Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 43 · 1 year ago

Real Feels, 90s One-Hit Wonders, and Bad Acting Gigs with Brad Gage

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

As an actor, host, emcee, and podcaster, Brad Gage has met a ton of interesting people — and he’s certainly one himself. He’s appeared in movies and TV shows like Timeless and Jane the Virgin and has hosted content for Hulu, Mercedes-Benz, American’s Funniest Home Videos, and more. Throughout it all, he's found a passion for having in-depth conversations and getting to know people.

That’s what Brad’s podcast Real Feels is all about. He asks guests to be vulnerable about masculinity and gender issues as they dive into who they are now and where they're hoping to go.

Other highlights include a terrible acting gig Brad once had, the power of restorative justice, and some of the best 90s one-hit wonders.

Welcome to good people, cool things, the podcast featuring conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives.I'm your host, Joey held, and today's guest is Brad Gage, whowas a host, writer and MC is. Hosting credits include content for ABC,Hulu, full screen, Mercedes and Social Club TV. He also hostedthe podcast explain things to me, which was one of itunes best of twothousand and fifteen podcast and he was named one of the new faces of twothousand and nineteen in the just for last comedy festival. Currently, Brad hoststhe web series real feels, which focuses on masculinity and self improvement and havingthose conversations that we certainly need to be having. And you know what,this podcast is one of those conversations because it is covering just about everything underthe Sun. We're talking about Brad's career as a host, as a podcaster, as an actor, his worst acting gig. We nerd out over drumsbecause we've both played drums. We both love drums. They're fantastic. We'retalking s one hit wonders. We're going to have a link to s playlistthat Brad has talking Beatles songs. We've got so much good stuff in here. Definitely want to stick around for the entire episode, which I hope you'renormally doing anyway. Let's let's not leave halfway through. This isn't like titanic, where it's a threehour show where you need an intermission in between. Ifyou'd like to get in touch with good people cool things, you can doso a couple different ways. Feel free to send an email joey at goodpeople cool thingscom or reach out on facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast.And Hey, you know what, it's getting cold outside, so whatthat? Head over to the good people cool thing shop, which you canfind right on the site. There's hoodies to keep you warm, there's hatsto keep that head of yours all cozied up, all nestled with the heat. It's wonderful. And of course, there's Tshirts, wall art mugs awhole bunch of other stuff. Pour yourself some hot coco, curl up andlet's listen to this conversation with Brad. I'd love for you to give everyonelistening your elevator pitch, but I also want to hear the elevator that we'reon while you're doing it. My Elevator Pitch for what? For you?As a personal elevator pitch? Yeah, and we're talking how many floors wetalking about here? Let's say eighteen. Eighteen floors. Okay, yeah,so I'm Brad Gage and Ding. Okay, so that's the first floor. Iam a host, a writer and working on being a real advocate fora type of Ding, new masculinity, and I'm doing a lot of researchand doing some writings on it and making videos Ding, and so I'm goingto skip all the rest of the things, but I will tell you, becauseI know that's going to get annoying to listen. But the rest ofthe way after floor for is a silent elevator. I am a guy whohas for a long time probably done too many things professionally to really hone inon on things in a focused way and make big head way. I've I'vedone a lot of acting, I've done a lot of live comedy, I'vewas a musician for a little bit, I've been in some bands, somany different things, and now I'm finally at the spot where I can reallymake a difference, do the big work, as I call it and that bigwork is communicating and and working with men to open up and be vulnerableabout our masculinity, and that can range from just talking about our emotions notkeeping them in, to really creating a more empathetic world for relationships with women. And so I'm just learning how to do that exactly, how to howto communicate in a way that is not a shaming of men, that isnot, you know, attacking men, it's more working in a collaborative sensewith men, the same way that I hope men in general can work ina collaborative sense with women in general moving forward, and I think and Ithink now is a great time for that type of work. Absolutely was there. First of all, you know, applause to the commitment of the days. I feel like most people just bypass that element to it. Well,how what out? What other noises do people do? I mean it's elevators. They gets. It's rarely a noise, it's more just a descriptor of thetype of elevator it is. Someone...

