Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 21 · 2 years ago

21: Writing Songs, Sharing Music, and Playing Video Games with Maggie Gently

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Maggie Grabmeier talks about her solo work as Maggie Gently, including her songwriting process, her worst gig (and the valuable lessons it taught her), and we discuss our favorite quarantine games.

Check out Maggie's new EP, Good Cry, which is a raw, introspective look at losing a relationship with a friend. Or, as Maggie calls it, "five songs of sadness."

Welcome to good people, cool things, the podcast featuring conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. I'm your host, Joey held, and today's guest is Maggie Grabmeyer of Maggie gentlely, who just had her debut EP launch not too long ago, and so we're going to get into all of that, the making of that EP, her writing process and, of course, since we're having a lot more time at home now, we also dive into the best video games to play during quarantine. So lots of good stuff in this one for any musician or anyone that's trying to promote their brand. Lots of good insights and a quick reminder, of course, you can get in touch with good people cool things by sending an email joey at good people cool thingscom or reaching out on facebook or twitter at GPCT podcast. All right, let's dive on in with Maggie. To get started, I'll ask probably what you're most excited about right now, which is your new EP. Tell us all about it. I've been working on it for a really long time. It's been more than a year of from the writing it to this this moment, about a year and a half. Actually, I wrote most of the songs right around the beginning of two thousand and nineteen, in the first few months of that year. It's about a painful friend break up and how I kind of coped with all of that, and I now can realize that writing the songs themselves was a way of coping with the the heartbreak of losing a friendship that meant a lot to me. So, yeah, five tracks of sadness. Does the friend know it's about them? We are not in contact, so I don't know. I you know, don't break up with friends all that often. So you know, I don't think it would be too hard for the person to figure it out. But yeah, I don't know. Well, I think that's something that most of us have gone through and yeah, it's not a great experience by any means, but I think you know, you do a good, great job of capturing that, that sadness and there is a lot of emotion that goes into it. So you said that it took a couple months to kind of put this all together, or at least the the writing process. Can you kind of dive into what that was liked? You have sort of a goto process that works for you, or is it kind of different from Song to song? Well, in this instance it was very different. Before I was writing songs for Maggie gently, I was in a band called the total betties, and so every time I wrote a song, I kind of had in my head what was going to happen to it, like okay, I'll send it to my bandmates and then, you know, will do this and then and then this. You it just was a little more clear about what would happened to the songs. But I started writing these while the band was still together and I was writing total betties music and then I was also writing this new music that I was like this doesn't really sound like like that band. The total Betti's is a pop punk band, and I was writing these songs that were a little bit quieter and slower and they just had like a different tone to them and I when I was imagining what they would sound like with a band, I was like, you know, it's just different from what we had been doing. So I kind of just put them in my pocket and I was like these are for later, but in writing them it was like, you know, they all kind of came out of this same situation. And the different points in the breakup where it's like deciding like is can I really do this? Is it? Is it worth it for me? Will I regret it? You know, all the way up until like okay, I did what I needed to do and I'm going to start feeling better about it now. So I think that it's kind of cool to have little moments at each stage of the process. They're kind of encapsulated, but they were all written really like freely. I didn't know I was going to have a solo project then. You know, I just was kind of writing music for myself, so I wasn't writing them with anything in mind except kind of like a musical diary. Nice. I think that's when music is at its best, is when it is kind of like a diary like that. So I can understand how that was a very both healing while at the same time kind of emotional process. So after you've gone through the writing, take us through the the rest of the creation. Did were you able to like nail everything in one take? Was it? Was it a lot more than that? I always hear stories of that and I'm like that person is lying, like there's no way you can. You can get everything immediately on the first dry. I mean it...

