Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 95 · 11 months ago

95: Step Up Your Digital Communication with Sam George

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We've all been there—you send a text message or email to someone, and it just sits there. They don't answer, even after following up. Our heart starts racing, beads of sweat form on our foreheads, and we may even start shaking with rage. Don't they LIKE us?!

In his latest book, I'll Get Back to You, Sam George explore s why this drives us so crazy—and what we can do about it. 

Sam also has an extensive background in spotting trends before they're widely popular and bringing them to the mainstream. He put together the strategy that ultimately succeeded in legalizing cannabis in 18 states. 

He's also worked with Nancy Pelosi, George Soros, and the University of Phoenix and is an expert in communication and how we can better interact with each other in this wacky digital world.

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is Sam George and we're going to jump all the way back to one thousand nine hundred and ninety five, which is when Sam first put together the strategy that ultimately led to cannabis being legalized in eighteen states. Maybe even by the time you hear this it'll be more, I'm because a lot of states are legalizing marijuana, especially medical marijuana, so lots of goodness from that alone. But Sam has done so many other things. He's worked with Nancy Pelosi, George Soros, the University of Phoenix, and he's very good at identifying trends before they become trends. He was probably on clubhouse in like two thousand and eighteen, back before that became a wild roller coaster of things. But we're chatting so much about the art of communication and immediate feedback, especially in our digital world here. Sam's latest book is called I'll get back to you, and it tackles the issue of why I unreturned messages, those texts we send, those emails, those even those social media messages that we send to people. Maybe we'll get the read receipt back and they haven't responded and it drives us. But NANEES B an as, that's Oh no, I forgot it. D In there I'm spelling like Gwen Stefani and Hallabacra Wild Times. But there's a lot of fascinating things in this episode. If you've ever felt like, Hey, I'm not being heard or I can't communicate very well with this person, there's so many good tips in here, so listen up. If you'd like to get in touch with the show, you can reach out on Instagram, twitter or facebook at GPCT podcast, or send an email joey at good people, cool thingscom. I love hearing from you. Also love, if you support the show, be a heading on over to apple podcasts, dropping a five star rating, a review. It does help more people discover the show, despite what Apple May and still it is fantastic for discovery and it also support the show via the shop. Good people, cool thingscom shop very simple, very wonderful. Get yourself some Nice Swag and you'll look stylish as I'll get up as you're listening to this episode with Sam. For people who are not familiar with you, can you give us your elevator pitch, but can you also tell us the type of elevator that we're writing on? Well, it would be an alligate elevator that would be totally glass and there would be no floor. It would just be, you know, it would be out, it would be nondimensional and I would be going up, but it's kind of hard to say what's going up when there are no dimensions. You know, always wanted a glass house that's high. Envision it an elevator, glass elevator. I've been doing politics for many years. That's really my vocation. My specialization is ballot measures. I worked at a number of big ballot measures campaign. I'm the architect of the whole marijuana legalization medical marijuana. Basically, in one thousand nine hundred and ninety five or it was hired by three billionaires, including George Soros, to put together a plan to legalize marijuana and America over twenty you know, a step by step process and and and I came up with a ballot measure campaign and the past, state by state, and that is something that, you know, I've also done big things with, like I helped to like to, you know, I work with Nancy Pelosi, not so much anymore so I but initiatives my true love because you take ideas and and they're about ideas and not just about, you know, who gets selected. They're much more creative. In terms of what I did in politics, I did communications, you know, messaging. You know what's the one word that changes everything? Well, in the case of marijuana, the one word was medical, you know,...

