexcited about this possible student loan debt forgiven Thi situation underByden, because eleven years later, Brandy's got somestill got some death and they're still asking for supportfor current life yed. Yes, I don't they don't call me anymore, pleasantly told them off enough times. Yeah. Maybe I just need to do it alittle more. I feel like I'll still get the calls every once in a while,certainly was getting a few text during election season, and I still maybemaybe this decade will be the one where there's a way to inform people thatyou've already voted so that they take you off the list of like Hey,who you're going to vote for I'm like well, it's already happened, so please I don't need a text right yeah I mean, as I've done some callingI've been a little bit of calling did for Lizzie Warren did some calling and during the primary and it's definitely you get you reach some people who arelike. Please take me off the list. You've called five times and I'm likeI'm so sorry, it's very easy for the people running those things, thetexting and the calling to to fuck it up and to not mark youcorrectly so now being on both sides of it. I doempathize but yeah I'd, be good. It'd, be good to op, dowt quicker yeah. I think I'm fine with like I've, never going to blame a coloror texter for it, but yeah. I think it's just like when it's when you'vealready voted, I'm like well, there's nothing like nothing. You can say would sway mebecause it's already happened. So what you didn't? No, I three four timesnowhat's I supposed to E. I mean you, can I mean Democrats can I know th t,that's true, why I blew it. So my apologies to my elo fellow voters out here I didn'tknow I didn't know yeah we're...

...apparently allowed allowed to votemultiple times. This is what I hear now something that I like to askmusicians and you have the benefit I guess, of having both music and actingexperience. You can pick your poison here, but I always like to hear what'sone of the worst gigs you've had acting for sure, because I have hadmuch much less music gigs worst acting gig was. This was incredible back when Iwas a nonunion actor. This wis, my last nonunion thing I ever did because it itjust totally just pissed me off so much and actors. Beware if you're you knowsigning up for nonunion gigs, they can really just do whatever they want andscrew around and change the rules of what's happening, but basically I auditioned and had been cast as one ofthe supporting you know: Characters in a feature film that was going to beshot very quickly over the course of three days at this big mansion up inthe Hollywood hills. Actually, maybe it was brantwood and so very exciting and it was non union soitwas just like well, you know, whatever I have a bunch of scenes andthey'll be really good for my acting real, and so it's one of those thingswhere there's not a lot of details but they're like meet here at you know:Nine am and bring three changes, O close and we'll figure it out. So Ipark on the side of the road meeting a parking lot and then there's these there's like a van and like okay. Sothis is kind of professional there's like a minivan, that's driving us up tothe location at this. At this mansion and a meeting you knowyou talk with your fellow actors and stuff like that, and you see somebodyyou know and that's cool and there's all these extras. It's a really bigproduction and slowly your once. We get the location, there'svery little food, but you're like okay, that kind of happens and then slowlyyou're, just waiting and then you're in holding your waiting and the hours tickby and I'm getting paid. I think maybe ofifty for three days like nothing but it's it was a good opportunity. I readthe script and I met the writers on set, but I'm meeting all these people andwe're just not shooting not shooting, not shooting and we end up not shooting at all all day and there'slike a hundred people there and they apologize and they go we'llmake it up tomorrow. So I come the next day and they say that we shoot one scene ofmine. They shoot a couple more other scenes and they say: okay, we'rerunning out of time change of plans, we're going to turnthis we're going to shoot a deritos crash. The super bowl commercial withthe rest of our time at the house, and so so then they start doling outrolls ran at random and then they go okay. You know you'll be on camera forsure. If you want to jump at the pool- and I'm like- I guess so- I jump in the Poo- I don't evenhave a Swimntrun, I just jump in the pool and my underwear and there theysomehow they have like a big Darito suit and I'm like wait a second. Theyliterally this wasn't. This wasn't supposed to be a film shoot. They are acompletely fucked production that is just was like back. Pocket werein just kind of this idea that oh we're going to make a crash, the super bowlcommercial and then I didn't go the last day and made them pay me my twohundred fiftydollar, but it was one of those circumstances where these are o.These were two twelve hour days where I shot one scene and then and then Ijumped into a pool in front of a guy in a drito's costume after the promise ofbeing like this kind of supporting role in this indi comedy, and it was, it wasso disheartening and so disappointing. You know it was just. It was just veryfunny. It's like o okay, and if you guys don't know what crashhe super bowl commercials are theyre kind of this thing that everybody does when they're non union,because it's ther, you know, there's a promise of a million dollar deal ifthey pick your commercial, but it's like the most low brow kind of crappything to do as a upand coming actor Creator and, and so that was among the worst gigs Imean there's worse ones, where you're not getting paid and everything's awful,but that one was egregious in particular. Did I'm assuming? The answer is nobecause I don't recall seeing a commercial like this, but was this picked as a winner for one ofthe Super Bowls I mean. Not only was it not picked, I don't think they evenfinished it. I don't think they finished it. I neverthey sent me. They couldn't send me the...