...totally depends. Like when I was recording with the total betties, we had been practicing together and playing shows playing these songs together for a long time. But when I went into the studio for this project, I knew the songs pretty well right I wrote them, I was practicing them and playing Solo, but I also had a band brought in. My brother played the drums and we weren't able to play together a whole lot before we went into the studio and my friends and Claire Played Bass and likewise we were we had like parts written, but once we got into the studio and heard how everything was sounding, I'll put together we were changing things up. It definitely was not a one take kind of situation and this was a really unusual way for me to do things. I'd never recorded music in this way before and I had a producer, Eva Treadway, who also wrote the lead guitar parts. So working with her and changing things up in the moment it felt really organic and kind of Erie because I didn't know how I was going to sound at the end of the day. I'd never heard it with all the instruments until like it was done being recorded. So it was a really organic process and kind of fun. I don't know if I prefer one way or over the other. Being in the studio isn't exactly my favorite thing in the world anyways, but I am really happy with how it came out. That's awesome. So you like from recording it to hearing the final product, did you? You didn't hear like demos along the way, or was it? No, that's crazy. I mean I had demoed my part. I play guitar and Sing, and then I sent it to my brother and he would send me back stuff and I would be like, okay, that sounds good, but for the the lead guitars, I mean that makes a huge difference. In the base makes a huge difference, and also just the other special touches that a producer can bring in, like the guitar tone and feedback and effects and buildups like. Those are the things that it's hard to really imagine what it'll sound like until you hear it mixed by a professional. Yes, and every time I have tried to mix music I am reminded I'm not a professional. So it's very impressive to hear it the kinds of the kinds of like amplification, enhancement's kind of tell me about it. Like I tried to record my own music all the time and it just and sometimes I'm like, Oh, this is sounding pretty good, and then when I hear grace do at my engineer, I'm like, Oh God, forget I have ever sent you this. Yeah, this is the raw stuff demos that I said. I don't even don't even bother with it. It's fine. So then, from the time that you kind of had all this ready to go and to the release date, is that just the the worst waiting period ever? Yes, it absolutely is. It's like there's so much to do at this point. I was kind of like building up my like identity as a solo performer as well as like working out how to put out an album. So I ended up teaming up with brace cove records from Minneapolis to put out the physical music. So they made a run of tapes for me and they're also doing some other cool merch like shirts and buttons and stuff. So finding the right label to work with was definitely a process and really happy I ended up going with them, though. They're really great people and that is the most important thing, in my opinion, and then just doing all the other like pr planning and and then, of course, you know, a month before, two months before my release date, we're all sheltering in place and I'm like, what's going to happen? Is Everything still going to be okay? I know a lot of musicians push back their release dates to kind of like wait this thing out, but I literally could not wait any longer. So have you. There's a lot that I want to get into an far as like the marketing and even branding yourself, which I think is an interesting thing that I think can get overlook sometimes. You're all about the album, but you've got your own self to put out there too as a solo artist. But as far as music, in the Times that we are in right now, these uncertain times, as every commercial next to remind us of, unpe you exactly. Yes, yes, these unprecedented times, have you found yourself partaking in virtual concerts or how are you kind of surviving and lieu of touring? Yeah, so I'm really like the the inability to tour is probably like, professionally and musically, the saddest part of this. I can't play a release show. You know, I mean there's a lot of sad things going on, but in terms of like my own career, I was really looking forward to touring as Maggie gently and, you know, building out my touring band and and going to...

...new places. I was supposed to play a festival in Canada and never been, never toured in Canada before, so I was really looking forward to that. But I have been doing a few virtual shows on instagram live and on Youtube and I really enjoy it. I've been watching a ton. It's like I'm kind of spoiled for choice here. There's just so much out there and so many people are putting stuff out for free and putting out like demos and beast sides and kind of helping us like fill this space with with new music and experiences, and I really, really love that. So I think there's a lot of wonderful music coming out right now and I don't know if we would have gotten a lot of these like behind the scenes things if it weren't for this situation. Yeah, and I think it's very interesting to to see kind of see into the homes of some of these people, and that's weird. Yeah, like their pets, which is I always enjoy a good dog cameo from this. I'm a big fan of seeing the different types of sofas that are in these folks homes because I think they're very, very much encapsulate their personalities. You read the hard boiled wonderland in the end of the world. I have heard more Commi I just started it and there's this whole, like long, long bit about how he judges people by how comfortable their couches are or if they're just like show sofas. anyways, that's funny. It just like I read it yesterday and it's all like coming together in my mind. That's awesome. I would get a big upgrade in his in his mind, since I recently upgraded my sofa and significantly more comfortable. You know, if you're going to be at home sitting around all day, you might as well have a Nice Comfy Coat Sofa. I know and it's I mean natural wear and tear is going to happen, but it is kind of amazing how like everything feels comfortable in the store, it seems like, or at least like most, most of them. You're like, Oh yeah, this is this is pretty good, and then a week after you have her like the sucks. That's why I'm afraid to upgrade. Honestly, it's like it's a big investment. You got to make sure you know you're getting. MMM, it's yeah, it's. And I don't believe most places will let you return a sofa, but maybe, I don't know, maybe you could get some sort of your long warranty and just spill pasta sauce all over it and then you can return it that way. That's a good idea. I'll look into that. I don't know. Yeah, not that I'm encouraging so far fraud out here. And so you kind of touch on this a little bit with instagram live and Youtube doing these concerts. But let's imagine we're before social distancing and presumably down the road when we're back to kind of a new you know, kind of our normal. What other ways to market both yourself and your album have you found have worked well? Or maybe once you've tried where, you're like, oh, that actually did not work at all. It's a lot of like creativity. Honestly, the music world is so confusing. I don't have like a PR budget necessarily, so a lot of what I've been doing has been you know stuff I've been doing on my own. I do have someone who is helping with like management stuff in this time until the end of my album cycle, Britt Hughes, and she normally works for this record label and collective called common ground, so having her expertise kind of guiding me and helping me strategize has been super helpful. But yeah, in terms of like how I've been marketing this EP, a lot of it is just I've have a lot of contacts from from my previous band, people who have written about the total beddies or, you know, put us on a playlist or something, and also it's kind of expanding on that and being like okay, a lot of it has happened in the past two years since I last put out music, like what's what's happening now? What can I what can I do? And I do think spotify is a huge part of it. If people add the song to playlists and stuff, that really helps broad in the reach. And then also PR and and music blogs and doing interviews like this or podcasts like all that stuff. It's just, you know, the thing about music is it's got a it's got to touch someone or else. You know, it doesn't. It doesn't matter how many, how many, you know, blogs you pitch it to. If someone likes it and and they care about it and they hold a closet to their heart and they put it on a mixtape and give it to their friend, like, that's the best. That's what you really want to happen. Goodness, I missed the days of mixtapes and now it's like I make it. I make a spotify playlist for someone. Yeah, it's like playlist for Ramona and then I'll like key texted to her or something, you know, Send Me, send me that link so you know I you know, I know you care. That's it's...

