Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 23 · 2 years ago

23: How to Write a Book People Want to Read with Michael C. Bland

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

It's time to write a book, kiddos! Author Michael C. Bland discusses his new book The Price of Safety and shares tips and insights on putting a book together, from writing to marketing and much more.

Welcome to good people, cool things, the podcast featuring conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. I'm your host, Joey held, and today's guest is Michael C Bland, author of the price of safety, a sci Fi novel about a man who covers up his daughter's crime to save her life, only for him to discover the society he helped create is a lie. The price of safety is a two thousand and twenty Indie book, award finalist in both science fiction and thriller, and it is a wonderful read. During this episode where chatting all about the writing of it, from outlining the story, first draft, all of that good stuff that goes into writing, but then everything else that goes into putting a book out, from marketing to building a brand and focusing on future books. But all at Michael get into all of those details. If you'd like to get in touch with good people cool things, you can do so in a couple of different ways. Follow at GPCT podcast on both facebook and twitter and give me a shout there or shoot an email joey at good people, cool thingscom promise I respond to every email. It might take me a day or two, but definitely love hearing from you, so give me a shout. Share a bad joke with me, because you know there's plenty of those on this podcast. For now, here's my conversation with Michael. I'm sure you've mastered this now, after after months of getting to practice it. But what's the elevator pitch? We're going to the fifth floor, so you got five floors to impress us. All. All right. So the story. It's set in your twenty forty seven, and it's where the world is so interconnected and there that technology is so advanced that no crime goes unsolved. You can't get away with anything. And in this world, the main character, his nineteen year old daughter, seems very innocent. Woman commits this crime that is punishable by death. So he forced to save his daughter. He covers it up to save her life, and that's strust on this rabbit hole where he quickly discovers that nothing is as he thought it was. Boom, doors open. I'm sold. I like it. Thank you. You're right. I've said it once or twice, I know. I feel like you really got to like almost time yourself and get it down to a science of absolutely how can I how can I explain this in a quick way? Yeah, I mean, I like, I'm thinking of two thousand and forty seven, which seems simultaneously very far off but also kind of close with there. was that just kind of a was that you're thinking with that, or did you just like how twenty forty seven looked on the page? What was the impetus for that year? Well, that's that's the goal, and it was to make it that it's far enough a way that it's not right around the corner and all the this is just somebody have a gop years now, but it's also it's attainable. I mean that's thirty years from now, if you know, so long as I don't get hit by a car, and that I should, you know, hit twenty forty seven, and I'm sure you know most most of your listeners and yourself should hit. It to be really fascinating a way. I can't wait to kind of see what that world's like. However, if it ends up like during the world in my book, maybe not. So that's that was the reason behind it. Nice see, I think it's good to have it far enough away like that. I was I was trying to think I was just watching something where it was I feel like the show was taking place in, you know, two thousand, two thousand and eleven, and they did a look in the future episode, but it was like two thousand and sixteen or something, and they just had all these crazy cliches, like the flying cars and like everyone's in matching suits and everything, and I like seems like a hugely like to be making it about the five years, right, or just more like you can your iphone turn you fold and a half and five years.

Yeah, that's let's let's stretch out a little further. I remember the first phone, my first smartphone, was the sprint palm prex. If you remember that one at all, it seems like it was a pretty not popular phone, but I liked it a lot and it had one of those kind of rotating keyboards where you could flip it out make it super compact, and I was that blew my mind ends and that was what ten years ago. That when you really started thinking about and that that's other the other reason with this is because, okay, okay, so the book starts is in thirty years from now, roughly. Well, that I went. Well, what was it like? Thirty years ago. I mean thirty years ago no one really had any kind of cell phone, if those that brick and only the the rich snobby. You know, college kids had those kind of things. You know you you had was the utari still roll Amery now. I think it's kind of died from there. But gaming wasn't really much of anything. The Internet wasn't even in existence. I think three years from now or just it was just starting to and where we've come in thirty years has light years different, I think. and then everything then speeds up to the amount of advancements we've had just left. Ten years has been a big lead and it's going to continue to increase. And so that was also when I was working on the technology in the what this world would really be like and how people communicate and how people interact and work and live. So those were all really in my mind as I was working on creating this book. Did you have a favorite old piece of technology that you came across while you were doing your racards? No, not necessarily, but I did like to sprinkle some, quote quote, old stuff into the book. You know that the main character, he has a silver sun pickups playing. When I nice one scene when he's in the office, you know. So that and mentions that, you know, all there. His kids love this, this kind of music that it would sound it kind of sounds like Prince of print, it really sucked kind of things. So that kind of gives you a vibe of what that music of that day might kind of sound like to a degree. Nice. That that's that's a great way to kind of weave in some of the stuff from the past while still giving at that feeling of thirty years from now. And Yeah, I can't even like just to think sometimes of, like you were saying, how far we've come in the last ten years. Well, the next thirty years be four times that. Are More Accurately, probably about eight hundred times that, based on how it's been. But or will we hit a peek at some point of you know, kind of Plateau a little bit in terms of technological advancements? I don't know. That's all people smarter than me figuring that right. Right, exactly so, and I definitely did not want make this book about pure technology. I wanted to be really the heart of it is, and one thing that's really been, it's been a lot to me, is people responding to it. One of the biggest things that they responded to is the heart that's in the story. It's revolves around the main character, dre and his and protecting his kids and his family, and that's what drives them in the heart and it in the characters in it. So while there's this technology and other there's this risk and the events that happened in the book, the heart is in it as well. Awesome, and I think that that kind of ties nicely into a question that I always like to ask, which is, what's a question you wish you were asked more frequently, and you wrote down what drives this book? The science or the story? So which is it? It's the story. You could have the coolest technology in the world, but if your reader doesn't care about the characters, doesn't care what's happening and technologies, because people can put the book...

