Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 65 · 1 year ago

65: Ice Cream That Just May Change Your Life with Tim Krauss

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Tim Krauss remembers his first ice cream memory from when he was four years old. But after being diagnosed with Type One Diabetes, Tim suddenly was taking extreme risks anytime he scooped a treat. So what did he do?

Start a business with his wife and children to make a delicious ice cream that could fit his now necessary low-carb, low-sugar, and high-fat diet.

Soon, Mammoth Creameries—a keto-friendly, diabetic-conscious frozen custard made with real, natural ingredients like grass-fed butter and high-quality heavy cream—was born. Once again, Tim can go back to enjoying tasty ice cream without putting his health at risk.

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things, and I hope you have brought your appetite for this episode, because we are diving into the world of ice cream and it is fantastic. It's already getting hot in a lot of places across the country. I don't know about the rest of the country, but in Texas, especially Austin, we've got these weird worms that are hanging down from trees everywhere and it's just all kinds of grossness. You're like walking and you walk into an invisible spider web type of thing with a war. You just want to get inside and have some ice cream, and thankfully that's what this episode is all about. Tim Krause, cofounder of mammoth creamer. He's hops on to talk how this company got started almost accidentally. Tim's wife, Susan, started making ice cream for him is he's a type one diabetic, and it turned into something fantastic and to all kinds of delightful flavors. So definitely check everything out at mammoth creameriescom. We're also talking about the fun memories that we have of eating ice cream growing up, the worst flavors that they've ever tried making over there at mammoth creameries and Tim share some of his favorite Texas landmarks, and I was just talking with someone about this, of how people outside of Texas have an impression of Texas that people are riding horses to school. I haven't seen it yet. I'd love to some day. Some day, maybe we'll see it, but alas doesn't happen here. It's okay that, because we've got ice cream and that makes everything better. If you like to support good people cool things, you can check out the merch shop at good people cool thingscom shop all kinds of goodies in there. And you know what, ice cream taste even better when it's coming out of a Mug. I don't know if that's true or not, but why not live it up, do you do? You can get in touch with the show as well on facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast. We'll see you over there and hopefully we'll see your ears here listening to this conversation with Tim. For people who don't know who tim krause or mammoth is. Can you give us your elevator pitch, but can you also tell us what kind of elevator we're riding on while you're telling us about yourself? Yeah, man, so if you got to get a dis elevator, you'd better hold on for dear life, because this sucker is completely out of control and it only knows one speed and that's full speed. And and and where does elevator will take you is to you know, let's call it the promised land of Mane with creameries. And what what you get when you walk out of those elevator doors is you'll walk into a world where, if you can admit imagine being a child and eating ice cream and just everything that you remember and feel is awesome. And now you walk into a world as an adult and have that same experience and the way we actually enhance that experiences that the ice cream that you're eating is good for you, is...

...good for the body and is good for the world. That's how I would describe this elevator right. Nice, Nice. So let's hop back to childhood. Do you remember the first time you had ice cream and what flavor it was, what what that experience was like. So I don't know if it was the first time out ice cream, but I remember, you know, being I mean I remember eating ice cream before my brother was born. And you know, we're four years apart, so anywhere between the ages of zero and four. And I also remember having, you know, we I'm from Germany, and we were still living in a you know new, quote unquote, East Germany at the time before he was born. So I was, you know, better, not great, but so, you know, it must have been I must have been two or three years old, and I remember it was an ice cream cone and it was, you know, one of those summers in Germany and also vibly reme was just hot as hell. You know, in Germany, like it gets warm into summer, you know totally, but it just usually doesn't get like terribly hot. And it was even Nilla cone and my mom had bought it for me, and I remember were sitting on the edge of a fountain and like hanging our feet in the water because it's just so hot, and like they were a bunch of people and and yeah, that was my very first memory of ice cream and it was just her and I and and again, yeah, this is like old school east Jeermany. So like it was an applause and did all I remembers like concrete everywhere, you know that there's like this fountain, but there's no grass, just no trees, no plants. You know, it's was like super barren. But that ice cream cone was legit Nice, Nice, starting you off on a the right foot, yeah, man. And then time, yeah, and just growing up. We just, you know, living in Germany, we have a lot of Italian influences, you know, a lot of Italian restaurants and a lot of just Italian people that live in Germany. And so ice cream was a you know, ice cream shop, scoop shops, ice cream parlors, whatever you want to call it, were I mean they were everywhere. You know. I think they were more frequent, at least in an area that we lived, you know, after we had moved, after my brother was born, it was like more ice cream parlors and they were, you know, like convenience stores or would have you, and an ice cream was super cheap even back then. You know, my mom would give us two bucks and me and my brothers would go and, you know, would get a couple of scoops, ice creams each and and yeah, you know, so we would eat ice caren probably every day, you know, especially during the summer. And Yeah, it's been for me personally, it's been something that I have regularly consumed most of my life. That's so awesome. Yeah, and yeah, it's it's I was just having this conversation with someone about music and I feel like food, but in particular ice cream, is the same way of you have those specific memories of having it. I was just like a friend. I saw dad by his son and ice cream cone. This is a shout out to taste of Chicago back in sometime in college I was I was up there where it's just a bunch of Chicago restaurants that come together. This was an original rainbow cone, so it's five flavors in one. Dad Buys it, gives it to his kid. He's getting that you pay in tickets, so he's getting a few tickets. act like his change in that time of giving the cone to a sun and then getting the tickets back and turning. The Sun has taken one look...