...asked for extra floors because they tendto ramble on and then gave a very succinct answer. So I guess wewere on an express elevator there. Some had like glass openings. You cansee everything going around you. Someone actually had an elevator in their home andso they just said they'd use that one. It you know, one story ortwo stories, I guess, between looking for their home. Was itthe the person who started comedy central? No, but he he probably haslike a firefighters pull or something. He's probably been. It's a goofy likethat. Yes, yes, it was a country musician and initially had hadit due to an injury and just to make it easier for herself and herdog to get around. They both had various injuries and they and you know, after recovering it's like you got an elevator in your house, you'll probablystill use it sometimes, like why not? I do wonder about that, though, because I'm sure it's much slower. Oh, it's gotta be. Ipicture it like the I mean, I know this isn't really an elevator, it's more of like a mechanical wheelchair device. But if you are anoffice fan, if you remember the episode where Jack Black is like lusting afteran older woman, it's like a movie within the show and she's trying tolike get away on that slow, like motorized, what's the technical termle likea wheelchair, wheelchair stairrier? Yeah, yeah, I imagine it's about thatspeed. Like it's pretty slow. But yeah, and and the worst partof elevators is the awkward waiting. This is I believe I've told this storyon a podcast before. I don't remember if it was this one, butI was in a work trip in Atlanta a couple of years ago and youknow, it was like a Hilton Hotel, his standard center chain hotel, butlike eight or nine floors. I am on like five or six,like somewhere in the middle. Hit the elevator. I'm waiting for a littlebit and doors open up. It's crowded. I get in, I'm standing theirdoors closed and then I notice, Hey, we're not moving and Ilook and no button has been pressed and I'd like reach over and hit thelobby button and then someone in the back was like, oh, that wasa good idea, and it like I had so many follow up questions ofdid this group all know each other and they all just got on and noone pushed it? Is it like a lot of different strangers all got on? How long had they been waiting because I assumed they weren't moving until Icalled the elevator and then it would go down to my floor. But likeit was. It blew my mind. It's like one of my favorite elevatorexperiences. I mean my guess would be that they were like a top floorand elevators do kind of automatically go places. They're like set in their in theircoating to go to certain places. If, you know, if nothingis pushed, and I think they probably were on the top floor. Allgot on, it started moving, but it is kind of funny that.Yeah, what do you like? Where you guys going? They're just therefor the ride. They don't have a destination. They're just staying it out. And for that many people, because here's the thing. When you walkinto a crowded elevator and you're the person right next to the panel, youalways look at the panel hmm, and and then you know, oh well, maybe somebody didn't push the thing, and then you're kind of the,you know, the captain of the panel. There's no captain, there's no captain. No, and then I hopped and I said I am the captainnow and I pushed it and we're now bark dot opt he's doing. Iwonder how if he's he was in he was he showed up in blade runnerand then I haven't seen him since. Haven't heard too much about him.It's a good homework assignment for after this we'll find out. Maybe he's alistener who knows? Yeah, hopefully, hopefully, if you are hello now. You were talking about your show real feels and said that now is agood time for it to be made. was there a certain like one specificthing we're like, okay, I got to do something about this, oras it just like the way the culture and climate in the world has been? Obviously in a pandemic year, there's high stress levels everywhere and there's alot of a lot of stuff going on. So was it just kind of likea culmination of all of that, or can you like point to aspecific moment where you were like that's it, I got to start a show aboutthis. Well, I think you know the show has evolved a bit. When I started it, I wanted to I wanted to have kind ofthe opposite of small talk. I want...

...to have big talk and want tohave conversation with people about what's really important to them and kind of chuck beingan entertainer in La. They're most so much of podcasting and conversations are aboutthe industry or People's story with their careers and stuff like that, and Iwas really like, I would love to just dive in and know people inthis moment. And and so and I've I've hosted so much and and andreally felt more of a calling towards an interviewed style show and I was listeningto a lot of Oprah's super soil conversations. So that all culminated to me startingthe podcast. But where it's evolved to and where my kind of missionhas evolved to in this I believe, you know, walking into a newera of masculinity in the way that were kind of conditioning young boys around masculinity. I see that as a result of the meat to movement and this kindof shaking loose of of the roots that have, you know, grown forcenturies, these beliefs of the structure of what men are supposed to be.And and it's really so. It's yeah, it's a culmination of meat too,and even Blm, just looking at systemic issues, the way that weare, it's like people are finally seeing that stuff is bigger, stuff isstuff is conditioning. We're taught things in schools that were lies or that,you know, service a certain area of the of the population or the powerstructure. And so I when I was kind of seeking something bigger than myself, something the purpose in my life more than just being an actor and honestlystruggling actor, it was it made a lot of sense for me to diveinto this, knowing where I'm from in the Midwest, kind of very Iwould say, just I'm a guy, a midwestern guy who's who's white andgrew up in the S and was in a fraternity and I've been exposed.I've lived a bunch of different places of the country and I know men whowho have not been exposed to strong women, strong female role models, and Ihave had a lot of us strong female role models, and so Ijust kind of saw this opportunity where there's a space where there aren't a lotof men talking are tackling tougher issues in gender relations, and so that's that'show I landed on this and I think it's a good time. Now I'mexcited because I think that these conversations are going to be much more welcome ina post trump world. I would agree with that. Yes, and Ido want to get back to the show, but I have to quickly ask ofsomeone else who also grew up in the s and in the Midwest.Would say coincidentally enough, but there's quite a few million people in that sire'smaybe nothing of a coincidence, but I was having this discussion with someone recently. Do you have a favorite one hit wonder from the sum boy, Igot a lot. I got a lot of them. I do hold onbecause I have, I literally have a playlist of all my favorite s onehit wonders and I'm just going to just going to take a peek at it. I would say, and I'm sure this is always that thing where it'slike, you know, they had other songs, but I really think there'sthere's a song called tomorrow by the band's silver chair. I'ven't heard silver chairsname in a hot minute. Yeah, well, as since probably the S. and then the other one would be in the just of just throw thisone in there. It just one thousand nine hundred and ninety nine. Itjust got in there. But Tal Bachman's, she's so high love it, whichis an incredible song by the son of an incredible musician, Randy Bachman, and Tal Bachman was like Canadian artist of the year, all the stuff. Never heard from again. Too Bad. Yeah, still a Banger, though. It's a Oh my God. I mean the music video was reallycool. It was very whimsical. It was like a pre the woman init was kind of a premanic Pixie Dream Girl in the music video, forshe's so highs guys, look that up. You'll see. You'll see exactly whatI'm talking about. But anyways, good question. Nice, Nice.Yes, I enjoy both of those selections. I'll give a nod to one.I and they heard again and was like yes, this song is sogood. A flagpole said up by Harvey...