...impossible for me to say that's going to the spotify playlist. Have you proactively been trying to get your music on there? Because I think this is a big thing for artists. It's definitely a way I've discovered new music is on playlists, either that spotify is curator for me, that someone is recommended. Occasionally I'll find something on a playlist where I'm like, I don't think this fits this playlist at all, but I also still like this song, so I'm not Super Mad about it, which maybe just speaks to my like weird ECLECTIC tastes. Being all on that, that person really figured you out. And the yeah, what to do? What's the weirdest mix of songs? I can put on a thing and joey'll like it. So have you proactively reached out for that, or is it just people are kind of vouching for your music by submitting it? It kind of is both. I mean, either you can submit your songs to spotify for consideration on spotify has curated playlists. Those are a little bit trickier to kind of like get on, because I'm sure everybody who puts anything on spotify is submitting to be on one of those spotify playlists. So no luck on that so far, but I still have a few days. But then also it's like, you know when a radio show we'll play my song on the air and then they put their music on a spotify playlist and then if you're a fan of that radio show, you'll go back and listen to it. So a lot of that stuff happens organically and is really nice. And then sometimes it's like there's a playlist I really love and the person in the in the comments on their on their playlists say like, if you want to submit music, here's how to do it, and then it's like well, why not? Yeah, I like that. So you mentioned how some radio stations have played your song. I was recently rewatching that thing you do, which I think has one of the greatest scenes in any movie, as when they first hear their song on the radio and they're just like running through the city so that can all meet up at I don't think I'm have I ever seen that? Oh my goodness, it's it's Tom Hanks's directorial debut. Oh yeah, so she's never saw that, but I do know what you're talking about now. Oh my goodness. Okay, yes, well, I want to have that. I want to have that moment where I yeah, in the street, I don't know who I would run to. Run to somebody, though. What I was going to say, what was your reaction the first time you heard your music on a radio station, because that's a pretty, pretty big moment. Yeah, it's totally cool. I think that, since, you know, I've had this experience with the total betties and kind of watching that band grow, and when I started the total beddies, I like had no idea about anything. So every little milestone felt like the hugest thing in the world, and now it's still really does feel extremely huge and humbling, and it's a great feeling to know that someone likes my music. At this point. You know, being played on a radio show is amazing and, you know, even equally as amazing as someone like dming me on spot on instagram and just being like, I heard your song for the first time, I really love it. I just want to let you know like I really related to it, and that feels like the most amazing feeling ever. That's awesome, especially because, you know, I think of musicians that get like, you know, if you're rude to someone one day, like that might be their only interaction to you, and it's like messages like that, I think, really hammer home like how powerful music can be and why it is important to be engaging with your fans, like to totally and never be rude. Why would you be rude? Just don't be rude to people. That's a good, good general lesson for life. And yet yeah, seriously, sometimes I guess if if you were to like smack me in the face to get my attention, maybe I'd be a little ticked off, but I'd also kind of admire the hustle. If, if that was like your way to introduce yourself, like why not? Yeah, I mean, obviously for protect your boundaries, but at the same time it's like you know these people are. If someone goes out of their way to like tell you how much your music means to them, like that is a huge moment. I mean you just can't take that kind of stuff for granted now, definitely not. It's it's a great moment for sure. Okay, so we're going back now. We've we're leaving current times. We're going to slide the the timeline over. I'm like gesturing around the room. You can't see at all, but there is a timeline being slid. We're going back to the first album that you ever bought. If you don't remember this, you can also do the first song where you heard it. And like, I always think like musicians have a more innate sense of like identifying everything that's in a song. We're like a song will hit you and it's like, Oh, this is like a perfectly written song. So what...