...of the ice cream cone and knocked it out of the cone and on to the ground and the dad is just like no, like you can see it slow motion. Is Eyes just like bugging out of his head, like what is happened? And to Rainbow cones credit, they gave him another, another cone on the House. But I was just walking by and saw this and I'm like, this is magical. I love it, love it. I mean I think that is the most classic Ice Cream Story of any child, right. It's like child, here's an ice cream I your dad, mom, dad gives you an ice cream cone and the child just stoked and just like three licks and that sucker hits the floor. I mean, it is, it is. That tail is as old as ice cream itself, I think. And to your point, though, man like the the awesome ice cream parlors, right, like did the real family run business? Two people that get it. You know, I've seen his hundred times due just like you know, to have the person work into the counter be like, don't sweat it, we got you. At the end of the day, it's just ice cream. And you know a scoop ice cream, give it away. Scoop ice cream is never going to break the bank. So it's Nice, the right thing to do, and it's also just like completes the saga being a child and dropping your ice cream. You have this like awesome ice cream scooperson. That's just like. I got you absolutely. And Are you? Are you more of like a purist in terms of your ice cream consumption, or are you like loading it up with toppings, like a cold stone, marble slab type of set up? Yeah, you know, so in in where I grew up, in Germany, like there was, you know, the only like, quote unquote, like mixins you'd ever have with ice cream. You know, it's like strawberries or whipped cream or like cherries or something. Right, I it never, you know, really got that crazy, and wasn't until I actually moved to Austin, Texas and was introduced to Amy's ice cream. Oh, yes, yes, I dank. This can get pretty Dang wild. I mean, you know, the sky is the limit, no joke. And and so I went through a phase, you know, especially in high school, where I's just like, if it's some type of chocolate or candy or fruit, even, I don't care, put it all together, you know, and mix it up. But now, you know, I would say, especially ever since we started this company, you know, I'm more of a purist night, you know, but I'll slap some blueberries on there every once in a while, you know, or some homemade whip cream. But you know, I kind of start straying away from all the all the crazy stuff. Yeah, I think, I think I'm the same way. I worked at a cold stone in high school and I feel like that was, yeah, like part of the start of like, let me see how weird I could make it. But then, however weird I thought I could make ice cream. Yeah, people that would come in would be much more weird. I still remember someone ordered a smoothie and they wanted gummy bears in it, and high school may said sure, let's do that, not thinking, wait a minute, this is actually a terrible idea and we'll probably damage the blunder here and then absolutely it did it. I said, I'm sorry, I can't put gummy bears in your shaped because they don't blend. That's that's a pretty good story, man. That's wild, wild time's out there. Ye, so for sure you started mammoth in two thousand and seventeen, as I correct. Well, so two thousand and...