Danger, which just more people probablyknow it as the I'm not sick, but I'm not well. So yeah, yeah, okay, because I was like I don't know, I don'tknow, yeah, but I know that, but I love that song. Thatwas in probably at least three teen movies from the S or early S. Oh, absolutely, that's that's the barometer, I think, for forany kind of success for the S and S is. How many of thoseteen movies, like if you're in every single American pie, you're probably doingquite fine, even though those movies have their fair share of problems. Yeah, banker status. True, if you show up an in more than smovie, you gotta hit song. I think the cranberries probably hmmm, Imean I we guess the cranberries dreams maybe takes the cake for that age group. Teen S movies or coming of age s movies. That's got to bethe song. Yeah, surely there's been some kind of analysis. I thinkthere actually has been. When when, I believe her name was surely funnyenough, when the lead singer of the cranberries died, I think they'd somebodydid a video about how dreams was just everywhere when that came out in movies. Yeah, also, also a fantastic song. It's all, though,is a good one. I mean I I s sent a few. Willmake mixes, I mean am I playlists, and my s playlist is probably mymost beloved. I'm looking at it right now. There's just some there'ssome yeah, bangers on here. Magical. Okay, we could, we couldcertainly go down this road sheryll day, but I do want to get backto your fastball, live Green Day, no doubt, collective soul, soundgarden, last more set seal. All right, we might need toput a link to this in in the show notes, so we'll follow upfor that for sure. anyways, got him out of there, got outof this magical magical. Now you were talking about how, a post trumpworld, these conversations and topics are hopefully better received and people are more willingto talk and listen, which I think it's also a key element to this. I not just that's, I think, shouting. I'm going on, yes, and it's the number. That's the first part. But it isstill, you know, a lot of topics and areas where people maybe aren'tas comfortable chatting about it as they would be, say, s music,maybe a little harder to like, I want to use the word Pry,but kind of pride stuff out of people sometimes. So your experience as ahost, I'm sure, helps with that. But what makes for a good interviewin having conversations that are worth getting out there, I think if peoplefeel seen and that they're not part of some other person's show. I thinkif the the best interviews are when someone is comfortable enough to share something thatmaybe they've never shared, but most of all, really peel back the layers, the masks, whatever you want to call it, that they usually puton when they're on camera or on mic or or just around people who theydon't know that well. And so the best interviews are when it can,it can not only be comfortable and kind of casual to a certain degree,but I think what I like doing on the show is digging in and andmaking people kind of formulate these ideas about themselves in the world around them thatit is still from them, but they're they're you know, those kind ofAha moments for yourself. You're like, wow, I'm kind of I'm reallyhappy with the way I put together that idea. I think those are reallyfun. I think, you know, the interviews were people feel like theykind of made little connections and breakthroughs and and and connections with themselves. Absolutely. And then on the flip side of it, have you ever had,whether with this show or any of your hosting past, you know, pasthosting experiences, have you ever had someone gets so upset that they left,or is that just something we get to see on them? Oh, yeah, I've never I am pretty good at not getting to that point. Idon't. I'm not here for a Gotcha situation, I think, because that'susually what it is people. People are just they're so uncomfortable and they feel, honestly, the like. I've I've been in situations, lunches with peopleor meetings with people, where I felt like leaving, and it's usually becauseI'm there's been some rug pulled out from under me, where someone is haseither not lied but as either as either kind of done a little deceit orsomething things are not as they seem, or or someone is being kind ofunnecessarily cruel or something like that. So...

