Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 84 · 1 year ago

84: Being a Digital Nomad and Traveling Tips with Tayler Gill

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Have you ever thought like a typical corporate job wasn’t for you? Or maybe the COVID-19 pandemic has had you rethinking what you want out of your career. The remote work lifestyle is attractive to a lot of people, and it’s led to the rise of the digital nomad — someone who’s still getting plenty done, but also is able to travel, see the world, and have adventures.

Tayler Gill is a Work From Anywhere Lifestyle Coach, and she helps people see the highs, lows, and everything in between of the digital nomad, work from anywhere experience. Yes, it’s not all selfie sticks and waterfalls; you’ll have some tough times along the way. But as Tayler tells it, it’s incredibly rewarding, and if you go in with a sound strategy, you’ll do just fine.

We’re talking about how to make that initial leap into digital nomad life, travel tips and digital tools to be more efficient, and explore some of the more unusual side hustles and travel experiences we’ve encountered.

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Howdy and welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is Taylor Gill, the face and voice behind traveling Taylorcom. She's a digital nomad coach who helps people just like you, you listening right now, transition into the work from anywhere in life, giving you more flexibility and freedom to do what you love. Taylor has lived in New Zealand, Australia, boy Vietnam, South Korea, the UK, France, Switzerland. Name a country, she's probably lived there or she's on her way to living there very soon. The goal is one hundred ninety seven, get to all of the countries in the world. Pretty fantastic stuff. We're talking all about how Taylor got into this digital nomad life and some of her tips if you'd like to do the same kind of thing. She also shares her video content and some of the tools that she has. Spoiler alert. Doesn't take a lot to get into video and it's what every single social platform is pushing on their algorithms. They love them some videos, obviously, tick tocks, huge instagrams all about rails and lives, and facebook's all about the videos linkedin. I don't know why I just started turning very kind of southern and fog horn leg horny there. But if you need video, she's got your covered. She also share some of her favorite productivity and remote working tools so you can get your work done faster, more efficient and better than you've ever had before. That's pretty magical. If you like to get in touch with the show, you can reach out via joey at good people, cool thingscom or on facebook, twitter or Instagram at GPCT podcast. And, as always, you can support the show by heading on over to apple podcasts, pod chase or stitcher and leaving a review, hopefully five stars, but hey, if you want to leave one star, I'll cry all day about it and it'll be great. Can also support the show, of via the Merch Shop, which you can find at good people, cool thingscom. Shop by yourself something wonderful. As you listen to this episode with Taylor. For people who don't know who Taylor Gill is, can you give us your elevator pitch and can you also tell us the type of elevator that we're riding on. Yes, we are in an elevator with mirrors all around so we can make silly faces as we go this really nice elevator in this Fancy Hotel and currently a community facilitator for hyper paradise, which is a digital nomad community that travels around. We organize trips for other other nomads and I got started in this after nomadding myself mostly Solo for about three years, and prior to that I was a study of broad adviser. So you could say, I usually say, that study abroad changed my life. So I studied abroad in college and then shortly after that I got to do an internship over in London as well, working with study abroad students, and that is really what led me down the path that I am on now. Fantastic. was that sort of the first trip that you ever took, or that was just the one that was like hey, I want to be doing this more. No, so I'd actually took my first international trip at fifteen and my uncle at the time was working for the USN Toc in London, and so my grandma was like we all have to go, we have to visit. Like she saw the opportunity for us to like have that experience and so we all kind of went and yeah, that was my first international experience on the the red tour bus driving around London. My hat getting, you know, flown off my head from the wind and just like I like I don't know why I remember that, but I just loved it. was so different from anything I'd ever experience ...