...seventeen is correct. My wife started it and she started it after she heard I talked about starting an ice cream company and I was like this is this stupidest idea ever and I would nothing to do with it. And she started it, you know, because she's like, well, I don't really care what you think, I'm going to start this company. And then after she started it and it started working, you know, I kind of flexed my way intos like Hey, I'm your husband's to me, you gotta hire me, you know, and I was working in food. So, you know, I kind of had a kind of had a lucky hand, because she know, she's never worked in sales before, and she's like, well, Tim Works, and not only in sales, but he's working and selling food. And get okay. Well, and he's my husband and I got to live with him. So yeah, I'll hire you and we can call you a cofounder. But Jeez man, you going to work hard and still true today, nice, Nice, glad she's putting you to work, not yes, not giving you any free rats. None. I'm not shy either to tell me it's not good enough. So you mentioned how you have a background and selling food, which I think there's there's a unique skill set that selling food has that maybe selling other types of products doesn't. So can you kind of talk about both your background and how that's helped you as you move into ice cream hotly man and I so my sales background actually started in software, you know, a as most people's does. You know. I was selling at first like this really old school, you know, on premise software, which, you know, was in and Dan in age where everything is in the cloud. You know, was really a tough sale. So I kind of, you know, was sharpening my teeth on dad because it really was a hard sale. And then, you know, I was selling software nearly close to ten years and then I just realize it's just for me personally. It was the worst. I hated it selling software, just no matter what type of software, no matter how successful I was, it just didn't get me excited. It was a job. I didn't want to do it. You know, I met a lot of cool people and I but I also met a lot of not cool people. You know. That would just it was just not for me. And so as I was kind of like looking at some not necessarily options, but you know, I was looking at my life and I was like what am I gonna do? Like there's no way I can, you know, be asked through this much longer, like I'm almost at the limit. You know, this opportunity came up to sell, actually to sell beef Jerky for a local Austin Texas company called an epic Bar and and, you know, day they hire or they they brought me from interview and they're like, okay, so you have ten years of sales experience. Great, but you know, it's obviously the wrong sales experience. And they're like, you know, yeah, it's I don't know, doesn't make sense. So like they put up this panel of six people right as I was interview with the six people and they're like, okay, you know, after the interviews are down there, like these six people are going to get together and they're going to vote on you know, you're hired or not. And they came back split right three and three, and I was like, Oh damn. Okay, well, you know what you guys going to do? And to like what we're going to take it to the president of the of the company, and he's gonna, you know, he's going to interview you and then he's going to do like a tiebreaker. And so I,...

...you know, I met this guy and again, you know, like he was like a CPG veteran. There's no snow bullshit in this guy right, like he completely is a industry veteran. He's seen it all, he's done it also as like well, you know. So I just I went as hard as I could in his interview, just selling myself on passion and what I wanted to do and what I thought about why, you know, I was the best person for the job and and you know, I don't know why, but this guy is like, all right, dude, we'll give it to you. So they gave me the job. You know how eyes. Yeah, it was pretty cool, man. And you know, he's like, ultimately, the reason why he felt like I was a good fit. And he's like, well, the way you are selling it, man, it sounded like you were willing to jump on a grenade, you know, for for for this job. And looking back, like I don't think I would have done that actually better. But yeah, I'm glad that's how it came across, you know, and and you know in during that interview, maybe I would have. So yeah, depends on the timing of the come totally, man. But UH yeah, so selling food is is you know, selling is selling, yes, but the approach to what you're selling and, you know, dd sales cycle and what have you, whatever you want to call it. You know, it's all these fancy terms. is completely different, right. So we start selling this beef Jerky, which was fairly new within, you know, the CPG industry at a time, maybe a couple of years old, which, you know, incpg is pretty much brandnew. And so you go. So I would go into these meetings, you know, like of grocery stores, retailers, which I had no experience with. You know, like I knew absolutely nothing about CPG. I didn't know anything about promotions. I mean, I just knew nothing. All I knew was this product and why this product was important, and I was really good at just selling the story and the mission and the importance of this product. You know, my goal and every meeting was don't ask me questions about the data. You know, they're like what type of revenue or, you know, what's this and this? What are the Trans and I had no idea. Had all the data in front of me, but I just didn't know it because I had no experience in that field. You know, from from you know, what's what's the percentage? You know, promotion, the broken down by all these different categories, like I don't know. But here's why that doesn't matter. It's because these bison eat grass and then eating the grass is going to make the world a better place. And it was just the right time to write place to me, you know, like selling on that passion, just selling that mission really, you know, made the difference and they that company. You know, I helped that company explode when it comes, you know, when you're looking at it from a sales standpoint, and they were extremely successful and had a you know, actually had an exit. You know, got a purchase by a very large CPG company called General Mills. And Yeah, so it was a was happy days and then you're ready to move on to the next challenge and you know, so after that acquisition, you know, we all moved into general mills. You know, at working for epic, but part of General Mills, which was was really awesome. General's a great company, you know, and there's a lot of people there, you know, like that work there for twenty and thirty years.