...and that word changed everything. And it's not because it was euphemism for Oh, sick people know. What it did is it was a metaphor to show that doctors, the medical community, was in control, because people trust doc you know, the medical community the time of law enforcement. So that's the kind of messaging I do and you know that's my background. In the last five to ten you last five years especially, I've moved my whole thing from radio and television into digital. I do digital communications, Digital Strategy with nonprofit political organizations in a couple of packs, and that that's been significant because it allowed me, in terms of the actual answer here and to be able to assess situation. It gave me the background to the to then give ideas to people of how to improve their situation, which we can talk about later, but I will be I brought that expertise to the book. So that's my background and you know that's some of my background. Anything else you'd like to know? was there a specific platformer moment within the digital space where you like that made you change your focus to that, or were you just seeing generally how the world was going? was just natural transition to you, because you not wanting to be it. It was easy, you know. Basically I was phasing out because, you know, like if you're in the battlefield, you know, I just couldn't handle, you know, the kind of stuff you see on CNN. So it was just a natural, you know, transition. As it pulled away. I saw the power here. I've been involved in it for a long time. Goes back what I was involved in the University of Phoenix Online, the First University, about twenty some years ago, and they went online and did research for them. This is the focus which I was telling you about at the time, that they were trying to consider, basically when they went online, when their first university, whether they would, you know, speak through a zoom like inn race, or whether they would communicate. And teams are very important. So I tested all different kinds of forms, phones, zoom, they all kinds of different platforms, did focus groups across the country and found that their team should actually use phones, okay, for conference calls. Because so, I guess what I'm trying to say is I have a very optimistic of the future of digital, but what I've learned is that there are some dangerous components of digital. That it's not it's the it's so what the problem is really is that digital is now so big. It mean it's the primary means of communication, and that is to the exclusion of talk, of conversation. You know, the exclusion of that, and you know for Millennia we relyed on since then, this is arguably the biggest shifts, bigger than the training pro ups, because for the first time we don't talk to each other. Because, I mean, I hate I'm going to you know, words matter. You know, I mean like the definitions of words matter, and you can't talk for emails and text because talking says speech and the word conversation says talking to someone you know. So I mean but what's beneath that? What the what the pivotal concept is not just the speaking, but rather the fact that there's immediate feedback. That is the ultimate problem of digital communication. There is no immediate feedback and we are not set up for that. And so there is a negative in terms...

...of the problems that situation has created, both psychologically as well as, obviously in terms of communication. But it's also affected on the other side because this is taking a greater part of the band width. It's pushing conversation and talk. You know, used to be, oh, we talked for hours, we talked all night. Well, I would talked to our you know. I mean, essentially, we're in a situation where, you know, calling people as the last resort. We're just so used to this and that interaction is important for our for for a wellbeing and humans. So the these two things are very significant. But that is just the context of what I call the discommunication crisis, and you kind of touch on this and more than touch on this, you dive into this in your book. I'll get back to you, which I think asks a question. I know, I mean, I know I'm guilty of this and I've certainly had other people make comments along the same lines. But when we send a message to someone, whether it's a text or a social media message or an email or things like that, and they don't respond back, especially if they've got the read receipts on and we see that they've read it, and it just makes us go crazy. We're like why, why have they not responded back, and I think we stress ourselves out a lot more than we need to for that. Why is that? Because I'm not a, you know, a trained psychologist. So so, I've been in a psychology office for a long time, but I'm not trained psychologist. I learned the other way. I know other side of the couch, but I can tell you that that it is psychological. So there's this thing that happens to people and I've done pulling and focus groups that I can talk to you about, but essentially they're when somebody doesn't return our message, no matter what the format, but particularly email or text or something, you know, electronic. What happens is that first there's anxiety, innocence, of restlessness and, you know, maybe agitation. I mean we start wondering very quickly. That starts happening pretty early. Like I send him on one or three note, three o'clock, and it doesn't take long before we start to spe decide, hey, something's wrong, or like why? What did why is something wrong? You know, you know you don't return messages for a long time, but you decide something's wrong and that whatever is wrong must have to do with you. And here's the crazy part. We immediately universally jump to the worst case scenario, the worst possible explanation to explain it's right. And if you try and tell yourself blah, blah blah, it will last for a minute. You'll just keep on going back to the the worst case scenario and from there it just takes out a life of it cell. And once you start with the worst case scenario and you catastrophizes, it forms a loop and it can sort of continues. It's kind of hard to get out of your head. It becomes a negative loop. Don I mean you know one said, you know they it was a that I'm not going to quote. It's I think it's in my book, Lady Gaga. Actually, you know, I can't hear the music in my head because there's so many negative loops. The loops keep on repeating, but the bottom line is street some noise in our mind. We think about it a lot and and according to my research, to summarize via the research, yet about seventy percent of the people, generally, because they have different answers, that one,...