I don't I've never had that situation. And even when people are wary about the interview afterwards, which does happenwhere people go. I think I said too much about this and I'm worriedabout the way this came up, at least for me, and it's,you know, it's, you know, not journalistically the best way to goabout it, but I do give people to benefit of the doubt and gohey, like, I think it was fine, but if you want tolisten to it, here you go and and if you have really have aproblem with it, I'll cut that out. And I think ninety nine percent ofthe time, and all of the shows are interviews I've done, peoplealways end up going you know what, I'm going to just stick with whatI said in the moment, because it's you know, you want to.People should want to stick to their word. If they know they're on camera,on on the mic, it it's good to. They should know whatthey're doing, you know. Yeah, I think that's a common issue.I've certainly run into that a few times too. We're after the fact.People are like, actually, can I not say that, and I waslike, but you did. Like if it's you know, if it's somethinglike an NDA and you like accidentally blurted something out like that, I canunderstand. And that did happen one time and I was like you should probablyhave that buttoned up a little more. But I think for the most partyou should have an idea of what you can and cannot say and you know, maybe it's nerves that pop in with there, but I think if it'snot, you know, anything like incriminating, then yeah, leave it in.It's more authentic and it's and it's I understand is tricky sometimes. I'vehad, you know, higher profile people on shows and stuff like that,and they they get worried about phrasing, which is natural. I mean,especially now we are in a we're in a time where you can, youcan say one thing wrong and really get in deep shit. And and andthat sort of justice has its place and and is taking, you know,picking up the slack for a criminal justice system and a systemic system of justicethat is not, you know, helping the little guys and gals and soso I get that, I get I get being wary of things and and, but also what's important is to be able to look at maybe a mistakenwording or phrasing and apologize for things like that wholeheartedly. And this is actuallya part of, you know, down the road, one of my biggoals is is promoting this idea of restorative justice, which applies to victims ofsexual assault. As well as saying the wrong thing or saying something racist oror something not empathetic to or punching down and restorative justice. It's this ideathat, especially in the criminal justice world, where it's being applied, you know, more directly through different types of psychologists and therapists and case workers,stuff like that. It's it's this idea of justice where there is a collaborationbetween the victim and the perpetrator to find a sentence or some sort of ofa, you know, end game for the relationship that serves both parties andand it's, you know, it's not necessarily like the victim saying, youknow, I'm I'm the judge and jury and I think you should go tojail for thirty years for what you did to me. It's more about,okay, you you did this thing to me. You're human being. Humanbeing can change, human beings have the right to growth. I can empathizewith that. Let's look at what is fair to both of us and finda middle ground. And it's a lot more it's seen as much more satisfyingkind of resolution for victims and, of course, for perpetrators, but reallyfor victims because it's there's more control, especially in circumstances that the original crimeor you know, trespass or whatever it was. The original thing, youknow, did not give the victim as much control, and so it's almost, you know, handing more control to someone who kind of deserves it andthat circumstance. So that's that's the idea of restorative justice and it's we're goingto we're going to you're going to be hearing it. We're all going tobe hearing it a lot, I think, in the next ten years as thisalternative, as as the criminal justice system does shift in the wake ofdefund the police and and everything like that.

So it's a very cool idea,I think. I don't know what you think about that. Yeah,I feel like I've heard rare instances of something like that and it's I'm tryingto think now if this is ever like I know I've seen it like inTV shows as kind of like a you know, we don't want to putsomeone away for, you know, fairly minor crime in the grand scheme ofthings, and maybe they'll come to some kind of agreement. I know I'mlike positive. I've seen it in a simpsons episode comedic effect, and Yeah, I think it's a it is a very interesting alternative to, yeah,some of these like real harsh penalties that come down for people that, youknow, probably probably don't deserve them in a lot of cases, and it'sit's an area that I'm excited to learn more about and kind of see howit grows, like you're saying, in the next ten years, and youknow, it's certainly like I think if two thousand and twenty is taught usanything, it's to like expect anything and just when you think you've you've hitthe bottom or the wall, or whatever you want to call it, wherethere's yeah, there's there's more, there's more to come and it's not allterrible, like it's just you kind of got to look at things in differentways, and I think that's a great example of this and it kind ofties nicely into something else that I wanted to chat about, which was yourprevious podcast, explain things to me, which I think the title is prettyself explanatory. So my question is, what's the your favorite thing that youhad explained to you? That's a great question. I mean, explain thingsto me. If people don't know, it's I no longer do that podcast, but it was bringing in experts and having them explain their jobs and andit was a lot of what they did and then kind of debunking myths aboutthat job. So I mean a lot of people's favorite is the first episodeand it was a more titian and, honestly, I mean it a lotof the things that were spoken about in a lot of these episodes just changedmy view and did make me a mini expert, you know, and thatwas what was cool about it, because we kind of got to now Iknow a bunch of about, you know, sizemology and the big one, youknow, the big earthquake that's going to hit the west coast, andI know a lot more about about mushrooms or you know, how lawyers orI mean another favorite was it just always it's just kind of funny, likeit sticks in my head, like there was a we had a blood spatteranalyst and I was just like, Oh, so it's not splatter, the wordis spatter. That just stuck in my head. But the more Titianwas great because this idea of death as something that is Ikey or we gotto stay away from it and were scared of it and and and the waythat we deal with death being this separate thing from life is, you know, bullshit. We have to embrace it and I I just really stuck withme. She had this idea that is illegal, but she you know,we asked her why. Caitlyn doughty was was her name? We as tohow she wanted to be buried or what she wanted to be done with herbody, and she said sky burial, which is when you put your bodyout in the woods and you let the animals and birds feast on you andthen you just disintegrates over, you know, the years, you decompose. Iguess that wasn't what I was thinking when I said my wow, Iwas expecting like getting shot into the sky or something, but that's also that'salso about. That is that's what I thought was initially too, because it'slike, yes, skyberry, like you shoot your ashes into the sky,it'd be like it would get on everybody, like like in the big Labowski orsomething. But no, apparently it's allowing the birds of the sky tobe your burial. Huh, sounds I'm it. Well, to me,it's like it's like plant yourself with the tree, those tree pod things,and I think we should be able to decide legally if we want that tobe done. I mean it's I think probably people are worried about sanitation orwhatever, disease or something, but I think that should be an option ifyou want it to be. Personally, yeah, yeah, did you everfrom any of the people that you talked with? Did you ever feel sopassionate that you're like, maybe this could be a career, moved down theline or what? Did it never get to that? No, I meanI was, I have always been, very, very tunnel visioned about beingan entertainment and so yeah, at the...

