Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 23 · 1 year ago

How to Write a Book People Want to Read with Michael C. Bland

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

It's time to write a book, kiddos! Author Michael C. Bland discusses his new book The Price of Safety and shares tips and insights on putting a book together, from writing to marketing and much more.

Welcome to good people, cool things, the podcast featuring conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives.I'm your host, Joey held, and today's guest is Michael C Bland,author of the price of safety, a sci Fi novel about a man whocovers up his daughter's crime to save her life, only for him to discoverthe society he helped create is a lie. The price of safety is a twothousand and twenty Indie book, award finalist in both science fiction and thriller, and it is a wonderful read. During this episode where chatting all aboutthe writing of it, from outlining the story, first draft, all ofthat good stuff that goes into writing, but then everything else that goes intoputting a book out, from marketing to building a brand and focusing on futurebooks. But all at Michael get into all of those details. If you'dlike to get in touch with good people cool things, you can do soin a couple of different ways. Follow at GPCT podcast on both facebook andtwitter and give me a shout there or shoot an email joey at good people, cool thingscom promise I respond to every email. It might take me aday or two, but definitely love hearing from you, so give me ashout. Share a bad joke with me, because you know there's plenty of thoseon this podcast. For now, here's my conversation with Michael. I'msure you've mastered this now, after after months of getting to practice it.But what's the elevator pitch? We're going to the fifth floor, so yougot five floors to impress us. All. All right. So the story.It's set in your twenty forty seven, and it's where the world is sointerconnected and there that technology is so advanced that no crime goes unsolved.You can't get away with anything. And in this world, the main character, his nineteen year old daughter, seems very innocent. Woman commits this crimethat is punishable by death. So he forced to save his daughter. Hecovers it up to save her life, and that's strust on this rabbit holewhere he quickly discovers that nothing is as he thought it was. Boom,doors open. I'm sold. I like it. Thank you. You're right. I've said it once or twice, I know. I feel like youreally got to like almost time yourself and get it down to a science ofabsolutely how can I how can I explain this in a quick way? Yeah, I mean, I like, I'm thinking of two thousand and forty seven, which seems simultaneously very far off but also kind of close with there.was that just kind of a was that you're thinking with that, or didyou just like how twenty forty seven looked on the page? What was theimpetus for that year? Well, that's that's the goal, and it wasto make it that it's far enough a way that it's not right around thecorner and all the this is just somebody have a gop years now, butit's also it's attainable. I mean that's thirty years from now, if youknow, so long as I don't get hit by a car, and thatI should, you know, hit twenty forty seven, and I'm sure youknow most most of your listeners and yourself should hit. It to be reallyfascinating a way. I can't wait to kind of see what that world's like. However, if it ends up like during the world in my book,maybe not. So that's that was the reason behind it. Nice see,I think it's good to have it far enough away like that. I wasI was trying to think I was just watching something where it was I feellike the show was taking place in, you know, two thousand, twothousand and eleven, and they did a look in the future episode, butit was like two thousand and sixteen or something, and they just had allthese crazy cliches, like the flying cars and like everyone's in matching suits andeverything, and I like seems like a hugely like to be making it aboutthe five years, right, or just more like you can your iphone turnyou fold and a half and five years.