A lot of people that's their only job, right, and so it's a great company's lots of opportunities. But to me it started feeling a lot like that corporate America in software that I left. And so after a couple years I was just like, you know, I was just starting to do things that I didn't want to do, and not only that, but I was spending most of my time doing these things. Since I was like yeah, it is feels so, you know, I like this feels like I remember this and I don't like it. And that was at the that was at the same time. We're kind of Susan that launched a company and was make an ice cream, and so, you know, as far as the timing goes, like it just kind of worked out. You know, it's like kind of like the general mills piece kind of just, you know, faded away in the sunset and the man of peace was just Sun Sun was rising, I guess, and and such just work that way. Awesome, awesome, and you you tease this a little bit at the beginning, but you said that mammoth is good for you ice cream, which I know people here and they're like, how true is that? So what makes it good for you? Totally man. So there's about a thousand things that make it good for you. But do you want that's most recognizable? I think to everybody is just we don't put sugar in our ice cream, not and and that's the biggest differentiator as well. Right. It's like, I think anybody that's ever eating ice cream, and you know I want to, you know, nine out of ten people at least, because I was always done. One Guy, as we discussed earlier, to write who, if you've eat an ice cream of any sort, you've probably eating ice cream with sugar. Right. That's just how the majority ice cream is distributed, that's how most of the ice cream is made and that's just how we all know it. But Susan made meymoth ice cream, originally not to start a company, but she just made it for me because I'm a type one diabetic and I just don't handle sugar really well. And so, you know, growing up without diabetes and I was eating this sugar ice cream all time, I never had an issue with it. And then when I was twenty eight we found it I was a diabetic and so that changed everything. You know, I was still kind of trying to eat just a normal ice cream, but man, it just I was getting sick. My blood sugar was just crazy and it just got to the point where I stopped eating ice cream for a couple of years completely. And and you know, for me, food is a very important piece of my life. It always has been, you know. I how it kind of was brought up, like food is the time we all get together. We shared a meal, we share stories, we share experiences. That's like, I don't know, it's just like the one very consistent thing in my life. And and not eating ice cream. And I'm not even joking you man. It just yeah, I didn't notice it, but it's like, you know, was I was a very depressing thing, you know, because, like we have a bunch of kids. They're still crush and ice cream. And I tried to be pretty cool about it and I was like yeah, you know, I don't worry about it, doesn't bother me. But really US killing me inside. Yeah, and so one day sue's was just like this is out of control. Let me just make you some sugar free ice cream, and I was like go ahead, I'm sure it's going to suck, you know, like that sounds terrible. And she made it and it was probably the best thing I've ever had into Wark, you know, in the world. And so she was just making it at...