...like growing up in Texas. And so, yeah, that was when I got the travel bug and then, yeah, ended up studying abroad in London as well, and then that experience led to a six month internship also working with study abroad students. So London was kind of like the main place I felt like I kept visiting like early on, and then that really gave me the Efidence to just like bode other places and keep exploring and kind of like build that passion and me love it. Yeah, I think there's things I remember from vacations growing up to where I'm like this is so random that this is the thing that's stuck in my mind from true, but I I've consistently told my parents this and also just anyone who will listen really, that I feel so fortunate that I did get to travel as a kid in growing up, because I've met people now who are like, yeah, I took my first international trip two years ago when I was in my late S, and that is such a different experience than both of us had really where we were getting to explore kind of at a younger age and seeing how different things are in other countries and how, you know, from from culture to food to music, all that good stuff, and really getting a taste of that early on, I think has been so impactful in shaping for sure my life and it seems like, based on how your career has turned out, yours as well. Yes, it definitely took me on this path because, yeah, talking about visiting other cultures, like also, on that same very first trip, we did a weekend trip to Paris, and so in one trip I got to see like the total difference between like a European cities, and the whole experience was just yeah, I definitely gave me the travel passion and never really left me and I just kept continuing to for me, I kept traveling in different ways. Right. It's like the first one was like a family vacation and then I did my study abroad, which was different, and then I in turned abroad, which was different, and then I eventually tried my first solo international trip to see if that was something that I could do and pursue on my own. And so for me it was just trying different types of travel to figure out what it is, how I actually liked to travel and what I wanted when I wanted to keep doing so. Do you have a favorite out of all the different ways you've traveled? Well, the one I've done the most is probably just solo travel. So I spent two years solo traveling internationally pre covid and then I took a little break during covid until I got back on the road. But I also really enjoy I mentioned I'm a Hacker Paradise Community facilitator at this point, so I actually joined a couple of their trips as a part to dis sent because it was a way to get ingrained into a likeminded community of other travelers and of other nomads, and then I could meet them around the world in different places wherever I was. So I think it's a mix of solo travel and then also just being a part of like the traveling community. At this point and you're very well versed in the travel sort of environment. I for for lack of a better word, but for folks that maybe haven't traveled as much or are, you know, maybe planning their first international trip, looking ahead to two thousand and twenty two, maybe doing a last minute two thousand and twenty one sort of crack all maybe? Who? WHO's to say? Who knows? Wow, the world will look at a couple of months. But Hey, we're thinking positive land here. So for those people that are maybe a little less experienced but want to do kind of a solo trip or maybe go somewhere with a couple friends, what are some of your kind of top travel tips and advice for people like that? So for less experienced travelers, what I try to tell...

...them is to not do too much, especially if you go to a place like Europe, where there's so many cities and countries just like right at your fingertips and it's so tempting to be gone for like ten days and go to like five cities and just be constantly moving around. But one you're just going to be exhausted because you're moving around to so much, and then it too you're going to spend half your time and trains or planes or figuring out where you are and actually getting to enjoy the experience of the destination. So I would say for a seven to ten day trip, no more than two locations, and I know that's can be really hard when you're planning to be like limit yourself, but I actually think you'll get a much deeper, richer experience if you don't try to do too much. And then the second tip, which is not unique at all, but just like do not pack too much. Like, you will think yourself at the end of the day for not packing too many things, because once you start taking your suitcase up and down stairs and up and downstairs and old hotels with Windy, narrow staircases and up and down, you know, through the train stations and things like, you will thank yourself for not packing too many things. Yeah, I echo that tremendously. I think the the last time I checked a bag was only because it's coming back from from London, ironically enough, London and Ireland, and I we I know I've told the story on the PODCAST so I'll keep it break, but we were coming back from the distillery in London which does a gin a whole like history of Gin and then you make your own gin. And they just gave us so many takeaway bottles that I think there were maybe like eight bottles of Gin, both of ones that that were created and then just some of their own kind of classic ones, and I'm like, well, we can't check any bottles of Gin, let alone eight large bottles of Gin. So checked checked a bag strictly for that purpose of smashing jis nice. I mean that's a pretty good reason. Yeah, it's tasty GIN. Would recommend for for any London frequenters out there, or even if you're visiting once it's not by the distillery, get yourself some it. Now for you, you mentioned that part of your experience has been as a digital nomad as well, which I think is a term. I don't have the Google search volume in front of me, but I would imagine that's a term that over the past couple of years more people are searching for, more people are trying to kind of get into that lifestyle or at least learn more about it. So, as someone that I'm going to I'm going to say it as an og digital no matter. I don't know I go that far. I'm I'm throwing the claim out there. You can reject it. If as a at least as a not novice digital no matter. Well, first of all, how did you kind of decide? I know you said you've gotten the the travel bug from London and kind of was like hey, maybe I can, I can try this out, but was it very much just like let's go take the plunge into it, or are there kind of like steps you can prepare before you go into that world? Yes, so I believe in planning and I think if it's like any lifestyle, if you don't put some like preparation and thought behind it, I don't think it's very sustainable. Like I think you have to really know your why and then, yes, put certain things in place so that you can continue to do it for however long it is that you want to do it. The people who typically like quit their job and leave the next day to go travel and say they're digital nomads like, usually have to return home in a few months because they haven't figured it...