Yeah, that's let's let's stretch outa little further. I remember the first phone, my first smartphone,was the sprint palm prex. If you remember that one at all, itseems like it was a pretty not popular phone, but I liked it alot and it had one of those kind of rotating keyboards where you could flipit out make it super compact, and I was that blew my mind endsand that was what ten years ago. That when you really started thinking aboutand that that's other the other reason with this is because, okay, okay, so the book starts is in thirty years from now, roughly. Well, that I went. Well, what was it like? Thirty years ago. I mean thirty years ago no one really had any kind of cell phone, if those that brick and only the the rich snobby. You know,college kids had those kind of things. You know you you had was theutari still roll Amery now. I think it's kind of died from there.But gaming wasn't really much of anything. The Internet wasn't even in existence.I think three years from now or just it was just starting to and wherewe've come in thirty years has light years different, I think. and theneverything then speeds up to the amount of advancements we've had just left. Tenyears has been a big lead and it's going to continue to increase. Andso that was also when I was working on the technology in the what thisworld would really be like and how people communicate and how people interact and workand live. So those were all really in my mind as I was workingon creating this book. Did you have a favorite old piece of technology thatyou came across while you were doing your racards? No, not necessarily,but I did like to sprinkle some, quote quote, old stuff into thebook. You know that the main character, he has a silver sun pickups playing. When I nice one scene when he's in the office, you know. So that and mentions that, you know, all there. His kidslove this, this kind of music that it would sound it kind of soundslike Prince of print, it really sucked kind of things. So that kindof gives you a vibe of what that music of that day might kind ofsound like to a degree. Nice. That that's that's a great way tokind of weave in some of the stuff from the past while still giving atthat feeling of thirty years from now. And Yeah, I can't even likejust to think sometimes of, like you were saying, how far we've comein the last ten years. Well, the next thirty years be four timesthat. Are More Accurately, probably about eight hundred times that, based onhow it's been. But or will we hit a peek at some point ofyou know, kind of Plateau a little bit in terms of technological advancements?I don't know. That's all people smarter than me figuring that right. Right, exactly so, and I definitely did not want make this book about puretechnology. I wanted to be really the heart of it is, and onething that's really been, it's been a lot to me, is people respondingto it. One of the biggest things that they responded to is the heartthat's in the story. It's revolves around the main character, dre and hisand protecting his kids and his family, and that's what drives them in theheart and it in the characters in it. So while there's this technology and otherthere's this risk and the events that happened in the book, the heartis in it as well. Awesome, and I think that that kind ofties nicely into a question that I always like to ask, which is,what's a question you wish you were asked more frequently, and you wrote downwhat drives this book? The science or the story? So which is it? It's the story. You could have the coolest technology in the world,but if your reader doesn't care about the characters, doesn't care what's happening andtechnologies, because people can put the book...

...down, everything, the end ofthe day, is about story. Star Wars had some really great, fantasticstuff in a course. To this day out still love to have a Lightsaber, but if this story itself wasn't solid and if the people involve any ofthe you know, the the rogue hear you got hants hollow and you gotthe the main characters and loop, the stereotypical hero, and if you didn'thave these great characters and events that happened, it would have not become star wars, who would have been something really different. I'm I also wish Ihad a Lightsaber, but I agree, I right. WHO Doesn't? ThereI guess. I remember going to someone's house one time and they had onehanging up on the wall. Obviously not a real one, at least Idon't think so, but still I was just like man, that's cool right, isn't it? Yeah, still still want up. So, going backto the writing process in general, and you can speak to either the priceof safety or the sequel. What is your writing process like? Are Youyou know right? Do you map everything out meticulously? Do you edit whileyou're writing, which I know some people swear by, an other people arelike, please, don't do that, you'll never get anything done? What'syour process like? I have to map it out. I tried previously tohey, let's just write it and see what happens and end up being anepisode train wreck. In on top of that was specifically with the price ofsafety. I wove in not only how the technology works. That drives thestory. But then what drey discovers and as he discovers it, and ithad to make sense. And one of the worst things that I hate asa reader is reading a story and then the writer, I don't get it'slazy, realizes they wrote themselves into a corner and they take some leap thateither is on earned or makes no sense and my time as I put downthe book just because that ruins it for me. So I really wanted tomake sure that never happened. And so I really wanted to because also youlose the reader because then you break that imagine my world right because I becauseof your laws, it doesn't work, doesn't fit, it doesn't you losethat reader. So I really planned out, in fact I had to, andif this really depressing, but there is more than one where I hadto kind of break apart my outline and Redo it because some of the thingsI played didn't work, some of the things it didn't make didn't meet thatthe laws, the rules of the world I created. So by the timeI actually started to write the rough draft, I've been working on the book forover a year. So I, which was a little painful, butit worked out because when I first of all, when I then wrote theactual rough draft, it only took about three months because also had lived itand I tightened it and I created everything. So when I'm writing, it's justnow putting on paper what now was completely fully formed in my head,and so then after that I was just editing it and that's what also withthe sequel. I've started to write the sequel and it outline for that onewas well over a year before I start writing that one. Had you startedthe outline for that before finishing the original, or did you at least wait tillthat was done? Then that would and so yeah, right. Soactually, when I first planned the price of safety, I didn't plan forit to be a there for there to be a sequel. I plan justa standalone book, and it does stand alone. But it was as Iwas writing it, as I was getting started to fashion how I won thestory and where I kind of want to go and the pointing the story andall that stuff, and I realized that it was just naturally a bigger story, or it had a natural than what's the next step? And the analogythat I use is like the Matrix, which is fantastic movie, and atthe end after reeves become neo, becomes...