...home you know, for for us and just you know, I never thought about starting company. And Yeah, and then one day, you know, somebody actually and in within the CPG coming down was working, you know, like somebody had gotten a hold of my ice cream that I brought to work and was like, Oh, this is really good. Where do you when you buy this? And I was like, well, you eating this out of a Tup of worm and we make this at home, don't you don't buy this. And and that first I started ice cream company and I was like now, absolutely not, no, thank you. And you know, that's how it kind of started. You notice. I went home and I was like yeah, Susan, this is the feedback. You know, they think that would be a good idea, terrible idea. And then, you know, Susan was like actually, it's a great idea. So she and and and the rest of history meant she started it and I was lucky enough to get in there. And Yeah, we just started shouting sound sugar free ice cream. That is a it's just, you know, really good for you, obviously because it don't have any sugar, but also what it does. We you just use, you know, like a hundred percent grass had butter. We use like super premium heavy whipping cream. We don't use any any preservatives or gums or any of the other young pretty much every other ice cream uses and and and, yeah, you know. And it's at least what the feedback's been so far. People are pretty much are into it. So Nice, Nice. That's always always good to hear, as opposed to the opposite. Totally, man. It's a you know, the way we make up for not having sugar. We it's a very high fat ice cream right where you traditionally when you buy a pink kind of ice cream, let's say like Ben and Jerry's right, which is probably one of the more famous out there. If you look on the back, man, you'll see it has a ton, has tons of fat in it, but it all has tons of sugar and so and we just kind of eliminated that one line item. And and yeah, it's been an amazing journeyman. It's a product that I mean, I will everybody but Ben and Jerry's, simply because Ben and Jerry's is just like a class of its own. But you know, a any other ice cream, and I challenged you to, you know, to eat our ice cream and compared to, you know, the full sugar version. And I'm telling you, man, if it's going to win every time, fantastic, fantastic. And since you have now been in business for several years gone through a pandemic, what's something that's surprised you about running a business? I mean, every single day surprise. As me man, every single day surprise is me most of the it's hard to say. So you know, last year obviously was a big surprise with the pandemic because, you know, we make our money selling ice cream to grocery stores and when the grocery stores are closed at is tough. When we started the company, you know, we didn't really think, I think, about like Oh, we need a really awesome online store to sell ice cream, because sell an ice cream online seems ridiculous. And, you know, went when Covid came, you know, we quickly had to rethink that and just figured that problem out and and you know, we I don't know if we figured it out. We came up with a solution that wasn't great, but at least it kind of helped us to you know, to get the ice cream out there and to...

...to make it through through last year, which is, you know, as success, success by itself because when you just look at last year, it's been so many young companies wishes didn't make it and to come out on the other side and, you know, go into the office and you flick that switch, you like, I hope that check cleared, man, and the light comes on. You like hell, yeah, let's get to work, you know. So, yeah, man, so that's so yeah, surprises, I guess. I mean there's so many surprises now. I love sometime, you know, sometimes I get an email and it's just like a mom of a diabetic child that was like, Hey, we just picked up this ice cream. You know, my child's a diabetic. I'm at I'm in sparent but I'm not diabetic, and so it's just like, you know, I haven't slept in eight years. It's the scariest thing in the world, like everything my child does after you just like hover and I, you know, I don't want to, but I have to because it's a young child and it, you know, diabetes will, you know, ultimately, if it's not managed, probably will take people's lives, and especially children's. And you know, ask giving you know, this diabetic child. You know your ice cream is one of the very few things outside of drinking water. Well, you know, this child can be unsupervised because it's safe. You know. So when I when I hear a story like that, I'm like that, you know, just even talking about you and I get goosebumps because that's, you know, that's awesome, you know, and like it's it's and not that it's surprising, but it is surprising that, you know, people go out of their way to tell me the story because, you know, even though that's why the product was created, I just didn't think that, you know, again, people would take time out of their day to say thank you. In a ways, like you purchased the pind you already said thank you. Always absolutely nothing, and then somebody, you know, writing three pages of email. You know that it's just so personal and so sensitive. It's just like, man, you know, that's that's awesome. Yeah, those are the most coolest things, like, and I know plenty of people get into business to to make money and like that certainly an admirable goal, but oh yeah, to keep to get those stories. I know that you're impacting people like that. I think it's such a such a cool thing to say. Yeah, man, but then, you know, on the on the flip side, you know, everyone, while I get that email, I just people tell me that I should absolutely ruined their lives and this is the worst thing that's ever happened to me. And how how dare I? And you know you mean, you always got those out there too. So sometimes I'm surprised how, you know, how how personal people can, you know, take ice cream, which then again, now I'm saying it out loud, I guess it is a very personal experience. But yeah, sometimes, not very often, but there have been one or two people, you know, to have we're pretty convinced that I have ruined their lives forever because the ice cream just wasn't what they expected. I mean, if that's the worst thing that happens in their life, I think they're they're living a pretty good lafe man. It's a great deal, because you know what man he is to deal even the worst ice cream in the world still ice cream. You know, I exactly like that's a that's a at the worst. I feel like that's a fair deal. Yeah, like it's not. If this is I think people also just liberally will say things are the worst in...