...experience the anxiety and agitation to jump to the worst case scenario in three catastrophies and read process in their heads. Okay, as those are the fundamentals, and this is in fact sequence or a syndrome. I call it the discommunication syndrome. So many of my last show ask me why don't I call it the Sam George Syndrome? Yeah, it actually is a real syndrome. And is there a way to overcome it? You were you're saying how you can, you know, try and tell yourself these things, like it's not the worst case scenario, but then shortly after we're going back to these kind of doomed Ay, doomsday sort of situation going on. So is there a way to overcome it or is this just part of life? Well, the reason we do this is because of our brain. It's not because, you know, there's all kinds of books about negative loops and why we tell ourselves the stories we tell ourselves and blah, blah, blah, pauses. Honestly, it's like a cloche and it turns out, at least in short term situation, I mean some people have long term problem, but it turns out in short term situations that it's simply the way your brain processes information. The brain processes information, and this gets some of the people want to get into this. It gets kind of like their eyes place over. But I think you're smart enough, Joe. But, but, but when the brain processes information through through patterns, it's called pattern recognition. Everything has to have a pattern. And what happens in an intermitent area? You know, this is a broken loop. We don't know the story. So the brain is forcing as we don't come up with these, we're forced. Why do you think we so quickly universally come up to worst case scenarios? Because the brain is using the worst case scenario. It's pushing us into it because it's a way to definitively complete. It's pack so it can store the information, and that's the reason. I mean, why else would we continue to do this? We know, you know, like eighty percent of the ninety percent of the people, eighty six percent of the people say hey. I mean it's rarely, rarely turns out to be true. These fantasies were thinking in our head. We suspect our girl from our whys betrayal, you know, we sect our boss of firing, all these crazy things. So what is obviously something you know. It has to be something deep. So it really doesn't matter how confident you are, whether you do yoga or don't do yoga or whatever. It doesn't matter. It doesn't matter you're insecure, your first child, third child. These negative loops are are our fact of life, and it's not just true about UN returned messages. What do you do in someone's Lice? The first place you've jumped to? Oom, Oh, it was an accident. You know again the brain going in the patter. There's a number given her back about a job. Well, I'm not going to get into it, but essentially the with the problem in here is in conversation, is that it's a particular problem because it's not just a one shot thing like someone's late. It's an actual conversation, and so that gets back to the problem is that this happens all the time and it happens you don't have to go into the full scale syndrome. People were thinking all the time about emails they've got out. You know, people are kind of trying to process the feedback and actually in writing the email right, but what would they think, oh about? And so one of the greatest things that what you know, because they're we're afraid that that they'll misunderstand is, you know, I mean, I mean, that's that's it, but there are ways, you know, a praamptive strategies, the way around this. Listen, we have to give it back to is. So essentially, yes, the book is about unreturned messages. I mean, but it's really that the it's really the lens that opens...

