Good People, Cool Things
Good People, Cool Things

Episode 73 · 1 year ago

73: How to Be More Creative and Have Big Ideas with Samuel Sanders

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Check this out: 75 percent of people think they're not living up to their creative potential, and we’re a whopping 96% less creative than we were as children. Luckily, this episode’s guest is sharing tons of good stuff on being more creative and finding big ideas. 

Samuel Sanders is an award-winning entrepreneur who has seen innovation, creativity, problem-solving, and ideation in action at many different levels, from a Fortune 500 company to an Inc. 5000 fastest-growing company to incubators. He also co-founded the company Wundershirt, which did plenty of cool things, including selling athletic training clothing to Olympic athletes preparing for the 2016 Olympics. Today, Samuel runs Heard, LLC, a software application helping governments and large companies get targeted and reviewed feedback from their citizens and employees to improve their decision-making. 

Now it’s your turn. Samuel’s debut book, Your Next Big Idea: Improve Your Creativity and Problem-Solving, provides tools for you to amp up your creativity, solve problems, and figure out ideation so you can turn those seedlings of ideas into real, tangible things.

Good people cool things as a podcast feature and conversations with entrepreneurs, writers, musicians and other creatives. Get inspired by their stories to do your own cool thing, and here's your host, Joey held. Welcome to good people, cool things. Today's guest is Samuel Sanders, an entrepreneur and author of the book your next big idea improve your creativity and problem solving. And if you ever been like, Hey, I have have this idea, I think it might be good, or you your you got like a little seedling of an idea. Maybe you're not even at that stage yet, but you you know that you want to create something that can help people. This book is a must have resource and Samuel's given a sneak peek inside of those pages on here. He's also a member of the Nonfiction Authors Association, so he's got all kinds of experience with entrepreneurship, innovation, creativity, problem solving, ideation, with a ton of different fortune five hundred companies and an ink five thousand fast growing company as well as companies he started himself, so he's got the whole Shebang. It's all going on, it's all fantastic and we're chatting about it all Samuel also a huge board game fan, so he's dropping some ideas that you can play. Whether you're still cooped up in quarantine or maybe you're going out traveling. Take these games with you so when you have little downtime you can play have some fun. It'll be wonderful, and we're talking roller coasters, so I hope you're strapped in and ready for a fun right. If you like to get in touch with the show, you can reach out on facebook, twitter or instagram at GPCT podcast, and you can always send an email. Joey at good people, cool thingscom love hearing from you and support the show by heading over to good people, cool thingscom shop picking up some merch look and stylish as all get up while you're coming up with your next big idea and enjoying this conversation with Samuel. I typically ask people to give me their elevator pitch and the type of elevator that were riding on, and I would still like to hear that. But I saw that you're a Syracuse University graduate. That was almost the school I went to. It was down between Miami and Syracuse and Miami was like here's a lot of money to come here and then yeah, it was like we didn't get your transcripts, we don't like we don't have a record of you. And then so got sent over again, but by the time they got it it was already passed where you had to declare so a last I went to Miami, but Syracuse loved the campus, had had a great time visiting. Well, my question is, are they like the biggest lock to make the sweet sixteen every year when they're haast made it into the tournament team? Because I feel like every year they do it and it's fantastic. Yeah, I just feel like behim. I just somehow like works his zone Magic to the point where, like so many teams don't understand how to play against the zone because they don't do it all year and then when, like, you play a good zone, it works well enough. And then once you're in the sweet sixteen it's a toss up because then those teams are really good and they figure it out. But...