...down, everything, the end of the day, is about story. Star Wars had some really great, fantastic stuff in a course. To this day out still love to have a Lightsaber, but if this story itself wasn't solid and if the people involve any of the you know, the the rogue hear you got hants hollow and you got the the main characters and loop, the stereotypical hero, and if you didn't have these great characters and events that happened, it would have not become star wars, who would have been something really different. I'm I also wish I had a Lightsaber, but I agree, I right. WHO Doesn't? There I guess. I remember going to someone's house one time and they had one hanging up on the wall. Obviously not a real one, at least I don't think so, but still I was just like man, that's cool right, isn't it? Yeah, still still want up. So, going back to the writing process in general, and you can speak to either the price of safety or the sequel. What is your writing process like? Are You you know right? Do you map everything out meticulously? Do you edit while you're writing, which I know some people swear by, an other people are like, please, don't do that, you'll never get anything done? What's your process like? I have to map it out. I tried previously to hey, let's just write it and see what happens and end up being an episode train wreck. In on top of that was specifically with the price of safety. I wove in not only how the technology works. That drives the story. But then what drey discovers and as he discovers it, and it had to make sense. And one of the worst things that I hate as a reader is reading a story and then the writer, I don't get it's lazy, realizes they wrote themselves into a corner and they take some leap that either is on earned or makes no sense and my time as I put down the book just because that ruins it for me. So I really wanted to make sure that never happened. And so I really wanted to because also you lose the reader because then you break that imagine my world right because I because of your laws, it doesn't work, doesn't fit, it doesn't you lose that reader. So I really planned out, in fact I had to, and if this really depressing, but there is more than one where I had to kind of break apart my outline and Redo it because some of the things I played didn't work, some of the things it didn't make didn't meet that the laws, the rules of the world I created. So by the time I actually started to write the rough draft, I've been working on the book for over a year. So I, which was a little painful, but it worked out because when I first of all, when I then wrote the actual rough draft, it only took about three months because also had lived it and I tightened it and I created everything. So when I'm writing, it's just now putting on paper what now was completely fully formed in my head, and so then after that I was just editing it and that's what also with the sequel. I've started to write the sequel and it outline for that one was well over a year before I start writing that one. Had you started the outline for that before finishing the original, or did you at least wait till that was done? Then that would and so yeah, right. So actually, when I first planned the price of safety, I didn't plan for it to be a there for there to be a sequel. I plan just a standalone book, and it does stand alone. But it was as I was writing it, as I was getting started to fashion how I won the story and where I kind of want to go and the pointing the story and all that stuff, and I realized that it was just naturally a bigger story, or it had a natural than what's the next step? And the analogy that I use is like the Matrix, which is fantastic movie, and at the end after reeves become neo, becomes...