...time I was very set on acting. But I mean it, it's it's a lovely thing because it I thinka lot of our listeners it helped out it. We had a lot ofyoung listeners and we actually we had one person on twice and that was DrRominy Dervasula, who's a therapist, psychologist who kind of specialized in narcissism,and we had her on the show and then we had her on again andshe told us the second time around that her whatever, current assistant or graduatedsisters, some sort of someone who work for her, had contacted her becausethey heard her on our podcast. And so that's cool, but it didn't. Know, it didn't really make me rethink my path, but it definitelybroaden my horizons about how incredible and how many more things there are outside ofthe entertainment industry, because when you're in the entertainment industry. You you drinkthe cool aid, you kind of think that you're the most important thing andcity in the world and that's not really true. Yeah, it's amazing,and this show has taught me the same thing of like how many different careerpaths there are out there and if you can dream of something, then it'sI mean, tens of thousands of people are probably doing it already. Butyeah, there you can. You can always find a niche somewhere where you'rekind of the unique creative one out of however many people there are. Butjust like and even just like some of the side hobbies that people have isalways so fascinating to me, and I'm sure and quarantine life people have pickedup even more. And I guess I'd be remiss if I didn't ask him. You picked up any quarantine hobbies? Um, I mean it's it's it'sa pretty basic one, but it is something that I've I have not reallycommitted to my entire adult life and that's working out nice. Like I finallydidn't have an excuse, and so up until, you know, the pastmonth when I was moving, I was working out four to five times aweek for the first time in my life since high school, and so thatthat was the new thing. That and developing real feels just kind of becamethe thrust of my days. But yeah, it's it's not cool. It's notI mean, I have other things I like to do that are fun, like playing drums. I know you are you a guitarist? Yes,and so, yeah, like playing music when I can, and I'm goingto set up my drum set in the new place here, which is goingto be fucking awesome. But and so that'll be you know, quarantines.That over, so I think that'll be my my next quarantine thing is takingdrums back up. But yeah, nothing, not like I mean, I guesscooking a little bit more, but I was already doing that. Soyeah, nothing. No baking bread for me, just baking my body.That's it. Yeah, I feel like the bread making was a real,real hot item and March, in April and then it just fell off acliff. But you know, could I did? I didn't go down thatrout either, but Kudos to everyone who did. And I think drums area terrific just like a stress relief. It look way more than playing guitaris, but I mean any, any kind of music, is fantastic andhighly recommend anyone who's been thinking about it do it. Do it. It'sso fun so funny. There's never been a better time to the really hasn't. Yeah, and yeah, I actually grew up playing, I say playingvery loose air quotes here, of playing drums. My Mom bought me asnare drum and then we just progressively, like every Christmas or birthday, wouldadd a piece to it and then recently she was like you're not playing these, like their tag up space in the house. I'm going to sell them. I'm like car right, I guess that's fine, but I was Iwas kind of getting the itch a few weeks ago and I'm like, howfar did you get with the adding to your set? Did you get tolike wood block Glockenspiel Gong kind? I didn't. I did have a Cowbell, which was was a like, you know, that had to be afterseeing the SNL bit of Huh, needs more cowbell? I think that thatreally solidified it. I was kind of on the fence and then I'm likeno, Cow Bos too much fun. I have to have that. Butit was pretty size. Well, let's see if I definitely. There wasa bass drum and two TOM's. I don't think I got to a floorTom but I had right sembal high hat crash to Tom's, over the overthe base, over the kick. You to no floor. How many symbolswe talk in this and I'm sorry, folks, when drummers get together,this is how many symbols we talk in here. We had. We hadthe high hat ride and a crash.