...until then, like often times and can catch a lot of teams by surprise with the zones. I think that's the secret formula. Lovely. So, okay, we've got the we've got the zone defense up. Now what kind of elevator for people who don't know who Sam Sanders is. Yeah, so I think just sitting with the theme, I'm like a drop ride, like one of those of these in part like drop ride elevators, like I love the excitement and the thrill and like being on your edge and that like feeling of like Oh my God, what did I just about to get into? Type thing, like I thrive off that. So that's definitely the elevator that I'm riding. I don't want to write it forever, you know, because that would be horrifying, but just you know, everyone's in a while like if I got a ride an elevator, that's where I'm going. But Yeah, the elevator pitch about me is I used to work for a large fortune five hundred company, did some business development, I worked for an ink Fivezero, fastest growing company in there R and d sector, and I started some of my own companies, including now I work on a company called herd and basically what I realized is that they all of these different types of companies, the large ones, the middle size ones, the entrepreneurs, they all think about creativity innovation a little differently and we don't really do a good job teaching creativity and innovation. So I wrote a book your next big idea, which talks and breaks down the entire creative process and walks people through how to find their own you know, either entrepreneurial venture big ideas or get some creative inspiration. Was this always something that you're like hey, I need to turn this into a book, or was it you were just kind of chatting with people here in a lot of the same questions, running into a lot of the same challenges and you're like, wait a minute, there's an opportunity here. Yeah, I think it was. It was more of the second. I was a very heavily math brained person like growing up, and so writing just was such a challenge and I think when I got into my career and in business, you know we're doing a lot of like analytics on fine. Well, in my section business we're doing a lot of finance analytics and stuff like that, and so like the creativity part I found like refreshing and then like I really got into it because it's fun. It's fun to be creative, believe it or not, and it just got to the point where one time I was invited back to Syracuse to speak about entrepreneurship and creativity and I realize that there are like a lot of students that like didn't you know, didn't really understand and the process, and I was like there's a there's a disconnect here and what. There's a process to being innovative or coming up with innovative ideas, and when we don't do an effective job of teaching, that kind of does a disservice because then a lot of people look in are just like, well, why didn't I think of that when they see some being brilliant, or they're like, I'm just not creative enough to think of that. And really I want to just, you know, demistify that entire process and...

...that's why I wrote your next big idea so you know how people understand, you know, when entrepreneurs come up with ideas, how they're going back that process. Awesome. What's the most unusual idea you've come up with? Oh my God, m yeah, they're like I'd have to open up my my notes APP, which has like tons and tons and tons of ideas. I think like recently I was I actually, you know, up for like the book, I was working on this idea. I was like, I wonder if there's a way that you could like effectively tell if someone's drunk before they get in the car, like so that I would only operate if they would if they were, you know, sober. But there's actually like a lot of like I was like, Oh, just put a breath alyzer in the car, but there's a lot of like challenges with bacause it's just like Oh, Yo, grab your friend, may him use or her use the breath alyzer. And it just went down a rabbit hole as I was trying to look at it and I was just like this no longer like no, this would never work. No car company would want this. So maybe there's something there, but I think it was just getting two out of hand. There was points where I was like maybe they can play a video game to test the reaction time, and I was like no, you know what, they're probably want to get somewhere. So, yeah, could you speed run through a Maria, like yeah, real quick. Yeah, if a Goomba gets you, it's game over, no driving for you. So I mean I'd get behind that. Yeah, I think a harder time convincing car companies. So I can't help you with that. But you've got, yeah, one. Yeah, I felt like that was that was relative, like, you know, as on top of my mind because I remember referencing it. But I feel like there's something like they're but it's just not quite worked out. So if somebody can listening, can figure it out, by all means, like take it, run with it, go for it, like I'd love to see that. I would as well. So, yeah, hopefully someone is able to put that into practice, but if not, maybe they're they're working on another idea. Yeah, kind of give us a look inside the pages, if you will, of what they can expect. Like they've maybe they've just got like the little seedling of an idea. What are? Yeah, steps after that. Yeah, so the first thing, like to taking a step back before the seedling that I tell people is if you want to find a new idea, if you're like wondering how people come up with the ideas, I always say look for problems, needs and wants. And it's kind of sounds counterintuitive because we're not, you know, as humanity, we don't really like to look at the negatives that often. But when you can really hone in on a problem or like a knee, that someone has, whether and it's more than just like air or water. It's like there are their auxiliary needs that people have, like Oh, I need to have a glass of water by my bedside or I cannot sleep, like that's something, that's something that is really powerful, and so you got to go through this problem identification process to really understand how to come up with ideas. And I'll give you like two worst look out for. So the first is annoy so...