...out, because it is it's a lifestyle change and that requires work. So for me personally, I mentioned, I was working in study abroad and I don't really know what the last straw was there were just so many different things that happened throughout my like six years working and study abroad, and I knew that this thing existed where people worked remotely and traveled whenever they wanted and I didn't understand how to get there. But I will say one of the one of the deadlines for me was turning thirty, because I knew of the Working Holiday Visa for New Zealand and I wanted to do that and I was turning thirty, so I was like, well, it's now or never. So once that deadline came, I had to figure out a way to make an online and come. So that's really the first step. Like you have to either have a remote job, which is way more common now than it was, you know, four years ago when I got started. Thank you. That's one of the positives. I think that came out of the pandemic, at least it's to my you know, atmosphere and environment. But yeah, you need to have an online income, so remote job or starting your own online business or becoming a freelancer. So I became a freelancer at that time time. And then figuring out how you actually want to travel, like what is your actual budget, or you're going to stay and air BN BE'S are you're going to stay and hostels. For me, and I didn't even mention this up top, but I started house sitting. So That's how I actually afforded to travel around New Zealand for a year, which is not, you know, a cheap country to be in. I was house sitting. So what that is is people leave to go on vacation or whatever whatever trip they have plans. Sometimes it's a work trip and they invite House that there's to come into their home and take care of their home and there's almost always pets involved and that's really the reason they get house that there, so they don't have to disrupt their pets schedules too much. And Yeah, I live in their home and walk their dogs and feed their cats and and exchange for my service they give me free accommodation, so I don't get paid for that, but it was just a really budget friendly way for me to actually travel, and so I did that all over the world. All I get that into Celand at Australia and Vietnam and Switzerland and I was able to go to a lot of different locations through that. So after yeah, so after you figure out your online and come, then it's just figuring out how you're going to travel and what your budget actually is. And then once you have those two things figured out, the rest of it can kind of be figured out, like while you're on the road, and you know things will change as you go along. Like I said, I a year into traveling solo, I was kind of tired. I was doing a lot of the logisticks on my own be because I wasn't traveling with anyone else, and so that's when I joined Hacker Paradise because I just needed a break and I just really wanted to meet other you know, a big tren as being used now, was work from anywhere. So other work from anywhere professionals and kind of get involved in a community that way, because it can't be challenging to find that. Sometimes on the road you need a lot of vacationers or you need a lot of locals and they're doesn't different points of their life and you are, and it's great to meet them and hang out with them, but it is not usually a long term community. So it is important, I think, to get to get involved in then in the nomad community specifically to also sustain it long term. All Right, I have a couple of follow up questions, but I think the most the most immediate. When you've been house sitting, has there ever been a very unusual pet that you've had to take care of or just something within the house? We're like, I've never seen that in a home before. Oh Um, I haven't had any unusual pets as mostly cats...