...up the whole digital crisis of communication, and that is the lack of immediate feedback. Talking and conversation. Of Google has emails and texts are not conversations and you know, technically by the dictionary they're not, because the speech. But what is implicit in that is is immediate feedback like we have right now. This is a conversation, you know. So, but our conversations have become digital and they're not conversations and and it's it's caused a lot of miscommunication. It causes a tremindous amount of anxiety. And you know, we can't think outside of this, so we don't realize, you know, where we're at. You know, I wonder sometimes if phones came now, maybe people would jump off the ship. You know, AH, wow, you know, it's great we can talk to people again. You know, what happens if phones came later? I wonder. So, so that's that's that. So, basically you have the discommunication crisis. The setup is this, you know, digital communications and the lack of mediate feedback. There is this psychological syndrome that's created by the way our brains process patterns and and and that's quite independent of that, but it's highlighted because digital communications and then, you know. So what you have to do is develop a preemptive strategy to get you a messages conveyed clearly, to get quick responses, to get clear responses, to get as close to the quicker the response, not just for your own psychology, the more healthy the relationship gets, because immediate feedback. I have you ever done one of these shows over text? No, no, definitely not. Really couldn't do it right. I mean you really couldn't do it. I mean without it's the feedback. Why do we have all these messages? Well, this would be about five hundred. You know, people you have to constantly go back and forth to clarify. You know, this is the key. It really isn't technology. The revolution, which is a bigger than the printing for us, in my opinion, is that we don't have instant feedback. And this is not about books. This is a heat that human relationships and it causes a great deal of stress. I mean the number of breakups over by text message, the number of it's just tremendous anxiety. And you know, people in your generation are the ones that are the highest. You know, are the most sensitive about the most supset by the younger the person to direct correlation about how much this follows them, because essentially this takes up a they do have a lot of communications through this meeting. So so, did I give you enough of the are you clearing the cause of their role situation here? Yes, and I appreciate you calling me young. Thank I'm part of the youngest generation I start this book. Guy. Just want to get how, before I get into the solutions, how severe this is. Do you remember, if you're the Cuban missile crisis. Did you read about that in school? Okay, for the reviewers that there was a time when the United States was in a coal war with Russia and it was to a state of being. Each side had nuclear weapons, and mean we had regular we had regular actually before. I was still too young, but they had regular testing and alarms and all kinds of things. They there was a general feeling that the end of the rule was a click away and that it we were headed. You know that if something happened between Russian and United States would go to nuclear war. And this came to a head in one thousand nine hundred and sixty three in Cuba. The Russia basically moved missiles into Cuba. Now can you imagine if China did that today? But here's what happened. Rather than having a conversation, they basically did this through telegram and the telegrams between Chris, Jeff and Kennedy. It was crazy, because I'm...

...getting worse and worse and worse, and we almost came, I mean as the closest we've ever come to the end of the world. It was very close. But what happened in his body, Kennedy was a very direct but John Son, I mean brother, went to the abassador and DC camped out because he wouldn't talk to him for almost, I don't know, for the whole day say, and finally they talked in Robert Kennedy was a real direct guy and they kind of deal right there. So this could it be a diverted had they had direct feedback? Had they been it doesn't even have to be facetoface. But you have to have this kind of feedback, you know, like you and I, have to be able to process meaning and information. And so what did they do after that? They installed a hot line. Okay, they did away with the telegram and they installed a hot line. That's what they do on the brink of world war three. The answer was immediate feedback, a hot line. And you can see that just highlights, you know, in a macro way, what the danger is here. It really is. So so that's that's I mean, I truly believe as I started writing, if I you know, after I wrote it, I mean I became't I saw more and more just how serious the situation is, that you know, I think it's a threat. I do, but but but to stay on message. So we can't, we can't change the role. You know, we can't go back. We can't return. You know, where we happier in a role without mail? Maybe, probably, but but you know, it's here to stay, and text and it's only getting bigger and it's only driving huge more at, you know, chaotic and more anxieties. Is more platforms. You know. I mean that, I don't know, but essentially, so what do we do? But what we do is we have to try and get someone to answer our communication is quickly as possible, primarily so we don't go into the psychological spin, but more importantly, is because the closer we get to immediate feedback, the better the communication and the more you know, the overall quality of communication will be higher. And so that's what we that's what we can do now, and to do that I can just give you, I have a two chapters and I don't zillions of so you know, ideas, but I'm just going to give you a thumbnail, some three, some basic things that people should do that they don't do well. The first thing, in the case of the emails, is that we, as a digital fundraiser, can tell you the worst thing to put in your subject line is the subject. Okay, because the problem here is that people are filing. They see your email, they file at they plan to get back to so if you put a subject that's familiar to them, you know, I mean, they're not they're not going to even open it up right away. Than that, they frequently forget or, you know, they remember later. Meanwhile you're catastrophizing. So the first thing is, you do you know like I mean in our business, we you know, it's pretty aggressive. I mean it's like, oh, your prescriptions expiring or that to get a lot of people open your email. But all you really need to do, as in you know, as people. What I tell people and shows like this is just do a pattern interrupt. Think of the first word that comes to your head. Come up with the word. Joey. Volcano just came to my mind. Okay, the put volcane on the subject on I guarantee you to open it up quickly. You know I mean, I mean pootball, Kano. When the subject honestly Gout, you know, and they want to believe it, they're not going to even ask you why. I mean, people get so much crap you think they got time to figure out what this causality and subject Lan. It's a vote volcano on they'll open it up. Once they open up the email, they'll respond...