...if, like, somebody's like wow, this is so annoying, you know there's a good chance that, if you listen, there's a problem there that potentially you can come up with an idea with and solve. And then another one is, hey, hate is like such a powerful word, and if somebody is using like Oh, I really hate this, you know there's a good chance there's a problem there that you could solve as well. So that's like how you start with the ceiling ideas. But moving on, like once you have the seedling ideas, it's a matter of aracing some of the stigmas that go with ideas. When I talk about racing stigmas, like one great example, I think it's circus delay, like they have the idea it's like let's create a circus, but it's like nothing like a circus, because they're looking at the circus and being like, okay, you know, what do we really need to create like an event, a circus? And they're like, okay, maybe we don't need the lions, maybe we don't need the animals, maybe we don't need like, you know, the different, different types of things, like what really is a performance? And that's all what erasing stigmas is all about. It's really about focusing on, you know, challenging some of the norms that we have around your idea. So that's definitely the next step, if your tripe, once you have that ceiling ideas, to really like challenge and and think about that that problem. I imagine you probably took this process while writing this book as well and and kind of putting all that together. So, as far as your creative process, as you were doing this, were you like dictating notes to your stuff? You mentioned you've got a huge list of ideas on your notes APP. Is that kind of how you put this book together to or where you like, I'm a, I'm a set some time up every day make it happen like that out of that luck. I think, like even more to the point of like going back to there's a good example of the erasing stigmas. So I wanted to teach about the ideation process and in order to do that, like I've read a lot of nonfiction business books. They're not everybody's got a team, but I enjoy them. But a lot of times it just is like a either memoiry where they're like telling their own story and that what they learned, or just like a lot of like just text that's like advice, see kind of and I didn't want I didn't want your next big idea, the book, to be like that. I really wanted to challenge what a book can be and there are two thoughts that I have when creating this book. Is the first is like how do I take someone that maybe isn't a real like active love of or has an active love of reading, and still present information in a way that would be really engaging to them? And then the other is how do I take and make something that even if you come in with some experience, you still can get something out of it, but if you come in with no experience, you're also still going to get something out of it. So that's how it went to the structure of the books, to the book has like exercises, Problems, challenges, like critical thinking, you...

...know x exercises and stuff that you can do. That really helps reinforce the information to try and have like a different spin on what a book can be. So yeah, I was definitely going through a lot of that process when thinking about how to write this book, and it also goes into like the tonality I'm using, like the kind of examples I used, really thinking about how I can pushed fast the norms of just being that General Business Book. Yeah, and did you have a I mean I assume, yes, that you had several drafts as you were kind of going through this. I did it kind of look like the final as you were starting, or did it really kind of evolve over the process? I think it's one of those things where I had so many drafts. I don't sis start by saying that it was it was mass. I like the first editor that I had look at my book. They're like, Oh, the first has pretty interesting, but the entire second half, I think that needs work and I'm like, I put my heart into this, you know, but it's really important because you know they're when you bring on a team of editors, they really know what they're talking about and like you're more directional expert, like you know the story, but they really talk about how to effectively use voice and, you know, writing style structure to tell a story most effectively. And so it definitely did a lot of moving things around, adding things, getting rid of things. Yeah, and yeah, and then on top of that, when I brought in a designer, that also changed a lot of it because because it's a book on creativity, I definitely wanted to make the design and the cover of the book something that I felt was really creative or something that I felt like would would match what I'm writing about, because if I wrote a book on creativity and it was just text, that would be kind of counter counterintuitive. So that definitely changed a lot of how the book looked as well, and that's that's something else too that I think is obviously important. They say don't judge a book by its cover, but so many people do, and especially now people are doing that online. They're not in a book store, they're not like paging through or seeing a shelf or anything, they're just kind of scrolling through. It's the same thing with podcast. We were maybe going through like a list of twenty five or fifty right in front of you, and I I think your your cover is very engaging, like I think it's something that would make someone stop if they were in a bookstore, or stop scrolling on a page. And you mentioned how you were working with a designer, which I think a is a very good first step. Of Yeah, especially for I can speak for myself, not at all a design a good designer, I can definitely think up ideas and tell a designer like hey, this is like vaguely what I want. Could you turn it into real life? Yeah, do, and it's allways very impressive. So, yeah,...