...and dogs, but when I was in New Zealand I did have lots of sheep and a couple of cows and lots of chickens, so I did have that experience specifically in New Zealand. But the homes are really interesting because usually their local houses. So in Vietnam, for example, everything is built to be tall and really skinny. It's like on every floor it's like one room and then you have to go up to another floor to get to like another room and then, I don't, I don't know, I'm nothing like super unusual is coming to mind, but they are all like a just a little unique, depending on the location and the the architecture of the area. Yeah, I think it's always fun to see the little quirks for, for lack of a better word at really at any any place I'm staying at, whether it's a hotel or a hostel or someone's home like that, just to see like hey, what are they because you'd have to imagine they're not keeping a hundred percent of everything they normally have out, like they're probably doing at least some sort of I clean up beforehand or maintenance to to maybe throw everything into a closet. That where they're like, I don't want you poking around my I don't know, lava lamp collection or whatever. Some people do, but not everybody'd be really surprised. Some people are just totally open it, just like yeah, like, use whatever you want. And then, yeah, some people are like here's our closet, don't worry about it. Don't worry about the eighteen thousand rolls of toilet paper that we hoarded at the start of the no, we know was so funny after the pandemic, every house that I did after that, which is mainly in New York, this summer, you guys spent three more three months in New York. This summer house sitting, everyone pointed out the fact that they had plenty of toilet paper, like no one has ever pointed that out to me. Like Post Post Covid, everyone's like and here's all the toilet paper, you're set. Okay, it is something. You like having it. It's rough if you don't have it. Yeah, it was just just noticed that. It was funny. You mentioned work from anywhere becoming hot a hot topic, not unlike the store hot topic, but more pleasant to work from anywhere than be inside hot topic. But for people that are exploring remote work or maybe again like they've kind of been forced into it from the pandemic, there are all kinds of digital tools as well to help get your work done more effectively, be more productive in some cases maybe just focus better, since there's plenty of home distractions. I don't know if you can hear, but there's dogs barking off in the background in my house right now because there's probably light movement outside and they're they're protecting against intruders. So I appreciate that. It's also not the best for podcast recording, but I'll fix it all in post, as I always like to say. So this is a very long winded answer for, or long winded lead up to, the question of what are some of your favorite digital tools? Well, I'm going to say that. First one is zoom, which again I was using pre pandemic and a lot of people are now really familiar with. But that is the main way, especially as a freelancer, that I talked to my clients and stayed connected with them. Another really big one is slack. So I use this with all of my clients. Actually I think I'm in like eight slack channels right now, so all my clients and then actually for Hacker Paradise, we have a slack channel for each one of our trips, as well as like an alumni slack, so that keeps US connected there. And then even, I would say, even like communities that...