...was one of those for you? It's funny. I think like it totally depends, like as a singer and a vocalist and songwriter. When I hear a song, the first thing I noticed are like if the lyrics are really meaningful to me, whereas like my girlfriend, for example, is like an electronic musician and when she hears the song she could be like I love the song, and I'd be like Oh, it's so sad and she like really, I had no idea. She like doesn't even know what the words are. It's astounding. But anyways, back to your question. I don't know what the first help them I bought is. I have like a memory of like what looking at my CD case, when I was a youth and I had like Berney spears. Oops, I did it again. I had Christina Aguilera, I had beyonce, crazy in love of I had like the spice girls. I really loved, you know, pop stars. There is a trend of their yes, yes, I clearly had to think of I really love Brandy. I had never, say never, I don't. I think my favorite thing then was singing along, and so if the song was like really in my range, and when I was young I had a different range than I do now, but I used to love like singing along with, you know, the songs that I loved and if they meant something to me. Like reflection by Christine Aguilera was like one of my favorites. I used to just lay on my bed and sing that song, you know, the song from Mulan. Yes, a true classic, True Classic. But I mean, going through my life there are other albums and songs that really touched me in an interesting way, like when I first heard Avril Lavine, hearing like a girl rocker who was young and cool and, you know, Punk Rock, paren aut malls. Yeah, yeah, and it's like kind of funny to think that she was like this this idol, right, but she totally was. In my generation, like I didn't really have a lot of women rock stars, and so when I like first heard Avri Lavine, I was like this is the most amazing thing in the world. I loved her. I still love her. I went to our in concert last year Nice. Yeah, and then in in high school, like finding emo music for the first time in pop punk. That was also totally huge for me, and hearing like these dancy, upbeat, energetic songs that were like also kind of grungy and angry, anksty. Like I loved that. Yeah, I feel like we I. I mean just judging from everything you've said, it sounds like we're about the same age and I totally agree. I feel like there was kind of a knock on emo in high school of like Oh, your emo, and it's like but some of those songs are just Super Fun. Also, what an insult just saying what what you are, but stuff what you listen to. Yeah, and, like you know, at my school anyways, everyone, you know, had their like a crowd, right, and the emo kids are the pop punk kids. We were like our own little crowd. I was in a band to in high school too, so you know, my band would cover. We covered lady Gaga once, so we we, we, you know, we expanded our horizons a little bit. But yeah, I really love say anything. They were my like most favorite disband when I was in high school and talking to my friends about and just getting all hyped up about music. Like people don't really talk about that mute music that way to me anymore and I miss it. Hey, anytime you want to geek out over pop punk, call you. Yes, got I catch your back. I'm just going to give a quick plug because I was listening to their CD the other day. Lucky boys confusion, who is always near and dear to my heart because they are a Chicago area band, which is where I grew up, but terrific pop punk in that vein in the early S. still releasing music today after a lengthy hiatus, but that'll take you back to high school for sure. Okay, I'm ready. So this is something I always like to ask musicians as well. Obviously you're not doing any touring right now, but of course you have done many shows in the past and I think it's always fun to hear. What was the worst Gig that you ever played? Oh, this is kind of an embarrassing one. One of the first shows I ever played with the total beddies was we like wanted to travel a little bit outside San Francisco so that no one we knew could come to the show because if we were like we were just kind of like testing the waters, testing out our material, and we didn't want anyone to that we knew to hear us until we were like confident that we could actually do it. So this might have been like our first ever show and it was a weird, weird like night. The bands were all...