That's all you need. And thenan important question. You got the cow bell. Where was the placement onthat one? Mine was attached to the kick drum, so it was kindof above my right knee. was might where my cow bell was placed.That was I believe that's where mine was to. I can't remember if itwas to the kick or the the snare. Had like a little clothing that Iwas able to hang it onto too. I think I started that at firstand then I was like no, it's more secure over the kick because, yeah, I think you need it. You needed an easy, accessible place. You don't want to be like ringing all over, because I'm assumingyou're probably hitting a cowbell several times in succession. If you're using it,you're not going to just give it like a one right, one, smash. So and I'm when you got it on the snare, then then you'reat almost making you're hitting the snare at the same time, relatively, you'rein the cowbell. If it's mounted on a snare, you will create thesnare type sound, which is not what you want. You want to cleancowbell sound. So that makes sense. But you you you trouble shot itand you figured it out and you know that sounds great. I wish Icould go back and, you know, jam to drummer style with you backback in the day. How young we talking about? I think I wasthirteen. Yeah, when I started thirteen and and kind of just grew itthroughout high school and then, as we've discussed, we both went to schoolat Miami, so I was out of the Midwest and then I lived inLa for a couple of years and now in Austin. So have not beena full time resident of Chicago in about, Oh goodness, fourteen, fifteen yearsnow. So the drums were just collecting dust, but I I'd liketo think at least my parents would rock out on them a couple times ayear, even though that's certainly was not the case. Yeah, what amake grow they just growled at it and thought about how much better it wouldbe if it wasn't there. But are sweet people, I'm sure, andwe're like, well, they are joey's and maybe he'll want them or somethinglike that. That's that's very sweet of them. Yeah, they held ontothem for much longer than was required and I would have expected. So Isold my original kit for gas money to drum. I've to Los Angeles.That was a wow. It's my kind of classic story. Did it getyou there? Did you have? Did you like Peter out along the wayget gas money? Wise, I think it was probably enough. I probablyenough. That would have been extra devastating, I think. If you that's thatwas all the money I had. I mean after going to school atMiami, I wouldn't be surprised. I'm very excited about this possible student loandebt forgiven this situation under Biden, because eleven years later, brand he's gotsome still got some debt and they're still asking for support for current state.God, yes, I don't. I. They don't call me anymore. II. I pleasantly told them off enough times. Yeah, maybe Ijust need to do it a little more. I feel like I'll still get thecalls every once in a while. Certainly was getting a few texts duringelection season and I still maybe, maybe this decade will be the one wherethere's a way to inform people that you've already voted so that they take youoff the list of like Hey, who you're going to vote for? I'mlike, well, it's already happened, so please, I don't need atext right now. Yeah, I mean, as I I've done some calling,I've done a little bit of calling. Did for Lizzie Warren, did somecalling and during the primary, and it's definitely you get. You reachsome people who are like please take me off the list. You've called fivetimes and I'm like, I'm so sorry. It's very easy for the people runningthose things, the texting and the calling, to to fuck it upand to not mark you correctly. So now, being on both sides ofit, I do empathize. But yeah, I'd be good, it'd be goodto opt out quicker. Yeah, I think I'm fine with like,I'm never gonna blame a color text for it, but yeah, I thinkit's just like when it's when you've already voted. I'm like, well,there's nothing, like nothing you can say would sway me because it's already happened. So why you didn't vote three, four times? Was I supposed to? Well, I mean you can, I mean Democrats can. I knowthey that. That's true. Why I blew it. So my apologies tomy low fellow voters out here. I didn't know. I didn't know.Yeah, we're apparently allowed, allowed to...