I'm a part of also just use slack. So for me it's been a it's a social tool as well as a work tool. And then beyond that, I think those are like the mean ones. As far as like productivity goes. For me, I'm a huge fan of the pomondoro method, which is a scientifically backed method of you work twenty five minutes on and then you take a five minute break and then you do another twenty five minutes, another five minute break, and you could do four sessions like that and then you take a ten minute breaks. We take a little bit longer break after that. So when I'm having a hard time focusing or just doing way too much context switching, then I actually just it's just a chrome extension and it's called timer. It's really basic, but I'll just set it for twenty five minutes and in that twenty five minutes I put my phone away and I just say, okay, all you have to do is focus for twenty five minutes, and that feels doable. Instead of being like you have to write this blog post or something right that like, I'm like, okay, just do twenty five minutes of work. And what it does is it actually like once you get into it, then you find yourself working and getting enough flow and things like that. So that's one of my like productivity tips. And then, speaking of chrome extensions, another one I really love that I found a couple of years ago. It's called one tab, and I know most people who work online you always have like a butt bunch of Tabs Open. Everybody doesn't. This is another thing that helps me to avoid context switching and get distracted by things I don't need to be working on in the moment. But you just click on the little icon and it throws all your tabs into like one page and kind of groups them so that when I'm like, okay, I'm working on this client, I'll open up all their tabs and then I close them as I finished tasks, and then I'll be like, okay, I'm moving on to this new task and I'll open up all those tabs for that. It's also really helpful if I pulled up a couple of like articles I really want to read, but I don't want to add them to my book marks like I just I want to go back and read them like later that night or the next day, I'll also throw those into my one tabs so they're easily accessible. But yeah, anything that goes to my book marks tends to get either used frequently or lost, so it's kind of a good it's kind of a good in between for me. Yeah, the multiple tabs is a very real issue, certainly, certainly for very much. I have one I'm there's one colleague in particular I'm thinking of where I've seen her screen before where it's you can't even see a letter of each tap right, and I'm just like, how do you even know what to click, like, how are you navigating between these, because you're like, are you just guessing or you just like, I think this was like the twenty four one down the line. I'm just going to click it and hope it's right and shuddering at the thought. Yeah, I can't. I can't work with clutter. So anything I can do to d clutter my work, my physical workspace and or my actual computer, then I'm much more focused and productive. One of the other things that you do is as part of your whole, really your whole online presence is you've got traveling Taylor as well, which is are you? Are you beyond a hundred videos? Now am among the the many resources that you have of of really all all kinds of great content and tips on being a digital nomad, on traveling, on creating better content. There's there's so many helpful tips and things out there, like I've recently watched your I break down of different ways that you can launch online courses. Yeah, shout out to podia. Hmmm, Podia, I never know how to say it. I say Podia, but I actually don't know. Now that you say that, feel like it's because it's like podium right it's like podium. Yeah,...

I like it. I like it. Put dietrist, I guess. I guess it's put dietarist. Sister get they probably say I podia, but otherwise will go with podia. But there's there's lots of good things on there and, as I feel like I'm a broken record and saying this, that video is all the rage. Yeah, for any platform that you're on where you've got, you know, obviously youtube has been around for forever, but every social site is prioritizing video now, the algorithm all that good stuff. So for some people video comes supernaturally. For other people it's might be a little bit more of a struggle and they're like, where do I even start? What kind of equipment should I have? So can you tell us a little bit about your video set up and maybe some things you've learned along the way and route to making over a hundred videos? Yeah, so I'll say for me, I actually started out as a travel blogger. That's what I thought I was going to do, and then about a year into that I realized I really don't like blogging and I'm really slow at it, and I was when I switched to making youtube videos. So my website and my youtube are both traveling Taylor's as. My instagram just kind of branded along all channel, so I'm super easy to find. But as far as my video setup, I've kept it really simple. I just you, I just record on my phone. That's it. So at the time I had like an old iphone. Now I've upgraded to an iphone eleven pro, so use that. I use a tripod. That is really important for the appropriate height as well as the sturdiness the camera, and then I did recently buy a lapel microphone, so that helps improve my sound and also I started recording outside a bit more and I just found I needed something that kind of blocked out like the wind, like extrenalis. So that was another reason I bought the microphone. And that's it. That's actually my entire setup. So I do think that there's a low barrier to getting started with video, lower than people think, because the cameras on smartphones these days are so good, like you don't have to have like a DSL are, you know, or a Gopro or something to get started. So that's all I've been using for the last two and a half years and I've put out at least one video a week, sometimes two videos a week during that time and I've never missed a week. So I've definitely stayed on top of it, which has been a big challenge. But what I've learned through that is, yeah, just like consistency, especially for Youtube, is really big. That's a big part of their algorithm, is consistency. And even during like early days of the pandemic, I definitely was one of those people that was just like had a had a bit of a breakdown. I was like, oh my gosh, if I'm not traveling, Taylor, like, who am I and what kind of content am I going to make if I'm not traveling, because what am I even going to talk about? And not just like, you know, I could even just talk about travel in general, because it just felt uneffable to even be mentioning going to different places, and so that's when I kind of pivoted a little bit of my channel to talking more about the online business aspect of, you know, generating online income, so and getting yourself prepared and set up to start traveling once things open back up. So I really this year I've created a lot more content around becoming a digital nomad. What that actually involves. And then I think moving forward, I'm going to do more like digital nomad destination videos and maybe more nomad interview videos to help, you know, continue to inspire people to live this lifestyle. If it's something that they're actually interested in.