...what was your your sort of relationship with that designer? Like, Oh my God, I mean he's fantastic, I he so I'll just give him a shout out here. Says Name is David Myles. He does David Designs. Books is his company and he does all types of interior and cover designs, and I think we we really worked well. We worked really well together. I was probably more detail like on top of all the details then probably a lot of is people who works with but also because, like the design of this book because it's about creativity and really needs to show that, you know, the design elements are much more important. You mentioned a cover. Like a cover is so critical for a book. You know, like you said, don't judge a book by its cover. Everybody judges a book by its cover. It's really unfortunate, because how it works is your online scrolling and then the first step is you got to catch that person's attention. So even or in a book storey, they got to see it and then they got to go, Oh, what is that, and then they flip maybe to the back or they open the inside cover, depending on, you know, how they like to look at books. And then it's like you got to have another set of like designer cell to get the person and to maybe put through the first couple pages, and then that's when you can actually, you know, get the sale. So it really is a like multi step process and when we were working on the cover design, we originally, like, you know, I explained kind of what I was looking for and he gave back like, I think, like eight or so ideas and I was like, Oh man, I don't know if any of these really works. I went back to them and I felt so bad because you put it so much work to all of these different like directions and I think over time, like moving back and forth, we did something that I feel like is is really is really not only like visually appealing, but the more you look at it, the more you can kind of notice more things going on. Yeah, I think it's a good job of kind of giving you a lot without being crowded, which, yeah, is a common, common issue with things. It's either like Oh, this is super minimal and which can work, but in some cases I'm like I don't know what this is about at or like here's you know, it's like a sergeant pepper's lonely hearts club band. Love you, streggs, which, yes, if you were yeah, a perhaps the biggest band ever. Sure, yeah, that works. Yeah. Yeah, and then in like interior, some of the interior design was inspired by thoughts I had about the cover. Like on top of the chapters we have that kind of like whiteboard feel where it's just, you know, like you get a sense of what the chapters about by a little picture and then like some of the section headers, like it's it's we're creating like something bigger and bigger. So if you flip through and look at each section header, it builds into something bigger. So we try to do a lot of really cool things in the book. And Yeah, but the design, you know, design is something that I'm rather proud of and, like, would bramble on forever talking about. So awesome, good job, David on. Yeah,...

...shout out to David does good stuff. You're also a member of the Nonfiction Authors Association. Yeah, which I think having other writers and small people around you always a good idea. How did you get involved with that? Yes, so I was researching how to mark it as a nonfiction author and I stumbled upon the nonfictions author association, and they are they're great. First of all, they give a ton of really great tips. They have like media leads and stuff like that. They they you know, have like a lot of online sessions and like different programs you can join and like internally that you can join to help, you know, understand how to better get your book out there, and not only just better get your book out there, but like grow your career a little bit, because when it comes to being a nonfiction author, there's a lot of you know, there are some authors that are all about the book and the book sales, but a lot of nonfiction authors are using the book to explain what they now and build their credibility back to what they know. And it says like how do you do that? You know, and take a look at that. So yeah, I definitely would recommend if you have a topic or something that you feel like you know really well, like right about it and put it, put yourself out there and see and see, you know, what people think. It could be a little scary, but it definitely, it definitely helps you know, not only your own ideas about what you know grow, but just you know, helps professionally as well. And you cute up my next question very nicely. Oh Yeah, of marketing, which is another element. I know I always mess this percentage up, but it's something of like writing. Is Ten percent writing, a nine two percent marketing? You're not, I don't know, but it's something along those lines and I think that is something that a lot of people overlook, especially if they're super into the writing and they're like no, I've always wanted to write a book, but that it's like the marketing side. It's just a whole new beast. Obviously coming on to terrific podcasts one way to market. But yeah, also, have you found that's been effective? Yes, so there are a lot of different strategies that I try to implement, just like basically throwing stuff at the wall and figuring out what worked, because this is my first my debut. Like books, I'm trying to figure it out as as I'm going along. But there are first of all, there's good reads, which is like a great place to find readers. It's like facebook for books and so like. You can use that. You can run a contest. Some of like other things you can do is you could set your book down price to two hundred and ninety nine or less, and then there are a lot of deal newsletters you can do to put yourself out there. I tell people, when doing media pitching, like to try and get an articles and stuff. It's no one, no one cares that you wrote a book, and I know that sounds kind of harsh, but when you're looking at pitching a book, it's like, okay, what is your topic about and how can I relate that to a story? So,...