...commercial they sent me the shot that Iwas in in case. I wanted to use that in my real, which I had to beg someone for and it's you know, but you can't use nolines and jumping in a pool like that's not even worthwhile, but when you're upn when you're starting out, you need anything on camera, and I was like Iguess I'll take it, but yeah it was and then they're not feeding you I meanit's just. It is a very it's a tough it's. Of course everybodyknows that being an actor s tough, but it's a really deceptive industry,because it just does use people and makes forceof people who don't havemoney to work for free for years with the promise of maybe some exposure and,of course, those those you know, Dream Scenarios Work and happen and peopleare discovered, but there is a as my friend Evan Watkin says, there isa kind of slight of hand. There's a magic that that La has that has kind ofgone away with Covid that I think people are starting to see a little bitme included, although I hope I don't sound too cynical about it, becauseI've had a lovely time, but it's it's just interesting to see it after.You know my experiences ten years in the business yeah and I think too from again this isfrom much less involved space, but just you know, conversationswith friends and and kind of seeing it as like a fly on the wall. Sometimesit's the sligt hand is a good way to put it like it's the particular way.Someone will phrase something where it's like. Oh technically, like Ididn't say anything, that's not true. It's just like you know, you'd, obviously take itanother way, and it's just yeah. It is a lot of lot of Shenanagains, to put itmildly, yeah taking advantage which, like I have also had people work for me for free, butit's when I'm working for free to I mean like there's a reasonable againcollaboration, there'sthere's, a there's, a point where you can behonest with people and give you know, state your peace and not have to trickpeople to work with you and that you know it goes for dating to nothaving to trick people. But it's yeah. It's just one of those things that youbecome aware of the more experiences you have with it, but but yeah it's. That was the. That was the one and Isaid, I'm going to join the Union somehow and never do this again and Idid and it was union workes much better. That's o! I'm glad it's spurred action,even if it was terrible in the moment and a great story. I enjoyed that verymuch. Thank you and we'll move from nonunion to a similar topic. I think of musical group that has struggled reallydidn't see a lot of success in their Hayday, which is the Beatles, and thisis a question that I also like to ask all,though my guesses. What's a question you wish, you were asked morefrequently and you I know I read this recently of how manysongs the Beatles have put out ever. But what is your favorite one out ofthe? I don't know to it's like two hundred something like two twhundred,thirty or so songs. The beettles have done what is number one favorite onBrad's list, so what', what's cool is I just did a big drive, a big long,several day drive and I just decided I could listen to a book Er podcast,but I'm just going to start with the. I have a playlist of the Beatles, that'sall their music in Chriological order and I'm just going to listen to himwithout skipping any songs which I normally do, because they have a lot ofthey a lot of shitty songs in their earlier album, and so I just pushedthrough and I've been a bals fan, the my earliestmemory as a human was watching the movie help, and- and so my if I were to pick onefavorite beatle song, it would be from help, and it's it's it's one- that peopledon't talk about as much, but I think is worthy and a beautiful song and it'sthe song. I need you by George Harrison Nice and so, even though, technically I think, whileGeorge Harrison is part of the Beatles picking a George Song is a favoriteBeatle Song, I don't think counts as much because the Beatles the Artansolde beels is the Len mccarney thing, but the song that I think about themost or that I like to sing the most is I need you and, and so that's I if I could only listento one more beetle song ever again. That would be that very nice. Very nice yeah, I thinkGeorge, is certainly less revered among...