Fantastic. Now, obviously one of the the Tieans, I think, for any kind of online business. I. When people are searching about it, you'll get all the different kinds of side hustles that you can do, all the different ways you can earn money online. So do you have a favorite one that you've ever read where you're like that is outrageous. How are people making money doing that? And it's wonderful. Oh, that was not the question I was expecting you to ask. Like to keep you out of your death I don't know. Usually, if I say how are people actually making money from that, I just believe it's a scam. Like I don't I don't know that I actually give it any credit in my mind and believe that they're actually making money. But I mean the the really common ones are anyone in tech really like I a software developer and engineer, those are really the easy ones to travel with. Like I said, I was a freelancer. So I was a freelance virtual assistant and then I kind of transitioned into more of a higher level online business manager. But there are all sorts of freelancers. Mean, there's video editors, a copywriters and social media managers and, you know, all accountants. Mean, you could really be anything, I believe, and find a way to, you know, make money online. Other really common popular ones are, yeah, like any like online courses, podcasting and Youtube. We didn't even didn't mention that, but there's podcasters of youtubers and yeah, drop shipping, ECOMMERCE. Those are another like popular in the the digital of that space. Two, I'm always amazed when I'll see, because you know, I work with some clients that are looking to get on podcast to and when I'll get a message back from a host or a producer or something like, Oh yeah, we'd love to have them on the show. It's five thousand dollars for an appearance. And I was like, I'm sorry, watch and it's just blows my mind, like I could not I say this and watching a year I'll be charging fat us. I'm just sorry. I can't imagine charging people to come on my podcast. Like I there are plenty of other ways to make money, but that just feels so seedy to me. Yeah, I mean, the way I see podcasting is like a great way of like marketing right, like it's a great way to like reaching new audience and tact to a round people who they not ever have heard of you or like how do reason to seek you out. So, yeah, it seems kind of crazy that you which charge for that, for like free advertising. That's wild times wow that, but they do you do. You do what works for you. I this is I think part of the reason I ask that question was I recently just read an article about, you know, some of the like weirdest side Hustles, and one that stuck with me with someone who had made a business. And again, like, I don't doubt that this person had done this, but I don't think this is something that you can, like anyone would just pick up, like I you can do this while you're watching, you know, spongebob or show here they currently watch. I don't even watch spongebob. I don't know why. That's random. I will say dairy girls, okay, I've been push are likely great show. But he essentially started a business where people would send him knives and he would sharpen them for them and then send them back. So like good, you know, a drop shipping knife sharp yeah, and I was like, you know what, that's fantastic. I don't think it's the business or side hustle for me, but I'm also not like I don't take the best care of my knives. Yeah, I try to, but I'm certainly not an expert at it. But I was like, you know what, that's like a very, very specific niche. Yeah, and finding it, which is I mean, good on him, right. I think...