...the one, and then he hasthat call on the phone booth going I don't know where this going to go, but basically I'm here deal with it. And so the my reaction it wasa oh my God, well, what happens next? Well, forme, price of safety. That's what happened. Was All. I kindof well know what happens. So I stay with just the price of safetyand focus on that, but with a couple ideas for the sequel. Butthen it wasn't till I was done with the first one before diving in thenext, because then also you can start down a rabbit holeer, oh mygoodness, let's start to create the second and third before we actually write anything. Well, then you're never creating the first book. So focused on oneat a time. You know, want baby steps, right what? Takeone step at a dime before gone in the next roup. I think that'sgood general life advice as well, but I've learned that the hard way acouple times. Exactly. Also, I great example with the Matrix, althoughI did just the worst, the worst thing and never saw the first onein theaters and then when the second one came out, everyone was saying howgreat it was. So I went and saw the second one without having seenthe first, and it was several years until I eventually saw the first one. That was just like okay, now I get it, but because likethe second one, I was like, I mean it was fine, butI think God, not having that back certainly hurt. Yeah, that woulddefinitely hurt. Yeah, yeah, and that was one thing. Is Writingthe sequel is I'm needing to mention enough about what happened in the first sothe reader either that hasn't read the first book or had read the first onein a while ago. Wait a minute, who's that character? What happened?Are they doing that? So it's so that is a little bit ofa challenge. With the second one will also keeping the pace and the interestin that kind of thing. Can we get a little bit of scoop ofthe sequel or is that still under development and not able to to share anything? Well, I definitely know absolutely everything that happens in the sequel and reallyactually really excited about it. So the end of the first book we're Dreyis and what happens he starts, starts to chain reaction, and so thesecond one picks up to at first what seems like would be the natural nextstep from there. But then everything starts to go wrong and in ways thatI really hope our surprise but also makes sense. Yeah, I think that'sa delicate balance to find in writing, and you're kind of talking about itbefore with when an author makes such a ninety degree turn that it's just likenot believable and really just doesn't make sense. And I agree. I think Ithink you, you have better will full power than me, I guess, to just put down the book and stop reading. I'm just at thatpoint. It's usually towards the end of the book. So I'm like,you know what, I'm gonna just hate read the rest of this and I'msure I could could say myself many hours over the years, but it isa rough balance to pull that off. Yeah, yeah, and I hopeI'm going to put a huge amount of work to try to make that happen. From the responses and everything in the success of the first book, Idefinitely think that, you know, I've a shot at doing it again witha sequel and, like you said, the things that I planned. It'sone of those as your kind of cover up with ideas and where's this goingto work? And when, at least for me, when I kind ofgo who my own idea of like, okay, that's that's a good time. You're right, absolutely, and kind of moving back, I guess we'rekind of all over the map in the book write in the process here,but this is this is how the creative juices flow anyways. Great, exactly, very true, as we're talking about a lot of book of writing abook is also the marketing side of things and obviously a big component of that. Despite I mean, I don't have that much, that many design skillsand I don't believe you do either,...