...vote multiple times. This is whatI hear now. Something that I like to ask musicians, and you havethe benefit, I guess, of having both music and acting experience. Youcan pick your poison here, but I always like to hear what's one ofthe worst gigs you've had acting for sure, because I have, of had much, much less music gigs. Worst Acting GIG was. This was incredible. Back when I was a non union actor. This was my last nonunion thing I ever did because it it just totally just pissed me off somuch. And Actors beware, if you're, you know, signing up for nonunion gigs, they can really just do whatever they want and screw aroundand change the rules of what's happening. But basically I auditioned and had beencast as one of the supporting, you know, characters in a feature filmthat was going to be shot very quickly, over the course of three days atthis big mansion up in the Hollywood hills. Actually maybe it was Brentwood, and so very exciting and it was non union. So it's just likewell, you know whatever, I have a bunch of scenes and they'll bereally good for my acting reel. And so it's one of those things wherethere's not a lot of details, but they're like meet here at, youknow, nine am and bring three changes of clothes and we'll figure it out. So I park on the side of the road, meeting a parking lot, and then there's these there's like a van and like okay, so thiskind of professional there's like a minivan that's driving us up to the location atthis at this mansion, and I'm meeting, you know, you talked with yourfellow actors and stuff like that, and you see somebody you know andthat's cool, and there's all these extras. It's a really big production and slowlyyou're once we get the location, there's very little food, but you'relike okay, that kind of happens, and then slowly you're just waiting andthen you're in holding your waiting and the hours tick by and I'm getting paid, I think, maybe to fifty for three days like nothing, but it'sit was a good opportunity. I read the script and I met the riderson set by meeting all these people and we're just not shooting, not shooting, not shooting, and we end up not shooting at all all day andthere's like a hundred people there and they apologize and they go we'll make itup tomorrow. So I come the next day and they say that we shootone scene of mine, they shoot a couple more other scenes and they say, okay, we're running out of time, change of plans. We're going toturn this we're going to shoot a derrito's crash the super bowl commercial withthe rest of our time at the house. And so so then they start dolingout rolls ran at random and then they go, okay, you knowyou'll be on camera for sure if you want to jump in the pool,and I'm like, I guess. So I jump in the pool. Idon't even have a swim Trun I just jump in the pool in my underwearand there they somehow they have like a big Dorito suit and I'm like,wait a second, they literally this wasn't this one isn't supposed to be afilm shoot. They are a completely fucked production. That is just was likeback pocket we're in just kind of this idea that, oh, we're goingto make a crash the super bowl commercial. And then I didn't go the lastday and made them pay me my two hundred and fifty. But itwas one of the circumstances where these are two these were two twelve hour dayswhere I shot one scene and then and then she jumped into a pool infront of a guy in Adrito's costume, after the promise of being like thiskind of supporting role in this indie comedy and it was it was so dishearteningand so disappointing. You know, it was just it was just very funny. It's like, okay, and if you guys don't know what crash theSuper Bowl commercials are, they're kind of this thing that everybody does when they'renon union, because it's there. You know, there's a promise of amillion dollar deal if they pick your commercial, but it's like the most lowbrow,kind of crappy thing to do as a upandcoming actor, creator and andso that was among the worst gigs. I mean there's worse ones where you'renot getting paid and everything's awful, but that one was egregious in particular.Did I'm assuming the answer is no, because I don't recall seeing a commerciallike this. But was this picked as a winner for one of the SuperBowls? I mean, not only was it not picked, I don't thinkthey even finished it. I don't think they finished it. I never theysent me. They couldn't send me the...

...commercial. They sent me the shotthat I was in in case I want to use that in my reel,which I had to beg someone for, and it's you know, but youcan't use no lines and jumping into pool like that's not even worth while.But when you're up and when you're starting out, you need anything on camera. And I was like, I guess I'll take it. But yeah,it was and then they're not feeding you. I mean it's just it is avery it's a tough it's a of course everybody knows that being an actorstough, but it's a really deceptive industry because it just does use people andmakes forces people who don't have money to work for free four years with thepromise of maybe some exposure and of course those those, you know, DreamScenarios Work and and happen and people are discovered. But there is a asmy friend Evan Watkins says, there is a kind of slight of hand.There's a magic that that La has that has kind of gone away with Covidthat I think people are starting to see a little bit, me included,although I hope I don't sound too cynical about it, because I've had alovely time, but it's it's just interesting to see it after, you know, my experiences ten years in the business. Yeah, and I think too fromagain, this is from much less involved space, but just, youknow, conversations with friends and and kind of seeing it as like a flyon the wall. Sometimes it's the slight hand is a good way to putit. Like it's the particular way someone will phrase something where it's like Oh, technically, like I didn't say anything, that's not true. It's just like, you know, you obviously take it another way and it's just yeah, it's a lot of a lot of shenanigans, to put it mildly,and taking advantage which, like, I have also had people work for mefor free, but it's when I'm working for free to I mean like there'sa reasonable again collaboration, there's there's a there's a point where you can behonest with people and gives you know, state your piece and not have totrick people to work with you. And that, you know, it goesfor dating to not having to trick people, but it's yeah, it's just oneof those things that you become aware of the more experiences you have withit. But but yeah, it's that was the that was the one andI said I'm going to join the Union somehow and never do this again,and I did and it was union work is much better. That's why I'mglad it's spurred action, even if it was terrible in the moment, anda great story. I enjoyed that very much. Thank you, and we'llmove from non unionto a similar topic. I think of a musical group thathas struggled, really didn't see a lot of success in their heyday, whichis the Beatles, and this is a question that I also like to askall of my guesses. What's a question you wish you were asked more frequently? And you, I know I read this recently, of how many songsthe Beatles have put out ever, but what is your favorite one out ofthe I don't know to it's like two hundred, something like two hundred thirtyor so songs the Beatles have done. What is number one favorite on Brad'slist? So what's cool is I just did a big drive, big long, several day drive, and I just decided I could listen to a booker, a podcast, but I'm just going to start with the I have aplaylist of the Beatles that's all their music in chronological order, and I'm justgoing to listen to him without skipping any songs, which I normally do,because they have a lot of a lot of shitty songs and their earlier albumand so I just pushed through and I've been a Beatles fan the my earliestmemory as a human was watching the movie help and and so my if Iwere to pick one favorite beatle song, it would be from help and it'sit's it's one that people don't talk about as much but I think is worthyand a beautiful song. And it's the song I need you by George Harrison. It Nice. And so even though technically I think while George Harrison ispart of the Beatles, picking a George Song as a favorite Beatles Song Idon't think counts as much because the Beatles, the heart and soul the Beatles isthe lenn McCartney thing. But the song that I think about the mostor that I like to sing the most is I need you, and andso that's if I could only listen to one more Beatles song ever again,that would be that very nice, very nice. Yeah, I think Georgeis certainly less revered among the group, but I mean certainly a step ofa ringo still. So He's there's letter...