...the group, but I mean certainly a stepof a ringo still so he's. There's Leoter of a Cartney very high up, George Ao e Fi Ami is ecredible andalso, I think people don't quite talk about it enough when they talk ab aboutthe Beatles and listening to the early tracks. George, his Solos are reallywell done, he's a he. I mean he composed those Solos andalmost every song, and so he he's the quiet beetle and he's verysweet and all of that, but he was a hell of a guitarist, and you know people talk about Paul' baseand John Songwriting and all that stuff, but Georgea Sake's, good good guitarist.Now you can write some great stuff for sure well, Bredore, almost off the hook, butwe always like to wrap up with a top three and also usually like to to letyou choose and I as a cheese, afficionado wel say that, like I know alot about Cheesus, I just enjoy eating them, but you specifically call thatVegan cheeses. So what are your top three Vegan cheeses? So when, when I think about the so, I grewup in Wisconsin Americas dary, land cheeses, my favorite food, my wholelife, my parents, to quiet me down as a kid would give me a slice of you know:Craft American. In my hand, that was how I grew up and made the switch about five years ago togo. You know cut dairy out for multiple reasons, but one of thembeing that you know the discovery that we technically aren't supposed to beingesting dairy, it's meant for baby cows and not for humans, and so I stopped. I lost ten pounds after likea month of not eating dairy and then had to kind of figure out a replacementand the best thing about the easiest way to kind of get more.You know: Vegan leaning lifestyle is to replaceyour favorite foods and so slowly I found these favorites and so my topthree. My number three is a sliced cheese called Chow ch Ao, andthat was my kind of gatewayt cheese because it tasted so close to real andso the chow kind of slice cheese. You can find that in most grocery stores itwould be my number three. My number two would be a a cream cheese like it's actually a pubcheese and that's a meocos road house Cheddarand that's the closest it taste incredible with the cracker. It's thetype of thing that I grew up eating. You know pub cheese out of out of aplastic container on a writz, so meocos is a great vegan dairycompany and then number one is a local la place called mishes and that would be Misha's locks orMisha's Sarri Sari and they're both cream cheeses that work for crackers orfor bagels or for Toast Rovocaa tost. Those would be my topthree ND, and you know, if anybody's scoffing, at the idea of a vigan cheesethat they could never stop eating cheese again, I grew up on it and I'just feel so much better. My body feels better. My stomach feels better and it's worth at least trying some ofthese, because the technology behind just the food technology behind some ofthese vegan options are really incredible and just playing healthier,so tils, my top three fantastic. I don't think I've explored vegancheese very much, but I think I can. I agree with the how you feel better:I've cut out cow's milk and and yeah it's a similarsort of like. I don't think we realized how bad a lotof things. We grew up on our groing up, just because you know there wasn'tscience around it and there weren't as much people researching alternativesand things like that. But it is pretty spectacular to see what has alreadybeen created as alternatives as substitutes and what's coming on thehorizon, because I I feel like every month, I'm just like they did. What,with what like e super impressing, what kind of milk we we talking about W Twas your replacement almond yeah. I typically go with almod I've dabbledwith oat and soy as well. I did try pe milk for the first time recently yeah,I h Itwas, pretty good. I read a fitl try to Macadamia, it'scalled Milkadamia, agreat, great name, all right. All right I might need tothat is a great name, and I do reward...

...great nams for at least trying thatOnlif Tay they can knock almend off of the list, but that'll be that'll wa an update fornext time. Please, yes, I mean here's. The top three best melts there's enoughalternative milks out there, that you can have a top three, but it's true and probably by by thistime. Next year we can get maybe even to a top ten at least the top five. I Iwould believe it. I think the milk technology it's moving rapidly. It's a rapid thing, excellent, I'm very a connect with thevaccine. I think well, bread. Thank you! So much forHampingon and chatting. This was great. We cover it. I think maybe the mostexpensive net that any guests has ever had on here. So very appreciative ofthat. If people want to learn more about you, if they want to check out anepisode of Real fiels, where can they find you they can go to Real Fieldscom? That'sreal felscom should find everything else, but real feelds on instagramtwitter youtube, but you can just go to Rofilscoma and L it'll get you whereyou need to go. That's that's all any of us can ask for awesome. Well, of course, we'll alsoend with a bad joke, as we always do and I'll eve I even made it cheese.Themed based on the Tom, Oh cool, but I actually have an addiction to cheddarcheese, but thankfully it's only a mild one good after today, peable lovely, I love cheese and CHEESY JOKES.

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