...the one, and then he has that call on the phone booth going I don't know where this going to go, but basically I'm here deal with it. And so the my reaction it was a oh my God, well, what happens next? Well, for me, price of safety. That's what happened. Was All. I kind of well know what happens. So I stay with just the price of safety and focus on that, but with a couple ideas for the sequel. But then it wasn't till I was done with the first one before diving in the next, because then also you can start down a rabbit holeer, oh my goodness, let's start to create the second and third before we actually write anything. Well, then you're never creating the first book. So focused on one at a time. You know, want baby steps, right what? Take one step at a dime before gone in the next roup. I think that's good general life advice as well, but I've learned that the hard way a couple times. Exactly. Also, I great example with the Matrix, although I did just the worst, the worst thing and never saw the first one in theaters and then when the second one came out, everyone was saying how great it was. So I went and saw the second one without having seen the first, and it was several years until I eventually saw the first one. That was just like okay, now I get it, but because like the second one, I was like, I mean it was fine, but I think God, not having that back certainly hurt. Yeah, that would definitely hurt. Yeah, yeah, and that was one thing. Is Writing the sequel is I'm needing to mention enough about what happened in the first so the reader either that hasn't read the first book or had read the first one in a while ago. Wait a minute, who's that character? What happened? Are they doing that? So it's so that is a little bit of a challenge. With the second one will also keeping the pace and the interest in that kind of thing. Can we get a little bit of scoop of the sequel or is that still under development and not able to to share anything? Well, I definitely know absolutely everything that happens in the sequel and really actually really excited about it. So the end of the first book we're Drey is and what happens he starts, starts to chain reaction, and so the second one picks up to at first what seems like would be the natural next step from there. But then everything starts to go wrong and in ways that I really hope our surprise but also makes sense. Yeah, I think that's a delicate balance to find in writing, and you're kind of talking about it before with when an author makes such a ninety degree turn that it's just like not believable and really just doesn't make sense. And I agree. I think I think you, you have better will full power than me, I guess, to just put down the book and stop reading. I'm just at that point. It's usually towards the end of the book. So I'm like, you know what, I'm gonna just hate read the rest of this and I'm sure I could could say myself many hours over the years, but it is a rough balance to pull that off. Yeah, yeah, and I hope I'm going to put a huge amount of work to try to make that happen. From the responses and everything in the success of the first book, I definitely think that, you know, I've a shot at doing it again with a sequel and, like you said, the things that I planned. It's one of those as your kind of cover up with ideas and where's this going to work? And when, at least for me, when I kind of go who my own idea of like, okay, that's that's a good time. You're right, absolutely, and kind of moving back, I guess we're kind of all over the map in the book write in the process here, but this is this is how the creative juices flow anyways. Great, exactly, very true, as we're talking about a lot of book of writing a book is also the marketing side of things and obviously a big component of that. Despite I mean, I don't have that much, that many design skills and I don't believe you do either,...

...but apologies if I'm suddenly insulting you here, but the book design is obviously a huge marketing tool and just important for getting people interested in your book. So can you kind of walk through your process for finding a designer or putting a cover that's eye catching together? Well, what's interesting is I really had no preconceived notion of what the cover should look like. The only thing when I got my contract with my my publisher, the initial the way it was kind of was written was that they had the final say on the book cover. I was like no, no, no, I get final saying. I mean because the other the old thing about book by it's judging book by its cover. The cover book is so important, I think. And so they came up with a couple ideas. They weren't been selling, weren't great, and I have a good friend who is a professional artist, what she has for living and she's absolutely fantastic and she'd actually read the book to which also helped, and so I hired her to help with the book cover and we went through many different designs and trying to brainstorm, trying to come up with different ideas and will be really interesting and, I catching and unique for this book and definitely one thing that I wanted to do, I told her from the beginning, is any if you show the character on the cover, don't show their face. I don't about you, but whenever I see a book cover and that you see a character's face on their well, now you've kind of taken away from me my ability to imagine that person. I self so great there. I hate when the only time I like that is on the animorphs covers going way back and I've never actually read any of those books. I just love the covers of the person transitioning to the animals. That's, yeah, exactly what. Wow, that was cool. I forgot about this, but so they definitely wanted to make sure that. Yeah, I didn't. I didn't do that because that that to me almost like it's I'm cheating the reader, you know, if you're taking time to read the book, I definitely don't want to take that away from you. So again, as we're so we're going through different ideas. And then this is a very action packed book. There's you know, but also there's that human element in that the heart the characters. So what ended up transforming into is the cover is from one of the scenes in the book, one of the action packed scenes, and it actually and I think working out very, very well. I've and extremely pleased with it and it gives a real feel for what the book is is there's this coming threat and reaching for his Drei's reaching for his daughter, trying to help safer, and that goes to the heart of the book. Yeah, I think it does a great job of encapsulating things and again, just fantastic job, not showing the face but still conveying a lot. Thank you. I've already now with the idea of what's going to it's happening the sequel. I'm like, Oh man, what covering it do there? But I think it's gonna be some only along the same once again in shadow hint with what's happening. I think that, like I said, very pleased without the first one king turned out. So probably do the same thing. Call my friend again to say, guess what, number two if you want to give her a plug, if other people need book designs, or will that eat up her time for you? Well, I don't know. Her name is Dorothy Mason. She's absolutely fantastic. She's also, like I said, professional artist and sells her artwork as well as fantastic, but she was incredible, awesome, awesome. I'm thinking of this is again another way, like way of scare, blast from the past, but the old Nintendo power magazines of Oh wow or each each issue on the spine would have a little piece of a character. So there's like Maria one year, Donkey Kong...