...fairly quickly. Okay, that's the key to get them to open the email. The next key is in this now applies to text, is is you can't put in text, you know, a subject line per se. I don't think it's good to create curiosity out of the front with text. So I want to be careful not to use that strategy with text messages, but with with with emails. Definitely. When we look at our fundraising emails, people give right on the spot, I mean, you know, because they want to complete the loop right. They don't go back later and contribute. So I know that this is a even strategy and every marketer in the world, you know my whatever they're selling, you know, uses this. So the second component is the is the most important thing in the role. Your first name, Joey, Joey, Joey, Joey. There's nothing more important. They've done numerous societies with the studies or they've wired people up. There is nothing that human beings respond to that stimulates them more than their own first name, Joey and so on. An email you use their first names three times, not less than three times. Always addressed that an email dear joey, and then we'll talk about later at a call, at a very pivotal point, you put joey common and then you go thanks, Joey Common. So you mean there's however you do it, you should mention mission, the person's three names, because the the next biggest problem of people not opening your emails, okay, is they scan them. Oh my gosh. And one of my recommendations is never put two subjects in an email. I can't tell you. I work with people all the time. I've stabbed, they missed things all the time. So now, I mean that's just one of what. That's a more interior solution, more it's a second tier thing. But you can't even I'd tell they don't even put two subjects in an email because they'll miss it. So so you know. You in other words, you don't, you know. So you just keep it real simple. You start with a subject line volcano, and then you address someone Joey and then you say, okay, Joey, now I'm going to tell you why this works, and then thanks, Joe Sam. The in text messages, it's very important to this is crucial. Almost never do we get a text message from someone that addresses us by name. Of course that's because our name shows up right. It's programmed in the phone. Doesn't matter, showy, common, this is Sam you know I mean. And absolutely start the text message with the person's first name period. You know, laterally, this is the way to get a response. At that point you've got their interest, you've engage them, you've pushed that button. I mean just it's very powerful. Joy I don't know. I mean if somebody you know forgets your name, you can kind of tell you haven't seen him in a while. Feel so good somebody like a store clerk whatever, remembers my now I'm like wow, you know so good. And you know there's, like I said, there's research to support that. So so that's how important the names basically, the the quantity of missing the emails is a big issue because of what the consequences are. The next biggest issue is people not opening the emails. Then there's the issue if they open the emails, they just scan them. Nobody reads an email or text the way they would a page in a book. No, they don't. You write it that way, but they don't. Read it that way. And so to stop them, to try and get them to...