...for example, my books a lot about creativity, innovation, entrepreneurship. So you know, if I'm pitching I'm looking like, okay, we're now in the post pandemic new normal. There were an incredible amount of startups started this past year. Why? And so that's like the pitch I'm giving versus like Hey, I wrote a book. It's like Hey, I can provide value to a news story. And so when you pitch like that, you're going to have a lot more of effective, you know, publicity method and I know that a lot of people are really not interested in the marketing aspect of it and it is a lot to kind of learn and taking because there's also Amazon ads and facebook ads and all that stuff, but it really can go a long way to get your book out there if you take some time you know, really understand it, and that's a great note. On the media pitching side of things is of finding that problem and solving it like a writer. Editor doesn't, to use use your term, of hating it. They probably hate when you're just like I wrote a book, and it's like cool, yeah, how does that help me? Yeah, yeah, and that's the thing. There's like a so many books out. They're published, and I tell this not only for nonfiction authors but even fiction authors. It's like, okay, think about the themes in your book. You know some of the stuff that you're getting across. How does that apply to you know, today's Today's times, if you're writing, you know, and now, let's say, a fiction nobble about what it's like to be, you know, someone in college. Think about the stories of what's happening with universities and how your themes tie together. So it's always you're always thinking in the like almost in the news set, like news jacking type away, like taking over a what would be a new story, with bringing recent, relevant data and then using yourself as like the credibility expert for it. Love a good news, Jack, we've a good news yeah, wonderful, wonderful. Now a question I like to ask as a question that you wish you were asked more frequently. I say it's because it's less work for me. I'm having you do the questions, and for yours and you we've kind of been touching on this throughout, but yours is you want people to ask you more regularly. Where do you find big ideas? Yeah, yeah, and I think another question I wish I was asked more often that I don't think people ask enough. are is why, like oftentimes we're just so, you know, on autopilot that we just don't we forget to ask why we're doing things. And when we go and we ask why, more often either to someone else, like you're doing it this way, why are you doing it that way? You know, a lot of times it can trigger potential problems that you might be able to find and you know that why question really allows you to dig deeper, like when I ask what or I ask you know, even like when that's just like one set of information, but the why really is going to is going to reveal a lot. And sometimes people are just like, well, that's just the way we've been doing it, and that's like a big red flag, because if there's no really good why reason, then that...