...one year, and then when you had the whole year together, you'd have the little design. And I'm wondering if there is if that can translate to like a book series of you kind of if you had the books, I mean this would probably be for a longer series, but if you had them all lined it together, if they'd form some kind of continuous image or something. But that could be really cool. Well, and you know that. You know books over time old change colorers and know jk rowings the Harry Potter series. Those change covers, and Stephen King, he's had different covers for his books and those kinds of things. I'd be I'd be done with that. Yeah, that could be like the collectors addition charge, eight dollars more, making right problem. It's great. I like that. Hey, I'll definitely write that down. Well, and what's interesting is okay, so right now I have this book as a trilogy. That's that's the plane with it. I start having some ideas on how it could become more than just a trilogy, but we'll see and I definitely don't want to force it. If it doesn't work, then I'm absolutely not going to. But if it does, then this could end up being more than just a trilogy. Well, what to see as first I've kind of admitted that out loud. But excellent so we did get the scoop. I like it. There kids from more than three? Yes, possibly, but again only if it makes sense. Does farm books have a name like a trilogy? Is it a Quad Quad logy? That sounds right now. It sounds very awkward. Yeah, then it just, I think, after a children, I think just falls into series. Okay, fine, you screwed with our cool little trilogy thing. We're just gonna just a series. For sure. I going to give you a cool name. You just now serious. That's it, but I guess you're getting the last laugh because you've had at least four books that say it's not too exactly. That's true. Yeah, if I'm yes, we're able to have people can do to purchase and enjoy the books, then that's that's all that matters, and I am sure we'll try not to get too down a path of you know what's going on in the world right now, but obviously the coronavirus pandemic probably impacted your marketing strategies a little bit. So can you kind of share what your game plan had been around promoting the price of safety and then some of the steps you've kind of taken to shift to a all virtual all the time sort of world. Absolutely. So a lot of it was going to be with book signings and going to book stores, and we're talking to multiple bookstores, a couple, of course, and included some alcohol with, you know, the book readings, which I'm all for. Any story gets better at a couple of beers, right, but was that's that was going to be one of the big areas of focus. was going to be with bookstores, not only even in a number of different cities. Also going to be some marketing in terms of distributing bookmarks to arey bookstores, putting flyers up very stores, all those things. Well, if you don't have anybody in stores, that doesn't matter. One of the thing that I was that I had had set up was going to be the Los Angeles Book Festival in mid April. You're familiar with that. It's the largest in the country. Yeah, actually like a hundred fiftyzero people go and of course that got moved and bookstores closed and and everything else. So a lot of the things that we'd had planned obviously didn't kind of pass. So we've, like you said, we've had to pivot. Two more online stuff between and one thing I've been I've been very fortunate to get a large number of reviews that have been very positive. been done. I've been doing some online marketing, facebook adds that kind of thing, because of course everyone's on facebook. In...