...stay connected to what you've written, you just use their first name and, you know, at the same time, do you validate them? I mean, you know, just using their name, you know, to say you're great, it's just this, your name, Joey, is validation, and so it makes them feel better. And then the important thing is, okay, Joey. We get emails. You probably get emails and you really don't know what they're what they're driving at. Correct, for sure. Okay, so all emails, you know that really, and text messages should have a question very early on, no matter what the email is about. Ask a question, make it short or whatever the text conversations about. Ask a question right out of the game, you know I mean, and they case of the text message, probably in the second text. And you know, at you bus always ask a question because a question forces people to respond. But I have to make sure that the answers not what do you think, or how do you feel about this, or you know, all these things that you see it all the time when people ask US questions. No, it can't be open ended like that. Is then they really are puzzling. What do, I think. But what you want my feedback about what you know? What feedback? So so, what particular part? So you ask them very clearly what's called like a yes, no, either or agree, disagree. You use that framework and you by doing that, you created what's doing in psychologies, a limit situation. So one you're going to push them to respond by the fact that you're asking a question and secondly, by making it not an open ended question but a kind of either or yes, no, agree, disagree. Then you're basically even forcing them more to respond because it's very clear that they have to do, what their choices are to respond. Yes, no, okay, you had it's a little bit sensitive. You know, you have to kind of work things, you know. I mean in a way that you don't. You know, it's not you can't say yes or no and everything, but I do feel that agree a disagree is a very it's a very easy way to you can leave that into you know, you can ask other questions which are you know, but I mean essentially you must ask a question if you want to get your email return quickly and that the answer you get a better of a higher level is is that it be a closed ended yes, no, either or with. I'm kind of envisioning it as when you have a blank page with like a cursor and they just say write whatever and you're like panicking because it's just like wait, I have to think of everything in the world. But if you're if you're kind of guiding them a little bit at helps, it's very simple. Use a person's three names, always introduced. Then the text message. Always use people's names. Don't like you more. People love their first names. I mean they really do. It's unconscious. I had a chiropractor once. He's come filling in from Florida. It was terrible and fifteen minutes you must have mentioned my name twenty six times. I knew it. It irritated but when I walked out of there I felt right. I mean, you know, they've done studies on this. It's just basically, you know, it just talked about dopamine. It goes right into the rewards there. So finally a lot of this. So yeah, I mean here's an example of feedback. A lot of us don't know exactly what they're driving at or what they mean, or what really what what the response or exactly. But that gets back to feedback and the problem in and this is opens up the door for misunderstanding, is it's awkward. Right, if you owner I have a conversation like that and I don't understand something you say really in real time, okay, but...

...when we don't understand something, if we go back to them, it's a it's awkward. It's kind of like, you know, what did you mean here? You know then, so that it was. All of this is trying to illustrate that. What we're trying to do is get your message returned as quickly a possible and so you can respond as quickly as possible to them, to get closer and closer to real time communications within the digital world. I believe that there's hope for interactive stuff, but it you know, I'll talk about that later and when I close. And then, finally, the most important thing, you know, I'm just going to do three things here, is follow up. Oh my gosh, people will freak out and you think that will. Why don't they follow up? Eighty percent of the people welcome to, you know, a follow up, and the other people didn't really say no. I mean they said of whatever. You know, they didn't really have a reply. I mean I think maybe five or seven percent said they didn't like it. So you have to follow up within twenty four hours of a text or email. Follow up, that's for sure. Follow up, because that's just to be like rope. But in the case of both of these mediums, don't don't. You don't have to to. I'll use email, but it's applicable for text. Just rewrite the same message, okay, and you know it. With the email it's a different subject line. The case of text, you just reform at a little bit. You know are just write it just like you did, you know, like you hadn't sent the other one. There's no sense. What people will get upset about is if you challenge them and put them on the defensive and say, Hey, did you get my message, or why haven't you responded on that? That does cause problem, but as long as you don't challenge them, you know I mean. So I would recommend ever saying referencing that they didn't return the message on text or emails. Just proceed, for I'll give you an example. An email. You put a new subject line, edit, copy pasteboom bond, don't change anything, and I actually I would do the same in text. But you don't like you hadn't said it before and said it before and and believe me, there's so much stuff going out there. Joy It. No one's going to ask why. Believe me, we need the response. There's so much incoming, there's so much don't stimulation. There are so many platforms. It's a favorite of people. To remind them. It really is. I can't tell your how many emails and stuff that I miss, and you know so. So those are the kinds of basics things you can do. Now it's more complex, but we need protocols for emails and text we do. We need the same kinds of things that we grow up. We develop protocols for the way that we speak. Okay, this is this is what we are. What I'm suggesting here is we're developing protocols of how to communicate with digital communication. If we didn't learn the same kinds of things that we learn growing up, language and and speech, then we wouldn't be able to communicate and effectively. We're not being able to communicate very well digitally without those protocols. You're almost off the hook here, but we always like to wrap up with the top three and it's going to be it's going to be a nice left turn here, but I'm very curious about this and maybe you can give just kind of like a fun fact for each of them. But your top three presidents? Well, I think Franklin Roosevelt was a very important president because he had the he he was president for the longest port. He was president during the most difficult time in America following the depression and through World War Two. Roosevelt is the greatest president in terms of an overall president and terms of being president changing history that no one you know is is pivotal to world history. Is as Franklin Roosevelt needs dinner. Excellent job...