...but apologies if I'm suddenly insulting youhere, but the book design is obviously a huge marketing tool and just importantfor getting people interested in your book. So can you kind of walk throughyour process for finding a designer or putting a cover that's eye catching together?Well, what's interesting is I really had no preconceived notion of what the covershould look like. The only thing when I got my contract with my mypublisher, the initial the way it was kind of was written was that theyhad the final say on the book cover. I was like no, no,no, I get final saying. I mean because the other the oldthing about book by it's judging book by its cover. The cover book isso important, I think. And so they came up with a couple ideas. They weren't been selling, weren't great, and I have a good friend whois a professional artist, what she has for living and she's absolutely fantasticand she'd actually read the book to which also helped, and so I hiredher to help with the book cover and we went through many different designs andtrying to brainstorm, trying to come up with different ideas and will be reallyinteresting and, I catching and unique for this book and definitely one thing thatI wanted to do, I told her from the beginning, is any ifyou show the character on the cover, don't show their face. I don'tabout you, but whenever I see a book cover and that you see acharacter's face on their well, now you've kind of taken away from me myability to imagine that person. I self so great there. I hate whenthe only time I like that is on the animorphs covers going way back andI've never actually read any of those books. I just love the covers of theperson transitioning to the animals. That's, yeah, exactly what. Wow,that was cool. I forgot about this, but so they definitely wantedto make sure that. Yeah, I didn't. I didn't do that becausethat that to me almost like it's I'm cheating the reader, you know,if you're taking time to read the book, I definitely don't want to take thataway from you. So again, as we're so we're going through differentideas. And then this is a very action packed book. There's you know, but also there's that human element in that the heart the characters. Sowhat ended up transforming into is the cover is from one of the scenes inthe book, one of the action packed scenes, and it actually and Ithink working out very, very well. I've and extremely pleased with it andit gives a real feel for what the book is is there's this coming threatand reaching for his Drei's reaching for his daughter, trying to help safer,and that goes to the heart of the book. Yeah, I think itdoes a great job of encapsulating things and again, just fantastic job, notshowing the face but still conveying a lot. Thank you. I've already now withthe idea of what's going to it's happening the sequel. I'm like,Oh man, what covering it do there? But I think it's gonna be someonly along the same once again in shadow hint with what's happening. Ithink that, like I said, very pleased without the first one king turnedout. So probably do the same thing. Call my friend again to say,guess what, number two if you want to give her a plug,if other people need book designs, or will that eat up her time foryou? Well, I don't know. Her name is Dorothy Mason. She'sabsolutely fantastic. She's also, like I said, professional artist and sells herartwork as well as fantastic, but she was incredible, awesome, awesome.I'm thinking of this is again another way, like way of scare, blast fromthe past, but the old Nintendo power magazines of Oh wow or eacheach issue on the spine would have a little piece of a character. Sothere's like Maria one year, Donkey Kong...