...addition, a couple other interviews kind of thing. I was very fortunate and very proud of winning. I was being named a finalist by the EIE book awards, and not one but two categories for both science fiction and thriller, which was very yeah, a lations awesome. Thank you, and for honestly, at first time author and first time published, it's actually pretty stunned to be honest. But, you know, very, very proud of that. So has been doing a lot more of online marketing and doing a couple of interviews on pages, and also I've been writing a blog, MC blackcom. If anybody is interested, I have a number of blog interviews of the air. If here one a little more little amusement and some of the things and that kind of stuff that I have. So been doing that and it's not as good as being able to be facetoface with people people, but that's the word we are in right now. Yeah, absolutely, and I can vouch based off your book pod newsletters that you've shared with us. They you're writing. Your writing cells very entertaining, I think, which I admittedly have not looked at your blog, but the if the style is like, is similar to that, then I would I would highly recommend. Thank you. And yes, so it is similar, right. I obnoxious humor definitely comes out. I will say that price to save you doesn't have the the humor. There's a little element of here and there, but just, you know, the story in the world and everything else, it doesn't. You know, it didn't really fit. So have more of the it came out on the blog. Yeah, and I think that's always fun to see. Like blogs should kind of be an escape from from everything else. You know, it's kind of a more personal, sort of behind the curtain type of feel, at least the ones that I enjoy or are providing like tremendously helpful resources, but those are usually different target audiences for those. Oh, yeah, I'm different tone. Absolutely. Yeah, you know, the other thing, talking just about the climate in the world that we're in right now is the the tracking of, you know, via cell phones and people, how they're starting to implement the software to track where people are in how they interact with others to track virus, the spread of the virus. And one thing is religiously. How if you heard about what happened in South Korea, this was three four weeks ago, about the nightclub, I actually don't think I heard about that. So from from what I read, there was in a South Korea was opening back up again. They went there was a night club in there one five hundred people in there and one of the attendees was covid nineteen positive and over the course of three weeks that the South Korean government locked down forty five people that directly indoor class result had been exposed and they shut down the spread. And they did all because of technology. And you know, as the writer of the price of safety and some of the things that I have in here, and I'm going is that the preclude to the world that I created? There's definitely some similarities and some like that could be the grandfather of some of the things that happened in my book. They're using the future and weights a little eerie that there's definitely you could see a connection from one to the other. Yeah, that's crazy and really, really kind of is and not something I planned, but wow, okay, that's fascinating, I think...

...a yeah, it's so interesting to see how really, just outside the United States, how people are, how different countries have been handling everything, and even within the US, how different states are. I know I'm always chatting with folks about obviously my parents living in Illinois, seeing how what's going on in their friends across the country and in Texas. It's interesting to see Austin appears to be taking everything very seriously and routinely are issuing, you know, strict guideline recommendations of Hey, even though these things are reopening, maybe not a good idea to be to be facetoface with like eight hundred people in a small room like still maybe maybe hold off on it, but Texas is just overriding everything, like let's state is just like actually, you can enforce that because Texas says it's okay. So it has to be strong recommendations instead of actual godlines, guiline spilines. You know, you're telling us or now we're gonna do my own thing. Yeah, that's that's that. That's the Texas way. Hey, I briefly lived in Dallas. I did see I know what you're talking about. Yeah, it's I mean that's an adventure. Yeah, something, but yeah, well than where this country is. She we are very headstrong and we're we love our freedom and it's going to be tough to see how this plays out because we want to make sure that, you know, we're being smart and protecting those need to be producted. A bunch of college kids, they want to grab a cake and party up, okay, they're their choice, but then if they then goes to either grandparents, who are very susceptible. It's just kind of think things through. That's all I thin. Yeah, which sometimes it is not always the case for people, but and slightly brighter news, I guess. Yeah, I think one of the things that a lot of people are finding challenging, whether they are writing book or not, is, I kind of keeping up with a routine in the the current remote sort of setting that we have. I know sometimes there's days where all the working later into the evening and I'm just like, Oh, it's already thirty and I've totally skipped dinner or something like that, and I think there is kind of it is kind of difficult to have more obvious routines and boundaries when working so have you found any sort of tools or strategies or anything that have helped you be productive and focusing on what you need to be working on? Well, what I've in the past, before the pre virus, I used to be able to between the you know, I could in the same day, I can work on the book for a period of time, I can work on other work for a period of time. I could do that kind of thing. And kind of what you're saying is how it seems to bleed through and there's it's harder to find that stopping point and then the starting point. So what I've really found is almost okay, right off the day, okay, that day I'm going to go ahead and maybe do a little extra work or do some of the other things I need to get done that would have been a distraction otherwise, and then the next day I'm just going to focus on writing. Doing it that way, because my it gets to a point because it's harder to have that separation, that differentiation than I've personally in a different everyone's different, but for myself I've learned that okay, this point, until things kind of go back to a previous level of normal city. If and when we get there, I'm going to basically just take a day for writing and that's going to be what I'm doing...