...over the place, all different genres. There was like a rapper, there was like a hair metal band and then there was us in the band. Who brought us out, and I think we did okay. There were a lot of hiccups. Someone in the band was super late and we didn't and he didn't play half the show with us, which was awkward. But the worst part was the one of the bands that was playing. Their songs were just so misogynistic and so insulting and I was sitting there and looking at my friends like why are we here, like what are we doing associating with these people? And then at the end of the night we were like, you know, saying thank you and shaking hands and making small talk, and I was sitting there like how can you, like, I don't know, how can you play a show with with a band with women? Like, how can you? It just felt so ICKY and so wrong. Sorry, this isn't a funny story, but it's like it. It really was an early lesson for me about like the company that I keep and the community that I'm a part of, the music community in the bay area especially. I think I don't really know about other places, but in the bay area it's so diverse and there's so much great music, so many women and Queer people and people of Color Making amazing music and uplifting marginalized voices. You don't have to waste your time, you know, playing with bands or or at venues or with, you know, promoters or engineers that are misogynists or who are like you know, who don't care about uplifting other people's voices. So, you know, I learned that less in the hard way, by just sitting there like squirming in my seas, so uncomfortable. The band, they had one of their songs, the course, was just ti TS. We Love Tits, and I was sitting there like, Oh wow, no, it's a very deep lyrics is what you're saying? Yeah, exactly. Yeah, they really dove deep in their wells of creativity for that one. Well, I'm glad you learned that lesson early on, because I think it is an important one, of of who you're associating with and also just like general life lesson, I think too, is you want to surround yourself with people that are good people. Hence the name of this show. Yeah, but especially just like, I mean not everyone has to think exactly the same as you, but like if they're just kind of generally terrible people. It's probably probably best to not not hang around them. Yeah, I get this question a lot in interviews. People are like, what's it like being a woman? What's it like being a queer woman in a scene that's like so, so hard on people with your identity? And it is. It is hard for a lot of people and there are a lot of boundaries and a lot of hoops to jump through and not every community is like the community in San Francisco. But at the same time, like if, if someone's hard to work with and I find that someone's like, you know, doesn't want to work with me because they don't like working with women, a queer people, I will never work with them again. Honestly, there is no reason. I don't care if it's the best opportunity in the world. If a person is, like, you know, rude to me or doesn't want to work with me, I don't want to work with them. Yeah, I think that's a good, good life lesson just in really in any relationship that you have, you know, business, professional, friendship, whatever, whatever the case, if they're shitty to you, like, yeah, there's there's plenty of people that won't be that. You can hang out with. I also need to revisit the you kind of slip this in there of your bandmate arriving halfway late, halfway through the show. Was this like a grand entrance? I'll stay. It was just traffic. Like I said, we picked a venue that was really far away from from San Francisco and you know that Bay area traffic. I'll get you. It's yeah, that is that is true. I have never owned a car in San Francisco. I've also never lived in San Francisco, but every time I visit I am I'm just like this traffic. Yeah, I knew pretty bad. Yeah, love the cable cars, though, which makes me sound very touristy, I know, but so I have to say I've never actually written on the cable cars. Oh, I did a whole I took a journalism class in college and it was like a travel writing class. So our spring break was a trip to San Francisco and we had to pick two stories there. So I did one about mirror woods and just like all the cool nature and San Francisco and then one about riding the cable cars. Right just rode the cable cars for like four hours and interview people and like the conductors along the way. It was a blast. I was like this is so cool and all that. Like you could tell who was a local because they're just like I'm just I'm just trying to get to my next stop, meetting exactly. I was like this is fun, that's really funny, but recommended at least once. You'll probably know I should. I know I should. Gotta wait now, but yeah, this is all...