...over four terms on his five. John Kennedy is a profile and courage, the penultimate down the definition of what a later is. Now he didn't talk time to be a good president. Okay, I mean many of his ideas were carried forward by Lyndon Johnson, but John Kennedy is the essence of leadership and he is the paragon. I can't think of a leader anywhere that is a greater paragon of leadership than John Kennedy. Donald Trump. No one is funnier than Donald Trump. That's all the elected office or anything in this country. The Entertainment o'donald trump is, I mean it's nonstop. He I mean the Comedians have a joke with it. So it's so so donald trump is absolutely the funniest president in the more I would just say, funny, entertaining. He's entertaining, he's stimulating, he's entertaining. Entertaining doesn't mean necessarily like podcast. You know, people think of entertainment is like entertainment tonight. No entertainment. I mean really podcast entertainments. You're trying to engage people, keep people interested if they're good at that. And I do think that, you know, he really in terms of he's the first person who really broke the paradise. I mean there's been no other president. We talked about a disconnect, you know, volcano. Well, that's trump. So I do think that that those aspects, you know, and of course he brought to the presidency. I'm not going to list this as a reason why I think he's up there, but he brought, you know, the using digital technology, tweets, to the process, which was too against the Turtin but but you know, anyway. So, so, I mean Jud Roosevelt is the most important president in America. He shaped the modern role both for America and Europe. In the whole role. John Kennedy is a paragon, a profile, encouraged, the essence of what leadership is. Every person who wants to study leadership should study him. And Donald Trump is is a very special man. I don't know anything like anybody like him. And listen, I'Ven vote for Donald Trump and I have, you know, only negative this things to say about his policy and his demeanor. But he changed, he really broke the paradigm of what it means to be a president, and so I think that, you know, deconstruction is reconstruction, and so that deconstructive moment, I think, will be, in the long run, healthy for the nation, as long as it doesn't happen again. So so you know. But I do admire all three of them. I do. I do fan tastic. Well, SAM if people want to learn more about you or check out copies of your books, see all about your background, all that good stuff, where can I find you? This simplest way to do this in this day and age is, you know, it's kind of hard to go through mean Amazon in search thing. So the the website is called discommunication, dys communication, Camm M, discommunication, can and there's my book, my profile, more about me, and you know that's that is the best way to get a hold of me and you can contact me there. But I really appreciate this opportunity. I hope. I hope this one well. Absolutely. I've got my my checklist handing out for the next time I'm sending emails. Just resending it with a new subject line. Is Brandish, all of it. Yeah, the first dame, I mean that first name thing is really important, especially with text messaging. A first name thing isn't silver boy. Okay,...

...fantastic, will sam. Thank you again for hopping on. And of course we got to wrap up with a Corny joke, as we always do, and I tried to make it topical. Why was the cell phone wearing glasses? Because he lost his contacts. Good after today, be a you're good. You know, you're probably have done some comedy work. Good people, cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you were a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. You can send me a message Joey at good people cool thingscom thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people, cool things and check out all the old episodes via good people, cool thingscom as always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (141)