...their life or like the worst thing they've ever had and I'm like everything can't be you're not progressively having more terrible things every time. Like step back will settle that, it'll bear it. Yeah, totally, man, totally, and again, you know, those are those are one in a million. But I was surprised the first few times I saw those emails when'm like holy, Holy Shit, like I think we have to move, like when they find us, you know, like this was just do this, threatening me. Yeah, well, that that actually ties and nicely. I always think this is a fun thing to ask any kind of CPG, specifically food or drink, but have you or your wife ever come up with a flavor that you thought was going to be great and just it just didn't turn out? Oh Dude, yes, man, I'm set. Is a great question. Nobody asked. Hell, yeah, Dude. So when sue first like got to make an ice cream and we were, you know, still doing it like in a commercial kitchen. Before to manufacture, we had, and this is actually even on our instagram, like if you were to go to like the very, very beginning, there's a picture of DIS flavor. It was a vocado of a Kado Lemon. I think it was okay. So it was like a vanilla based and then, like Susan would like like Mash Real Avocados in there and lemon zest and so like. It was just beautiful green like it was. It was probably the best ice cream we ever made, you know, like and it was delicious. But Dude, like and and we kind of talk. Yeah, you know, it's it's it's an ice cream. So would be frozen. So you know, it will be good for forever. But Dude, like even in the freezer that ice cream kind of acted like any avocado. Once it's peeled. It starts out at this beautiful green, you know, and just like every day it's like changing color, changing color, and after about ten days I opened that ice creams like it might be safe to eat, but this is just no way in Hell I'm going to even attempt to eat this. And and we really tried and you know, we really thought, you know, that lemon is going to act as a preservative because it's an acid, and these are all just rumors, due these are myths, and and so, you know, the only option was to like put a preservative in there and or, you know, like something artificial and then some color and we're just like man, we're just going to table this for now and and maybe one day, if this company even becomes anything real, you know, maybe we'll try to bring it back. But Avocado Lemon, man, it was, it was, it was stupid good. It was probably it's probably too good. So, as someone who just I opened up some leftovers that apparently included a scoop of Guacamoli in it from my Dka Marias. I'll have them a shadow, a great little Mexican place down here, and they I always forget, they include this with like almost anything you get. They'll give you a side a rice and beans and a scoop of Guacamoli, and I always forget the Guacamole. So I'll like save the rice and beans for later. And then I open it up and I'm like, oh no, this is yea, this is turned, this is rice and beans. And what is this? Yeah, that's some sort of some sort of tennis ball or something, I don't know, unclear, clear what it is. Yeah, it's it's a fuzzy growing all kinds of things. It's probably got some of those worms in it too. Yeah,...