...over, I'll go and do that Nice, nice, like fall day. I guess we were there in the spring, but I remember it being kind of cold and it was like Nice, you know, you get that cold air on your face, can't beat it's a good San Francisco weather there. Yes, lots of great stuff. Now another question that I always like to ask is a question you wish you were asked more frequently, and I very much enjoyed your answer, of how to support upandcoming musicians because of course, now in our digital age, it seems like there's a new musician born every second. There's probably more than that. Yes, lately, true, and you've dabbled on some of the ways that you've marketed yourself and tried to get your music out there. But as far as supporting other musicians. What what she got? Yeah, in terms of advice that I would give to people, like it's not so much practical like, you know, play the spotify playlist on repeat while you sleep, like no, what I really think is like important is to care about your local music scene. And you know, it's kind of astounding to me how many people don't really don't really know where care, or they'll like go to their and they think their local music venue is like the like tenzero seat, you know, super arena, and you know, they don't know about the two hundred capacity music dive bars down the street or like, you know, all ages venues that are doing really cool stuff and there's so much amazing local music and bands playing, you know, local nights, and you know, a lot of people just don't know about it or they they don't know that they can get amazing shows and meet new friends and have an awesome time at these like smaller venues. And so in San Francisco there's like so many ways to interact with the music community. There's a local online radio station called BF DOT FM, which is one of my favorite things ever, and they play lots of local music, they support local musicians in different ways. They host these monthly showcases where you can go see live bands and it's so cool to just like know that something so intricate and so thoughtful and full of love exists in my community, just to kind of like help the music community thrive, and I wish everybody knew about it, you know, and I'm sure there's equally amazing radio shows, are blogs or podcasts in every city in the country. So, you know, you got to do a little bit of Legwork, but it's so worth it. I'll totally pay off for sure, and that's something that I've really enjoyed living in Austin is how just like insane the music the community is, and I say that very endearingly. I'm like always hearing about new place. I'm stumbling into new, you know, new venues. I obviously like playing at a band as well, like I'll meet people that I otherwise maybe never would have come in contact with. And Yeah, it is I would say most of my like more memorable memories of attending shows have been at those smaller venues. Like very rarely am I like yes, that show where I was seated the entire time and, you know, had to do golf claps in between songs. That was my favorite time. Yep, I relate to that, although maybe ten years from now, when my back gives out, I'll appreciate those shows more. Well, all shows should have seats for people who need seats. That's the fully part of it, is true. Yes, you can stand in dance. Yeah, it's good to stand a dance of it's yeah, lovely, lovely. Well, any other tips that you would recommend? Or should we move into the top three, which I'm very excited about? Let's move into the top three. Let's do it, because you have given us some fantastic us being the listeners. Well, I'm hyping this up a lot, but this is your top three quarantine video games, which I think we are all in dire native, and I'm speaking on behalf of of everyone, just for myself. Yeah, I've been playing a lot of the video games. I am like. I wouldn't say I'm a Gamer. I don't like I don't like violence at all, so that my video game tastes are a little unusual. But in this quarantine, my girlfriend and I have a Nintendo switch and I've been playing a lot of switch games. And should I do three, two, one in terms of my favorites. Let's do it. Yeah, okay. My third favorite, I would say, is animal crossing. It's been getting a lot of hype. I was really into it for a while and would play a lot. Since I've kind of like toned it down and I've been playing so much these days. But it is very fun and I'm a part of this like discord server of animal crossing people and we'll...

...visit each other's pilins and just talk about animal crossing and that's very cute and stuff, which is much needed right now, a little bit of socializing. That's fantastic. I have only played animal crossing on Gamecube, I way back in the day, and also had a similar experience where I played it like all the time when it first came out and then realize hey, it's okay to miss a day or two. The game will actually go on, even though they kind of chastise you for I yeah, they do kind of chest yeah, and I'm like hey, Nintendo, calm down, maybe I'm going on vacation. Yeah, I can do I can give my life. Yeah, but I do like that social, social aspect of it of getting to visit other islands like that. Yeah, it can be very cute and it's fun to decorate. This is true. Yes, anyways, my second video game I played Pokemon Sword. I really like Pokemon and I've played many versions on many different game boys through my life, but playing pokemon just really like brought me back to my childhood and it was really fun. And the POKEMON are just getting cuter and cuter. Some are really weird. There's one that's just like an apple and one that's just like a teacup one that is like an ice cream cone. They're like not as creative, but it was very fun to play. Well, they're up to like what, seven hundred pokemon now, something like that over all the generations. Yeah, I was like looking at my Polka DEX and I was like there's no way I'm filling this out. Like me back to my original hundred and I could like maybe I could do a hundred, but this is just like too much. Oh Yeah, though, Oh Ge, like if you had me name pokemon outside of red, blue and yellow, I could maybe get you like maybe twenty, and I think I might be, yeah, hyping myself. I'm are too much hard time with that. When I was a kid, my brother and I shared a room and we had a poster on the wall of our room with like little tiny drawings of all hundred pokemon and all their names. So and also there's a song. So I think I maybe name a lot of them. Do you have a favorite? This will say a lot about you. I think that clifery is my favorite. Excellent, that's your favorite. I've always been partially drawn to Gold Duck, which is the side uck evolution. It's a blue duck with spiky hair and, for some reason, like a red dot on its forehead. And the only reason I think I really like gold uck was in the original Pokemon Blue Game, that was the first Pokemon I got to level one hundred and that's that's like a pretty big accomplishment for any any pokemon master to get your first Pokemon to level a hundred, which is the maximum, I think, unless it's been changed, but at least back then that was the maximum. And so yeah, just always kind of like gold uck for that reason, although this is going way back to my an old blog that I still have but rarely update, but I ranked all the pokemon back in the day like the original the original crew metrics. So there was a it's a very subjective rankings, as many rankings are, but I did it on a Combo of like looks and coolness factor, as well as the actual abilities that they have, like from the the move st they can learn, and then their hats and from that. I'm trying to remember what my I think my top three were starry, Gangar and Zaptos, because I definitely put mew two down a little bit because of like how overpowered it is and just like that's that's not fun. Like I want. I want to relatively powerful, but I don't want like so powerful that it's banned from tournaments. Exactly. You want to keep your fans guessing, like exactly you choose number twelve, who's going to be number one? Yes, yeah, I can't. I don't want them predicting number one because this what, yes, wasn't all at one time. was over that. So of the course of like two and a half years, because I was terrible at updating it, but wow, I know some of those fans really finishing it, though, but that's impressive. Thank you. It was took way too long. Good Times, good times, all right. So we've gotten way off on a pokemon tangent. What's your number one? My number one is Zelda, breath of the wild. I like beat the game. I was like I kept telling people like I can't wait till I beat Zelda. I'm I'm like addicted to Zelda. I can't put it down. Once I finish it, I'll be free. And then once I finished it, I was so sad. I was so sad I was having dreams about Zelda. It was such a good game. It was just like really fun to explore this really...