...that day and then another day do other things I like that have a good focus. Have you? I have you had to develop a Home Office of sorts, kind of a more of a makeshift one, or did you already have a nice set up going before everything? Oh, I already had a nice set of come before. I've got it all set up and with active with those of stars, ours characters, a little figurings and stuff around, and I have some I'm got a little baby Yoda that was painted and I've got, you know, so I've got my my Nook, my area, and I'm able to close close a door focus on that and which is been key in this is where I wrote price of safety, and so it's where I'm working from the sequel, and so I'm fortunate enough to have my own space that I can dive in and be creative. Yeah, I think that is such a key thing and getting things done is if you're you know, if you're trying to set up shop in a bedroom or something or, you know, in the kitchen, it's that's not really the design focus area for working. So, aside from you know, if when you're doing your master chef impersonations, of course then the kitchen is all not working right. Well, depends on whatever and whatever space where you have that comfort that you can let the juices flow to degree, and I have in the past. I've had it where I've had the computer on the dining table and trying to work there and just it doesn't work as as much. That's why I say I'm fortunate to have this separate space, because I know that not everybody does and I hadn't in the past, and so to be able to have that has really helped elevate, at least in my mind, and I could be wrong, but at least allivate the the right the right being in the creativity, in the to be able to dive in when I do have that time to do that, because unfortunately, every everybody, there are other distractions and poles and requirements of life that pull you in and you know you have to mow the grasshold the driveway, take care of the dog, to those kind of things as well, and spend time with your loved one and do other things that do take away from writing. But if all you do is right, or at least for me, I'll if all I do is right, then it's going to take away from the same characterization and having characters that love and feel and interact with each other. If you're not doing it yourself, it's harder to get that because realism or that that extra touch that sometimes can elevate that story. Yeah, that's a really good point too, because I think it can be easy to fall into that trap of Oh, I need to write a certain amount every day or, you know, I need to spend x amount of time writing. But unless your book is about being stuck in solitary confinnement, I think you're probably going to lose a lot of that human element and I know just from a dialog perspective that can be very difficult for people to write. And so much of that comes from real world experience. I know a lot of dialog I've used in writing is almost verbatim from conversations I've had, maybe, you know, shifted a little bit to be a little less vulgar, more from the other person than I like to keep. I come such a pretty clean try right. Yeah, exactly, trying our best out here. Well, Michael, you're almost off the hook, but as you as you know being a former guest of a podcast of mine, I always like to end with the top three and I for this one. I'd love to hear your top three inspirations for the price of safety. HMM, okay. Number one would be the the book one thousand nine hundred and eighty four. The definitely the kind of underlying vibe of this, this state...

...that is at least overseen and watching and big brother and that element, which I do think that they're depending on what happens with technology and how much we as a society keep track of and be aware of and resist or push back against the technology. It could, just as the progression of way things are going right now, we could end up with not necessarily that. I'll he'll tell the Tal Terry can speak that kind of state, authoritarian state, where everyone is your everything is dictated and what you wear. That not talking that level, but definitely the vibe with it was definitely a was an influence. Definitely wanted to kind of have an element of you know, if the your country's kind of taken on this different tone's different attitude than what you'd expected and what kind of how would you act and react in that kind of world. Second influences minority report, curse. You of element of the technology and the advancements and that kind of world. So that was definitely an influence with the world that I'm in. And you know, we don't have the cars that go sideways done the highway in the book or like that, but you do have technological advances and again, how people are acting and reacting in that world. And then I would say the third influence was was the writer, Michael Crichton. Loved Him, his ability to take stories, take something that's fantastical or something that wasn't really known. Prey with the drones, you know, that was really the first time, and my small robotics and how they interact together. You know, that was something new. You know the course drastic park, you know, which everyone knows, and drameda strain and how a ironically potential lethal virus and how we'd react. And so it's this technology, but then how the characters acted reacted with it, and I think usually the the story west world, that's also an element of the technology and what if things go wrong and how would you act or ex survive in that kind of world? Nice all fantastic inspirations. Well, that's so. If people want to find you online, if they want to learn, learn more about you, read your musings, I give you tips for future books that they things they want to see. Where can they find you? Absolutely, MC blandcom. You can sign up for the newsletter and you don't have to. Obviously completely, absolutely, totally up to and there's Info about myself, about price of safety. You can read about when I pitched another story to Columbia Pictures, and that was really fun, fun event, as well as you know, some of my other influences in that kind of thing. Fantastic. Well, Michael, thank you again for for making a repeat appearance. First Time on good people cool things, but not first time in our hearts. So wait, Joey, thank you so much for having me on. This has been great. Absolutely and of course we got to end with a Corny Jack, as I'm sure you might remember from last time as well. It's right. What do you get when you cross a writer with a deadline? A really clean house? It's night. People's Great.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (126)