...that's the thing, right, like you have to find what you're interested in and then just like figure out how to make money from that, even if it seems kind of ridiculous, if you know people will pay for it. There you go. That's your huns as your side whistle. Like. Actually, that reminds me two things. Actually. So a girl that's on the trip with me currently, she is like really end up plants. It's like not her day job, but she just loves plants and takes care of them, and so she actually goes out in like buys plants and then sells the cuttings of that to basically pay for this large expensive plant and she was talking to us the other day and there was like all these like local like there's a local facebook group and her area and people will just like you can pop in and show pictures and be like I'm selling this plant for five dollars or twenty dollars or whatever it is. And then she also started like how sitting the plants like for people who are going out of town. So she would go to their home and water them and take care of them while people were gone. And so yeah, I mean that's a pretty cool like side hustle that I never considered because I am terrible with plants. Yes, same, especially if it's a succulent get out of here. They're not easy to take care of. I don't care what anyone should I always like hearing about, quote unquote, nightmare stories. HMM. I asked every musician that comes on here about their worst gig and as a traveler I'd love to hear what's your worst travel experience? So I will say I've been pretty fortunate. I don't have a lot of stories, but the first one that comes to mind was when I was house sitting and Ho Chee Men's city it was a Sixteek houseit and I had gotten there, I think, the night before, so I hung out with a family a little bit that night and then they left the next day for like a fourteen hour flight. Right. It's like they were inaccessible be pretty much the whole day. And it was around dinner time and I took the dogs out for their walk and I come back and I can't open the front door, like I've essentially locked myself out. It's my very first day, like the home owners had looking like five hours previously, like mantompen God for Very Long. And I'm just standing in the street and it's they were more in like a neighborhood. So they were actually teachers at an international school there, so they lived more in like a neighborhood area wasn't very touristy. And I'm standing in the street and the dogs are getting anxious because we're not going inside the house and that's really unusual, and there's mopez going by and kids playing in the street and I'm just standing there because I literally like there's no back to the house, there's No side to the house there. Everything is like right up next to each other. There's no way for me to get into the house and I don't know what I'm going to do. So I'm staying there probably like two thousand and twenty five minutes, like how am I going to solve this problem? So I luckily, and this is not always the case, but in this situation, they had actually emailed me the like home instructions, if you will. So a lot of homeowners would just print them out and put them on the kitchen table for me and that piece of paper would have the emergency numbers, you know, the animals routine, any corks about the house, how to use the oven, like little things like that. But in this case they actually emailed it to me, so fortunately I was able to like pull it up on my phone. I texted the landlord, who was Vietnamese but spoke enough English, and also this was a Sunday. Evenings like this is not typically a time that anybody wants to be called for an emergency. So I message him and he's like doesn't fully understand what happened. He's like, okay, I'll be there. I don't actually know how far away he lives, so I didn't know how long this is going to take. And then another fortunate, lucky thing happened...

...to me and the neighbors right across the street, who happened to be American, which I did not know that prior. They pull up on their moped. They just got back from dinner and they were like hi, like are you do you need help? And I was like, oh my gosh, he's speaking English and it was like yes, like, I can't get into the house. I don't know what it happened. The dogs are freaking out and they were like, okay, come, will be here, like we'll put the dogs inside whatever. ANYWAYS, it turns out so on this on the house they had like the front door key that locked, but then they also had one of those locks that go into the ground. You know how you have like an extra lock that goes into the ground own door sometimes? Well, that long good when into concrete, like there was no getting it out and I don't even know how it happened, but it just fell when I shut the door, when I left, apparently. And so what ended up happening? Long Story Short, the landlord finally came. They tried for probably an hour to get it open. They had all these tools. I had a picture. It's great is and then he got all the neighborhood people in. So there were like five guys trying to get the door, the door stopp her open, and then eventually they were just like they had to break the glass. So they just broke the glass, reached down, pulled it up, got me inside and then that was a six weeek houset and the landlord refused to change the glass for like the rest of the time that I was there. So then I just had this nice open part of the front door the rest of my time into ntall. It's amazing. Yeah, yeah, so I will say the fortune thing there was I just had a lot of help. Like if I had a had any help, if the neighbors had to come home, I only saw them maybe three times and the whole six weeks I was there. Like it was so fortunate that they came home at that time and then they actually made a point. I kind of check on me a couple of times after that. They're like, how are things going? Is Everything okay? Is The glass getting fixed? And I was like, I don't know, he doesn't like me, he doesn't want to come fix the door, he's given up on me. Yeah, yeah, tyl, you're almost off the hook, but we always like to wrap up with a top three and for you, since you've been to so many places, you've mentioned losing hats in the Wind, you've had you have broken glass door for four weeks on end. So we kind of touched on some of these. So we're going to go a little more specific beyond just the top three travel experiences, top three sites that you've seen along your travels? That is a great question. Top three side side. Seeing that, I'm guessing that I loved. That's the qualified yeah, probably leaning towards that, but I guess if you've seen three horrible ones that you want to steer people away from, you can go that wrapped. It's basically do you want to be positive or will go with positive. I like to be positive, although there are places that I do not care to return to. Um, I would say one of my absolute top favorites is Mount Cook National Park in New Zealand. I mean really, all the national parks in New Zealand are amazing, but I'm going to go with just Mount Cook for the sake of this podcast. I went the very first time by myself and it was actually winter and it's just beautiful. The National Parks in New Zealand are really different from the US and that they're not crowded and there's like no entry fee and there's no gait. Like you actually don't even know. You're like where, where does the start? Like this just basically like open nothingness that's just like declared...