...fun world. There's like tons of puzzles. There's this thing thing where you can like climb up really high and then just like jump off and fly across the whole map with like a hang glider, and that jumping off and flying off a hang glider. I like wish I could like jump out my window right now and like hang glide across the street. It's just like such a fun thing to like think about and want to do. So I think about that hang gliding like effect all the time. That's wonderful and I agree. The hang gliding would be just such a cool thing. Maybe some day. I mean, like in reality there's this place in the city by the beach, this a park called Fort Funston and there's like a hang gliding place there and sometimes you see people like actually hang gliding and I would never ever try. It looks so dangerous, like there's nothing holding you in there. You're just like it's just you in the sky. I still remember so one of my early albums that I got was the offsprings Americana, which was my sister's copy, but I would I probably listen to that at least a thousand times more than she did. And the why don't you get a job music video starts with Dexter Holland, lead singer, just coming in on a hang glider for like no other I feel like. I don't know if I like heard a commentary on it or like read an interview with him one time where he was just like I just thought would be cool to come in on a hang glidder. Like there's no it's no purpose to the video. It's just like that's a bit cool thing to do. Why not? And that's kind of how I imagine a lot of people are probably doing this hang gliding anyway. There's like that seems fun, but yeah, definitely doesn't seem like the most secure thing. Yeah, definitely, but I also relate to that, like as someone who asks to sometimes think up concepts for music videos. I'm like, maybe this will be cool, I don't know. I mean that's half the fun of doing a music video, right it's just trying things and saying how they turn out? This is cool? Is this cool? We'll fixit and post. Yes, my favorite. I say that at least once a podcast as well. Well. I beat you two at this time. Thank you doing my work for me. I like it awesome. Well, you wanted me to give you a top three as well. Yeah, what are your top three video games? I need some recommendations. I don't have a Nintendo switch, so I am going to give some older I'll stick with the nintendo theme for a couple of them, and these are based on ones that I've been playing recently. For and sixty four. I popped in Tony Hawks pro skater not too long ago, which is yes, just to it's still like, it's still holds up, it's still fantastic. I still hate the Phoenix downhill jam level, which, you know, apologies if that's your favorite level anyone listening, but that level sucks. I hate but yeah, just such a blast to go through. Obviously the soundtrack on that game is fantastic. I still can't hear Superman by Goldfinger without hearing the beeps, you know, at the certain point where you'd hear the ups doing your run. It also just like the two minute runs, are kind of Nice to like not make you overdo it, like in a weird way. Like the time constriction. You're kind of like, okay, if I only have like fifteen minutes to play a game, although I guess this list is supposed to be if we're cooped up and we have ample time to play, but still, you could also do that with Tony Hawk. There's lots nice to have some, yeah, a little bit of boundaries with your video games too, because I can really go in and then next thing I know, like the day is gone. Yeah, just get some crippling arthritis from from all of that's fun times, though, Fun Times. Then a second game is another one that I've been revisiting a little bit, fantasy star online episodes one and two, which was a game. It's it's kind of a I kind of hate it sometimes, but for the best part I enjoy it. It's been a really long time since I played fantasy star online. Yeah, it's same. Like I have not outside of that episodes one and two. I have not played a fantasy star online game since then, which I don't know when exactly. It came out, like two thousand and one, two thousand and two, something like that. So but yeah, still still fun to get back in there. I always thought the sound effects and music in that game was really enjoyable. Still believe that as well, and just a nice way to kind of like grind through. It's a very much like a, you know, an RPG, like collect stuff, level up, all that good, good things. So definitely a good way to waste some time, for sure. One of my best friends in high school was in my band and also in another band that was called photon drop, who named after fantasy star online. That's very impressive. Shout out to the now defunct Photon drawn drop. Yeah,...