...they've been hanging around town, thankfully, thankful. Actually, I did find a worm on my hand the other day and I thought it was a leftover from my food and I was about to just kind of like wash it off in the sink and then I was like, oh no, that's like I'll let you outside. I was hoping you want to say, yeah, that this was like a piece of cheese and you pop in your mouth and then I'm probably done that. Incidentally, in the past two I bet we all have and just don't even know. I mean, cricket, cricket based food, is starting to come alive, so you'd like sure worms are good. Yeah, man, like cricket protein, like that's a real thing, man, like it is a you know, for me personally, I'm not super into it, but I can, you know, I can respect the people that they are doing it, because it's like, man, what can we do to just be crazy but still deliver valut deliver value, and you know, it's just I mean that's that's crazy, man. That's awesome. So yeah, Kudos to that. I think I've had one. I had one. I think it was chips that were cricket, cricket made from CRIEK POTTERERN I thought I was like this is not as bad as I would have thought, but I've tried a couple of others and it's like yeah, it's a little it's a little lie and needing to like a consistency thing. Yeah, like just needs a little, little something. Yet I was just thinking. I was like, you know, the only thing like I ever consumed, like with a cricket dude, are like does gas station lollipops there will have like a cricket into lollipop or Scorpion or something crazy, you know, like that was like the closest I think I've ever ever gotten to it. So it's a it's come a long way, I guess. Yeah, yeah, that that actually just reminded me. I think I saw, I think it was Scorpion lollipops when I studied abroad and China and for whatever reason there were like two shops on this street to food shops, and it was like Scorpion lollipops or Pumpkin bread, and I was like I'm gonna go with the pumpkin bread. Yeah, man, we sat last time we drove through New Mexico. That was a gas station dud. I have, you know, like lollipop and Scorpions in it. And you know, even if you kind of like, you know, you leave the big towns of Texas, like anywhere going, you know, what does that West or North Texas? You know, you like you stopped just gas station, you know, notice like beer, m o gas, nothing else, and you go into guaranteed, you find us someone. Those lollipops, you know, are like rattletail, snake in there. Or yeah, it's so wild out there, out of control, out of control. Well, do you have any other flavors coming up that you're working on that that we might be able to see later this year, in the future? Totally man. So we actually just launched three new flavors on Friday, so last Friday, which are just, I mean, so game changing. You know, like when we started to come then we launched our first four flavors, you know, like we were like hey, this is going and this is really good, this is really changing the game within our niche, which is, you know, high fat, low carb ice cream. But now we launched these three additional flavors, which are strawberry, butter, coffee and butter pecan, and these are so amazing that you know, yes, this is going to change you know, better for you ice cream, no question. But this is going to change ice cream...

...overall because Susan and her team. You know, Susan is in charge of all the operation R d. she's the CEO and a company to have cracked the code to making a better for you product that doesn't taste like a better for you product. And you know what I mean right like you know, you like if I were to give you a quote quote protein bar, you know, immediately is like, Yep, this is does not have sugar in it or anything. That I love, you know, like there's no question about it. But yeah, these new skews that we launch, man, it's like it's it even what as I'm eating, as I was eating a pint for lunch today, I was just like it is just so hard to believe that there is no sugar in this, you know, and and you know the way I kind of, you know, keep myself honest. You know, as a diabetic, I'm monitor my blood sugar and so I'm just looking at my, you know, my blood chair. I'm like this, certainly it's going to take off like a rocket any second. It is just too good and it's just no response and it's like, Damn, you know Susan, Susan her team. They I mean, they really figured it out, man. It's amazing. And and we do have a five additional flavors launching at the end of the year and I'd love to share them, but I think you know, Su's is looking through me, at through the window at me. He's giving me one of these right now. She's and so I better not. But let me just say that out of those five, there's going to be a few like very traditional, traditional flavors, and then there's going to be three that are going to be more, more fun. It's God yeah, looking looking forward to that for sure. I'll be some good stuff, good stuff all around. Now, as we as we traditionally do on the show, it was like to wrap up with the top three and I was going to ask your top three flavors, but I feel like you just kind of gave us a little scoop there with the ones you just launched. So let's just will go outside of the ice cream game. You've been you've had a Texas for a while now, right. Yeah, twenty five years. Okay, okay, twenty five years. So give us your top three Texas landmarks? Oh Dude, yes, absolutely. Well, let's see, that's that's actually so. I'm a you know, before I moved to Texas, never heard of Texas. Knew nothing of actually, the only they have herds, like, yeah, you know, riding a horse to school, shooting guns, you know, cowboys, a just just like anybody really would grown up. Yeah, small, that's the that's the talk of Texas, outside of Texas, totally. And so then once we move here, you know, especially to Austin, you know, it's, Oh wow, this is nothing like expected. And so as I grown, growing older and start to appreciate things more in life, you know, like Texas history, actually I absolutely love you know, like there's just so much of it. The land marks are just so amazing. It is, it is, it is crazy right. And so one of my very favorite ones, which I considered a landmark, I don't know if the greater public would, but is a pallador canyon outside Amarilla, Texas. You know, it's I don't know if you've been or, you know, planning ongoing. I'd highly recommend it and and the reason why I you know, to me what it means is I'm I'm a huge fan of the Grand Canyon Right which, if you...