...one year, and then when youhad the whole year together, you'd have the little design. And I'm wonderingif there is if that can translate to like a book series of you kindof if you had the books, I mean this would probably be for alonger series, but if you had them all lined it together, if they'dform some kind of continuous image or something. But that could be really cool.Well, and you know that. You know books over time old changecolorers and know jk rowings the Harry Potter series. Those change covers, andStephen King, he's had different covers for his books and those kinds of things. I'd be I'd be done with that. Yeah, that could be like thecollectors addition charge, eight dollars more, making right problem. It's great.I like that. Hey, I'll definitely write that down. Well,and what's interesting is okay, so right now I have this book as atrilogy. That's that's the plane with it. I start having some ideas on howit could become more than just a trilogy, but we'll see and Idefinitely don't want to force it. If it doesn't work, then I'm absolutelynot going to. But if it does, then this could end up being morethan just a trilogy. Well, what to see as first I've kindof admitted that out loud. But excellent so we did get the scoop.I like it. There kids from more than three? Yes, possibly,but again only if it makes sense. Does farm books have a name likea trilogy? Is it a Quad Quad logy? That sounds right now.It sounds very awkward. Yeah, then it just, I think, aftera children, I think just falls into series. Okay, fine, youscrewed with our cool little trilogy thing. We're just gonna just a series.For sure. I going to give you a cool name. You just nowserious. That's it, but I guess you're getting the last laugh because you'vehad at least four books that say it's not too exactly. That's true.Yeah, if I'm yes, we're able to have people can do to purchaseand enjoy the books, then that's that's all that matters, and I amsure we'll try not to get too down a path of you know what's goingon in the world right now, but obviously the coronavirus pandemic probably impacted yourmarketing strategies a little bit. So can you kind of share what your gameplan had been around promoting the price of safety and then some of the stepsyou've kind of taken to shift to a all virtual all the time sort ofworld. Absolutely. So a lot of it was going to be with booksignings and going to book stores, and we're talking to multiple bookstores, acouple, of course, and included some alcohol with, you know, thebook readings, which I'm all for. Any story gets better at a coupleof beers, right, but was that's that was going to be one ofthe big areas of focus. was going to be with bookstores, not onlyeven in a number of different cities. Also going to be some marketing interms of distributing bookmarks to arey bookstores, putting flyers up very stores, allthose things. Well, if you don't have anybody in stores, that doesn'tmatter. One of the thing that I was that I had had set upwas going to be the Los Angeles Book Festival in mid April. You're familiarwith that. It's the largest in the country. Yeah, actually like ahundred fiftyzero people go and of course that got moved and bookstores closed and andeverything else. So a lot of the things that we'd had planned obviously didn'tkind of pass. So we've, like you said, we've had to pivot. Two more online stuff between and one thing I've been I've been very fortunateto get a large number of reviews that have been very positive. been done. I've been doing some online marketing, facebook adds that kind of thing,because of course everyone's on facebook. In...

...addition, a couple other interviews kindof thing. I was very fortunate and very proud of winning. I wasbeing named a finalist by the EIE book awards, and not one but twocategories for both science fiction and thriller, which was very yeah, a lationsawesome. Thank you, and for honestly, at first time author and first timepublished, it's actually pretty stunned to be honest. But, you know, very, very proud of that. So has been doing a lot moreof online marketing and doing a couple of interviews on pages, and also I'vebeen writing a blog, MC blackcom. If anybody is interested, I havea number of blog interviews of the air. If here one a little more littleamusement and some of the things and that kind of stuff that I have. So been doing that and it's not as good as being able to befacetoface with people people, but that's the word we are in right now.Yeah, absolutely, and I can vouch based off your book pod newsletters thatyou've shared with us. They you're writing. Your writing cells very entertaining, Ithink, which I admittedly have not looked at your blog, but theif the style is like, is similar to that, then I would Iwould highly recommend. Thank you. And yes, so it is similar,right. I obnoxious humor definitely comes out. I will say that price to saveyou doesn't have the the humor. There's a little element of here andthere, but just, you know, the story in the world and everythingelse, it doesn't. You know, it didn't really fit. So havemore of the it came out on the blog. Yeah, and I thinkthat's always fun to see. Like blogs should kind of be an escape fromfrom everything else. You know, it's kind of a more personal, sortof behind the curtain type of feel, at least the ones that I enjoyor are providing like tremendously helpful resources, but those are usually different target audiencesfor those. Oh, yeah, I'm different tone. Absolutely. Yeah,you know, the other thing, talking just about the climate in the worldthat we're in right now is the the tracking of, you know, viacell phones and people, how they're starting to implement the software to track wherepeople are in how they interact with others to track virus, the spread ofthe virus. And one thing is religiously. How if you heard about what happenedin South Korea, this was three four weeks ago, about the nightclub, I actually don't think I heard about that. So from from what Iread, there was in a South Korea was opening back up again. Theywent there was a night club in there one five hundred people in there andone of the attendees was covid nineteen positive and over the course of three weeksthat the South Korean government locked down forty five people that directly indoor class resulthad been exposed and they shut down the spread. And they did all becauseof technology. And you know, as the writer of the price of safetyand some of the things that I have in here, and I'm going isthat the preclude to the world that I created? There's definitely some similarities andsome like that could be the grandfather of some of the things that happened inmy book. They're using the future and weights a little eerie that there's definitelyyou could see a connection from one to the other. Yeah, that's crazyand really, really kind of is and not something I planned, but wow, okay, that's fascinating, I think...