...you know, then that's definitely something that needs to be changed. Yeah, that's one of my favorite response is that's just how it's always better. It's like it's but yeah, things that weren't great that we yeah, yeah, and then in terms of like I'm just gonna take this question a little further, because in terms of like when you're going with the ideation process and you're talking about an idea, some questions that I wish people asked more is really understanding is there a market for the idea? So you're asking and finding at ourger market. Does the market one it now, which I feel like people sometimes mess up because, you know, like if I created a new idea for a typewriter, you know, like that's probably not that exciting and idea to that many people. There are collectors that may find it interesting, but it's really not the right timing. And also works the reverse way, like if I created like a really advanced technology and maybe just be the people are not really ready to adopt that technology. So really understanding the timing is actually pretty important to seeing whether your idea would be full. And then the last question. It's helping classes really you know, what kind of resources do you have and where do you, you know, go to find them? Like you need some money to try and start a business. Typically doesn't always have to be a lot, but you need some you need skill sets, you need like different people often times that have these different skill sets. So it's really asking those questions can help you know, build an idea and get it, get it further to really, you know, complete that full ideation process and see if you have something that could work aggressive right turn here. We're talking before on how you're a big board games fan. We're going to get that on board games for a little bit. First of all, all time favorite board game, and then have you been playing anything new during the pandemic? We are like this is this is the hot stuff, all time favorite. You know, it's really hard for me because I love so many different four games. I guess I would say that, like Quatan is probably my all time favorite. I've played that game I don't even know so many times, like more than I can count. But during the pandemic I've gotten the opportunity to play a lot of different, really unique for games, especially because we were stuck at home and it's great, you know, to a great activity to pass the time. One of the ones that I think is really interesting, that I played recently, is called pendulum, and it's the concept behind the game is like there's this town that the leader disappears and so everybody, everybody's a noble trying to take power. But what's weird about it is there are no turns. Everything is done being a timers. So it's like there are timers running and like you have to make decisions basically before the timer runs out. So you're trying to run around do different things in the town and then like you keep flipping the timers first certain amount of time and then when the time is up, it's just like whoever has been able to do the most wins, and that's it's really unique, like and creative in a...

...way that I haven't really seen a board game do before, and so I think that's cool. I'm sure the pendula makers are just loving the shadow, but yeah, that's definitely something that's been really cool and and really really unique from a board game perspective. I'd like. I'd like that. I think. I know I'm thinking of at least a handful of people I've played with that will just take the longest time on their turns. So I there you go. I like rushing them, I like there you go. Yeah, then pendulum is is perfect because it's just a times game. But yeah, they're they're like other games that I've really enjoyed. There is this game called last bottle of rum where everybody is a pirate like out to try and catch them treasure and it's just like really it's got like funny themes and you're trying to avoid like a cracking and stuff like that that I played during the pandemic. And there's wits and wagers, which is like a trivia game that I think it's really fantastic for people and it's got like a vegas field to it, so that's always fun. So yeah, definitely like another thing I could just keep ranting on for so long. I'm a huge board Game Fan. So well, here's here's a tangential question. While you're playing board games, are you like, let's get out the snacks, maybe some drinks? Are you just like I'm focused, nothing, no distractions, boy, I am. I'm so flexible. It really depends. Okay, you know, I'm give one more game of shout out here. There's this game happy Salmon, which is like it's kind of a kids game, but it gets very intense and competitive. And so how the game works is you have a deck of cards and everybody has like directions on the card and so you're looking for someone else the same directions. So you're like running around the room being like Oh, who has high five, high five, and like, you know, trying to like high five someone, to get rid of all your cards and go through all the different directions and like drinking during the you know, bad and snacks is like perfect. Sometimes it's like a more strategy game in the people on with, you know, really are trying to focus, and so it just it also depends yet the game the people in with. But yeah, I like to try to be flexible because, you know, sometimes I play with people that are like more really into it and then sometimes I'm just playing when people trying to have a good time and, you know, I just I'm always trying to have a good time. So whatever, whatever you know, works with the group. Yeah, I think the the key is, if it's a new game for everyone, is that the instructions aren't too lengthy. Yeah, once in a while I'll see one where it's like us, you know, and full Almanac worth of yeah, auctions, and I'm like Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, that's why, you know, great to have YouTube. Anytime I see that, I'm just like, I got to YouTube. So someone explain this for me in five minutes. Yes, that's a good yeah, strategy. What've got? It looks like I've got a list. I've got I've got some shopping to do. Oh, yeah, well, there you go. Yeah, you have to see if, if you like, any of them. I would I would definitely say, yeah, pendulums, like the the instructions were a little like,...