...also I would highly recommend you go there. But you know, to have something so similar, just smaller scale, in Texas is just absolutely insane and it is one of those things. I could sit here for two hours and tell you how bad assid is and the the way it makes you feel in the just all the things, but it just you just gotta go there and it is again, you know, you can look at all the pictures in the world, you can love all the video footage in the world. It just doesn't do adjusting when you stand in that canyon, you look left and you look right and you just like it is so unbelievable, like it is hard to even you. It's hard to process in your brain because there's just so much going on. That, I would say for me, certainly it is. It is the the number one favorite place for me in Texas. And then let's see you, and then there's just so many, so many amazing things. I guess the you know, the second one, and this is a pulp pretty as not super exciting, pretty classic one, but just I a'm a big fan of the Alamo simply because, you know, I've spent a lot of time kind of learning about the almo, you know, about all the history and and what have you, and so I think it's it's a cool place. Right. So I really enjoy, you know, going there and just checking it out and showing the kids. Seems that the kids are kind of like know, this sucks, but you know, I'm like that's okay. You know, I think you're supposed to say that as a child, you know, but hopefully as you get older and you understand really what it stands for, you can look back at this day and he's like, I've been there, that's cool. And and then the what's the last one? I would say landmark and in Texas. Man, it's it's a tough one, but so I let's say I got I got two tied for number three, and those two would be big Bend National Park and for Davis Mountain State Park. In for Davis Texas, simply because you know, big bend, if it's just it again, a shive world on its own, it's like you're on Mars. It's you know, it's Super Badass, beautiful, unbelievable. And then for Davis, it's just because it's like it is so tiny but it's just like when you think about like this tiny mountain town in Texas where you like mountain town in Texas, in a mountain in Texas, but it's like no dare. There are and they're like legit mountains. You know. You're like at five thousand feet, so there's like actual real altitude there. And if you just think about the struggles on what it would have taken, you know, in the eighteen hundreds to build a fort out there, and and the logistics and the maneuvering of food and just just you know, it's just hard life out there and and I really just love spending time there. And Yeah, yeah, but I fully agree with the list. I was just that big bench last summer as well. I wrote trip because, like you're saying, it's it's very remote and your even even though there are a couple of other cars kind of along the road, you'll pass by every once in a while, you have the lay of the land to yourself wherever you end up stopping, which is real cool. Yeah, man, Big Ben is one of those few places, I think, where you like if you want to get lost, like a really, really legitimately...

...lost, like I might die out here lost. Big Ben can deliver, you know, absolutely. And also it's one of those things if you're not, you know, depending on how lost you get, you know, you might get found in Mexico, you know, which is also super neat. Like, you know, like, I don't know, there's it just I just think it's so cool. I agree. I've never gotten lost in Mexico, but maybe that's a goal for the next guy. Next time. It's got a big bend end up in Mexico. Yeah, you know, it's it's one of those things, you know, just depends on where they find. I guess we'll time. If people want to learn more about mammoth and order, I would guess all the flavors all at once. It is probably the smartest strategy. Where can they find you man? So yeah, I mean, of course you know maymoth Creamascom is just kind of like d d Hub For all of the Info. But you know, I'd I'd suggest, if you have to availability, you know, follow us on Instagram, maymoth creamies. You know, we obviously talk a lot about the products, but we talked about, you know, a health and fitness and really everything that that is important to a good life, and those two spots are certainly, certainly pretty awesome. But if you you know, if you local to Austin, a really, really anywhere in the country, you know you pop into your local whole foods and check out the product, or you know central market in here and are in Austin, or I mean really any any major retailer, should carry man with greeneries to some capacity across the country. So fantastic. Will Tim. Thank you so much for hopping on and chat and this was delightful and I'm gonna go and get some ice cream for this. Please do man, let me know what you think. Yeah, absolutely. I will wrap up with a joke, as we always do, a Corny joke, I should emphasize. So don't expect greatness here, but I thought this was a fun one. I just learned what's ice cream's favorite show. No, I feel like I should notice I don't know. Game of CONES, game off call God after Ta people, good people, cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you're a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. As always, you can send me a message Joey at good people, cool thingscom thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people, cool things and check out all the old episodes. Be a good people, cool thingscom as always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

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