...a yeah, it's so interesting tosee how really, just outside the United States, how people are, howdifferent countries have been handling everything, and even within the US, how differentstates are. I know I'm always chatting with folks about obviously my parents livingin Illinois, seeing how what's going on in their friends across the country andin Texas. It's interesting to see Austin appears to be taking everything very seriouslyand routinely are issuing, you know, strict guideline recommendations of Hey, eventhough these things are reopening, maybe not a good idea to be to befacetoface with like eight hundred people in a small room like still maybe maybe holdoff on it, but Texas is just overriding everything, like let's state isjust like actually, you can enforce that because Texas says it's okay. Soit has to be strong recommendations instead of actual godlines, guiline spilines. Youknow, you're telling us or now we're gonna do my own thing. Yeah, that's that's that. That's the Texas way. Hey, I briefly livedin Dallas. I did see I know what you're talking about. Yeah,it's I mean that's an adventure. Yeah, something, but yeah, well thanwhere this country is. She we are very headstrong and we're we loveour freedom and it's going to be tough to see how this plays out becausewe want to make sure that, you know, we're being smart and protectingthose need to be producted. A bunch of college kids, they want tograb a cake and party up, okay, they're their choice, but then ifthey then goes to either grandparents, who are very susceptible. It's justkind of think things through. That's all I thin. Yeah, which sometimesit is not always the case for people, but and slightly brighter news, Iguess. Yeah, I think one of the things that a lot ofpeople are finding challenging, whether they are writing book or not, is,I kind of keeping up with a routine in the the current remote sort ofsetting that we have. I know sometimes there's days where all the working laterinto the evening and I'm just like, Oh, it's already thirty and I'vetotally skipped dinner or something like that, and I think there is kind ofit is kind of difficult to have more obvious routines and boundaries when working sohave you found any sort of tools or strategies or anything that have helped yoube productive and focusing on what you need to be working on? Well,what I've in the past, before the pre virus, I used to beable to between the you know, I could in the same day, Ican work on the book for a period of time, I can work onother work for a period of time. I could do that kind of thing. And kind of what you're saying is how it seems to bleed through andthere's it's harder to find that stopping point and then the starting point. Sowhat I've really found is almost okay, right off the day, okay,that day I'm going to go ahead and maybe do a little extra work ordo some of the other things I need to get done that would have beena distraction otherwise, and then the next day I'm just going to focus onwriting. Doing it that way, because my it gets to a point becauseit's harder to have that separation, that differentiation than I've personally in a differenteveryone's different, but for myself I've learned that okay, this point, untilthings kind of go back to a previous level of normal city. If andwhen we get there, I'm going to basically just take a day for writingand that's going to be what I'm doing...