...oh, I feel like overwhelming, but like, once I've read them, my I understood them. But it was just like sometimes we when you just see it, you're just like, well, that looks like a lot, and then keep reading like okay, yeah, that makes sense, but yeah, it's that's that's the board game design part. So you know, that's on someone else exactly. Yeah, let them, let them worry about it. That's yeah, nice and Nice. Well, you're almost off the hook, but we've got to end with our top three, and this is another thing we're talking about beforehand. Amusement parks. Obviously, besides perhaps a funnel cake, the best attraction of an amusement park are the roller coasters. All right, do love final cakes, though you've them after the roller coasters. Yeah, yeah, that is definitely good advice, as I have failed to do sometimes. And Oh, yeah, what it happens, but we've gotten older, we've gotten wiser. But as an amusement park at Fiscionado and a roller coaster enthusiast, what are your top three roller coasters? Whole man, there, there are really so many great ones. I would I like. I would say that one of my favorites I've ever written was Nitro at six flags New Jersey, which also has this roll coaster. Came to cab which is currently the tallest in the world. So double whammy. You'll get to ride nitro and you know go that, but nitro is it's got no flips. It's just like huge hills that you keep going up and down and you get a ton of that weightless, this feeling which I really like. So that's definitely one up there. I would say a universal. There's the whole ride, which I'm a huge fan of. The whole ride was like one of my first up sid out roller coasters. I went. I'm assuming it's still there because that was a while ago, but yeah, that was a really great roller coaster as well, and I'm trying there's this I'm totally gonna Blank on the name of it, but there's this one ride in Thailand which I would put it number three, which probably wouldn't pass American safety standards, but it's like you, like everybody sits on this like circle, like huge circle, and then the circle just bounces up and down. But you don't have any seatbelts, so you just kind of like bouncing up and down. It's very unique. I've never written anything like it. Definitely wouldn't buy in America, but definitely really find a lot of weightlessness feelings. So that's what I was gotta be my top three. That is fantastic and I think hulk is still there. I remember it being there. Well, I mean I think the last time I was at universal was two thousand and seventeen, maybe two thousand and sixteen. And Yeah, it was there, but it was it was undergoing repairs, so it was closed. Interesting. Apparently it's going to open up with eve. I mean I assume it's opened up by now after four or five years, but maybe they're still doing lengthy repairs. Who knows? Yeah, better than ever, I'm sure. Yeah, and that, yeah, that's great. It's a great ride. And there,...

...you know, universal Disney. There a ton of really great rides there. So I'm a big fan of when you can do really effective storytelling with you know, your experience, and Universal Disney just master that. So awesome, awesome. Well, everyone that is going out traveling stop by whatever the closest amusement park is and go enjoy yourself a roller coaster and then say yeah, and then perhaps read a chapter or two from your next big idea. Where can people find it? Yeah, so, if you're interested, you can go to your next big idea bookcom and then you can click on the shop botton if you want to purchase or if you're just interested in learning more about the reviews or some of the press. You can just check that out there. It's on Amazon, Barnes and noble. You can find it some local bookstores as well. So, yeah, do you know, check it out if you're interested. And if people want to get in touch with you, what's what's the best? Where you on the socials? Oh, yeah, this socials. Yeah, you can, you know, find me on Linkedin. I'll just like there are out here on my website. There's an email if you're if you're interested, you want to connect with me, you know, connect with me. I love hearing from people, so please, you know, reach out. Boom Boom Will Samuel. Thank you so much for hopping on. This was fantastic and yeah, lots of lots of great ideas, but here you're out in the book. I love it. There you go. Yeah, yeah, thank you so much. This has been really great, awesome, and let's end with a Corny joke, as we always do. What does corn say when it's complimented? What does corn say when it's complimented? Dang, I don't know. What does it say? Ah, shucks, ha ha ha. That's a good one. I'm a steal that. I love that good people, cool things is produced in Austin, Texas. If you were a fan of this episode, go ahead and hit that follow button. That helps more people here the show. As always, you can send me a message Joey at good people cool thingscom. Thank you to all of the guests who have been on good people cool things and check out all the old episodes via good people cool thingscom. As always, thank you for listening and have a wonderful day.

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