McCartney very high up. George arsonslike can make is incredible. And also, I think people don't quite talk aboutit enough. When they talked about the Beatles and listening to the earlytracks George his Solos are really well done. He's a he. I mean hecomposed those Solos and almost every song and so he he's the quiet beatleand he's very sweet and all of that, but he was a hell of aguitarist and you know, people talk about Paul's Bass and John Songwriting andall that stuff. But George's ask he's good, good guitarist, that youcan write some great stuff, for sure. Well bred. You are almost offthe hook, but we always like to wrap up with the top threeand I also usually like to to let you choose. And I as acheese AFICIONADO. Why say that? Like I know a lot about cheeseus Ijust enjoy eating them. But you specifically call that Vegan cheese. Is So. What are your top three? Vegan cheese is so when I when Ithink about the the so, I grew up in Wisconsin, America's dairy land. Cheese is my favorite food my whole life. My parents, to quietme down as a kid, would give me a slice of, you know, craft American in my hand. That was how I grew up and madethe switch about five years ago to go, you know, cut dairy out formultiple reasons, but one of them being that, you know, thediscovery that we technically aren't supposed to be ingesting dairy. It's meant for babycows and out for humans. And so I stopped. I lost ten poundsafter like a month of not eating dairy and then had to kind of figureout a replacement and the best thing about the easiest way to kind of getmore, you know, Vegan leaning lifestyle is to replace your favorite foods.And so slowly I found these favorites, and so my top three. Mynumber three is a sliced cheese called Chow Cho, and that was my kindof gateway cheese because it tasted so close to real and so the chow kindof slice cheese you can find that in most grocery stores, would be mynumber three. My number two would be a cream cheese like a it's actuallya pub cheese, and that's a Miyoko's Roadhouse Cheddar, and that's the closest. It tastes incredible with the cracker. It's a type of thing that Igrew up eating, you know, pup cheese out of out of a plasticcontainer on a Ritz. So mioko's is a great vegan dairy company. Andthen number one is a local la place called misha's, and that would bemisha's locks or Misha's sorry s Ari, and they're both cream cheeses that workfor crackers or for bagels or for toast, Avocado Toast. Those would be mytop three and and and you know, if anybody scoffing at the idea ofa vegan cheese that they could never stop eating cheese again. I grewup on it and I've just feel so much better. My body feels better, my stomach feels better and it's worth at least trying some of these becausethe technology behind, just the food technology behind some of these vegan options arereally incredible and just playing healthier. So those are my top three fantastic II don't think I've explored vegan cheese very much, but I think I can. I agree with the how you feel better. I've cut out cow's milkand and yeah, it's a similar sort of like. I don't think werealized how bad a lot of things we grew up on our growing up justbecause, you know, there wasn't science around it and there weren't as muchpeople researching alternatives and things like that. But it is pretty spectacular to seewhat has already been created as alternatives, as substitutes, and what's coming onthe horizon, because I am I feel like every month I'm just like theydid what with what like super impressive well, what kind of milk we talking about. What was your replacement? Almond? Yeah, I typically go with almond. I've dabbled with oat and soy as well. I did try Pmilk for the first time recently, yeah, which was pretty good. I reasonfuddle. Try to Macadamia. It's called milk a Damia. Great,great name. All right, all right, I might need to that as agreat name and I do reward great...

...names for at least trying them.Let's see if they they can knock allmond off of the list, but that'llbe that'll be an update for next time, please. Yes, I mean here'sa top three best melts. There's enough alternative milks out there that youcan have a top three. But it's true, and probably by by thistime next or we can get maybe even do a top ten, at leasta top five, I I would believe. I think the milk technology it's it'smoving rapidly. It's a rapid thing. Excellent. I'm very reconnect with thevaccine, I think. Well, Brad, thank you so much forhopping on and chatting. This was great. We covered I think, maybe themost extensive net that any guests has ever had on here. So veryappreciative of that if people want to learn more about you, if they wantto check out an episode of real feels, where can they find you? Theycan go to real feelscom. That's our Al Felscom. Should find everythingelse but real feels on Instagram, twitter, Youtube, but you can just goto real feelscom and it'll it'll get you where you need to go.That's that's all any of us can ask for. It awesome. Well,of course, we'll also end with a bad joke, as we always do, and I'll leave I even made it cheese themed, based on the top. Oh cool, but I actually have an addiction to cheddar cheese, butthankfully it's only a mild one. Good after it today. People lovely.I love cheese and cheesy jokes.

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