...a national park. So Mount Cook was absolutely amazing and then my mom came to visit. I like made sure we like went off road, off road but like off our, you know, path, just so I could like show it to our I absolutely loved it everything about New Zealand, but specifically Mount Book. I also, you know what, actually when I was in Berlin I did a graffiti walking tour and that might have been one of the coolest things I've done, like coolest tours I've done. Our tour guy was really good. He he explained the history of the city and how that related to the graffiti that we were actually seeing as we like walked around, and so I just feel like I got to like a deep, rich history of Berlin by like looking at all of this graffiti, including graffiti on the Berlin Wall. M Oh, you know what, as another favorite book mine in Cornwall, England, which is like the southwest coast, there is this theater called a manack theater and it's carved into the side of the cliff, like the seats are carved into it and down at the bottom is actually like the stage. And so I've actually a couple of times done road trips through Cornwall and we always stop of the manack theater. Every time. It's always like a Royal Shakespeare Company play, of course, so we see some short of Shakespeare, but it's just this like the most beautiful outdoor theater space I've ever been and because you're sitting up high you're watching the show down below. Of course it's the RSC, so it's always really good, and then you just have like the sea in your background. Yeah, I love them, the neck eater. So yeah, I would say those. Those are three favorites. I'm sure could come up with more I've a had a bit more time. You know, time and top of the head. That's fantastic. Adding it all to the list. Taylor. Thank you so much for hopping on the PODCAST. You kind of tease this earlier but in case people tuned out in the middle, totally on. Hopefully not or maybe they, just maybe, that is fast forward to the end to hear maybe closing credits and all of this, but the Corny joke at the end. That's to come very soon. But where can people find you and connect with you online? I'm on Instagram as traveling Taylor, and that is traveling with one l and Taylor with an ER. Traveling Taylor on Instagram, traveling Taylor on Youtube, and then my website is also traveling Taylor, and you can find actually didn't even mention this yet, but I also do Digital Nomac coaching, so you can apply if you want to get some digital nomad coaching or see some of my videos or read my blog on my website. Wonderful, wonderful. Will also be in the show notes for the folks that only like reading this podcast, which I mean, I get it. There's time. Certain lessen makes sense. Love late will Taylor. As always, a pleasure chatting with you and thank you for all the all the good stuff. And now I've got like I got my long list of places I need to go to and hopefully shorter. No, no, it never does. It's even even after knocking off like ten, I'm like, oh well, there's twenty others, but I saw along the way that I'd like to get and, as promised, here is this corney Jo. It's not even good, but I'm ready. I don't probably. I just promise corning. I just promised Corney. Did you hear the joke about that Large Hill? We can't get over it. Good after it's okay now. I love me some good like laughing, happy dad jokes. They are. They're actually my favorite. So thank you. Good...

...people cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you were a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. You can send me a message, Joey, at good people cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people cool things and check out all the old episodes via good people cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

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