...they're now defunct. I just call them PhD. That made me very happy. Fantastic. So I'm torn on this third one because part of me wants to do an actual video game. So I'll this is going to be a top three and a half because I've got to okay, one is if you're doing a solo player on xbox. I had started replaying La Noir. It's actually on like every system. At the time. It's on we regular we I think maybe we you and Playstasian three. I guess that would have been at the time. So whatever, you're not current generation of choice console is, you can play it on that and it's probably available as a downloadable thing, notice, since everything seems to be. But you play as a detective in s Los Angeles and solve a bunch of crimes and I always enjoyed the there's definitely like some repetitiveness in it of like finding clues and sometimes we'll have to kind of like go back to a place that you were already at. But I think like the the visuals are super impressive, because this game is like ten years old now, and they use all this crazy facial motion capture, because a big part of the game is interviewing people and believing them or accusing them of lying and like showing the proof that you have, and I also I like that. Yeah, yeah, it's a fun, you know, like can you read people type of game and for you know, the the subject matter of the game, like it's not super violent. Every once in a while, you'll see, like there's a part where you're at the arson desk, so you see a lot of like charred bodies, but such as life and the day of a detective. That's true. You gotta do the job exactly exactly. But I also like the the detective will get like unreasonably mad sometimes, like you know, he's interviewing someone and they're like, Oh, you know, I don't think I saw anything, and he'll you can choose either truth, doubt or lie, and if you choose doubt, it's the same as accusing them as lying, but you don't have to show any proof. So that's usually my go too, because if I'm like I think they're lying, but like I don't know if any of the things I've found so far can actually point to that. Like I'll just choose that and you can tell, based on like a little piano sound effect that plays, if you've chosen the right thing or not. But I'll enjoy. We're like the persons like God and see anything and then the detectible be like bullshit, like tell me what you saw, and they're like Oh, like, I didn't mean for him to. Yeah, okay, I know, I just wanted him to like lately suggest that bad things could happened. Yeah, but that's a fun, Fun Little One player game and a lot of a lot of fun cut scenes in that too. So That's always enjoyable. Gives my fingers a break at least from I'm exploring the virtual worlds. And then I also got to give a shout out to the JACKBOX party packs of games. I've been playing so much of that. I know I almost did it include it because I've been playing so much of it, but I need a break. But they're they're they're not all created equal. I will say some of the Jack Boxes are more enjoyable. Yeah, some of them are more like fun for me, and somewhere I know I have to really like flex my creative muscles and be funny. I find a little bit stressful sometimes if I'm in the mood to be funny that day, like I really have to try hard. Do you have a favorite game that you want to give a plug to from the Jack Backs? Awful draffle's the best one. Yes, draffle is very enjoyable. Ill, so will I like quip lash a lot, which is one of those games you were talking about. It about having to flex your creative muscles. So do you like quip lash to? Okay, if I'm in the mood for it, I like it this one. Yeah, I will. Also let's give a shout out. So the worst game in any of the Jack Boxes, which I just played for the first time over the weekend. That's called Zepledome, which I believe is on Jack Box party pack five, and it's probably the closest thing to a video game in one of the Jack Boxes. But we played the IT's a four round game. We played four rounds and at the end of it our group of what do we have? Six people had no one knew how to play it, like no one knew what our objective, I guess, or what we were doing for the past ten minutes. I as far as I could tell, you fling your little humanoids, which are ze pals, at these like balls of gas or something. I don't really know what they were, and...

...like no indication of whether it would harm you or like you destroy it by going into it. But I found my character dying many times throughout the you know, ten minutes of it, and once was enough for that one. So that one gets my thumbs down. Do not recommend. Okay, get to know I will not play it. Excellent. Yes, please continue to not playing it and you'll be just five perfect awesome. Well, Maggie, if people want to learn more about you, if they want to check out the EP, if they want to recommend video games to you, where can they reach you? I'm easily reachable at Maggie gently on instagram or twitter or facebook. You can listen to my music on spotify or band camp or apple music, and if you want to buy my cassette tape or any other cool merch you can do that at brace cove recordscom cassette type. I love it. I love cassette tapes too, so they are wonderful, wonderful stuff. Well, Maggie, thank you so much for having on. This was a blast. I have lots of new games to check out and also, of course, great music to listen to. Maybe we can find some photon drop online, perhaps even yeah, I'll dig in see if I can find some grey. Excellent. Really got to search the dupe web, but totally well. Well, thank you so much, Joey. Absolutely thank you. And of course we got to wrap up with a Corny joke, and I'll make it music themed, because we've just been talking about music. I probably didn't need to say why. But what do you get if you cross a sweet potato and a jazz musician? I don't know. What do you get? A Yam session good after it's a people love it.

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