...that day and then another day doother things I like that have a good focus. Have you? I haveyou had to develop a Home Office of sorts, kind of a more ofa makeshift one, or did you already have a nice set up going beforeeverything? Oh, I already had a nice set of come before. I'vegot it all set up and with active with those of stars, ours characters, a little figurings and stuff around, and I have some I'm got alittle baby Yoda that was painted and I've got, you know, so I'vegot my my Nook, my area, and I'm able to close close adoor focus on that and which is been key in this is where I wroteprice of safety, and so it's where I'm working from the sequel, andso I'm fortunate enough to have my own space that I can dive in andbe creative. Yeah, I think that is such a key thing and gettingthings done is if you're you know, if you're trying to set up shopin a bedroom or something or, you know, in the kitchen, it'sthat's not really the design focus area for working. So, aside from youknow, if when you're doing your master chef impersonations, of course then thekitchen is all not working right. Well, depends on whatever and whatever space whereyou have that comfort that you can let the juices flow to degree,and I have in the past. I've had it where I've had the computeron the dining table and trying to work there and just it doesn't work asas much. That's why I say I'm fortunate to have this separate space,because I know that not everybody does and I hadn't in the past, andso to be able to have that has really helped elevate, at least inmy mind, and I could be wrong, but at least allivate the the rightthe right being in the creativity, in the to be able to divein when I do have that time to do that, because unfortunately, everyeverybody, there are other distractions and poles and requirements of life that pull youin and you know you have to mow the grasshold the driveway, take careof the dog, to those kind of things as well, and spend timewith your loved one and do other things that do take away from writing.But if all you do is right, or at least for me, I'llif all I do is right, then it's going to take away from thesame characterization and having characters that love and feel and interact with each other.If you're not doing it yourself, it's harder to get that because realism orthat that extra touch that sometimes can elevate that story. Yeah, that's areally good point too, because I think it can be easy to fall intothat trap of Oh, I need to write a certain amount every day or, you know, I need to spend x amount of time writing. Butunless your book is about being stuck in solitary confinnement, I think you're probablygoing to lose a lot of that human element and I know just from adialog perspective that can be very difficult for people to write. And so muchof that comes from real world experience. I know a lot of dialog I'veused in writing is almost verbatim from conversations I've had, maybe, you know, shifted a little bit to be a little less vulgar, more from theother person than I like to keep. I come such a pretty clean tryright. Yeah, exactly, trying our best out here. Well, Michael, you're almost off the hook, but as you as you know being aformer guest of a podcast of mine, I always like to end with thetop three and I for this one. I'd love to hear your top threeinspirations for the price of safety. HMM, okay. Number one would be thethe book one thousand nine hundred and eighty four. The definitely the kindof underlying vibe of this, this state...

...that is at least overseen and watchingand big brother and that element, which I do think that they're depending onwhat happens with technology and how much we as a society keep track of andbe aware of and resist or push back against the technology. It could,just as the progression of way things are going right now, we could endup with not necessarily that. I'll he'll tell the Tal Terry can speak thatkind of state, authoritarian state, where everyone is your everything is dictated andwhat you wear. That not talking that level, but definitely the vibe withit was definitely a was an influence. Definitely wanted to kind of have anelement of you know, if the your country's kind of taken on this differenttone's different attitude than what you'd expected and what kind of how would you actand react in that kind of world. Second influences minority report, curse.You of element of the technology and the advancements and that kind of world.So that was definitely an influence with the world that I'm in. And youknow, we don't have the cars that go sideways done the highway in thebook or like that, but you do have technological advances and again, howpeople are acting and reacting in that world. And then I would say the thirdinfluence was was the writer, Michael Crichton. Loved Him, his abilityto take stories, take something that's fantastical or something that wasn't really known.Prey with the drones, you know, that was really the first time,and my small robotics and how they interact together. You know, that wassomething new. You know the course drastic park, you know, which everyoneknows, and drameda strain and how a ironically potential lethal virus and how we'dreact. And so it's this technology, but then how the characters acted reactedwith it, and I think usually the the story west world, that's alsoan element of the technology and what if things go wrong and how would youact or ex survive in that kind of world? Nice all fantastic inspirations.Well, that's so. If people want to find you online, if theywant to learn, learn more about you, read your musings, I give youtips for future books that they things they want to see. Where canthey find you? Absolutely, MC blandcom. You can sign up for the newsletterand you don't have to. Obviously completely, absolutely, totally up toand there's Info about myself, about price of safety. You can read aboutwhen I pitched another story to Columbia Pictures, and that was really fun, funevent, as well as you know, some of my other influences in thatkind of thing. Fantastic. Well, Michael, thank you again for formaking a repeat appearance. First Time on good people cool things, butnot first time in our hearts. So wait, Joey, thank you somuch for having me on. This has been great. Absolutely and of coursewe got to end with a Corny Jack, as I'm sure you might remember fromlast time as well. It's right. What do you get when you crossa writer with a deadline? A really clean house? It's night.People's Great.

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